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Cost-effective Ways to minimize Risks in the Supply Chain Photo: Pixabay
28.07.2020

Fraunhofer ITWM: Cost-effective Ways to minimize Risks in the Supply Chain

  • Algorithms for optimized supply chains

The coronavirus pandemic has hit the economy hard. What lessons can be learned from this experience? And what’s the best way for companies to protect themselves against this kind of crisis in the future? The answer will certainly involve a combination of different approaches – but new mathematical methods developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics ITWM look likely to be a very promising piece of the puzzle. These methods aim to calculate how the risks posed by supply shortages can be reduced significantly at very little extra cost.

  • Algorithms for optimized supply chains

The coronavirus pandemic has hit the economy hard. What lessons can be learned from this experience? And what’s the best way for companies to protect themselves against this kind of crisis in the future? The answer will certainly involve a combination of different approaches – but new mathematical methods developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics ITWM look likely to be a very promising piece of the puzzle. These methods aim to calculate how the risks posed by supply shortages can be reduced significantly at very little extra cost.

 Nobody ever expected hospitals to be struggling to get hold of the face masks and other personal protective equipment they need. The supply chain had always run smoothly in the past, yet the coronavirus crisis has now caused shortages of these products on multiple occasions. Previously, these supply chains had worked well – but the necessary restrictions on the global flow of goods led them to collapse.In many cases, for example, Chinese suppliers were unable to make deliveries even while factories in Germany were still working as normal, a situation that had a knock-on effect on goods production in Germany. And viruses are not the only potential risk: international suppliers can be paralyzed by all kinds of unforeseen factors, from natural disasters such as tsunamis, earthquakes, storms and floods to strikes or other unexpected political developments. If a company chooses to rely on just one supplier for its production needs in order to reduce costs, this can have devastating consequences that may even bring production to a complete standstill. It can take a very long time indeed for other suppliers to ramp up their production and start delivering the required products.
 
Analyzing and safeguarding supply chains
This is where methods developed by Fraunhofer ITWM come into play. “The algorithms analyze how diversified the supply chains are in different areas of the company and thus how great the risk is of running into critical supply problems in an emergency, in other words in the event of regional or global disruption,” says Dr. Heiner Ackermann, deputy head in the Department of Optimization at Fraunhofer ITWM in Kaiserslautern. “The question is how you can minimize the risk of supply shortfalls without incurring significant additional costs.” The dilemma is similar to that of buying a house: Is it best to opt for the lowest possible interest rates, even though there is a risk that follow-up financing will offer much worse rates? Or is it best to play safe and pay slightly higher interest rates from the start if that means having the reassurance of reasonably priced financing for the entire term?
 
Companies also have to get the right balance between risk and costs. If a company chooses to rely solely on the cheapest supplier, they are taking a major risk. But if they procure a raw material from multiple suppliers at the same time, that risk drops significantly. “And in this case the difference in cost is much lower than the difference in risk,” says Ackermann. In other words, the risks fall dramatically even when a company increases its costs by just a few percent – so it is possible to eliminate much of the risk by accepting just a slight rise in costs. Companies can use the algorithm to discover what would work best in their particular situation. “This method lets companies optimize their supply chains based on multiple criteria, helping them to find the optimal balance between costs and risks,” says Ackermann. “The underlying algorithms work equally well whether you are dealing with supply shortages caused by an earthquake or a virus. So, unlike existing software solutions, we don’t try to make assumptions as to the likelihood of any particular scenario.” With this new method, a company starts by entering various parameters – for example areas in which they think disruption could be likely and how long that disruption might last. The algorithms then calculate various cost/risk trade-offs for this exact raw material, including the possible allocations of suppliers that would correspond to each point on the scale. They even take into account options such as storing critical products in order to cushion any temporary supply shortfalls.
 
Substituting raw materials during supply shortages      
Another option the algorithms take into account is whether a raw material could potentially be replaced by different materials in the event of a supply bottleneck. If so, this can be taken into consideration from the start. Essentially, the method calculates the costs and risks of different courses that a company can follow in regard to their suppliers. Procter & Gamble is already using a software-based variant of this methodology which has been specially tailored to its needs.

Source:

Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics ITWM

Protective masks for Augsburg University Hospital (c) Fraunhofer IGCV
14.04.2020

Protective equipment from 3d printers

  • Fraunhofer IGCV supplies protective equipment made via 3d printers to university hospital Augsburg

For more than a week, the Institute for Materials Resource Management at the University of Augsburg has been supplying the University Hospital Augsburg with protective masks from 3D printers. In order to meet the enormous demand for absolutely necessary protective equipment for the the needs of hospital staff, a call for support was sent to cooperation partners - Augsburg University of Applied Sciences and Fraunhofer IGCV are stepping in.
 

  • Fraunhofer IGCV supplies protective equipment made via 3d printers to university hospital Augsburg

For more than a week, the Institute for Materials Resource Management at the University of Augsburg has been supplying the University Hospital Augsburg with protective masks from 3D printers. In order to meet the enormous demand for absolutely necessary protective equipment for the the needs of hospital staff, a call for support was sent to cooperation partners - Augsburg University of Applied Sciences and Fraunhofer IGCV are stepping in.
 

Fast communication in the research network:
Production of 3D-printed parts accelerates in the shortest possible time
Without further ado, an internal university group searched for possibilities of manufacturing via 3D printing. Prof. Dr. Markus Sause and Prof. Dr. Kay Weidenmann of the Institute for Materials Resource Management at the University of Augsburg immediately agreed and pulled out all the stops to start production as quickly as possible. In order to provide as many protective masks as possible in the shortest possible time, an appeal was also made to existing cooperation partners. They found what they were looking for in their direct colleague Prof. Dr. Johannes Schilp, Professor of Production Informatics at the University of Augsburg and Head of the Processing Technology Department at the Augsburg Fraunhofer IGCV: Max Horn, research associate at the Fraunhofer Institute, and Paul Dolezal from the FabLab (production laboratory) at Augsburg University of Applied Sciences immediately promised their help. "Thanks to the excellent cooperation of our team, the first parts were produced in our laboratory for additive manufacturing just a few hours after the first telephone call," Max Horn recalls. "With the support of the Augsburg University of Applied Sciences and the Fraunhofer IGCV, the production capacity of 50 masks per day could be significantly increased," Markus Sause is pleased to report.
          

Printing masks with Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)
Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) was selected as the manufacturing process for the face protection. This means that the mask is created by forcing fusible plastic through a nozzle and applying it in layers in individual lanes. In addition to an extensive laboratory for metal-based additive manufacturing, the Fraunhofer IGCV operates a new laboratory unit with various FDM printers. Due to the simplicity of the process and its great flexibility, it is particularly suitable for prototypes and sample components. "However, the masks produced are by no means only illustrative objects", adds Georg Schlick, Head of the Components and Processes Department at the Fraunhofer IGCV. The team processed durable polymers for the parts, which have good resistance to the disinfectants used in the hospital. This results in high-quality components that are ideally suited for multiple use.
 
Additive manufacturing for flexible production
In the meantime, some bottlenecks have been overcome: The Institute for Materials Resource Management at the University of Augsburg is switching back to production processes for the manufacture of face masks that are better suited for the production of large quantities. "The great strength of additive manufacturing lies rather in the production of very complex components with smaller quantities," explains Matthias Schmitt, group leader for additive manufacturing at the Fraunhofer IGCV. "But 3D printing also enables us to act at very short notice and to compensate for lack of capacity for almost any component as required," Schmitt continues. Thanks to the flexibility, motivation and expertise of all cooperation partners, a complete production and supply chain for the face masks was implemented within a few days. Georg Schlick therefore emphasizes the need for good networking and rapid exchange between the research institutions. "The close networking within the 3D printing community enables short communication channels and fast action. This can save lives in this case."

Source:

Fraunhofer Institute for Casting, Composite and Processing Technology IGCV

Foto: Pixabay
07.04.2020

Natural textile sector responds to Corona with creativity and cooperation

While you can read everywhere that the fashion industry is on the verge of collapse and is demanding funding from the government, many textile and leather companies with an ethical background are actively and jointly working on creative solutions so to avoid closing.
It is now becoming clear that smaller sustainability pioneers have some advantages over the retail giants and big brands. Flexibility, a strong connection between suppliers and customers and credibility are now paying off.

While you can read everywhere that the fashion industry is on the verge of collapse and is demanding funding from the government, many textile and leather companies with an ethical background are actively and jointly working on creative solutions so to avoid closing.
It is now becoming clear that smaller sustainability pioneers have some advantages over the retail giants and big brands. Flexibility, a strong connection between suppliers and customers and credibility are now paying off.

Mobility is trump card
The precarious economic situation in the stationary retail sector forces companies to take new and creative paths. Close and emphatic customer loyalty and the flexibility of smaller shopkeepers pave the way. And the ideas and measures are manifold. Some redirect their goods to online trading, offer a delivery service.  Life videos from the shops, which present and explain the goods, or participation campaigns for consumers are further examples. Manufacturers and brands are also rethinking. For example, some companies are producing face masks to cushion the decline in sales somewhat, while others are shifting the short-term production focus to basic products that are easy to market online.
 
Supply chain safety
The leather and textile industry are currently not only facing the problem of falling sales. The fragile global markets, which supply raw materials and services for large corporations, are currently becoming a threat. If the economies in China and Bangladesh come to a standstill, the German fashion market will no longer be able to obtain sufficient goods in the short term. Companies that produce in Germany or in other economically stable countries are now at an advantage.  Some of the companies that purchase raw materials from abroad are already ordering them for the next production cycle, on the one hand to give the supplier a certain amount of security, and on the other hand to be prepared for the post Corona era.

Community spirit
An ethical business practice does not only mean acting in an environmentally and socially responsible manner with regard to supply chains. Credibility, trust and empathy are just as important now if the fashion industry does not want to lose itself in price dumping and fierce competition. The press talks about billion-dollar cancellations, corona bargains and bankruptcies. Many IVN members show that there is another way. Suppliers tell us that they are holding back orders until the end of April in order to give the trade some financial leeway. Retailers usually at least consult with their suppliers if they are unable to call up a complete order. Retailers with online shops spontaneously take in goods from friendly brands, even if the products do not fit into the company's own portfolio. Brands advertise their customers' sales channels in social media, orders are bundled. People talk to each other - the customer with the supplier, but also competitors with competitors.

Slow fashion
Conventional fashion is subject to extremely fast cycles - "fast fashion" is the keyword. To a lesser extent, the fashion industry at least follows the seasonal seasons. Currently, the spring collection is hanging in the shops and cannot be sold in June. This is no different for sustainable fashion. However, the fashion trends are less pronounced, so that the current merchandise can still be worn next spring. The sustainable consumer attaches somewhat less importance to the fashion aspect and green fashion is fashionable but also tends to be more timeless than conventional fashion.

The mood
Naturally, companies from the natural fashion scene are now also forced to reduce their operating costs if they want to survive. This means short-time work, and if the situation continues for a longer period of time, this will certainly include layoffs. And of course, all niche market players are also deeply concerned. But whoever we have spoken to so far, we hear stories of opportunity, gratitude and activity.
Some see an opportunity in involuntary pauses - for example, this forced pause is certainly beneficial to climate protection. There is a very real chance also, that the fashion cycle can now be shifted back a month and thus be brought back into line with the real situation.

Many IVN members are grateful, for example, that they are based in Germany. The health care system is at least still stable at present and the black zero enables our government to set up a rescue fund. Many are also grateful for the solidarity and trust that is shown to them. From the end consumer to the business partner to the landlord, who would rather reduce or suspend a rent claim than lose a long-term tenant.
The mood is battered, but not yet in the basement. It is to be hoped that everyone will soon be able to resume their economic activities in the normal framework and that the privileges and advantages enjoyed by the sustainable fashion industry will be sufficient to ensure that everyone comes through this crisis as unscathed as possible.

 

Source:

Internationaler Verband der Naturtextilwirtschaft e.V.

INVENTING TECHNOLOGIES NO ONE CAN COPY… I.S.T © I.S.T Corporation
03.03.2020

INVENTING TECHNOLOGIES NO ONE CAN COPY… I.S.T

NEW HIGH-TECH FIBERS AND YARNS FOR THE SPORTS AND LEISURE MARKET 

With its trade fair premiere at this year's ISPO Munich at the end of January, a newcomer in the sportswear and outdoor market has achieved a well-received appearance: For the first time in Europe, the Japanese company I.S.T Corporation presented its new high-tech fiber and a spinning technology with amazing possibilities at their booth with extensive augmented reality technology. In the sports industry, I.S.T is only known to a few, although there have been first cooperations with well-known manufacturers such as Patagonia in the last seasons.

NEW HIGH-TECH FIBERS AND YARNS FOR THE SPORTS AND LEISURE MARKET 

With its trade fair premiere at this year's ISPO Munich at the end of January, a newcomer in the sportswear and outdoor market has achieved a well-received appearance: For the first time in Europe, the Japanese company I.S.T Corporation presented its new high-tech fiber and a spinning technology with amazing possibilities at their booth with extensive augmented reality technology. In the sports industry, I.S.T is only known to a few, although there have been first cooperations with well-known manufacturers such as Patagonia in the last seasons.

The CEO and president, Ms. Toshiko “Toko” Sakane, answered Textination's questions. She has been running the company - founded by her father - since November 2016. After completing her bachelor's degree in sociology / human sciences, she worked in the office of the House of Representatives of the Japanese Parliament and the former Japanese Minister of Health and Social Affairs. Later she was managing director of the I.S.T Corporation in Parlin, New Jersey, USA, founded in 2000 - a manufacturer of unique, high-temperature resistant resin materials.

I.S.T is a Japanese company with a comparatively young history. Originally founded in 1983 as an R&D company, you are now also based in the United States and in China. If you had to introduce yourself in 100 words to someone who doesn't know the company: What makes you unique?
I.S.T Corporation is an R&D-oriented Japanese material company with the claim to "invent technologies that no one can imitate". What makes us uniquely competent is our integrated process of material development, innovating our own in-house production methodologies and advancing production technologies. Through this end-to-end cycle, we can achieve various advantages including developing complete original products, securing best quality assurance, and, most importantly, letting us discover new innovations. I.S.T is committed to keep innovating new technologies so they can contribute to enriching people’s lives more.   

Your slogan is: make the impossible possible. In which markets and from which industries do you feel particularly challenged? And with which product innovations for the textile industry do you think you can move the most?
I.S.T’s focus is sporting goods and apparel industry because materials used in this industry demand a wide variety of functionalities and are likely used in extreme conditions. We find it challenging and exciting to offer our advanced innovations. As for the textile industry, we believe our KARL KARL™ spinning technology offers a new great solution for winter active inner wears because it offers all the functions they want, such as warmness, being light-weighted, and easy-care.

A central guideline of the company is the motto "Inventing technologies no-one can copy". Patent protection and a consistent brand policy characterize your activities in the market. But patents can expire and brands can be copied, what makes you uncopiable?
A patent or brand can be copied. However, what makes it impossible to copy us is that our core technologies are embedded throughout our integrated process of material development, in-house production methodologies and advancing production technologies. For example, our KARL KARL™ technology is spinning technology that offers multiple functionalities in one yarn and also can be applied to all different types of and hybrid yarns.
There are some other companies that claim their yarns having a similar function with ours, but those are single function and in a particular type of yarn. This is the most fundamental and significant difference between technologies and competitors. Other companies may be able to copy a single function from us, but it will never be the same as our products that are the results of layers and layers of our integrated innovations.
          
Initially focused on selling technology, you are now a major fiber producer yourself. In addition, you have expanded your portfolio in the past 15 years - for example in the wool market - through acquisitions in Japan and China. Where do you see I.S.T as a player in the textile sector in 2030?
Just as you see a GORE-TEX tag on any outerwear, I would like to see brand names produced by I.S.T on every sports and fashion apparel and people instantly recognize it as the sign of most advanced functional materials.

For the first time you attended ISPO Munich 2020 in January as an exhibitor to present the high-tech fiber IMIDETEX® and new KARL KARL™ yarns to the sporting goods and outdoor industry. What is so special about these two products and what makes them so suitable for use in these markets?  
IMIDETEX®, made of 100% polyimide resin and commonly used in outer space, has possess various advantageous characteristics that other existing super fibers couldn’t overcome, including it being high UV resistant, heat resistant, low water absorption, and has a high tensile strength.
Examples of possible applications for the outdoor market as in composites, would include highly resistive but also durable golf shafts or tennis rackets that can minimize the impact sent to players, and a bicycle that can absorb the shock from the ground throughout a long and competitive race. As for textile, it makes an incredibly durable sail that endures an unforgiving sun. Finally, as yarns IMIDETEX® makes a light-weighted but super strong ropes that people can trust their lives with. IMIDETEX® can provide great performances in extreme natural conditions.
KARL KARL™ is the patented spinning technology that multiplies one core thread with another thread. By expanding the yarn structure itself, it achieves lightness and warmness, which are two seemingly opposite characters to coexist. This technology can be applied to wool, cotton, silk, polyester, nylon … plus there are endless possibilities of developing new yarns by combining different characteristic yarns.
These materials by I.S.T are unrivaled and present infinite possibilities for richer designs in sports fashion scenes.

In a world in which great value is placed on nature and natural materials, man-made fibers are not always welcome. On your website you postulate, I.S.T contributes to the people around the world through chemistry for a better life style. Which aspects make a good case for that?
Our brand-new product, faux-fur, made with KARL KARL™ technology is a good example of our contribution to keep the good balance of natural and synthetic.
The real fur is fashionable but it’s a symbol of animal abuse nowadays. To conserve the nature, our KARL KARL™ faux-fur offers an alternative to fashion, while preventing polluting the ocean from using micro fibers.    

In which socially relevant subject areas do you see a particularly great need for innovation and action during the next 5 years? What is your assessment that your company will be able to offer solutions for this with its products?
We believe that light-weight is a major key factor for better lives and the planet because it allows to save energies and expand the performances.
As the first step, we are bringing in our light-weight technologies, such as IMIDETEX® composites and KARL KARL™ technology, to sporting gears and apparels to support our active lifestyle before extending those technologies to all other markets that can benefit from them.

There are various definitions for sustainability. Customers expect everything under this term - from climate protection to ecology, from local on-site production to the exclusion of child labor etc. What do you do to bring this term to life for your company and what activities or certifications do you rely on?
I.S.T's taking this subject seriously in any aspects. We aggressively approach to research and develop technologies and materials that can support human lives and planet, as well as bringing in sustainable methods and materials to our operations. For instance, we are developing a yarn making from cellulose taken out of used papers without using any harmful chemicals to humans. Also, we invested in a state-of-the-art low emission production facility to make Polyimide materials.
We are RWS (Responsible Wool Standard) certified yarn spinner as far as wool is concerned and we are using RWS certified wool fiber. As for polyester, we are using GRS (Global Recycled Standard) certified recycled polyester and as for cotton, we are using organic cotton fiber. Moreover, our company values producing materials that last forever and not to produce any wastes and/or one-time use materials.
          
Where do you get your inspiration from to research certain technologies or products? Which orders or inquiries from the textile supply chain play a decisive role?
You may think that our life is already filled with things and there isn’t a thing that we cannot get in this world. And yes, we have everything. Yet there are some functions you wish you had in addition to full of those things.
The original idea of developing KARL KARL™ technology was that we wanted to adapt functions like lightness, warmness, quick-drying and easy-care that synthetic fibers have, into natural fibers such as wool and cotton because, obviously natural fibers are much friendlier to human and the earth than petroleum-based fibers.
We believe in and keep our corporate missions: “Develop and manufacture products no others have tried before” and “Handle high-value added products”. Our inspirations for R&D come from our belief, “bringing a wish into a reality”. We do not get an inspiration from others. Our innovations inspire customers and the market.

Breaking new ground means willingness to make decisions, overcoming fears - and thus courage to fail. Not every project can succeed. In retrospect, which entrepreneurial decision are you particularly happy to have made?
Actually, for us, there is no such thing as failed projects because we never give up until each and every project becomes successful.
By carrying on our original corporate missions of “Develop and manufacture products no others have tried before” and “Confront difficulties” that my father, the founder of I.S.T, established almost forty years ago, I.S.T members including myself have learned the joy of overcoming problems and of feeling the victory.
When I took over the business, I have set my goal to “move forward to the global market to inspire the world with our technologies”.
Most recently, by making the decision to enter the sporting gears and apparel market and receiving very positive responses at the ISPO Munich 2020, I’m very pleased that we have made one step forward toward my goal.

The interview was conducted by Ines Chucholowius, CEO Textination GmbH

Copyright photos: MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt
06.08.2019

DIGITEX SHOW 2019 GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER MILESTONE

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

The 4th edition of the Show is gearing up incorporating DIGITEX Show highlighting the developments and innovations taking place in the digital textile printing technology, which is eventually picking up fast in the apparel manufacturing industry across the country. More than 20,000 enthusiastic visitors are expected to witness the latest developments during the three days of extreme business activities. They would not only take a glimpse of what new has hit the turf in the digital textile printing, but will also experience the newest technologies through various live demonstrations that the leading brands catering to the solution for soft signage and sublimation printing would put on the display.

The transformation in digital technologies over the past few years has been tremendous, which the organisers found important to bring forth under the DIGITEX @ Gartex Texprocess 2019. The advancement in technologies and rapidly increasing awareness has brought it at a revolution of sorts. Digitex hopes to become a one-stop solution hub for the latest machinery, inks, software and services to serious buyers and decision makers of the digital textile printing industry. The Show would also witness renowned brands offering live demo of their respective machines to let the visitors feel and appreciate the development taking place in the fabric digital printing arena which is slowly but steadily picking up.

Ever since direct to garment (DTG) printing has been introduced, textile printing industry has started finding new horizons with a fast and flexible production solution that delivers exceptional image quality, which in turn is opening up new doors of opportunities for those who are willing to enter into the apparel industry or are eager to expand their garmenting & textile business. Digitex @ Gartex Texprocess India is an important event for the digital printing technology leaders as it offers them the perfect Launchpad as far as Indian market is concerned.

Moreover, experts feel that increasing thrust and resultant R&D investment in progression of digital textile printing technology will further boost the growth avenues for the digital textile industry in near future. Meanwhile, increasing popularity of polyester as an alternative to cotton as a textile fabric further creates opportunities for digital textile printing equipment providers to expand their business. Attributing to such significant demand for digital textile printing technology, there is scope for manufacturers to enhance their business in time to come.

Many leading names like ColorJet India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Apsom Technologies, Kornit Digital, True Colors Group, Epson India, Jaysynth Dyestuff (India) Ltd., etc. are lined up with their new arrivals and eagerly awaiting the Show dates to launch their latest printers. Featuring continuous production and a wide range of printing capabilities, most of these new age digital textile printers work on minimal maintenance and come with easy cleaning options for smooth operation. All these activities clearly evince that overall textile printing technology market has positive growth prospects, riding on the back of the country’s burgeoning textile industry.

Companies like Arrow Digital, AT Inks, Britomatics, Cosmic Trends, DCC Print Vision Llp, E.I.DuPont India Pvt. Ltd. Electronics For Imaging India Pvt. Ltd. (Efi Optitex), Epson India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Ganpati Graphics, Grafica Flextronica, Green Printing Solution, Green Tech, Hi Tech Marketing, HP India Sales Pvt. Ltd., Jay Chemicals Industries Ltd., JN Arora & Co., Kamal Sales Corp., KNR Technology Company, Mac Printing Solutions, Mouvent, Negi Sign Systems & Supplies Co., Orange O Technology Pvt. Ltd., Somya Digital Technologies, Spintex Pvt. Ltd./Aura, Tanya Enterprises, Texzium International Pvt. Ltd./Wenli, Veekay Enterprises, & many more are coming up with their technological innovations to showcase their latest product range under the DIGITEX.
 
The extensive exhibit profile ranging from new printers and inks to upcoming techniques will explore new and exciting opportunities offered by digital printing for home furnishing & interior decoration, apparel & fashion and corporate interiors. On the display will be digital textile machinery, digital textile printing machines, dye sublimation process, screen printing machines, t-shirt printing machines, transfer printing process, digital textile printing chemicals, digital textile printing inks (disperse, reactive and pigment inks), heat transfer machines, sublimation paper, software & many more.

Moreover, it’s a great opportunity for digital printing companies, signage industry stakeholders, screen printing industry people from graphic arts industry, merchandisers and other industry players to interact with the leading digital printing technology suppliers and to witness the latest range and innovations in the sector. This is because following the advent of digital printing solution, the applications of fabric or textile is not limited only to the clothing and home furnishing, but has gone far beyond to include signage, flags, posters, back-lit, front-lit, etc. to bring forth a wholesome idea that where all digital textile printing technology can be used.

Points to be noted are numerous benefits of soft signage. Textile or soft signage presses are very eco-friendly, run over water-based inks with little to no odour and low power consumption. Soft signage facilitates customers save on shipping because of being much lighter in weight than other materials used in the signage and graphics industry. Also, fabric-printed signs fold up to create smaller packages, again decreasing shipping costs. But overall, the Show would be a win-win for business visitors as it has much more than focusing on digital printing technology, bringing entire value chain of garmenting and textile printing manufacturing solution under one roof.

Organised by the MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. in association with Messe Frankfurt India, Gartex Texprocess, this year, will have three more shows apart from the Digitex. These are namely, FABRIC & TRIMS SHOW: A focused area to source all embellishments & fabrics, DENIM SHOW: A zone that aims to bring together the denim supply chain under one roof, and INDIA LAUNDRY SHOW: An ideal platform offering a wide range of business and networking opportunities to manufacturers, suppliers and service providers in the laundry and dry-cleaning industries.

Additionally, there are a couple of focus areas i.e., EMBROIDERY ZONE highlighting the significant evolution that has been taking place in the invention of new technologies and machinery for embroidery. The top variants of embroidery machines, software & allied products will be highlighted in this dedicated segment. Another focus area is GARMENTING & APPAREL MACHINERY that would showcase technological developments in the Garment & Apparel Manufacturing Sector.

Broad exhibit categories at Gartex Texprocess 2019 include embroidery machines, cutting and sewing machines, fabrics & accessories, needles & threads, laundry & washing equipment, finishing equipment, laser cutting machines, digital textile printing machines, automation and software.

Source:

MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt

Composites Europe 2019 (c) Photos: Reed Exhibitions/ Oliver Wachenfeld
30.07.2019

COMPOSITES EUROPE 2019: Digital Process Chain makes Fibre Composites Competitive

  • Strong Triple: COMPOSITES EUROPE, International Composites Conference and Lightweight Technologies Forum
  • “Process live” special areas showcase technological progress
  • Co-located event: Foam Expo Europe

The composites industry provides important impetus – for lightweight construction and material innovations in automotive, aviation, mechanical engineering, construction, wind power as well as in the sports and leisure sectors. So in international competition it is solutions with a high degree of automation that are in demand. COMPOSITES EUROPE from 10 to 12 September will present the trends and advances in the production and processing of fibre-reinforced plastics in Stuttgart. The trade fair will be accompanied by the International Composites Conference and the Lightweight Technologies Forum. Also held in parallel at the Messe Stuttgart premises will be Foam Expo Europe.

  • Strong Triple: COMPOSITES EUROPE, International Composites Conference and Lightweight Technologies Forum
  • “Process live” special areas showcase technological progress
  • Co-located event: Foam Expo Europe

The composites industry provides important impetus – for lightweight construction and material innovations in automotive, aviation, mechanical engineering, construction, wind power as well as in the sports and leisure sectors. So in international competition it is solutions with a high degree of automation that are in demand. COMPOSITES EUROPE from 10 to 12 September will present the trends and advances in the production and processing of fibre-reinforced plastics in Stuttgart. The trade fair will be accompanied by the International Composites Conference and the Lightweight Technologies Forum. Also held in parallel at the Messe Stuttgart premises will be Foam Expo Europe.

Trade fair visitors will meet with over 300 exhibitors from 30 nations who will be displaying materials, technical solutions and innovative application examples in Stuttgart. Apart from novel products the trade fair will place special emphasis on innovative process engineering. Visitors will learn about the state of play in serial production and new applications in the composites industry in the exhibition area as well as on numerous special areas, on themed guided tours, at the accompanying International Composites Conference and at the Lightweight Technologies Forum, which is dedicated to the trends in multi-material lightweight construction.

“Process live”: Technologies in Synergy
Perfectly coordinated processing and manufacturing processes will be centre stage at the “Process live” event. On shared exhibition space machinery and equipment manufacturers will exhibit their technologies in concert and – what’s more – in operation so as to show the different individual processes in a real context.  

On display, to name but one exhibit, is VAP®, the Vacuum Assisted Process patented by Airbus, which will be in the limelight in the Trans-Textil and Composyst special area. This process permits the one-step production of large-surface and geometrically complex components without an autoclave, which is why it is particularly suitable for structural components in aviation, wind power, shipbuilding, in rail and road transport, in machinery and device manufacturing as well as in architecture and in the leisure industry.

The “Process live” special area care of cutting specialists GUNNAR from Switzerland specifically targets the DACH region (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) with its small and medium-sized companies. Jointly with laser projection expert LAP and composites engineering expert SCHEURER Swiss, GUNNAR introduces a connected overall process that fuses modern machinery and software with specialists’ manual jobs. The point of departure here is an automated manufacturing process for sorted layer placement in small and medium quantities involving a certain degree of skilled labour.

Fibre composite specialist Hacotech will present CNC-controlled cutting processes and various finishing possibilities in cooperation with Aristo Graphic Systeme and Lavesan. Alongside cutting, production preparation and customised sizing, the production of dimensionally correct templates and the cutting and custom-sizing of composite materials and prepregs will be on show.

Cutting technology is also centre stage in the special area of Rebstock Consulting, Broetje-Automation and Zünd Systemtechnik, which will be taking part in “Process live” with “Automated Sorting and Kitting”.

Composite producer Saertex and chemical company Scott Bader will demonstrate the RTM process for producing and curing a laminate that complies with the highest fire protection requirements in as little as 1 hour.   

5th International Composites Conference (ICC)
Serial production, stable processes, new markets – the International Composites Conference (ICC) is set to inject a fresh breeze for innovations into the market and to this end brings together processors and users of fibre-reinforced plastics from all over Europe. For the first time, this renowned Conference will be held in parallel with COMPOSITES EUROPE. The lecture programme put together by the trade association Composites Germany and the trade fair will also move closer in terms of content.  

One of tomorrow’s cross-cutting themes keeping the entire industry on its toes are multi-material solutions in nearly all industrial applications. In the construction sector the Conference also deals with the rising use of carbon concrete. Process engineering will focus on processing thermoplastic materials for serial production and stable processes for thermoset plastic processing.  

The partner country of the Conference is the United Kingdom. Especially against the backdrop of the current Brexit debate the ICC aims to foster exchange among all European countries. After all, the UK is among the biggest producers of composites components in Europe.

Themed Tours on Digitalisation, Fibre Glass, Thermoplastics, Automotive and Wind Power
Guided tours and hands-on demonstrations in the exhibition halls complement the conference programme. Themed guided tours revolving around composites application, materials and markets guide trade fair visitors and congress delegates right to the stands of selected exhibitors, who will share with visitors their innovations in the fields of digitalisation of composites production, automotive manufacturing, building and construction, fibreglass, new mobility, thermoplastic materials and wind power.  

New ideas on special areas and joint stands
“Material and Production Technology” is the name of the new special area set up under the guidance of the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) of the RWTH Aachen University. In cooperation with other institutes such as the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) the IKV will place manufacturing technology centre stage at the trade fair. In particular, the special area will trace the path from scientific development to practical, industrial implementation.

Tomorrow’s automotive experts will also be given a separate forum: under the heading “Formula Student” students and trainees will present to visitors racing cars and bikes they have engineered.

Lightweight Technologies Forum: platform for multi-material lightweight construction
Lightweight construction remains a driver across the board for many developments in the composites sector. The Lightweight Technologies Forum (LTF) held as part of COMPOSITES EUROPE makes it clear how lightweight construction can be achieved in an economical and resource-efficient manner. This Forum views itself as a cross-industry and multi-material think tank where all parties involved can reflect on these new concepts.

To this end, the Forum in Stuttgart pools lightweight construction projects from automotive manufacturing, aviation and aerospace and mechanical engineering, to name but a few industries that serve as a driving force for many sectors with high demands made on materials, security and reliability.  

This year’s keynote speakers include Airbus Innovation Manager Peter Pirklbauer, lightweight construction expert Prof. Jörg Wellnitz (TU Ingolstadt), Dutch racing driver Jeroen Bleekemolen and lightweight construction, aviation and aerospace specialist Claus Georg Bayreuther (AMC). In their talks they will provide an overview of reference projects and novel manufacturing and joining technologies.  

Combining its own exhibition space with a lecture forum, the LTF demonstrates how glass-fibre reinforced plastics (GRP) and carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) leverage their strengths mixed with other materials in hybrid structural components. Exhibitors at the Forum and in the neighbouring Lightweight Area include “Leichtbau-Zentrum Sachsen” (Lightweight Construction Center Saxony), Chem-Trend, Gößl + Pfaff, Krempel, Mitsui Chemicals Europe, Leichtbau BW, the VDMA, Gustav Gerster, Potters Ballotini (UK), Yuho (Japan), Riba Composites (Italy) and Stamixco (Switzerland) as well as the journals Lightweight Design (Springer Fachmedien) and Automobil Industrie (Vogel Communications Group), to name but a few.

“Ultralight in Space”: market study on lightweight construction trends in the aerospace industry
The aerospace industry has always served as a pioneer for ultra-lightweight construction pushing many disciplines to their limits as a driver of innovation. The latest technical trends are currently under scrutiny via a market study carried out by consultancy Automotive Management Consulting (AMC) in cooperation with the Luxembourg-based aerospace OEM GRADEL. The results will be presented for the first time at the LTF in Stuttgart on 10 September.  

Presentation of the AVK Innovation Prize
Innovative products and applications in fibre-reinforced plastics, manufacturing processes and the latest insights from research and science, will again be recognised by the German trade association AVK – Industrievereinigung Verstärkte Kunststoffe e. V. with its renowned Innovation Prize. The winners will be announced as part of the trade fair on 10 September and the award-winning products and projects will be on display in a special area.

Presentation of the SMB-BMC Design Award
The European Alliance for SMC BMC will announce the winners of the SMC BMC Design Award 2019 – also on 10 September. The contest already held for the second time now, honours and promotes the design excellence of students or young design professionals who use SMC and BMC components (sheet and bulk moulding compounds) in their designs. This year saw sustainable mobility take centre stage as a theme.

COMPOSITES Night
The event to celebrate the midway point of the trade fair: the COMPOSITES Night at the end of the second trade fair day offers visitors and exhibitors additional opportunities for networking. Participants are in for buffets and live music at the Stage Palladium Theater in Stuttgart.

Matchmaking programme makes trade fair visit more efficient
Thanks to the complimentary networking & meeting platform “matchmaking” visitors and exhibitors can already reach out to contacts in the run-up to COMPOSITES EUROPE. Who is at the trade fair? Who has answers to your specific questions? Who can you team up with to turn new ideas into practice? The matchmaking platform allows you to “filter” and make direct appointments with potential cooperation partners by product category, industry, country, or company.

Career & Composites
With its career&composites stand COMPOSITES EUROPE targets students and graduates who can come here to establish contact with potential employers. On the special area the exhibitors present their companies to interested junior employees and attract attention to vacancies and career opportunities via a Job Wall.

Co-located with Foam Expo Europe
COMPOSITES EUROPE will be co-located with Foam Expo Europe for the first time. This trade fair covers the supply chain of technical foam production and presents moulded, rigid and soft foam solutions – from raw materials to equipment and machinery. The parallel exhibition dates generate special synergies for gaining an overview of lightweight construction materials for such shared applications as the automotive, aviation, construction and sports & leisure industries.

NIEDERLÄNDER KAUFEN GERNE ONLINE EIN Photo: Pixabay
14.08.2018

DUTCH PEOPLE LIKE TO BUY ONLINE

  • E-commerce to grow by 17 percent in 2018

Berlin (GTAI) - E-commerce in the Netherlands is expected to grow in 2018. The most popular products are media and entertainment. Strong growth was recorded in the food trade.
The Dutch online food trade is gaining momentum, and high growth rates are expected for 2018. Customers also look beyond the borders and shop abroad. However, the online shops with the highest turnover are in Dutch hands.

  • E-commerce to grow by 17 percent in 2018

Berlin (GTAI) - E-commerce in the Netherlands is expected to grow in 2018. The most popular products are media and entertainment. Strong growth was recorded in the food trade.
The Dutch online food trade is gaining momentum, and high growth rates are expected for 2018. Customers also look beyond the borders and shop abroad. However, the online shops with the highest turnover are in Dutch hands.

Dutch people are very open to new technologies. In 2018, around 97 percent of the population (16.8 million people) will have an Internet connection. On average, the 13.9 million online shoppers spend EUR 1,242 a year. In 2018, e-commerce revenue will grow by around 17 percent to EUR 26.3 billion. This is predicted by an investigation of the organization Thuiswinkel. Already in the first quarter of 2018, EUR 6.3 billion were spent online, an increase of 13 percent compared to the same quarter of the previous year. The last quarter of a year with the holidays (Christmas, Santa Claus and Black Friday), in which 30 percent of the annual sales are taken place, is always very promising.

According to the Portal Commercenews online trading amounted to EUR 22.5 billion in 2017, up 13 percent from 2016, accounting for 9.7 percent of the total retail sales, which grew by only 4.2 percent. The e-commerce boom was followed by new company foundations: around 9,200 new webshops were established, but 5,400 were closed too. Most of these webshops also have foreign markets in their view.

Laptops are most commonly used for online purchases, but mobile devices are becoming increasingly popular. 2017 was marked by growing mobile commerce (m-commerce), a further increase is expected in 2018. After all, the country has more mobile devices than inhabitants (110 percent).

Not only the web shops benefit from the booming e-commerce. The Dutch Post is also pleased about the growth. Their e-commerce revenue is estimated at 42 percent of total revenue in 2018 (2017: 34 percent).

Food is bought more frequently online
Demand is focused on the media and entertainment sectors, where some 8.5 million purchases were made in the first three months of 2018. Food and near-food products (goods that are not food but are also available in supermarkets) were in demand in the first quarter of 2018, 42 percent more than in the same period of last year. Although their share of total purchases is still low, experts are already forecasting 3.7 percent in 2018 after 2.9 percent in 2017, when the sales exceeded EUR 1 billion for the first time. The purchases were mainly made at the large Albert Heijn and Jumbo supermarkets. The third important market Picnic, which only operates online, wants to expand into Germany and has already started a pilot project in the Düsseldorf area.

The Albert Heijn supermarket is about to make it even easier for its customers, to receive goods even when they are not at home. It is testing a so-called intelligent key (smart door lock) from Nuki. Customers can use their mobile phones to control who enters the apartment in their absence. By this this way he can let the delivery service in after his call..

Buyers are usually satisfied with their online purchases. Nevertheless, they fear that the goods are not clearly enough illustrated and described, as well as difficulties in returning them and their costs. Web shops can score points if they offer free shipping and fair return options.

The thrifty Dutch also compare when buying on the Internet. According to Ecommerce Foundation, 60 percent look around at multiple merchants before deciding, 53 percent use websites that compare prices or products, half consider other users' reviews on the web and only 8 percent buy spontaneously based on advertising or social media ads (multiple answers possible).

Dutch spend more and more abroad
Around 3.8 million Dutch people bought from foreign webshops in 2017, spending rose by 28 percent compared to the previous year. In 2017, they spent around EUR 1.5 billion on webshops in the European Union. Also Chinese sites with favorable offers are popular. Around EUR 248 million were invested in shops such as Aliexpress, Banggood, Dealextreme, Geekbuying, Gearbest, MiniIn TheBox. The most popular countries were China, the United Kingdom, Germany and the USA.

The most popular payment provider on the Internet is iDEAL. Around 95 percent of customers use the Dutch online payment system, in which several local banks are involved. Its market share is an impressive 57 percent. In 2017, the number of transactions via iDEAL grew by almost 34 percent. Foreign webshops have also joined the system: About one third of the payments went to them.

Most popular online payment methods
(in %, multiple selections possible)
iDEAL      95
Kreditkarte    50
pAYPAL 31
Tikkie 22

Source: Ecommerce Foundation

Many Dutch retailers among top online shops
Many of the most successful online retailers are Dutch companies. Bol, the local online seller with the highest turnover, was able to grow because large e-traders such as eBay or Amazon were not yet present in the Netherlands. Bol developed from a project of the German Bertelsmann Group with a focus on books and DVDs, but is now in Dutch hands and has considerably expanded its offering to other product groups. In 2012 Bol was acquired by the Ahold Group.

The Rotterdam-based company Coolblue launched an online store in 2000. Subsequently, several web shops were opened, each focusing on one product category. A stationary business was added in 2005. Coolblue today sells mainly consumer electronics, white goods and fitness equipment and is the second largest online retailer. The company is known for its excellent customer service.

Wehkamp began as a mail order company in 1952 and sold all articles via its Internet platform before 2000. The Internet pioneer has developed slowly, but has recently invested heavily in order to survive in the Dutch top league.

Like eBay in Germany, Marktplaats.nl in the Netherlands is the marketplace for second-hand goods. Google Shopping achieved strong growth in 2017. The portal is also expected to become the most important comparison portal in the Netherlands in a short time.

Important e-commerce events in the Netherlands
Event Date
Digital Marketing World Forum, DMWF Expo Europe, Amsterdam 19 - 20 September 2018
Savant Supply Chain Congress, Amsterdam 2 - 3 October 2018
Shopper Insights & Retail Activation International, Amsterdam 29 - 31 October 2018

 

More information:
ecommerce Onlineshopping
Source:

Inge Kozel, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

CHIC Shanghai - THE MOTTO 'NEW MAKERS' BY CHIC INTERPRETS THE PROGRESSIVE CHANGE IN THE CHINESE FASHION BUSINESS Photo: JANDALI MODE.MEDIEN.MESSEN
26.06.2018

CHIC Shanghai - THE MOTTO 'NEW MAKERS' INTERPRETS THE PROGRESSIVE CHANGE IN THE CHINESE FASHION BUSINESS

  • The important trade fair platform for entry into the Chinese consumer market with China's most influential consumer group for the fashion and beauty sector with the strongest growth in consumption - the millennials - as target group
  • The international fashion showcase for decision makers with an overview of na-tional and international fashion brands
  • Strategic market development through comprehensive visitor marketing for inter-national brands at CHIC

 
CHIC, China International Fashion Fair presents around 800 exhibitors in an exhibition space of approx. 50,000 sqm (CHIC in March 100,000 sqm) in two halls from 27 to 29 September 2018 at the National Exhibition & Convention Center in Shanghai.

  • The important trade fair platform for entry into the Chinese consumer market with China's most influential consumer group for the fashion and beauty sector with the strongest growth in consumption - the millennials - as target group
  • The international fashion showcase for decision makers with an overview of na-tional and international fashion brands
  • Strategic market development through comprehensive visitor marketing for inter-national brands at CHIC

 
CHIC, China International Fashion Fair presents around 800 exhibitors in an exhibition space of approx. 50,000 sqm (CHIC in March 100,000 sqm) in two halls from 27 to 29 September 2018 at the National Exhibition & Convention Center in Shanghai.
The current conditions for international fashion companies in the Chinese market offer significant improvements for international brands. Import tariffs will be lowered from 15.9% to 7.1% to further promote the import and upgrade of the industry.  

The McKinsey study "THE `Chinese consumer´ no longer exists” defines Chinese consumers no longer as interested only in low prices, but as selective, healthconscious with diverse shopping hab-its and preferences. The fashion awareness changes to an individual sense of style, influenced by international and national trends. China's millennials are the WORLD'S most influential consumer group, with a 16% share of the population, driving consumption growth in the Chinese market and contributing more than 20% from today until 2030.  
 
According to the edition's motto "New Makers", Asia's leading fashion fair is picking up on the latest changes in the Chinese fashion market and providing the essential tools for the Chinese market. The new, young design of the fair, which was launched in March this year at CHIC, is being ex-panded. The individual sections of CHIC present the latest trends in the Chinese and international fashion market. CHIC connects and brokers partnerships and launches the new generation gar-ment industry, which builds on high-tech strategies and interlinks industrial production with modern information and communication technologies, relying on intelligent, digitally networked systems in self-organized production.

The individual fashion areas of CHIC  
FASHION JOURNEY puts the focus on interna-tional exhibitors. In addition to the large Italian pavilion, the French pavilion "Paris Forever" and the Korean show-inshow "Preview in China", in-dividual participants from Poland, the UK, France, Italy, Spain, Japan and the USA use CHIC as a bridge in the Chinese market. The next German group participation is planned for March 2019, whereby Germany will also be rep-resented with individual brands such as ESISTO in the area NEW LOOK.

IMPULSES, CHIC's designer section, features emerging designer brands such as Junne, Hua Mu Shen, King Ping, Anjaylia, Mao Mart homme, Tuffcan, etc.

The SUSTAINABILITY ZONE, first showcased at CHIC in the fall of 2017, is receiving even greater emphasis due to the increasing environmental and health awareness of Chinese consum-ers, featuring sustainable supply chain solutions, sustainable innovation and sustainable fashion collections. Programs such as Chemical Stewardship 2020, Carbon Stewardship 2020, Water Stewardship 2020 and Circular Stewardship 2020 are presented. The womenswear section NEW LOOK of CHIC presents next to the leading Chinese brands like AVRALA, and CMH also international brands like Saint James from France, ESISTO from Ger-many, Trenz Eight from Canada or PN JONE, USA.

Beside the suppliers of classic menswear, URBAN VIEW, the menswear section, also includes casualwear brands like NRDMA and SUPIN as well as bespoke companies like H. Pin& Tack, Jin Yuan Yang, Fa Lan Qian Mu, Long Sheng and DANDINGHE.
CHIC YOUNG BLOOD shows young lifestyle brands, KID'S PARADISE offers e.g the largest fashion group in China for children's fashion XTEP KIDS.

SECRET STARS (fashion accessories), SHANGHAI BAG (bags), HERITAGE (leather & fur), SUPERIOR FACTORY (ODM) and FUTURE LINK (services) complete the fashion offer at CHIC. FUTURE LINK gathers fashion service providers for among others supply chain solutions, smart retail and smart production, RFID, laser technology and data utilization.

Visitor management
On the rise in China's retail scene, multi brand and custom stores are the fastest growing offline sector. The number has increased significantly in the last five years from less than 100 to more than 5,000 stores. Exclusive shopping experiences and an individual offer are important. Custom-ers value a wide range of products: a mix of international and national exclusive brands is the most common concept.

The high investments of the CHIC organizers in the visi-tor management for the fair pay off: CHIC has a per-sonalized trade visitor database of over 200,000 con-tacts, which are used intensively for the visitor marketing in the run-up to the fair for a commercial matching for the exhibitors. At the fair, VIP match making activities will take place especially for selected international brands, that will have the opportunity to present them-selves there and make the relevant contacts in the Chi-nese trade. Meetings are organized among others with multi brand stores and buyers such as The Fashion Door, Dong Liang, Jing Dong, VIP Shop and department stores, and retailers such as Carrefour, Amazon, De-cathlon, Wang Fujing, etc. An important tool for the CHIC visitor marketing is social media; for this special programs are run, in which individual brands are pre-sented to prospective visitors.    

CHIC is visited by representatives of all distribution channels for distribution in the Chinese market, at the last event in autumn 2017 more than 65,722 visitors from all over China and other nations were registered at the CHIC, with a significant increase in multi brand stores.
 
Seminars and shows

The future of fashion business in China will be discussed in a panel of experts as part of CHIC TALKS. Furthermore, a trend seminar from WGSN for FW 2019 and a workshop on bag and shoe production from the Moda Pelle Academy are planned.

CHIC shows provide an overview of selected international brands.

CHIC is organized by Beijing Fashion Expo. Co. ltd. and China World Exhibitions, supported by China National Garment Association, The Sub-Council of Textile Industry (CCPIT) and China World Trade Center.

DOWNPASS e.V.’s FIRST TRADE FAIR IN CHINA Traumpass e.V.
20.03.2018

DOWNPASS e.V.’s FIRST TRADE FAIR IN CHINA

  • The association's zero tolerance standard was presented at Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles between 14 and 16 March
  • The association enjoyed a successful appearance together with three certification bodies from Germany, Japan and the US/China
  • Chinese manufacturers showed great interest in the unique combination of animal welfare and quality control

‘We met many committed companies – primarily from China – that showed great interest in traceability and the ethically sound sourcing of feathers and down. The potential that Downpass offers as a traceability standard together with continuous quality control was clearly recognised and won companies over not only for export-oriented purposes, but also for the domestic Chinese market’, explained Dr Juliane Hedderich, who was responsible for the trade fair appearance as managing director of Downpass e.V.

  • The association's zero tolerance standard was presented at Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles between 14 and 16 March
  • The association enjoyed a successful appearance together with three certification bodies from Germany, Japan and the US/China
  • Chinese manufacturers showed great interest in the unique combination of animal welfare and quality control

‘We met many committed companies – primarily from China – that showed great interest in traceability and the ethically sound sourcing of feathers and down. The potential that Downpass offers as a traceability standard together with continuous quality control was clearly recognised and won companies over not only for export-oriented purposes, but also for the domestic Chinese market’, explained Dr Juliane Hedderich, who was responsible for the trade fair appearance as managing director of Downpass e.V.
‘The follow-up after the trade fair will be crucial to translate Chinese companies’ interest into actual memberships.’

The association's representatives and rotating teams from the certification bodies Wessling, QTEC and IDFL advised visitors at a large stand in the foyer of hall 4.2 (HOME) with a deliberately puristic design. These independent testing institutes and auditing organisations are companies’ direct contacts for audits and product monitoring. As is common for trade fairs, the largest crowds were seen on the afternoon of the first and second day of the event.

The markets are increasingly demanding materials that guarantee trading partners and therefore consumers the greatest possible security when it comes to ethics and sustainability, alongside high product quality. Products certified by independent testing institutes gain in importance and set sales standards.

Ms Anna Elisa Wessling, legal representative of the subsidiary Wessling Consulting (Shanghai) Ltd. and representative of the German Wessling Group at the trade fair, was happy to engage with customers directly, explaining, ‘our presence as a consulting, analysis and testing company at Intertextile Home gave us the opportunity to talk to visitors and thus allowed us to increase transparency on the Chinese market such that retailers and consumers are suitably informed of the highest requirements of product quality and of the origin of bedding filled with feathers and down.’
As a German family company, the Wessling Group has stood for continuous improvement in the quality and security of products and processes for 35 years and is set to move into new, larger premises for its subsidiary in Shanghai in the near future so that it can fulfil the increasing number of testing requests in Asia with a larger team.
‘We expect constant growth in our analysis and consulting segment feathers and down, especially as our international customers see Downpass as a clear advantage for customer acquisition domestically and abroad. As an independent testing institute, we play a substantial role in underpinning trust in the Downpass brand’, highlighted Ms Weßling.

The Japanese institution QTEC also confirmed Downpass’ high level of visitor interest and, like its colleagues, stressed the importance of an institute’s independence. The managing director of Shanghai QTEC Testing Laboratory, Hiroyuki Nakamoto, who successfully presented the company’s three Chinese sites – including Shanghai and Wuxi – at the home textiles trade fair, explained, ‘our knowledge of the Japanese market, together with our testing expertise, make us a top contact for manufacturers of bedding and clothing products filled with feathers and down to ensure the supply chain is ethically sound.’ The institute expects a steady rise in the number of testing requests for Downpass, especially at Chinese sites.

A large, bilingual English-Chinese sales team from IDFL China, based in Hangzhou was available at the trade fair in Shanghai to answer all questions relating to audits and testing procedures with its varied specialist expertise. Together with its cooperation partner, the Chinese national down and feather laboratory CIQ Xiaoshan, IDFL has capacities for a broad range of different tests and audits.
IDFL’s Global Audit Manager Bryan Mortensen highlighted that Downpass had become a standard and therefore a seal that is recognised worldwide and in China in particular. The joint appearance with other certification bodies provided the opportunity to answer the questions of Chinese companies along the supply chain, from wholesalers to clothing and home textile brands and trading partners.
‘We are seeing strong demand for the current version of the standard, Downpass 2017, and its seal. IDFL carried out numerous audits across the globe in 2017 and we receive new requests every day. Overall we anticipate a successful future for Downpass in the down and feather industry’, explained Mortensen. IDFL – which will celebrate 40 years in the industry in 2018 – has been carrying out audits in the field of down and feathers for more than 10 years and is currently undergoing certification in accordance with ISO/EN 17065 and 19011.

In their first summary of the event, the extended Downpass trade fair team took stock of a successful trade fair premiere. ‘We aim to promote the sustainable use of natural resources across the globe and to increase transparency in the supply chain’, explained Dr Juliane Hedderich. ‘Animal welfare and guaranteed product quality are our hallmarks. We did a great job in Shanghai of jointly informing others about these and finding new collaborators.’

 

About the zero tolerance standard DOWNPASS 2017
Products filled with feathers and down that are certified in accordance with Downpass 2017 exclude products sourced from live plucking and production based on force feeding. The animals’ rearing is monitored and monitoring may be extended to the parent animal farms.
To this end, farms, commodities traders and producers are subject to audits and monitoring.
Pre-made products are bought by mystery shoppers at the point of sale and subsequently undergo quality control in independent testing laboratories.
As of January 2018, 503 million animals had been audited in accordance with DOWNPASS 2017.
Labelled products are available in North America, Europe and Asia.

26.09.2017

TAIWAN'S TEXTILES AND CLOTHING ARE EXPECTING HIGHER DEMAND

  • Production and Exports on a recreation Course
  • Investments in Capacity and Modernization

Taipei (GTAI) - Taiwanese textile and clothing manufacturers see improved sales prospects in 2017 and 2018, following a weak development in the previous year. With its range of functional textiles in particular, the country occupies a position of great importance throughout the world. In order to maintain competitiveness, the sector companies invest in new equipment and product innovations. One of the most important machine suppliers is, among others, Germany in third place behind China and Japan.

  • Production and Exports on a recreation Course
  • Investments in Capacity and Modernization

Taipei (GTAI) - Taiwanese textile and clothing manufacturers see improved sales prospects in 2017 and 2018, following a weak development in the previous year. With its range of functional textiles in particular, the country occupies a position of great importance throughout the world. In order to maintain competitiveness, the sector companies invest in new equipment and product innovations. One of the most important machine suppliers is, among others, Germany in third place behind China and Japan.

Taiwan's textile industry is looking more optimistically on business performance in the current year as well as for 2018. This is attributable to the high level of consumer spending in the most important sales markets, price increases and major international sports events such as the FIFA World Cup and the Winter Olympics in South Korea. The island is the world's leading supplier of functional textiles used in sports and outdoor clothing.

According to the Taiwan Textile Research Institute, this textile sector accounts for about 50 percent of the world's production value of functional textiles. In order to maintain this position, the manufacturers are investing in capacity expansion, new technologies and the development of innovative textiles, while focusing on the diversification at production sites.

Production is recovering

Despite shrinking production development, the number of companies in the textile and clothing industry has risen over the last few years and, according to the Taiwan Textile Federation, at the end of 2016 to 4,361 companies. Of these, 3,205 (2015: 3,163) belonged to the textile segment and 1,156 (2015: 1,144) to the garment sector. The number of employees however is declining, as companies invest in automation.

According to the Ministry of Economic Affairs the production value of the sector fell by 5.9 per cent in 2016 over 2015. The development in the first half of 2017 however indicated that the weakness phase is declining. In particular textile production, which represents the most important area, showed signs of recovery. Here a more efficient utilization in the second half of the year was expected, as inventories are declining and orders are rising.

On the other hand the production of clothing and accessories and the production of synthetic fibers and yarns have shown a further shrinking trend in the recent years. Most of the industrial companies have moved their production towards abroad. At the end of the first half of 2017 the clothing segment accounted for only 4.9 percent of the total apparel segment.

Production (in NT$ billion; change compared to the previous year in %)
  2015 2016 Change 1st half 2017 Change
Fibers and yarns 102.6 91.0 -11.4 45.4 -3.1
Textiles 284.7 272.4 -6.2 131.5 -1.3
Clothing  21.9 21.8 -0.2 9.1 -4.7
Total 409.3 385.2 -5.9 186.1 -1.9
Source: Ministry of Economic Affairs, 2017

Rising foreign trade expected

Export development also offers a better outlook. According to figures for the first six months of 2017 the export value of the textile and clothing sector shrank by only 0.3 per cent. For the full year 2016 the Taiwan Textile Federation statistics show a decline of 8.3% to USD 9.9 billion. The exports of textiles reached a value of USD 6.7 billion.

Exports of textiles and clothing are three times higher than imports. While exports are dominated by textile products with a share of 68%, imports of clothing accounts for 55%. Imports of textiles in 2016 were worth only about USD 427 Million.

Foreign trade in textiles and clothing
(in USD million; change compared to the previous year in %)
  2015 2016 Change 1st half 2017 Change
Import 3,458 3,308 1.0 1,566 0.2
Export 10,804 9,904 -8.3 4,968 -0.3
Source: Taiwan Textile Federation, 2017

Investment activities are growing

According to the reports of at the stock market listed companies, it looks good on the orders received from existing as well as from new customers. As a result, the capacities are expanded, as at the Far Eastern New Century. The company is looking above all at Vietnam, where USD 760 million will be invested in the expansion of a supply chain for textiles and clothing over the next three years.

Other manufacturers such as Eclat and Makalot are also expanding their activities in Vietnam. It also will be invested in Taiwan, where, for example, Eclat Textile wants to spend between USD 26 million and USD 33 million to build new facilities for digital textile products. Makalot Industrial has announced plans to create smart production lines in Vietnam and Taiwan to increase efficiency.

With Shinkong Synthetic Fibers, another large textile producer on the island, wants to expand production. The company plans to increase the production of artificial fibers during 2018 from 50,000 tons to 110,000 tons. This is to serve orders from European and Japanese customers from the automotive sector.

Finishing equipment imports show little dynamics

The investment activities and plans of the textile and clothing manufacturers are expected to lead to increasing finishing equipment imports and exports. However, imports of textile machinery show an overall decline in the first six months of 2017. Only China and Japan, the most important suppliers, were able to boast high growth rates. Germany, the third largest supplier, was much less successful.

Main supplier countries of textile machinery
(in USD millions, change compared to the previous year in %) *)
  2015 2016 Change 1.st Half 2017 Change
Total 383.8 405.4 5.6 190.0 -2.5
PR China 93.6 108.7 16.1 65.5 28.8
Japan 107.3 97.2 -9.4 46.9 20.7
Germany 78.3 82.5 5.4 34.2 -28.4
Italy 20.4 32.8 60.5 11.0 -38.0
USA 11.9 19.2 61.2 5.9 10.5
*) HS-Pos. 8444-8453, ohne 8450; Source: Customs Statistics, Ministry of Finance, 2017

In the first six months of 2017, textile machine exports rose by 7.5 percent to USD 543 million. It is mainly supplied to the overseas production plants in China and Vietnam, to where in this period about USD 111 million was exported. At the third place follow the USA with USD 40 million.

More information:
Asien textile industry
Source:

Jürgen Maurer, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

ECO-FASHION GREENSHOWROOM UND ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN MESSE-DUO MIT HOCHKLASSIGEM RAHMENPROGRAMM © Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
14.06.2016

ECO-FASHION GREENSHOWROOM UND ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN MESSE-DUO MIT HOCHKLASSIGEM RAHMENPROGRAMM

  • DTB Info Day: CSR-focused series of talks on the Wednesday of the trade fair
  • Three-day programme: fashion shows, talks, podium discussions and tours
With an extensive event programme, the two trade fairs for eco-fashion, Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin, will provide a comprehensive update on sustainability and fashion-related issues. From 28-30 June 2016, the talks, podium discussions and tours will provide first-rate information and networking opportunities. Well-known representatives from the worlds of fashion, politics, film and television are expected to attend the podium discussions and be in the audience. The two fashion shows "Salonshow" and "Ethical Fashion on Stage" promise an increased glamour factor.
  • DTB Info Day: CSR-focused series of talks on the Wednesday of the trade fair
  • Three-day programme: fashion shows, talks, podium discussions and tours
With an extensive event programme, the two trade fairs for eco-fashion, Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin, will provide a comprehensive update on sustainability and fashion-related issues. From 28-30 June 2016, the talks, podium discussions and tours will provide first-rate information and networking opportunities. Well-known representatives from the worlds of fashion, politics, film and television are expected to attend the podium discussions and be in the audience. The two fashion shows "Salonshow" and "Ethical Fashion on Stage" promise an increased glamour factor. Invited guests can look forward to catwalk presentations by international Designers.
 
All eyes will be on the catwalk from the very first day of the trade fair onwards (Tuesday 28 June): The event will kick off with the "Salonshow" as an official offshoot event of the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin. From 3 p.m. onwards, designers from Greenshowroom will present selected high fashion looks from their 2017 summer collections in the Club of the Postbahnhof. The show will be given a new Parisian slant: designer Eymeric François will be working on the staging of the salon show for the first time. As a director of numerous fashion shows, he has already enjoyed much success at Messe Frankfurt's textile trade fairs in Paris. 'The challenge lies in creating a highly professional internationally-oriented show that is up-to-date with trends and also retains the ethical aspect', explains François about the aim of the event.
 
Part two of the show programme follows at 5 p.m.: the catwalk show "Ethical Fashion on Stage" showcases street and casualwear. Lavera will also present the winner of the Lavera Green Fashion Awards, Ina Budde. The designer and founder of Design for Circularity has developed a circular collection for the label Jan'n June – which can be seen live at "Ethical Fashion on Stage".
 
The second day of the trade fair (Wednesday 29 June) focuses on CSR: for the first time, the Dialog Textil-Bekleidung (DTB) will host its CSR day in cooperation with Messe Frankfurt. There will also be a whole-day symposium held in the Club of the Postbahnhof entitled "Responsible Management of Supply Chains – Social Compliance and Chemical Input". The agenda includes topics such as "The consequences of globalised trade", "Corporate Responsibility Review 2016" and "Transparent and sustainable sourcing". An open panel discussion on the theme of "The Emperor's New Clothes – is transparency coming to the fashion world?" invites attendees to discuss practical questions in greater depth with speakers, exhibitors and companies.
 
On the third day of the trade fair (Thursday 30 June), a comprehensive programme awaits – with presentations by Fairtrade Deutschland, GOTS and IVN, Textile Exchange and Fair Wear Foundation. Renate Künast (Bündnis 90/Die Grünen), Stefan Genth (HDE Handelsverband Deutschland),  Matthias Hebeler (Brainshirt) and Claudia Lanius (Lanius) will discuss transparency in the supply chain at 2 p.m.

An overview of the programme (location: Club at the Postbahnhof):
Tuesday 28 June 2016

10 a.m. Opening. In German.
10.30 a.m. Press tour following the opening (start point: press Lounge)
11 a.m. Press conference TransFair e.V. "Designing supply chains to be sustainable – Fairtrade textile standards and textile plan" (location: press lounge, upper floor, Postbahnhof). In German.
2 p.m. Press tour (start point: press Lounge)
3 p.m. Salonshow with outfits by Austriandesign.at, Bhusattva, Carpasus, Cocccon, Elementum by Daniela Pais, Elisa F., Heartcouture, Inti Ferreira, Lanius, Soome, Studio Elsien Gringhuis, Studio Jux, Tuschimo. Invitation only!
5 p.m. Ethical Fashion on Stage with outfits by Anzüglich organic and fair, Chapati, Daily´s Nothings Better, De'qua, Get Lazy, La Robe d'Inna, Milena with Love, Mud Jeans, Najha, Noumenon, Päälä, Tijar, Tranquillo, Verena Bellutti. Invitation only!

Wednesday 29 June 2016
DTB Infotag – Responsible Management of Supply Chains Social Compliance and Chemical Input
Moderation: Rolf Heimann, Vorstand, hessnatur Stiftung

10.00 a.m. Welcome and introduction by the DTB and Messe Frankfurt
10.15 a.m. "The consequences of global free trade", Dr Sabine Ferenschild, Research Assistant, Südwind e.V.
10.45 a.m. "Corporate Responsibility Review 2016 – annual report on global corporate responsibility", Lisa Häuser, Senior Analyst, Oekom Research AG
11.30 a.m. "Transparent and sustainable sourcing", Deniz Thiede, Managing Director, ATICS GmbH
11.50 a.m. "Sustainability, REACH etc. – Quo Vadis?“, Dr Dirk von Czarnowski, Vice President Global Chemical, Intertek Holding Deutschland GmbH
12.15 a.m. Guided tour(s) of the trade fairs
1.45 p.m. Update on the Partnership for Sustainable Textiles, Dr Bernhard Felmberg, assistant state secretary, Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development
2 p.m.  Presentation of a collaborative project to promote sustainability, Carolin Bohrke, hessnatur Stiftung
2.20 p.m. "Best practices in supply chain management transparency", Prof. Patrick Kugler, HAW Hamburg
2.40 p.m. "Company-customer relationships in a CSR context", Prof. Rudolf Voller, Hochschule Niederrhein
3.15 p.m. "The Emperor's New Clothes – is transparency coming to the fashion industry?" Panel discussion with speakers, exhibitors and companies in the industry
12.30 p.m. Press conference Bündnis für nachhaltige Textilien / GiZ (location: press lounge, upper floor, Postbahnhof)

Thursday 30 June 2016

10 a.m. Talk “The true costs of cotton", Mariska Przyklenk, Fairtrade Deutschland. In German.
11.30 a.m. Talk "GOTS and IVN-Best summarised. How the certification ensures that you can meet the requirements of governmental and non-governmental organisations", Claudia Kersten, GOTS und Heike Scheuer, IVN. In German.
1 p.m. Talk "More sustainable fibres and materials – from vision to volume", Simone Seisl, Textile Exchange. In German.
2 p.m. Podium discussion "Transparency in the supply chain", with Renate Künast (MdB, Bündnis 90/Die Grünen), Stefan Genth (Managing Director HDE Handelsverband Deutschland), Matthias Hebeler (Managing Director Brainshirt), Claudia Lanius (Managing Director Lanius). In German.
3.30 p.m. Talk and interactive game: "Fair Wear Foundation towards sustainable global garment supply chains", Andrea Spithoff and Maaike Payet, Fair Wear Foundation. In English.

 

Videos, photos and other Information:
www.greenshowroom.com
www.ethicalfashionshowberlin.com
www.facebook.com/greenshowroom
www.facebook.com/ethicalfashionshowberlin
www.youtube.com/greenshowroom
www.youtube.com/EFSBerlin
www.instagram.com/greenshowroom
www.instagram.com/ethicalfashionshowberlin

 

 

100 years VDFI VDFI e.V.
31.05.2016

VDFI E.V. LOOKS BACK ON 100 YEARS OF ITS ASSOCIATION HISTORY

  • From Wilhelm II to the traceable Supply Chain of ethical sourced Down and Feathers
To celebrate its 100th anniversary the Association of the German Down & Feather Industry has invited to the origin of its genesis to Berlin. From Schleswig-Holstein to Bavaria the largest German bed-feather and bedding companies sent their management to the Spree. Friendly associations congratulated as well as representatives of certification and auditing companies, universities, exhibition companies, media and animal welfare organizations. Politicians praised in particular the socio-political and standardization legal merits of the VDFI.
 
The parliamentary state secretary of the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Mr. Peter Bleser, MDP, gave in his speech the importance of sociopolitical consumer and animal protection broad space.
  • From Wilhelm II to the traceable Supply Chain of ethical sourced Down and Feathers
To celebrate its 100th anniversary the Association of the German Down & Feather Industry has invited to the origin of its genesis to Berlin. From Schleswig-Holstein to Bavaria the largest German bed-feather and bedding companies sent their management to the Spree. Friendly associations congratulated as well as representatives of certification and auditing companies, universities, exhibition companies, media and animal welfare organizations. Politicians praised in particular the socio-political and standardization legal merits of the VDFI.
 
The parliamentary state secretary of the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Mr. Peter Bleser, MDP, gave in his speech the importance of sociopolitical consumer and animal protection broad space. After focusing on environmental protection in the 80s and the issues of food safety in the 90's in recent times the focus has shifted to livestock farming. There would just be a beginning of a development whose aim is to become leading in animal welfare in Europe. So the sector could use the change in values of the society for a differentiation from competitors and profile themselves over the unique proposition traceability.
The chairman of the parliamentary committee for Food and Agriculture, Alois Gerig, MP, congratulated the association for 100 years bed-feather industry in good as well as in difficult times. He praised the dialogue orientation of the association with politics, associations and animal welfare organizations and underlined the readiness to continue the talks: "Only when politics and people talk, one can achieve positives together."
 
The chairman of the association, Friedrich-Wilhelm Verse, took in his lecture the audience on to an exciting journey through the time: The cradle of today’s VDFI stood 1915 in Berlin. In a cold, grim war winter full of heavy snowstorms, when heating materials were in short supply and a warming blanket could decide about life and death, Emperor Wilhelm II. committed himself personally in providing the population with down comforters during the war years through establishing a common organization of bedding manufacturers. Because during the wartime travel options were restricted and dangerous, two regional organizations were established in December 1915 – one in northern Germany and one in the south. In the privation postwar years both decided 1921 to merge to the Union of Bed-Feather Manufacturers. Until 1945 the development of uniform guidelines for descriptions of the goods at the bedding retailers took a large room – the RAL regulations became valid. With the development of the Nazi dictatorship a state allocation system on the issuing of import licenses for feathers and downs was constructed.
 
Weekly representatives of the bedding industry met with a representative of the surveillance office in Berlin to test the conformity with the import samples. Negotiations followed to enforce quotas and foreign exchange allocations and the distribution of import quotas for the German bedding manufacturers. At the beginning of World War II the association of the bedding manufacturers was renamed "War Community of Bed-feather Factories”. After World War II, in 1946, parallel with the British, the French and American occupation zone, three new regional organizations were established.
 
Verse drew the bow of the association history to the founding of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1949 and thus to the new working group of the German bedding industry, which was formed from the merger of the three regional associations. In the 50s the association activities shifted to fields of quality testing and promotional activities, inter alia mainly to position the proven products with natural filling materials feathers and downs against the new synthetic bedding materials. In particular, the emerging discussion about allergies, which began with house dust allergy, required scientific research and an information policy until it was assignable that down comforters and pillows are free of mites. The number of employees in the sector increased significantly - especially since the companies started to offer ready-made comforters and pillows to the trade. And the association became a new scope as an employers' organization.
 
In 1990, the working group got a new name: for the first time under the today’s familiar name VDFI - Association of the German Down and Feather Industry. In the same year it got to feel the consequences of the European integration. The European commission demanded that the EU member states should adapt and combine the labeling of the filling material downs and feathers with the European textile labelling directive. All necessary labeling regulations, product standards, test standards and definitions had to be renewed in and with all European countries. At this target the VDFI was intensively involved. And 10 years later in 2000 the EN 12934 replaced the RAL.
 
Parallel with the subjects of standardization animal protection took an ever greater room in the field of the association activities. 1995 VDFI initiated the first European agreement regulating the breeding of ducks and geese in agricultural livestock. After four years of intensive work with animal welfare organizations, scientists, and institutions the agreement was adopted and gradually taken into the national legislations. The next step for the member companies was the voluntary agreement to make the origin of the raw material traceable and to get it audited. Further steps are in preparation, so Verse, in order to get an evidence of ethical behavior at the sourcing of downs and feathers. The goal is a fully global traceable supply chain with ethically sourced downs and feathers.
 
Already before the event the VDFI took different actions to lead attention to the anniversary: These included an innovation competition - advertised for students of different disciplines to get the use of downs and feathers artistic, functional and thru marketing highlighted. Innovative ideas and approaches in using a natural, ecologically valuable commodity were awarded at Heimtextil 2016.
Next was an illustrated children's book about Oscar and the adventures with his down comforter: from the knight’s cloak over the flying carpet to the wigwam. The production costs were covered by all VDFI member companies, in addition 1 Euro per book went as a donation to the foundation Herzenswuensche e.V., a nationwide operating non-profit association, which realizes since 1992 seriously ill children and young people long held wishes. 70 volunteers and three full-time employees try with parents, doctors, therapists and the affected children to establish a close contact to find out what wish could give a child new courage and strength. A following spontaneous collection for the foundation Herzenswuensche yielded again around € 2,300, so that an amount of more than € 17,300 in total as "Motivation Help" became available.
 
The end of the evening the guests enjoyed at the Berlin Waterworks.
 
Vietnam´s Grament Industry experiences Investment Boom ©Beckmann Agency
12.04.2016

VIETNAM'S GARMENT INDUSTRY EXPERIENCES INVESTMENT BOOM

  • FTA attracts Manufacturers
  • Proportion of local added Value should rise

Hong Kong (gtai) - Vietnam is one of the main production sites of the clothing industry. Already in recent years the country had attracted buyers from around the world. In 2014 textiles and clothing shared 22% of the total merchandise exports. According to the state owned VINATX in 2015 Vietnam was the fourth largest apparel exporter in the world. The through the FTA with the EU and the Pacific neighbors expected growth requires investment in the supply industry.

  • FTA attracts Manufacturers
  • Proportion of local added Value should rise

Hong Kong (gtai) - Vietnam is one of the main production sites of the clothing industry. Already in recent years the country had attracted buyers from around the world. In 2014 textiles and clothing shared 22% of the total merchandise exports. According to the state owned VINATX in 2015 Vietnam was the fourth largest apparel exporter in the world. The through the FTA with the EU and the Pacific neighbors expected growth requires investment in the supply industry.

In 2015 the Vietnamese garment exports amounted to about USD 27 billion. Estimates of the Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (Vinatex) show they will increase by 8% in 2016. Nearly USD 30 billion of sector products would then be exported and assure Vietnam a ranking among the four largest exporting countries. The world market however is stagnating. The sector contributes nearly 10% to the industrial added value of the country, 2.5 million people are employed.

As the most important export market remains the United States. According to Vinatex the export to the US rose by 13% in 2015. The group dominates the textile production in the country, including companies like Garment 10, Phong Phu Textile and Garment Corporation, Viet Tien Garment and Hoa Tho Textile and Garment. Vinatex itself exported products worth of USD 3.5 billion, representing an increase of 10%.

TPP promises benefits

The sector has high hopes on the in February 2016 signed FTA Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), in which next to the USA, Japan and Vietnam and eleven Pacific Room states arranged added tariff reductions and improved market access. If the ratification process in all countries will be successful, the agreement would enter into force in February 2018. Analysts show that Vietnam would become one of the main winners, among others due to the lowest labor cost in comparison of all other involved countries. The agreement therefore is welcomed by the majority of the population.

Pre-products have to be imported

According to experts the competitiveness of Vietnam will be increased especially in the area of textiles and clothing. About 70% of the textile exports will be delivered to TPP member countries. Despite the annual growth rates of 15 to 20% the value adding in the country remained low. Imports of raw materials and accessories are high and totaled to USD 16.5 billion in 2015. 90% of the 5,028 textile factories in Vietnam (end of 2013) are apparel manufacturers, that mean sewing operations. By contrast there are just four cotton-processing and two synthetic fibers producing companies.   

Imports of textile industry (in USD million, annual change in %)
  2014 2015 Change
Cotton 1,443 1,623 12.5
Fibers 1,559 1,515 -2.8
Fabrics 9,428 10,197 8.2
Accessories 3,031 3,193 5.3
Total 15,461 16,528 6.9

Source: Vietnam Textile and Apparel Association (Vitas)

The sector is facing a challenge: TPP offers the free imports only if 55% of the value is provided in the member states. For the textile sector this is called the "Yarn Forward Rule", that means everything following the yarn. In Vietnam the proportion of the added value currently stands at 25%.

The text of the agreement is online available: (http://www.tpp.mfat.govt.nz/text). Chapter 4 deals with the textile and clothing sector and contains important annexes to the rules of origin. TPP is expected to attract investments into the country, as the value supply chain is incomplete: yarns and fabrics are mostly imported from East Asian countries.

Value adding rules require investment

Also the free trade agreement between the EU and Vietnam, agreed on August 4th 2015, should push the exchange of commodities. The share of the EU clothing imports from Vietnam is only 3%. Thus the country ranks as the sixth supplier. In the United States, Japan and South Korea Vietnam, however, is the second largest clothing supplier.

Following ratification of TPP an abolishment of 99% of all tariffs would follow.  Textiles from Vietnam would then be duty-free within a maximum period of seven years. For that TPP
defines clear rules of origin: (http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/press/index.cfm?id=1437).

If investments would flow into the country and strengthen the supply chain, the value of clothing exports from Vietnam could be doubled until 2020 - so bold estimates.   Then the annual production of yarns should reach 2 million tons, the amount of fabrics 2 billion square meters and that of clothing 6 billion pieces. Following the Vietnam Textile and Apparel Association (VITAS)  the export value then should be between USD 45 to 50 billion. This requires new textile machinery. So far, mainly Chinese products were in demand, but also for German suppliers the opportunities emerge.

Production capacity of the Vietnamese textile industry
Sector Annual capacity
Cotton ginning (1,000 t) 70
Synthetic fibers (1,000 t) 400
Filament yarn (1,000 t) 182
Spinning (1,000 t) 900
Weaving (Mio. m²) 800
Knitting (1,000 t) 110
Nonwovens (1,000 t) 16
Dyeing and finishing (Mio. m²) 1200
Toweling (1,000 t) 62
Clothing(Mio. Stück)  4000

Source: Vitas

However, many sector representatives in Vietnam see TPP also critical, because by the agreement large new market participants could intensify competition. The small and medium companies are hardly competitive due to their outdated technology, lack of capital and low know-how. They demand government aid in the form of tax breaks and subsidies for land. The Bank for Investment and Development of Vietnam has already provided USD 2 billion for the support of the industry for the next five years.    

Investment in regional centers

Large investments are happening already now: The TAL Group from Hong Kong, one of the largest owner-managed apparel producers, has invested USD 600 million in factories in the Dai An Industry Zone in Hai Duong Province, especially for yarn dyeing and finishing. Haputex Development, which is also from Hong Kong, has built with up to USD 120 million in the province of Binh Duong on a twelve hectare site a Weaving mill which should go into operation 2016.  There also the South Korean company Kyungbang is building a spinning mill for USD 40 million. The Texhong Textile and Garment Group is building with USD 300 million a yarn factory in Quang Ninh. And in Nam Dinh the Yulun Jiangsu Textile Group, a state-owned company from China, is building with USD 68 million a factory for the manufacturing and dyeing of yarn.

Investments are mainly attracted by the regions Ninh Binh, Hue, Binh Duong and Ham Dinh, as well as the cost favorable  Mekong Delta. New target regions are at the borders with Laos and Cambodia, such as the area Tay Nguyen. As the largest Vietnamese group also Vinatex invests in new capacities and announces in convincing interviews to reach by 2020 a local added value part of 65% in final finished products.

Target markets of Vietnamese apparel exports (in USD million, annual change in %)
  2014 2015 Change
USA 9.841 10.984 11,6
EU 2.261 3.325 47,1
Japan 2.092 2.163 3,4
Korea (Rep.) 2.092 2.163 3,4
Total 24.692 27.021 9,4

Source: Vietnam Textile and Apparel Association (VITAS)

Contact address:
Vietnam Textile and Apparel Association (VITAS)
2nd Floor, 32 Trang Tien Str., Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel.: 0084 4/39 36 41 34; Fax: -39 34 98 42
Email: info@vietnamtextile.org.vn; Internet: http://www.vietnamtextile.org.vn

Supply chains in Asia are in motion © Tokamuwi/ pixelio.de
08.03.2016

SUPPLY CHAINS IN ASIA ARE IN MOTION

  • Vietnam is largest beneficiary
  • Relocation closer to sales markets

Hong Kong (gtai) - For global consumer product manufacturers, Asia has developed an important role as a procurement region. Large parts of production have been displaced in recent decades into the region and here traditionally mainly to China. The rising costs in China however lead to a strategy adjustment. Thus the production moved on to cheaper locations and a shift back closer to the end customer began. Free trade arrangements support this trend.

  • Vietnam is largest beneficiary
  • Relocation closer to sales markets

Hong Kong (gtai) - For global consumer product manufacturers, Asia has developed an important role as a procurement region. Large parts of production have been displaced in recent decades into the region and here traditionally mainly to China. The rising costs in China however lead to a strategy adjustment. Thus the production moved on to cheaper locations and a shift back closer to the end customer began. Free trade arrangements support this trend.

Labor costs in China will not move down again. Even when the economic growth increasingly weakens, China's coastal regions are already often too expensive for wage-intensive productions. The world's largest location of the manufacturing sector will anyway leave its dependence of exports and will generate more growth through domestic consumption. The remaining companies are therefore increasingly focused on Chinese customers. Has the textile industry heard the signals already several years ago and shifted away, now the electronics companies have started to search.

But – the relocation of production is not so easy, the experts agreed upon at the discussion panel Shifting Supply Chains in Asia on the Asian Financial Forum (AFF) in Hong Kong. Because no country, except India, offers such a workforce. But neither the infrastructure and the investment climate can match, nor the country has any interest in low-production stages. Furthermore China has set up a supply industry without any comparison.

Relocation trends slow down

Even Bangladesh, established for a long time as a cheap location for clothes, is losing its attractiveness - experts say. Besides fundamentally difficult production conditions especially scandals like collapsing factories are responsible. No western clothing manufacturer likes to be associated with that repute today. While Indonesia was generally judged for being rather little investment friendly, the Philippines would provide a better reputation than years ago. So in addition to numerous Japanese producers also German companies have moved from southern China to the special areas of the Philippines.

Due to wage cost increases by an average of 15% per year, China with it’s the low-wage area has catapulted itself in a large extent out of the market. In times of rising productivity this was compensated for a while but at last the model came to its limits. The empire of the middle will therefore make the leap to a consumptionbased growth based on production of high-tech and on the provision of services. It is still
unclear whether this leap across the "middleincome trap" will succeed. Many emerging countries are caught in this trap, and the growth is flagging.

German buyers order less in China

Accordingly German retailers are increasingly reducing their imports from China and buy more and more in other countries. This is the result of a member survey of the Foreign Trade Association of German Retailers (AVE), at which for the most part textile and shoe retailers participated. 80% of the respondents have already reduced their import volume from China in 2015, 90% of the companies said they are
planning to source from other supply regions. The merchants are seeing a shift to countries like Myanmar (78%), Bangladesh (67%) and Vietnam (56%).

Vietnam, which already benefited in recent years from the relocation, was still recommended on the AFF as a top location. The country with the highest economic growth in Southeast Asia in 2015 would have risen in the 1st half of 2015 to the fourth-largest exporter of textiles, the Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (Vinatex) analyzed. For shoes it is already the third largest supplier worldwide. Based on mega investments from Samsung, now the electronics industry came out of the starting blocks and should attract more activities. Experts cite especially the mixture of young, growing populations with low labor costs as an important locational advantage.

Vietnam benefits from Free Trade Agreements (FTA)

A thrust Vietnam's attractiveness currently receives through free trade agreements which are in a final stage. So a free trade agreement with the European Union was signed in December 2015 which was followed early February 2016 by the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP). The latter agreement, which includes next to ten other Pacific neighbors the United States, should bring a large benefit for Vietnam. For the Vietnamese consumer goods manufacturers the US is the most important market, the large retailers in the United States can move their procurements very fast.

As an underdeveloped member Vietnam is likely to get larger portions of the value chain in the textile and electronics area at the ratification (and even before). The country is still missing a developed supplier structure. This is just happening to be built in the textile sector, there are investments in capacity for yarns, fabrics and dyeing going on. For Samsung, the largest foreign investor, all components are still coming
from China. And only when a large proportion of the added value comes from TPP member states, the low duty will become applicable.

While the purchasing power is not quite so big in Europe, costs play an important role also there. But next to it the control of the supply chain and the flexibility has developed a greater role, rapid changes of trends and collections are determined by customers and the Internet. Therefore also here a shift back, closer to the markets, has begun. Romania and Bulgaria have established themselves in the middle of
Europe as a "low-wage locations". But even there the population is characterized by aging. Accordingly labor forces will become scare and wages will rise. Ukraine is traded as a new location.

Africa still with small potential

Little potential the experts from the Supply Chain Panels evidence the location of sub-Saharan Africa. This was tested by some buyers or producers, but the results would not be convincing. The views however diverge. Some Chinese companies are already partly on site and American manufacturers are monitoring the further development. So, for example, the VF Corporation, the largest denim retailer in the world, is buying in Africa. Only Ethiopia would have potential - according to a representative. But the infrastructure, investment climate and working morale could not be comparable.

So - basically serious alternatives to the established locations are lacking. Therefore, due to the scarcity of labor, costs and thus the final prices will rise. Even in Vietnam the minimum wage increased by 15% in 2015. But when it will be hardly possible to turn at the purchase screw, the companies need to position themselves better in marketing and sales, so a large clothing buyer. Therefore social media must be used in order to come closer to the customer and, for example, to develop individualization as a selling point.

The buying hotspots for clothes for the upcoming years (survey early 2015)
Country Named among the Top-3
Bangladesh 48%
Vietnam 33%
India 30%
Myanmar 30%
Turkey 30%
PR China 23%
Ethiopia 13%
Indonesia 10%
Egypt 5%
Sri Lanka 5%
Tunesia 5%

Source: McKinsey survey of chief purchasing managers