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Wanted: Start-ups with innovations for textile care © Photo: Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH / Jens Liebchen
09.02.2021

Wanted: Start-ups with innovations for textile care

From 24-hour deliveries, status tracking and green packaging to textile recycling and innovative cleaning technology: new services have the potential to revolutionise the business of dry cleaners and laundries. Against this background, Messe Frankfurt invites start-ups to present their products and ideas at Texcare International. The world’s most important event for the textile-care sector in Frankfurt am Main from 27 November to 1 December 2021 offers young entrepreneurs outstanding opportunities to draw the market’s attention to their innovations.

From 24-hour deliveries, status tracking and green packaging to textile recycling and innovative cleaning technology: new services have the potential to revolutionise the business of dry cleaners and laundries. Against this background, Messe Frankfurt invites start-ups to present their products and ideas at Texcare International. The world’s most important event for the textile-care sector in Frankfurt am Main from 27 November to 1 December 2021 offers young entrepreneurs outstanding opportunities to draw the market’s attention to their innovations.

The demands placed by both private and commercial customers on textile care are extremely high, especially in terms of speed, immediate availability, transparent communication and sustainable solutions. In this connection, Johannes Schmid-Wiedersheim, Director of Texcare International at Messe Frankfurt, says, “Start-ups have an important role to play when it comes to promoting digitalisation and sustainability in the world of textile care. In many cases, they succeed quickly in transforming the results of scientific research or trends from other sectors into useful projects. To support this, we want specifically to promote young, agile companies at Texcare International and offer them an attractive ‘Start-up Package’.”

Digital platforms offer dry cleaners and laundries an opportunity to promote their services online in a modern way. Summarising what makes these platforms so important, Daniel Dalkowski, Managing Director of the European Research Association for Innovative Textile Care (EFIT), says, “Digital platforms are undoubtedly one of the most important achievements of recent times – not just because there are so many of them but also because they have found imitators in the sector. In this case, the innovation is to be seen in a combination of ordering, flexible logistics and billing in a smartphone app or online platform.”

With their robotics solutions and bright ideas for artificial intelligence, IT start-ups help textile care companies on their way to becoming smart laundries. Elgar Straub, Managing Director, VDMA Textile Care, Fabric and Leather Technologies, explains how machine and plant manufacturers have benefited from their input: “In the field of mechanical engineering, an important role is played by start-ups offering technical solutions covering a broad spectrum of sectors, e.g., virtual machine commissioning and the optimisation of production process chains.”

Naturally, company founders in other disciplines are also putting forward their ideas. Against the background of the plastic waste debate, there are, for instance, numerous start-ups offering biodegradable packaging materials. As well, there are start-ups in the field of textile recycling, which process used workwear or laundry and thus contribute to the circular economy. And what does the future hold for the sector? One thing is for the experts certain: artificial intelligence and automation offer a great potential for ‘outsiders’ with genuine innovations to gain a foothold in the market. Improvements in the logistics chain of laundries and dry cleaners also have excellent chances of success.

Market entry at Texcare International Texcare
International from 27 November to 1 December 2021 offers start-ups an outstanding opportunity to draw attention to their services and to make contact with established companies. The Start-up Package of Messe Frankfurt includes a turnkey exhibition stand.

The prerequisites for participation:

  • The company was founded no more than ten years ago per 27 November 2021
  • The company employs max. ten people.
  • The annual turnover does not exceed € 1 million (net).
  • The start-up offers innovative products or services especially for the textile-care sector.

The product spectrum of Texcare International embraces machines and plant, laundry and cleaning substances, IT and logistics solutions and workwear and laundry.

More information:
texcare Startup Start-ups
Source:

Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH

Photo: Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH / Jens Liebchen
25.02.2020

AUTOMATION PROGRESSES ALONG THE LAUNDRY SECTOR

The productivity of a laundry depends on unbroken process flows and transparent commodity streams. Thanks to increasing digitalisation and consistent integration of data, the through-put of textiles in laundries is being continually improved. The solutions required for automation in the sector are therefore a high priority at Texcare International, from 20 to 24 June in Frankfurt am Main.
 

The productivity of a laundry depends on unbroken process flows and transparent commodity streams. Thanks to increasing digitalisation and consistent integration of data, the through-put of textiles in laundries is being continually improved. The solutions required for automation in the sector are therefore a high priority at Texcare International, from 20 to 24 June in Frankfurt am Main.
 
The be-all and end-all for the laundry sector is the ability to monitor the quantity, quality and storage location of the textiles that are circulating on site, at all times. The data collected form the basis for precise price calculations, throw up any weak points in the system and serve to provide documentation for third parties. But it is only when all the machinery and plant involved in a given textile service are interlinked on a single network that the logistics of the laundry service run seamlessly, with minimal down-time of the machinery, reduced quantities in circulation and the resultant increase in productivity that is closely associated with it.

Transparent tracking for each individual laundry item
Automation in the processing of workwear is already well advanced. As the dirty laundry is sorted on arrival, each item is recorded using an identification system such as a barcode or RFID technology. From this moment on, all the stages that the textiles undergo are controlled. ‘Readers’ or ‘gates’ on the premises enable each item to be recorded as it progresses through the system, right up to the point of order picking; and they monitor whether an item is sent to a repair station or directed into storage. In addition, high-frequency transponders (UHF tags) can monitor the movements of laundry items outside of the laundry: in hospitals, for instance, identification systems have been installed, which record the despatch and return of apparel and enable an extensive process of textile management via data transfer procedures.

Robots for the soiled laundry area
This already high degree of automation in a workwear laundry facility is, however, capable of still further refinement. Artificial intelligence can simplify the ‘dirty’ work in the reception area: robots separate and sort the soiled clothing and x-ray machines, cameras and metal detectors are used to identify any foreign bodies. The advantages of such systems are particularly in evidence in hospital laundries: medical instruments, which regularly find their way into the laundry bags, are automatically separated from the clothing, thus minimising damage to the items themselves and to the machinery. The useful life of the textiles is extended and costs are reduced. Moreover, there is no danger of infection for the staff.

Real-time laundry processes
Whilst individual control and traceability are already widespread in the professional treatment of work apparel, when it comes to flat linen, often only generalisations about quantity, quality and storage location for the textiles are possible. “In order to assess a business’s efficiency, calculate prices and efficiently control processes and procedures, laundries need reliable figures […],” observes Martin Rauch, CSO of the Jensen Group, who operate on a worldwide basis.

In the pursuit of automated production, ultra-modern information and communications technologies assume a key role. They synchronise the machines involved in a given production process and facilitate communication and cooperation between plant, product and the human being. This way, you get self-organising, flexible production with unbroken processes and high levels of utilisation of equipment. With the synchronisation of commodity streams and information flow in the laundry, all items arrive at the right processing station at the appropriate time. A central database controls all the processes in the entire laundry, regulates the machinery and the linked sub-systems, chooses the correct processing programmes and optimises machine use.
 
Data accompanies the laundry throughout
“Trolleys of laundry standing around, waiting times at the machines, excessive buffering and time spent searching for items are all lost capital […],” says Matthias Schäfer, who is responsible for product management, laundry logistics / smart laundry at Kannengiesser (Vlotho).

When data and goods flows are successfully synchronised throughout a flat-linen laundry, each washing station contributes its information along with that of other stations, right from the initial sorting of the soiled linen through to the folding machines. The laundry can, therefore, be monitored throughout the entire operation, as the information from each station is sent on with the item, either automatically or – after the drier – in the form of bar-coded labels. (“Stabilisation of production through the synchronisation of material and production flows.”)

RFID identification systems do indeed enable complete transparency to be built into the passage of goods through the various stages, as each chip or tag carries the necessary information for each individual item. In view of the high cost of the transponders, ‘chipping’ of flat linen is, however, currently an option for only very few laundries. So the textile care sector is waiting on more economical, more functionally reliable solutions from the machinery and plant manufacturers.
 
Smart to the very end of the chain
Further potential for automation resides in the picking and packaging. Collecting together items for delivery manually is subject to error and that leads to customer complaints. With intelligent storage facilities and transport solutions, smart stacking management and the networking of equipment with the laundry’s information system, order picking becomes simpler, quicker and more reliable. To ensure that the integration can function, modern machines are equipped with interfaces, so that each new installation can be linked seamlessly into a laundry’s existing system. The same goes for accessory machines, which exchange all the important information relating to preparation and repair online.

User friendly apps
Digital developments are not only large scale: they are to be found on a smaller scale as well. For launderettes, too, apps provide important information on the status of the equipment, enable operators to see what is going on, even at considerable distances, as well as being able to provide digital payment models. Moreover, in heavily used laundry facilities, they can take on the entire job of time management, as Andreas Barduna, Head of Business Management, Miele Professional (Gütersloh) is very aware.

At Texcare International, from 20 to 24 June 2020, machinery and plant manufacturers from all over the world will be presenting their smart solutions for the laundries of tomorrow. The focus will be very much on artificial intelligence and smart information systems, which will help maximize the degree of automation within the sector.

TV TecSTyle Visions proved its status as a leading trade fair of the European textile decoration industry in an impressive way. (c) Messe Stuttgart
11.02.2020

TV TECSTYLE VISIONS: IMPRESSIVE CONFIRMATION OF STATUS AS LEADING TRADE FAIR

  • High internationality and excellent visitor quality ensure top ra-tings

The trade fair combination for visual communication and haptic adver-tising, EXPO 4.0, was an impressive event with 421 exhibitors and 12,518 visitors held from 30 January to 1 February 2020 in Stuttgart:

  • High internationality and excellent visitor quality ensure top ra-tings

The trade fair combination for visual communication and haptic adver-tising, EXPO 4.0, was an impressive event with 421 exhibitors and 12,518 visitors held from 30 January to 1 February 2020 in Stuttgart:
TV TecStyle Visions, trade fair for textile decoration and promotion, enriched the trade fair combination with a top-class exhibitor offering, high internationality and an accompanying programme characterised by innovations and know-how transfer. It proved its status as a leading trade fair for the European textile decoration industry in an impressive way: 262 exhibitors, including all relevant companies from the exhibition segments textiles and technology, mark the importance as a European industry get-together every two years in Stuttgart. The leading trade fair confronts the uncertain European market situation and uncertainties in trade, the number of exhibitors remained almost constant compared to the previous event (2018: 270). The 126 international exhibitors came from 21 countries to Stuttgart. The top 5 countries of origin are Germany, Great Britain, Spain, Poland and Italy.
 
Many decision-makers from the Germany/Austria/Switzerland region
Within the framework of TV TecStyle Visions the visitors were particularly interested in the different printing processes, embroidery and textiles. The EXPO 4.0 trade fair combination attracted 17 per cent international visitors from 50 countries to Stuttgart. The appeal of the leading European trade fair is manifested with the top visitor countries Switzerland and Austria. 35 percent of all visitors to TV TecStyle Visions travelled more than 300 kilometres to Stuttgart.

The quality of the visitors has been a reliable constant for years: four out of five visitors are actively involved in purchasing and procurement decisions, 87 percent have concrete intentions to invest and 84 percent of the visitors want to invest in the next 12 months. An overall rating of the trade fair combination of 2.0 ("good") and a return visit rate for 4 out of 5 visitors highlight the positive synergy effects created by the parallel timing of the three trade fairs in the trade fair combination EXPO 4.0. This is also reflected in the amount of time visitors spend at the event - on average 4.8 hours at the three trade fairs.
 
Comprehensive accompanying programme
Apart from the exhibition offering, TV TecStyle Visions has been convincing for years with a comprehensive accompanying programme. Not only real innovations and trends that move the industry are showcased at the stands. At this year's trade fair the TecCheck Area acts as a look into the near future. In the digital microfactory nine companies demonstrated the possibilities of digitalisation in production under the coordination of DITF (German Institutes for Textile and Fibre Research, Denkendorf). A polo-shirt was made in one hour, from the 3D design and conception, through to the printing, thermosetting, cutting and making-up of the garment. The trend topics of the industry and the degree of innovation were also shown in the forum, such as the option of personalisation and automation in textile finishing/textile decoration/garment decoration. The TecStyle Fashion Show, the forum and also Charlie's Corner gave visitors a platform to exchange information and ideas and for know-how transfer, as well as another presentation possibility for the exhibitors.
 
The next TV TecStyle Visions takes place in the EXPO 4.0 trade fair combination with WETEC and GiveADays in two years. The dates 10 to 12 February 2022 are currently reserved.

China Gerd Altmann, Pixabay
17.09.2019

FAIR MARKET CHINA

The People's Republic of China has experienced unprecedented economic growth since the late 1970s, with average double-digit growth rates. Over the past 10 years, the country has become the export world champion and holds the position as the second largest economy after the USA for almost as long. Along with the economic boom, modern China faces major challenges, including high wage increases, massive environmental problems and overcapacity in many industrial sectors.
 

The People's Republic of China has experienced unprecedented economic growth since the late 1970s, with average double-digit growth rates. Over the past 10 years, the country has become the export world champion and holds the position as the second largest economy after the USA for almost as long. Along with the economic boom, modern China faces major challenges, including high wage increases, massive environmental problems and overcapacity in many industrial sectors.
 
Unlike at the beginning of the opening policy more than 40 years ago, when foreign investors with the appropriate technology and know-how were targeted, China is now pursuing a strategy to strengthen the domestic market. With the support of the "Made in China 2025" decree adopted in 2015, the Middle Kingdom is to become one of the leading industrial nations in three ten-year programs by 2045. In doing so, the government is focusing on promoting innovation, increasing production efficiency, optimizing the industrial structure and "green" production. Key sectors such as robotics, medical technology, electromobility and modern agricultural technology are defined as particularly eligible. The development of Industry 4.0 is also of great importance.

Economic data 2018/2019* (estimates and forecasts)
GDP      USD 14,217 billion*
Population    1,395.4 billion
Exports    USD 2,487.4 billion
Exports to Germany EUR 106.3 billion
Imports USA 2,135.6 Mrd. billion
Imports from Germany EUR 93.1 billion 

    Source: GTAI, Ministry of Foreign Affairs    

China's regions have developed at different rates. Although the economically strong regions at the east and southeast coast of the country generate about half of the annual GDP, the areas in central and western China are recovering dynamically. With the "go-west" policy, since the turn of the millennium, the Chinese government has been increasingly working to promote and develop the western regions, increasing the attractiveness of the affected regions to foreign investment and business settlements. 

Another ambitious project is designed for decades: The “One Belt and One Road” initiative, i.e. the revival of the "Silk Road", which connects more than 60 states in Asia and Europe via land and water. Planned and already implemented billion investment in the construction of ports, railways and telecommunications equipment. Opportunities for German companies exist above all for providers of special equipment in rail, shipping, port and aviation technology. 
 
German-Chinese economic relations have developed very well in recent decades. At the beginning of 2014, the first Chinese Chamber of Commerce (CHKD) in Europe was founded in Berlin to promote the intensification of trade relations. Since 2011, Germany and China have been conducting regular government consultations that include comprehensive strategic partnerships.  

In 2018, German exports to China amounted to EUR 93 billion. Imports from China today amount to more than EUR 100 billion. With a trade volume of about EUR 200 billion in 2018, Germany is by far China's most important European trading partner. For Germany, the People's Republic of China is again the most important trading partner in Asia and the third most important worldwide. The main products supplied to China are machinery, motor vehicles and automotive parts, electrical engineering and chemical products. Around 5,200 German companies are based in China; around 900 Chinese companies have settled in Germany. 
          
Trade Fair Industry
Although China's economy is slowing, the world's second-largest economy continues to grow. Investments worth billions in infrastructure, housing, climate and environmental protection, combined with the construction and expansion of trade fair venues, have made China the most important trade fair venue in Asia, and this position is undisputed. Especially in cities such as Beijing and Shanghai, the professionalism of the trade fair organizers is high, above all because of the numerous international cooperation. 
 
The fairs in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou continue to characterize the Chinese fair landscape. Beijing as an important trade fair location is characterized by its proximity to political decision-makers and the extensive expansion of infrastructure. The majority of the major trade fairs take place in Shanghai and the concentration of international organizers is high.  

The increased reorientation of the Chinese economy on the domestic market also influences the further development of the Chinese trade fair landscape, as the exhibition industry is increasingly turning to the service sector, digitization, automation, health, education and high-quality consumption.  

The "New Silk Road" project also has a major influence on the Chinese trade fair industry: Chinese organizers are increasingly conducting trade fairs and trade fair participations in countries that are to be linked via the Silk Road. In 2018, 76 trade fair organizers were involved in 718 trade fairs in 33 countries, an increase of around 14% compared to the previous year. Most of the fairs were classified as multi-sector and machine-building exhibitions. With an increase of 19% compared to the previous year, the majority of the exhibition-related projects were realized in Russia.

Country Number of Fairs Exhibitors from China
Russia 132 3,870
India 89 3,129
United Arab Emirates 82 3,906
Turkey 30 1,728
Thailand 47 1,641

Since 2015, the Chinese State Council has been pursuing the strategy of making the domestic trade fair industry more international and transparent by 2020. For example, the approval of new trade fairs is to be gradually decentralized and responsibility transferred to the provinces. There is a noticeable professionalization of trade fairs outside the traditional trade fair locations of Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou. In addition, China has developed into the world's largest e-commerce market, i.e. online platforms are used as distribution channels for products. This development is also increasingly affecting trade fairs as a marketing instrument, as traditional aspects of trade fairs are virtualized.   
 
The main problem for the Chinese trade fair industry remains the great complexity of the Chinese trade fair market with its many trade fair offerings, which vary greatly in terms of quality. In addition, the "Go West" strategy of the Chinese government to promote and develop the western regions has resulted in a large number of trade fair centers that are often not profitable due to their low capacity utilization. In 2018, for example, around 9.83 million m2 of exhibition space is said to have been available in 164 exhibition centers in China. More than half of the exhibition grounds had a utilization rate of less than 10%. The competition between trade fair locations for trade show themes and thus exhibitors and visitors lead to overlapping themes and schedules. Sufficient information or independently collected data on space utilization, exhibitor and visitor numbers are scarce and make it difficult for everyone involved to make the right trade fair selection.

Trade fair cities and exhibition venues
In China, many large exhibition centers have been built during the last 10 years. In 2018, 164 exhibition centers with a hall area capacity of 9.83 million m² were counted. That were 11 exhibition centers or 480,000 m² more than in 2017. Shanghai is the most important exhibition hub in the country - two of the largest exhibition centers are located here.

The 10 largest fairgrounds in China (more than 100,000 m²)
Venue     Gross hall size in m²
National Exh. & Conv. Ctr (NECC), Shanghai 400,000
China Import & Export Fair Complex, Guangzhou 338,000
Kunming Dianchi Intern. Conv. & Exh. Centre 300,000
Western China International Expo City, Chengdu 205,000
Chongqing International Expo Centre 200,000
Shanghai New International Expo Centre (SNIEC) 200,000
Wuhan International Expo Centre 150,000
Nanchang Greenland International Expo Center 140,000
Xiamen International Conference & Exhibition Center 140,000
GD Modern International Exhibition Center, Houjie 130,000

Additional fairgrounds were built over the last years e.g.in the provinces Shandong and Guangdong. With a covered exhibition area of 1.54 million m2 spread over 21 fair grounds the southern province Guangdong takes the top position in China.

German Engagement
In a comparison of countries, the People's Republic of China takes first place concerning German trade fair organizers’ self-organized events abroad. The concepts of these events are based on the standards of leading international trade fairs in Germany. Almost all major German trade fair organizers are active in China. By far the most attractive market is the economic metropolis of Shanghai.

Outside the leading trade fair cities of Shanghai, Beijing and Guangzhou, German organizers are active in Chengdu, Changsha, Foshan, Nanjing, Shenzhen, Wuhan, Qingdao and Xian. 

Year Number GTQ** China (without Hongkong) Shanghai
2019* 324 86 51
2018 321 88 51
2017 300 83 50
2016 296 84 49
2015 295 84 49

* preliminary
**Self-organized events by German trade fair organizers are advertised by AUMA with the label "German Trade Fair Quality Abroad" (GTQ). 
Source: AUMA database
 
Foeign Trade Fair Program 
In the PRC, German companies can present themselves at numerous well-established trade fairs under the umbrella brand "made in Germany" within the Foreign Trade Fair Program. The trade fair participations in the form of German Pavilions cover a large part of the capital goods sector, such as mechanical engineering, food and packaging machinery, automotive supply industry, plumbing, heating, air conditioning, agricultural technology, health care to chemical and environmental engineering. But also, furniture, fashion and consumer goods fairs have been an important part of the program for many years. China is the most important trade fair venue for German companies within the Foreign Trade Fair Program, with Shanghai remaining by far the most important trade fair location.

Contacts
Delegation of German Industry and Commerce Beijing
E-Mail: info@bj.china.ahk.de 
Homepage: http://www.china.ahk.de

Delegation of German Industry and Commerce Shanghai
E-Mail: office@sh.china.ahk.de  
Homepage: http://www.china.ahk.de

Delegation of German Industry and Commerce Guangzhou
E-Mail: info@gz.china.ahk.de  
Homepage: http://www.china.ahk.de

Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany
E-Mail: embassy@peki.diplo.de  
Homepage: http://www.peking.diplo.de

AUMA e.V.
Natalja Winges
Manager
Regions: Eastern Europe, Central and East Asia
Tel.: +49 30 24 000 124 Fax: +49 30 24 000 320
E-Mail: n.winges@auma.de

More information:
China trade fairs
Source:

AUMA Association of the German Trade Fair Industry

Copyright photos: MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt
06.08.2019

DIGITEX SHOW 2019 GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER MILESTONE

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

The 4th edition of the Show is gearing up incorporating DIGITEX Show highlighting the developments and innovations taking place in the digital textile printing technology, which is eventually picking up fast in the apparel manufacturing industry across the country. More than 20,000 enthusiastic visitors are expected to witness the latest developments during the three days of extreme business activities. They would not only take a glimpse of what new has hit the turf in the digital textile printing, but will also experience the newest technologies through various live demonstrations that the leading brands catering to the solution for soft signage and sublimation printing would put on the display.

The transformation in digital technologies over the past few years has been tremendous, which the organisers found important to bring forth under the DIGITEX @ Gartex Texprocess 2019. The advancement in technologies and rapidly increasing awareness has brought it at a revolution of sorts. Digitex hopes to become a one-stop solution hub for the latest machinery, inks, software and services to serious buyers and decision makers of the digital textile printing industry. The Show would also witness renowned brands offering live demo of their respective machines to let the visitors feel and appreciate the development taking place in the fabric digital printing arena which is slowly but steadily picking up.

Ever since direct to garment (DTG) printing has been introduced, textile printing industry has started finding new horizons with a fast and flexible production solution that delivers exceptional image quality, which in turn is opening up new doors of opportunities for those who are willing to enter into the apparel industry or are eager to expand their garmenting & textile business. Digitex @ Gartex Texprocess India is an important event for the digital printing technology leaders as it offers them the perfect Launchpad as far as Indian market is concerned.

Moreover, experts feel that increasing thrust and resultant R&D investment in progression of digital textile printing technology will further boost the growth avenues for the digital textile industry in near future. Meanwhile, increasing popularity of polyester as an alternative to cotton as a textile fabric further creates opportunities for digital textile printing equipment providers to expand their business. Attributing to such significant demand for digital textile printing technology, there is scope for manufacturers to enhance their business in time to come.

Many leading names like ColorJet India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Apsom Technologies, Kornit Digital, True Colors Group, Epson India, Jaysynth Dyestuff (India) Ltd., etc. are lined up with their new arrivals and eagerly awaiting the Show dates to launch their latest printers. Featuring continuous production and a wide range of printing capabilities, most of these new age digital textile printers work on minimal maintenance and come with easy cleaning options for smooth operation. All these activities clearly evince that overall textile printing technology market has positive growth prospects, riding on the back of the country’s burgeoning textile industry.

Companies like Arrow Digital, AT Inks, Britomatics, Cosmic Trends, DCC Print Vision Llp, E.I.DuPont India Pvt. Ltd. Electronics For Imaging India Pvt. Ltd. (Efi Optitex), Epson India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Ganpati Graphics, Grafica Flextronica, Green Printing Solution, Green Tech, Hi Tech Marketing, HP India Sales Pvt. Ltd., Jay Chemicals Industries Ltd., JN Arora & Co., Kamal Sales Corp., KNR Technology Company, Mac Printing Solutions, Mouvent, Negi Sign Systems & Supplies Co., Orange O Technology Pvt. Ltd., Somya Digital Technologies, Spintex Pvt. Ltd./Aura, Tanya Enterprises, Texzium International Pvt. Ltd./Wenli, Veekay Enterprises, & many more are coming up with their technological innovations to showcase their latest product range under the DIGITEX.
 
The extensive exhibit profile ranging from new printers and inks to upcoming techniques will explore new and exciting opportunities offered by digital printing for home furnishing & interior decoration, apparel & fashion and corporate interiors. On the display will be digital textile machinery, digital textile printing machines, dye sublimation process, screen printing machines, t-shirt printing machines, transfer printing process, digital textile printing chemicals, digital textile printing inks (disperse, reactive and pigment inks), heat transfer machines, sublimation paper, software & many more.

Moreover, it’s a great opportunity for digital printing companies, signage industry stakeholders, screen printing industry people from graphic arts industry, merchandisers and other industry players to interact with the leading digital printing technology suppliers and to witness the latest range and innovations in the sector. This is because following the advent of digital printing solution, the applications of fabric or textile is not limited only to the clothing and home furnishing, but has gone far beyond to include signage, flags, posters, back-lit, front-lit, etc. to bring forth a wholesome idea that where all digital textile printing technology can be used.

Points to be noted are numerous benefits of soft signage. Textile or soft signage presses are very eco-friendly, run over water-based inks with little to no odour and low power consumption. Soft signage facilitates customers save on shipping because of being much lighter in weight than other materials used in the signage and graphics industry. Also, fabric-printed signs fold up to create smaller packages, again decreasing shipping costs. But overall, the Show would be a win-win for business visitors as it has much more than focusing on digital printing technology, bringing entire value chain of garmenting and textile printing manufacturing solution under one roof.

Organised by the MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. in association with Messe Frankfurt India, Gartex Texprocess, this year, will have three more shows apart from the Digitex. These are namely, FABRIC & TRIMS SHOW: A focused area to source all embellishments & fabrics, DENIM SHOW: A zone that aims to bring together the denim supply chain under one roof, and INDIA LAUNDRY SHOW: An ideal platform offering a wide range of business and networking opportunities to manufacturers, suppliers and service providers in the laundry and dry-cleaning industries.

Additionally, there are a couple of focus areas i.e., EMBROIDERY ZONE highlighting the significant evolution that has been taking place in the invention of new technologies and machinery for embroidery. The top variants of embroidery machines, software & allied products will be highlighted in this dedicated segment. Another focus area is GARMENTING & APPAREL MACHINERY that would showcase technological developments in the Garment & Apparel Manufacturing Sector.

Broad exhibit categories at Gartex Texprocess 2019 include embroidery machines, cutting and sewing machines, fabrics & accessories, needles & threads, laundry & washing equipment, finishing equipment, laser cutting machines, digital textile printing machines, automation and software.

Source:

MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt

Composites Europe 2019 (c) Photos: Reed Exhibitions/ Oliver Wachenfeld
30.07.2019

COMPOSITES EUROPE 2019: Digital Process Chain makes Fibre Composites Competitive

  • Strong Triple: COMPOSITES EUROPE, International Composites Conference and Lightweight Technologies Forum
  • “Process live” special areas showcase technological progress
  • Co-located event: Foam Expo Europe

The composites industry provides important impetus – for lightweight construction and material innovations in automotive, aviation, mechanical engineering, construction, wind power as well as in the sports and leisure sectors. So in international competition it is solutions with a high degree of automation that are in demand. COMPOSITES EUROPE from 10 to 12 September will present the trends and advances in the production and processing of fibre-reinforced plastics in Stuttgart. The trade fair will be accompanied by the International Composites Conference and the Lightweight Technologies Forum. Also held in parallel at the Messe Stuttgart premises will be Foam Expo Europe.

  • Strong Triple: COMPOSITES EUROPE, International Composites Conference and Lightweight Technologies Forum
  • “Process live” special areas showcase technological progress
  • Co-located event: Foam Expo Europe

The composites industry provides important impetus – for lightweight construction and material innovations in automotive, aviation, mechanical engineering, construction, wind power as well as in the sports and leisure sectors. So in international competition it is solutions with a high degree of automation that are in demand. COMPOSITES EUROPE from 10 to 12 September will present the trends and advances in the production and processing of fibre-reinforced plastics in Stuttgart. The trade fair will be accompanied by the International Composites Conference and the Lightweight Technologies Forum. Also held in parallel at the Messe Stuttgart premises will be Foam Expo Europe.

Trade fair visitors will meet with over 300 exhibitors from 30 nations who will be displaying materials, technical solutions and innovative application examples in Stuttgart. Apart from novel products the trade fair will place special emphasis on innovative process engineering. Visitors will learn about the state of play in serial production and new applications in the composites industry in the exhibition area as well as on numerous special areas, on themed guided tours, at the accompanying International Composites Conference and at the Lightweight Technologies Forum, which is dedicated to the trends in multi-material lightweight construction.

“Process live”: Technologies in Synergy
Perfectly coordinated processing and manufacturing processes will be centre stage at the “Process live” event. On shared exhibition space machinery and equipment manufacturers will exhibit their technologies in concert and – what’s more – in operation so as to show the different individual processes in a real context.  

On display, to name but one exhibit, is VAP®, the Vacuum Assisted Process patented by Airbus, which will be in the limelight in the Trans-Textil and Composyst special area. This process permits the one-step production of large-surface and geometrically complex components without an autoclave, which is why it is particularly suitable for structural components in aviation, wind power, shipbuilding, in rail and road transport, in machinery and device manufacturing as well as in architecture and in the leisure industry.

The “Process live” special area care of cutting specialists GUNNAR from Switzerland specifically targets the DACH region (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) with its small and medium-sized companies. Jointly with laser projection expert LAP and composites engineering expert SCHEURER Swiss, GUNNAR introduces a connected overall process that fuses modern machinery and software with specialists’ manual jobs. The point of departure here is an automated manufacturing process for sorted layer placement in small and medium quantities involving a certain degree of skilled labour.

Fibre composite specialist Hacotech will present CNC-controlled cutting processes and various finishing possibilities in cooperation with Aristo Graphic Systeme and Lavesan. Alongside cutting, production preparation and customised sizing, the production of dimensionally correct templates and the cutting and custom-sizing of composite materials and prepregs will be on show.

Cutting technology is also centre stage in the special area of Rebstock Consulting, Broetje-Automation and Zünd Systemtechnik, which will be taking part in “Process live” with “Automated Sorting and Kitting”.

Composite producer Saertex and chemical company Scott Bader will demonstrate the RTM process for producing and curing a laminate that complies with the highest fire protection requirements in as little as 1 hour.   

5th International Composites Conference (ICC)
Serial production, stable processes, new markets – the International Composites Conference (ICC) is set to inject a fresh breeze for innovations into the market and to this end brings together processors and users of fibre-reinforced plastics from all over Europe. For the first time, this renowned Conference will be held in parallel with COMPOSITES EUROPE. The lecture programme put together by the trade association Composites Germany and the trade fair will also move closer in terms of content.  

One of tomorrow’s cross-cutting themes keeping the entire industry on its toes are multi-material solutions in nearly all industrial applications. In the construction sector the Conference also deals with the rising use of carbon concrete. Process engineering will focus on processing thermoplastic materials for serial production and stable processes for thermoset plastic processing.  

The partner country of the Conference is the United Kingdom. Especially against the backdrop of the current Brexit debate the ICC aims to foster exchange among all European countries. After all, the UK is among the biggest producers of composites components in Europe.

Themed Tours on Digitalisation, Fibre Glass, Thermoplastics, Automotive and Wind Power
Guided tours and hands-on demonstrations in the exhibition halls complement the conference programme. Themed guided tours revolving around composites application, materials and markets guide trade fair visitors and congress delegates right to the stands of selected exhibitors, who will share with visitors their innovations in the fields of digitalisation of composites production, automotive manufacturing, building and construction, fibreglass, new mobility, thermoplastic materials and wind power.  

New ideas on special areas and joint stands
“Material and Production Technology” is the name of the new special area set up under the guidance of the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) of the RWTH Aachen University. In cooperation with other institutes such as the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) the IKV will place manufacturing technology centre stage at the trade fair. In particular, the special area will trace the path from scientific development to practical, industrial implementation.

Tomorrow’s automotive experts will also be given a separate forum: under the heading “Formula Student” students and trainees will present to visitors racing cars and bikes they have engineered.

Lightweight Technologies Forum: platform for multi-material lightweight construction
Lightweight construction remains a driver across the board for many developments in the composites sector. The Lightweight Technologies Forum (LTF) held as part of COMPOSITES EUROPE makes it clear how lightweight construction can be achieved in an economical and resource-efficient manner. This Forum views itself as a cross-industry and multi-material think tank where all parties involved can reflect on these new concepts.

To this end, the Forum in Stuttgart pools lightweight construction projects from automotive manufacturing, aviation and aerospace and mechanical engineering, to name but a few industries that serve as a driving force for many sectors with high demands made on materials, security and reliability.  

This year’s keynote speakers include Airbus Innovation Manager Peter Pirklbauer, lightweight construction expert Prof. Jörg Wellnitz (TU Ingolstadt), Dutch racing driver Jeroen Bleekemolen and lightweight construction, aviation and aerospace specialist Claus Georg Bayreuther (AMC). In their talks they will provide an overview of reference projects and novel manufacturing and joining technologies.  

Combining its own exhibition space with a lecture forum, the LTF demonstrates how glass-fibre reinforced plastics (GRP) and carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) leverage their strengths mixed with other materials in hybrid structural components. Exhibitors at the Forum and in the neighbouring Lightweight Area include “Leichtbau-Zentrum Sachsen” (Lightweight Construction Center Saxony), Chem-Trend, Gößl + Pfaff, Krempel, Mitsui Chemicals Europe, Leichtbau BW, the VDMA, Gustav Gerster, Potters Ballotini (UK), Yuho (Japan), Riba Composites (Italy) and Stamixco (Switzerland) as well as the journals Lightweight Design (Springer Fachmedien) and Automobil Industrie (Vogel Communications Group), to name but a few.

“Ultralight in Space”: market study on lightweight construction trends in the aerospace industry
The aerospace industry has always served as a pioneer for ultra-lightweight construction pushing many disciplines to their limits as a driver of innovation. The latest technical trends are currently under scrutiny via a market study carried out by consultancy Automotive Management Consulting (AMC) in cooperation with the Luxembourg-based aerospace OEM GRADEL. The results will be presented for the first time at the LTF in Stuttgart on 10 September.  

Presentation of the AVK Innovation Prize
Innovative products and applications in fibre-reinforced plastics, manufacturing processes and the latest insights from research and science, will again be recognised by the German trade association AVK – Industrievereinigung Verstärkte Kunststoffe e. V. with its renowned Innovation Prize. The winners will be announced as part of the trade fair on 10 September and the award-winning products and projects will be on display in a special area.

Presentation of the SMB-BMC Design Award
The European Alliance for SMC BMC will announce the winners of the SMC BMC Design Award 2019 – also on 10 September. The contest already held for the second time now, honours and promotes the design excellence of students or young design professionals who use SMC and BMC components (sheet and bulk moulding compounds) in their designs. This year saw sustainable mobility take centre stage as a theme.

COMPOSITES Night
The event to celebrate the midway point of the trade fair: the COMPOSITES Night at the end of the second trade fair day offers visitors and exhibitors additional opportunities for networking. Participants are in for buffets and live music at the Stage Palladium Theater in Stuttgart.

Matchmaking programme makes trade fair visit more efficient
Thanks to the complimentary networking & meeting platform “matchmaking” visitors and exhibitors can already reach out to contacts in the run-up to COMPOSITES EUROPE. Who is at the trade fair? Who has answers to your specific questions? Who can you team up with to turn new ideas into practice? The matchmaking platform allows you to “filter” and make direct appointments with potential cooperation partners by product category, industry, country, or company.

Career & Composites
With its career&composites stand COMPOSITES EUROPE targets students and graduates who can come here to establish contact with potential employers. On the special area the exhibitors present their companies to interested junior employees and attract attention to vacancies and career opportunities via a Job Wall.

Co-located with Foam Expo Europe
COMPOSITES EUROPE will be co-located with Foam Expo Europe for the first time. This trade fair covers the supply chain of technical foam production and presents moulded, rigid and soft foam solutions – from raw materials to equipment and machinery. The parallel exhibition dates generate special synergies for gaining an overview of lightweight construction materials for such shared applications as the automotive, aviation, construction and sports & leisure industries.

(c) Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
09.04.2019

Clothing Production in the Future

Individualisation, automation and digitalisation: micro-factories are the way forward for the future of clothing production and will be the main theme of Texprocess in Frankfurt am Main from 14 to 17 May 2019.

“Send your favourite design to the manufacturer today via an app and wear your individually designed, perfectly fitting trainers or shirt tomorrow.
It’s a long time since this was just a pipe dream for the future,” says Michael Jänecke, Director Brand Management Technical Textiles and Textile Processing at Messe Frankfurt. “Behind it, however, lies a host of complex processes, involving production, processing and logistics. Micro-factories, based on networked and integrated procedures, represent the progressive way of making textile processing quicker, more flexible and, because it is more local, also more sustainable; whilst, at the same time, producing personalised products.”

Individualisation, automation and digitalisation: micro-factories are the way forward for the future of clothing production and will be the main theme of Texprocess in Frankfurt am Main from 14 to 17 May 2019.

“Send your favourite design to the manufacturer today via an app and wear your individually designed, perfectly fitting trainers or shirt tomorrow.
It’s a long time since this was just a pipe dream for the future,” says Michael Jänecke, Director Brand Management Technical Textiles and Textile Processing at Messe Frankfurt. “Behind it, however, lies a host of complex processes, involving production, processing and logistics. Micro-factories, based on networked and integrated procedures, represent the progressive way of making textile processing quicker, more flexible and, because it is more local, also more sustainable; whilst, at the same time, producing personalised products.”

In a total of four micro-factories at the up-coming Texprocess, trade visitors will be able to get an idea of how integrated textile processing works and where micro-factories are already being used.


Digital Textile Micro-Factory: on-demand and virtual reality
Following the success of the last event, Texprocess, in collaboration with the German Institutes of Textile and Fibre Research in Denkendorf (Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf – DITF) and partners from industry, will once again be presenting a ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ display - and thus fully networked production chains - live in Hall 4.1. New this year: the ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ will showcase three production lines – one for apparel manufacture, one for 3D-knitted shoes and one for processing technical textiles, largely for the motor-vehicle and furniture industries.

‘Fashion Line’ integrates virtual prototypes and customer interaction
The fashion industry plays a central role in the ‘Digital Textile MicroFactory’. The customer’s digital doppelganger is becoming more and more important in development departments in the apparel industry as the starting point for individualised and perfectly fitting clothes and for links with finishing departments. In the context of the micro-factory’s production line, it is the key feature.

The production line demonstrates the various stages involved, including CAD/Design, printing, cutting out, assembly, finishing and labelling. New approaches also combine 3D simulations of clothing with direct data transfer in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). Instead of presenting the customer with physical examples of the clothing to be produced, the examples are visualised as virtual objects. And during the production process, the customer has the opportunity for direct input into the design of the product in question. This direct interaction between the 3D simulation of an item, the representation in VR/AR displayed on the customer’s own hardware and the direct impact on the production process has never been shown before in this way. Partners of the ‘Fashion Line’ are: Assyst (CAD/design), Mitwill (materials), Caddon, ErgoSoft, Mimaki and Multiplot (printing), Zünd (cutting), Juki and Stoll (assembling), Veit (finishing) and Vuframe (AR/VR).

3D knitting on the way to Industry 4.0
From 3D image to finished prototype in 18 minutes: the future is here in the world of knitting too! The ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ at Texprocess and Techtextil shows a workflow which enables 3D-knitted uppers for shoes to be produced directly from the customer’s own particular foot measurements.
The ‘3D-knitting Line’ of the micro-factory demonstrates the process from the 3D model to the creation of a geometrically accurate knitting pattern by the software, based on the 3D data set, and the development of a specification of the final knitting data, through to the manufacture of a 3D-knitted prototype. Knitting is the additive manufacturing process for textiles. The ‘3D-knitting Line’ is partnered by Stoll.

Processing technical textiles in the micro-factory
Industry 4.0 live: the focus of the third production line of the ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ 2019 is on the automated processing of technical textiles, personalised for the individual customer, taking us right through to the finished product. Trade visitors will see here on-demand inkjet printing and networked machines with integrated sensors, which are linked through a bus system – a future-oriented topic for integrated manufacturing. A robot arm with a special claw for use with textiles sorts the cut items as they emerge from the cutter in a free-moving open shuttle. The items to be sewn are conveyed automatically to the sewing stations. Tracing and tracking procedures show the progress of each order through the individual stages of the manufacturing process using an auto ID. In addition, the display will also show how creative ideas from the Cloud can be incorporated in the manufacture of technical products. Technology meets creativity. Partners of the production line: Mitwill (design), ErgoSoft (RIP), Caddon (colour management), HP (large-format inkjet printing), Zünd (cutting), Dürkopp Adler (networking, integration of an open shuttle, sewing), Veit (finishing), Next Robotics (material handling).

Smart Textiles Micro-Factory: industrial-type production of smart textiles
In their ‘Smart Textiles Micro-Factory’, located in the walkway between Halls 4.1 and 5.1, the Institute for Textile Technology (ITA) at the RWTH Aachen University, together with partners from industry and research, will be producing a ‘smart’ pillow which, with the help of integrated LEDs, provides new ways of interaction. With this demonstration, the partners in the project will present an exemplary, industrial-style manufacturing process for a smart textile from design to finished product. The prototype of the pillow was displayed in advance at Heimtextil 2019. The following are all involved in the ‘Smart Textiles Micro-Factory’: the Institute for Textile Technology (ITA) of the RWTH Aachen University (project coordination), Gerber Technology GmbH (cutting), the Korea Institute for Industrial Technology KITECH (electronics), VETRON TYPICAL Europe GmbH (sewing), Wear it GmbH (product design and concept) and ZSK Stickmaschinen GmbH (embroidery).
 
World of Digital Fashion: customisation of apparel
Six companies have grouped together under the ‘World of Digital Fashion’ umbrella. They work in areas of visualisation, CAD-cutting systems, automated body measurement, cutting out and process automation. Together, they will be showcasing, in Hall 4.0, ways of integrating and combining their products in a variety of workflows within the value creation chain and will enable visitors to experience what the digital process chain is like in practice. The focus will fall particularly on the customisation of apparel and fashion items. Partners of the ‘World of Digital Fashion’ are: Browzwear Solutions and Tronog (visualisation), Software Dr. K. Friedrich (CAD), Fision (automated body measurement), Bullmer (cutting), as well as Gertsch Consulting and Mode Vision (process automation).

Micro-factory presented by Efka and Gemini: easy to implement
Manufacturers of drive mechanisms for industrial sewing machines Efka will,in collaboration with CAD suppliers Gemini, be showcasing the production of a knitted garment that can be individually designed. The core element of their micro-factory, which closely reflects industrial practice, is the link to the sewing stage of production, something which is already available today as an economic, partially automated solution. The display presents a solution that can be easily implemented and adopted by most companies, using already available resources.

 

More information:
Texprocess
Source:

Messe Frankfurt Exhibtion GmbH

CHINA'S TEXTILE AND APPAREL INDUSTRY FEELS US PUNITIVE TARIFFS Photo: Pixabay
05.03.2019

CHINA'S TEXTILE AND APPAREL INDUSTRY FEELS US PUNITIVE TARIFFS

  • Nevertheless - automation, environmental compatibility and energy efficiency increase machine imports

China's textile and clothing industry is modernizing. High-quality textile machines are in demand. But because of the trade dispute with the USA, investments are also postponed.

How the trade dispute between the USA and China affects its business is currently being discussed by China's textile and apparel manufacturers - and in particular by the companies located in the high-quality sector: Of the approximately USD 119 billion, that they sold abroad in 2018, about two thirds went to the United States.

  • Nevertheless - automation, environmental compatibility and energy efficiency increase machine imports

China's textile and clothing industry is modernizing. High-quality textile machines are in demand. But because of the trade dispute with the USA, investments are also postponed.

How the trade dispute between the USA and China affects its business is currently being discussed by China's textile and apparel manufacturers - and in particular by the companies located in the high-quality sector: Of the approximately USD 119 billion, that they sold abroad in 2018, about two thirds went to the United States.

According to the American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA), 41 percent of the clothing sold in the USA, 72 percent of the shoes and 84 percent of the accessories come from China. On the other hand, the producers of intermediate products or textiles are less or hardly affected by the punitive tariffs, because here the dependence on the USA is not quite as great. Apparel manufacturers in Vietnam and Bangladesh, for example, generally are also buying in China.

Following previous punitive tariffs on Chinese imported goods, in September 2018 the USA imposed a 10 percent punitive tariff on a wide range of other Chinese imported goods, including goods from the textile and clothing industry. On January 1. 2019, the tariffs should originally be raised to 25 percent, but at the beginning of December 2018 US President Trump and China's President Xi agreed not to increase the tariffs until March 1st 2019.

Companies are reluctant to invest
It is hardly possible to make predictions about the outcome of the conflict. In view of the uncertainty, many of the companies affected are therefore waiting for the time being. German textile machine manufacturers are also feeling the effects of this, whether due to lower demand for machines from Germany or locally. According to a representative of the German Engineering Federation (VDMA) in Beijing, many investments have been stopped.

But apart from the upheavals, the modernization process of the Chinese textile and clothing industry is far from complete. Gone are the days when the numerous street markets in China were flooded with cheap clothes. They're hard to find these days. Their manufacturers either had to modernize or have since disappeared from the market.

Number of Chinese textile and clothing companies down sharply
China's textile and clothing industry has been through tough years of consolidation and modernization. In fact, between 2013 and 2017 alone, the number of predominantly private-sector companies in the sector fell by almost 11 percent to around 33,500.

Chinese customers don't want any more junk - and can usually afford better. According to the Chinese National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), they spent about RMB 1,371 billion; equivalent to about USD 207 billion; (1 USD = about 6.6114 RMB, annual mean rate 2018) on clothing and shoes in 2018. This is 8 percent more than in the previous year.

Rising personnel costs force automation
On the one hand, consumer demand has grown and led companies to invest in better machines, on the other hand, the constant pressure on personnel costs has forced them to automate their processes. Between 2010 and 2017, the number of employees in the sector fell from 10.9 million to 7.8 million.

Many have tried (and are trying) to escape the pressure by relocating their companies - for example to the interior of the country, where the wages are lower, or to cheaper foreign countries. However, the great migration movement did not take place, as most of them see themselves too strongly interwoven with their suppliers. Some are also skeptical about the move to the West, arguing that it would only be a temporary solution - and that sooner or later the wages there would follow.

Traditionally, the industry has concentrated on the provinces of Guangdong, Fujian, Zhejiang and Shandong. There, the average gross monthly wages of urban workers rose between 2013 and 2017 (latest available figures) by between 38.9 per cent (Fujian) and 48.5 per cent (Guangdong) - with significantly lower inflation rates.

Development of the Chinese textile and clothing industry 2013 to 2017
(% change over previous year) *)
  2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Cjamge
Number of companies 37,376 36,642 36,488 35,197 33,326 -5.3
.Textile industry 21,666 20,821 20,545 19,752 18,726 -5.2
.Clothing industry 15,710 15,821 15,943 15,445 14,600 -5.5
Number of employees in 1,000 persons n.a. n.a. 9,140 8,667 7,784 -10.2
.Textile industry n.a. n.a. 4,645 4,362 3,912 -10.3
.Clothing industry n.a. n.a. 4,495 4,305 3,872 -10.1
Turnover in RMB bn. 5,553 5,934 6,222 6,458 5,700 -11.7
.Textile industry 3,608 3,829 3,999 4,084 3,611 -11.6
.Clothing industry 1,945 2,105 2,223 2,374 2,089 -12.0

*) only companies with an annual turnover of more than RMB 20 million are included.
Source: National Bureau of Statistics (NBS)

Environmental legislation and energy efficiency as additional investment drivers
The industry also has to deal with a generally stricter environmental legislation, which increasingly is being implemented. Added to this is the growing importance of the energy efficiency aspect.

Both are good news for German textile machinery manufacturers, according to VDMA estimates. As a result, the market for high-tech machines is expanding and the resulting demand is still far from being met by local production. China imported USD 4.2 billion worth of textile machinery in 2018, an increase of 6.7 percent over the previous year. A further customer potential arises from the growing importance of technical textiles.

According to Chinese customs statistics, German suppliers supplied textile machinery worth USD 1.1 billion to China in 2017 (latest available data) - a whopping 28.3 percent more than in the previous year. Despite this success, however, they had to cede their previous leading position as the main supplier country to Japan. However, this statistic shows only one side of the medal. Almost all well-known manufacturers are now represented in China with their own production facilities - and no figures are available about their activities.

Imports of textile machinery to China by selected countries
(SITC item 724; in US$ million, change from previous year and percentage share)
  2015 2016 2017 Change Share 2017
Total, thereof from 3,354 2,907 3,897 34.1 100.0
.Japan 728 765 1.169 52.8 30.0
.Germany 1,219 851 1.101 29.4 28.3
.Italy 415 347 448 29.1 11.5
.Taiwan 206 187 203 8.6 5.2
.Belgium 134 124 173 4.0 4.4
.Switzerland 104 111 126 13.5 3.2

Sources: UN-Comtrade; Calculations by Germany Trade & Invest

Environmental model companies point the way ahead

Already today there are manufacturers with ambitious plans in environmental protection. One of them is the Dongrong Group. Based in Chifeng, Inner Mongolia, the Cashmere company has been selected by the government of the Autonomous Region, together with a dairy company, as a model company for environmental protection. This included President and owner Cheng Xudong having his company - by the way inspired by the German Pavilion at the World Expo in Shanghai 2008 - sealed energetically (albeit not with materials "Made in Germany").

The next big step will be the purification of the company's own waste water. "Cheng describes his goal as follows: "Fish, suitable for consumption in our canteen, should be able to swim in it. The company is already now growing vegetables for the canteen itself. In his efforts it is financially supported by the state. But certainly not all entrepreneurs are so ambitious.

And there is still an old Chinese saying for many companies: "The sky is high - and the emperor is far away". In other words, what the central government decides in Beijing does not necessarily have to be implemented in the huge hinterland. But all these efforts show in which direction the journey goes.

 

More information:
China USA Tariffs
Source:

Stefanie Schmitt, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

12.02.2019

TECHNICAL TEXTILES ARE A SUCCESSFUL INDUSTRY IN ISRAEL

  • Israeli Manufacturers with increasing Presence on the World Market

The production of technical textiles is one of the leading sectors of the Israeli textile industry. Their success is not least due to intensive research and development. In view of the fierce international competition facing the Israeli textile industry, high-quality and innovative products are indispensable for stabilizing this
industry. One of the sectors that best manage this modernization is the production of technical textiles.

In 2017, this product category accounted for an estimated USD 600 million or nearly one-third of the total sales generated by the textile and apparel industry. With an export share of around 70 percent, the division is also strongly world market-oriented and accounted for USD 414 million, 43 percent of Israeli textile and clothing exports in 2017.

  • Israeli Manufacturers with increasing Presence on the World Market

The production of technical textiles is one of the leading sectors of the Israeli textile industry. Their success is not least due to intensive research and development. In view of the fierce international competition facing the Israeli textile industry, high-quality and innovative products are indispensable for stabilizing this
industry. One of the sectors that best manage this modernization is the production of technical textiles.

In 2017, this product category accounted for an estimated USD 600 million or nearly one-third of the total sales generated by the textile and apparel industry. With an export share of around 70 percent, the division is also strongly world market-oriented and accounted for USD 414 million, 43 percent of Israeli textile and clothing exports in 2017.

The production of technical textiles is based not least on strong domestic demand. The largest domestic customers include the armed forces and security forces, which demand high functionality and top quality from their suppliers. Among other things, this market segment produces bulletproof textiles, special textiles for uniforms, carrier bags for sensitive devices under field conditions and camouflage nets.

Strong domestic demand helps product development
As the Fashion & Textile Industries Association explained to Germany Trade & Invest in January 2019, direct contact with the military and internal security institutions helps companies to offer tried and tested products. In addition, according to Maya Herscovitz, director of the association, former members of the armed forces and security forces who are familiar with the requirements for corresponding products are active in the manufacturing companies.    
 
Other domestic customer industries are construction and agriculture. Building construction is increasingly relying on modern building materials, including lightweight and highly insulating textiles. The agricultural sector, on the other hand, contributes only 1.2 percent to the gross domestic product, but is capital-intensive and innovation-oriented. Safety nets are a popular agrotechnical product. In September 2018, Israeli agronomist Yossi Ofir pointed out in a contribution that climate change is leading to an increasing use of shadow nets. Last but not least, more and more Israeli farmers covered entire orchards with shade nets. 

Networking with the high-tech industry
The anchoring in the domestic market and the direct contact to customers accelerate the development of new products. At the same time, the technical textiles sector is embedded in the high-tech scene. For example, manufacturers integrate research results from nanotechnology and materials science into their products.

An example of this is Marom Dolphin, which manufactures military and civilian products and uses plastics, metal and composite materials to increase the strength of its textile products or reduce their weight. A leading manufacturer of technical textiles is Hagor Industries, which offers combat vests, protective vests, backpacks and tents of all sizes among other things, while Source - Shoresh produces textile hiking accessories. These and similar manufacturers are represented on numerous export markets.

Some companies do not offer finished products, but technological solutions. Nano Textile, for example, has launched an antibacterial sonochemical coating for textiles. Hospitals are planned as a main field of application, but according to company information other fields of application such as aircraft construction and public transport, restaurants and hotels or baby clothing may also open up. Gideon Guthrie Technical Textile also offers research and development (R&D) services in cooperation with Israeli and foreign textile manufacturers.

In addition to the activities of the company's own R&D departments, research is also carried out at universities. For example, the textile coating technology used by Nano Textile was developed at the Israeli Bar Ilan University. The Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art is home to CIRTex (The David & Barbara Blumenthal Israel Center for Innovation and Research in Textiles). The center carries out applied research on new products, production processes and applications for textiles and promotes cooperation between established companies on the one hand and start-ups and individual inventors on the other. Industrial textile research and development is supported by the Innovation Authority.

According to the trade association, the production of technical textiles will continue to increase in the coming years. As Maya Herscovitz explained to Germany Trade and Invest, manufacturers of technical textiles invest large amounts not only in the development of new products, but also in the modernization and automation of production processes. This was not only necessary for reasons of cost savings, but also because of the shortage of skilled workers on the labour market.

Israel is a net exporter of technical textiles
Der mit großem Abstand wichtigste Exportposten im Bereich technischer Textilien (SITC 657) sind The by far most important export item in the technical textiles sector (SITC 657) are nonwovens (SITC 657.2). They accounted for 67.1 percent of total exports of technical textiles in 2017, or USD 278 million. Second place went to batting, wicks and goods and products for technical use made of textile materials. With an export value of USD 88 million, they accounted for 21.6 percent of industry exports.

The most important export market in 2017 was the USA, followed by the Netherlands and Germany in a great distance. The Federal Republic of Germany purchased technical textiles worth USD 44.7 million (10.8 percent of Israeli exports) from Israel.

With USD 136 million imports accounted for 32.6 percent of exports. The three most important supplier countries - China, Turkey and Italy - were almost on a par at USD 25 million, USD 24.8 million and USD 24.2 million. Germany ranked fifth and, with a delivery value of USD 11.2 million, achieved an import market share of 8.3 percent.

Source:

Wladimir Struminski, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

PIXABAY
04.12.2018

CLOTHING INDUSTRY IN CAMBODIA WITH UNCERTAIN OUTLOOK

  • Exports rise in the country's most important industrial sector.

Phnom Penh (GTAI) - Cambodia's clothing exports are growing steadily. However, two factors cloud the prospects for the future.

Cambodia's garment industry is the backbone of the Kingdom's export-oriented economy. Industry exports account for around 40 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP). More than 800,000 Cambodians are employed in over 800 companies. That is more than 85 percent of all factory workers in the country.

Apparel and footwear exports reached USD 8.0 billion in 2017, according to Cambodian customs. This represented an increase of 9.6 percent compared with 2016. Proud growth rates between 7 and almost 15 percent were already achieved in previous years. GTAI estimates on the basis of partner countries' imports an even higher export volume of around USD 12 billion.

  • Exports rise in the country's most important industrial sector.

Phnom Penh (GTAI) - Cambodia's clothing exports are growing steadily. However, two factors cloud the prospects for the future.

Cambodia's garment industry is the backbone of the Kingdom's export-oriented economy. Industry exports account for around 40 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP). More than 800,000 Cambodians are employed in over 800 companies. That is more than 85 percent of all factory workers in the country.

Apparel and footwear exports reached USD 8.0 billion in 2017, according to Cambodian customs. This represented an increase of 9.6 percent compared with 2016. Proud growth rates between 7 and almost 15 percent were already achieved in previous years. GTAI estimates on the basis of partner countries' imports an even higher export volume of around USD 12 billion.

More than 70 percent of the country's total exports of goods regularly come from the sector. Shoes accounted for exports of USD 873 million (+14.4 percent) in 2017. Foreign business with shoes has been improving for some years now and has been able to increase its share of exports to over 10 percent. With an unchanged share of 46 percent compared to the previous year, the EU continued to play a major role among the customers in 2017, followed by the USA with 24 percent.

The value-added volume of the sector is low and the road to an integrated textile industry in Cambodia is still long. Machines, raw materials and design come from abroad in the form of a CMT model ("Cut Make Trim"). Fabrics, yarns and haberdashery have to be imported in order to keep the local clothing industry "on the runway". In 2016, according to the United Nations Comtrade Database, USD 4.1 billion worth of textiles came into the country for processing - about 60 percent of which came from China. Textile imports have risen proportionally to clothing exports in recent years.

The garment industry is dominated by foreign companies, mostly from the Asian neighborhood China, Hong Kong (SVR), Singapore, Malaysia or South Korea. Many manufacturers produce to order for multinational brands such as Adidas, Puma, Gap, H&M, Marks & Spencer or Uniqlo. In principle, the complete contract manufacturing is intended for export.

Rising wages fuel fear of competition
After years of growth the sector is looking to the future with concern. The country is increasingly in danger of losing market share to its competitors - for example in Myanmar, Vietnam or Bangladesh - primarily due to rising wage costs. In January 2018, the monthly minimum wage for workers was raised to USD 170, up from USD 153. Compared to 2013, when a minimum of USD 80 was required by law, there has now been more than a doubling.

The annual agenda included regular increases of around 10 percent. According to the Cambodia Garment and Footwear Sector Bulletin of the International Labor Organization (ILO), workers who worked the full month, including overtime payments and incentives, were paid an average wage of just under USD 243 in 2017. Last year, it was USD 225.

In the past, low wages were mainly responsible for the attractiveness and competitiveness of Cambodian industry. This advantage is crumbling year after year as a result of the increase of minimum wages. An end to this politically motivated development is not in sight. The government can imagine, referring to expert recommendations, that minimum wages will be raised to USD 250 per month by 2023.

If the trend continues, companies are likely to migrate and not too many new investors will pitch their tents in Cambodia, critics warn. In 2017, sector companies invested nearly USD 270 million in 55 projects. This represented 5 per cent of the Kingdom's total investments. In the previous year, this share had been 9 percent.

Industry representatives complain that the costs grow faster than the productivity. Automation of production processes is becoming more and more urgent in order to keep up with productivity. However, both the lack of skilled workers and an infrastructure in need of improvement are serious bottleneck factors. There are also critics who are generally pessimistic about a possible automation in the sector. Cambodia could only score points through low labor cost advantages. Automated mass production is reserved for countries that have a reliable and cost-effective power supply and are closer to the sales markets.

Will the trade routes to the EU remain free?
Even more worrying would be the EU's cancellation of the preferential trading system EBA ("Everything But Arms"). Finally, the exemption of Cambodian clothing from customs duties is at stake on the main market. A discontinuation is likely to trigger a wave of migration of the clothing industry. Quite a few companies have taken the EBA initiative alone as an opportunity to establish themselves in the Kingdom.

In addition, the view wanders across the border to Vietnam. Manufacturers there could soon benefit from a free trade agreement with the EU. Vietnam is also participating at the Asia-Pacific Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), while Cambodia remains outside. If the trade arrangements remain unchanged, Cambodia may get off with a black eye. However, the other factors should not be ignored. Transport and general export costs are also considered comparatively high compared with Vietnam or China.

Cambodian exporters are currently benefiting from the trade dispute between the USA and China. The National Bank of Cambodia (NBC) semi-annual report supports this assumption. According to the study, apparel and footwear exports rose by 11 percent in the first six months of 2018 compared to the same period of last year to reach a volume of USD 4 billion. Since July 2016, clothing, shoes and travel goods (suitcases, bags, etc.) can be delivered duty-free to the USA. According to the Garment Manufacturers Association of Cambodia (GMAC), shipments of travel goods to the USA in the first half of 2018 reached an amount of around USD 160 million - three times the previous annual exports.

Cambodia's imports of textile machinery amounted to USD 127.3 million (SITC 724) in 2017 according to the UN Comtrade database. This was 11.4 percent more than in the previous year. About 60 percent of the capital goods came from China; the remaining deliveries are relatively evenly distributed among other Asian countries. German deliveries only appear very sparsely in the statistics. Used machines from abroad are more likely to be in demand, but are not recorded statistically.

More information:
cambodja Asien GTAI
Source:

Michael Sauermost, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

20.11.2018

CHINA'S CLOTHING COMPANIESS REPOSITION THEMSELVES

  • AUTOMATION AND STRONGER FOCUS ON THE DOMESTIC MARKET

Beijing (GTAI) - The Chinese apparel industry is repositioning itself. Increased wage costs force more automation, more customers demanding more quality.
Nowhere else in the world so much clothing is being produced as in China. According to the sector portal http://www.ask.com, alone 22.9 billion pairs of socks were being produced in 2017. This was 4.8 percent more than in the previous year, and the production of jeans amounted to more than 0.6 billion pieces according to information from http://www.chyxx.com, an increase of 5.0 percent.

  • AUTOMATION AND STRONGER FOCUS ON THE DOMESTIC MARKET

Beijing (GTAI) - The Chinese apparel industry is repositioning itself. Increased wage costs force more automation, more customers demanding more quality.
Nowhere else in the world so much clothing is being produced as in China. According to the sector portal http://www.ask.com, alone 22.9 billion pairs of socks were being produced in 2017. This was 4.8 percent more than in the previous year, and the production of jeans amounted to more than 0.6 billion pieces according to information from http://www.chyxx.com, an increase of 5.0 percent.
China is not only the world's largest production nation, but also by far the world's largest export nation in the sector. However, countries such as India, Vietnam, Bangladesh and Cambodia are catching up enormously due to lower wages. As a result, China - measured by its share of world clothing exports - has lost around 5.5 percentage points since 2013, down to only 32.4% in 2017.

China's share of world clothing exports 1) (in USD billion; shares in %)
  2008 2013 2015 2017
World Export 380 468 471 486
China Export 120 177 175 157
China's share 31.6 37.9 37.1 32.4

1) SITC Pos.84; 2) Partially estimated on the basis of information provided by the ITC
Source: UN Comtrade, GTAI calculation.

By contrast, Bangladesh (+3.7 points), Vietnam (+2.0 points) and Cambodia (+1.3 points) in particular recorded gains in the period from 2013 to 2017. In absolute terms, Chinese apparel exports fell by 15.6% to USD 157 billion since the record year of 2014 (USD187 billion). No improvement is in sight as exports are stagnating in 2018.

Export of clothing 1) by country (in USD million; shares in %)
  2008 Share 2013 Share 2017 Share
World Export 380,000 100.0 468,000 100.0 486,000 100.0
China 120,405 31.6 177,435 37.9 157,464 32.4
ASEAN3) 29,793 7.8 42,123 9.0 61,441 12.6
Vietnam 8,724 2.3 17,230 3.7 27,930 5.7
Kambodscha 3,014 0.8 4,832 1.0 11,250 2.3
Bangladesch 12,035 3.2 19,679 4.2 38,460 7.9
India 10,968 2.9 16,843 3.6 18,313 4.0
Germany 18,183 4.8 19,178 4.1 22,034 4.6

1) SITC Pos. 84; 2) partly estimated on the basis of ITC data; 3) excluding Laos and Brunei
Sources: UN-Comtrade; ITC; GTAI calculation

Rising wage costs as investment driver
Due to rising personnel costs throughout the country, manufacturers were and are under considerable cost pressure. With an average hourly wage for a Chinese worker of the equivalent of around USD 5.2 (2017), China has not only left classic emerging markets such as Thailand (USD 2.3) or Mexico (USD 3.9) behind - not to mention India with USD 0.8 - but is already approaching individual European countries (e.g. Greece 2016: USD 6.0).


Companies have met and continue to meet this challenge through increased automation. Between 2015 (9.1 million) and 2017 (7.8 million) alone, the workforce of the textile and clothing industry shrank by 14.3 percent - according to the Chinese statistical office. More and better machines make it possible to say goodbye to the previous labor-intensive production - and thus lower cost pressure with more precise and faster execution. Imports of textile machinery are also benefiting from this. These rose in 2017 by a whopping 34.1 percent year-on-year to nearly USD 3.9 billion.


Germany no longer number one textile machinery supplier
Although Germany lost its position as most important supplier country for textile machinery to Japan, it was still able to increase its deliveries by 28.3 percent to USD 1.1 billion. This corresponded to a supply share of 28.3 percent. Japanese manufacturers achieved a ratio of 30.0 percent with just under USD 1.2 billion (+52.8 percent). Competition from Italy came to only 11.5 percent. The good performance is remarkable due to the fact that a number of German textile machine manufacturers have invested heavily in recent years in the region in order to be able to meet the wishes of Chinese customers more effectively.

China's textile machinery imports *) by selected countries (in USD million; year-on-year change and 2017 shares in %)
  2015 2016 2017 Change Shares
Total 3,354 2,907 3,897 34.1 100.0
including          
Japan 728 765 1,169 52.8 30.0
Germany 1,219 851 1,101 29.4 28.3
Italy 415 347 448 29.1 11.5
Taiwan 206 187 203 8.6 5.2
Belgium 134 124 173 4.0 4.4
Switzerland 104 111 126 13.5 3.2

*) SITC-Pos. 724
Source: UN-Comtrade; GTAI calculation

Due to the high pressure to modernization Chinese textile machinery imports in the first seven months of 2018 increased by almost 15 percent compared to the previous period. German machine manufacturers in particular benefited from this development, with deliveries increasing by 30 percent in the same period. As Japanese exports of textile machinery to China stagnated at the same time, German manufacturers are likely to take the lead again in 2018.
As the garment exports come under such severe pressure, the industry is now increasingly geared towards the local market. Whereas ten years ago about half of the value of production was exported, today it is only about a third. In fact, the Chinese spent an average of around 4.8 percent of their disposable income or 1,238 Renminbi (RMB; around 183 US dollars; 1 USD = 6.7531 RMB, annual mean rate of 2017) on clothing in 2017, according to the Chinese Statistical Office. With an average disposable annual income of 25,974 RMB and a population of 1.39 billion, this translates into a market volume of approximately USD 255 billion.

China's consumers demand quality and design
This makes the Chinese clothing market one of the largest in the world - and one that is becoming increasingly diversified. Local offerings range from the cheapest mass-produced goods, qualitatively and visually appealing products in the mid-price segment up to luxury and haute couture. Much has changed in the upper price segment in particular. "In the past, the Chinese exported the best qualities, but today they keep them for themselves," says a British sourcing expert who has been working in the Kashmir business for decades, describing the development.

In general, Chinese consumer demand is becoming increasingly sophisticated and differentiated. In addition to the tendency towards recognized brands, an increasing individualization of consumption can also be observed. The question is what fits well, pleases and is also somehow "special". "People in the North used to buy cashmere clothes because they warmed well," explains Cheng Xudong, president of the private Dongrong Group. The design was of secondary importance - and accordingly most of the pieces were "old-fashioned".

"Today, cashmere clothes also look very good," Cheng adds. "That's why it's bought not only in the north, but also in the more southern parts of the country." In general, the middle class in particular is looking for a high-quality lifestyle - and clothing is a part of it. The entrepreneur is convinced that if the textile and clothing industry succeeds in adapting to the higher quality demands of local customers through a technical upgrade and improved design, then the industry will continue to do well in the future.

Additional information
Further information on the economic situation, the sectors, business practice, law, customs, tenders and development projects in China can be found at http://www.gtai.de/china The website http://www.gtai.de/asien-pazifik provides an overview of various topics in the region.

 

More information:
China Sampe China GTAI
Source:

Stefanie Schmitt, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

Show Preview COMPOSITES EUROPE 2018: Focus on process technologies (c) COMPOSITES EUROPE
09.10.2018

SHOW PREVIEW COMPOSITES EUROPE 2018: FOCUS ON PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES

  • Premiere: “Process live” format
  • Lightweight Technologies Forum to present hybrid lightweight construction
  • Trade fair kick-off event: International Composites Congress (ICC)

In the competition of lightweight construction and design materials, composites are among the winners – automotive engineering, aerospace, wind energy, boatbuilding and construction can no longer do without glass- and carbon-fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP & CFRP). Nevertheless, the greatest impetus right now is coming from the composites industry itself: technological advancements in the process chain. From 6 to 8 November, COMPOSITES EUROPE in Stuttgart will drive home that point.

  • Premiere: “Process live” format
  • Lightweight Technologies Forum to present hybrid lightweight construction
  • Trade fair kick-off event: International Composites Congress (ICC)

In the competition of lightweight construction and design materials, composites are among the winners – automotive engineering, aerospace, wind energy, boatbuilding and construction can no longer do without glass- and carbon-fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP & CFRP). Nevertheless, the greatest impetus right now is coming from the composites industry itself: technological advancements in the process chain. From 6 to 8 November, COMPOSITES EUROPE in Stuttgart will drive home that point.

Trade fair visitors will meet more than 350 exhibitors from 30 countries who in Stuttgart will present state-of-the-art technology and the potential of fibre-reinforced composites – in the exhibition area as well as in numerous event areas, lecture forums and themed tours.

With the new “Process live” format, coordinated processing and manufacturing processes will become the visible focus of this year’s COMPOSITES EUROPE. Mechanical and plant engineering companies will get together in group exhibits to showcase their technologies in live interactions – thus enabling visitors to experience sub-processes presented in a larger context.

Partnerships in the process chain accelerate growth in the industry
Among others, the cutting specialists Gunnar (Switzerland), the composites automation experts Airborne (Netherlands) and the gripping systems providers Schmalz (Germany) will join forces to create a combined production cell in a process-safe depiction of the entire value chain from roller materials to the finished layer structure of a composite component. In this setup, interlocking hardware components are fully connected with each other via software. “Cooperation among processors is getting closer and closer. These partnerships within the process chain are accelerating the growth of the composites industry; that’s what we want to show with the new ‘Process live’ format”, says Olaf Freier, event director of COMPOSITES EUROPE.

Lightweight Technologies Forum: Platform for multi-material lightweight construction
Besides the optimisation of the process chain, industry research today is heavily focused on the use of GFRP and CFRP in multi-material systems. The Lightweight Technologies Forum will once again demonstrate how composites play to their strengths alongside other materials in the material mix for hybrid structural components. A total of 16 exhibitors will present materials, tools and exhibits here – from fillers to bonding agents and presses for laminating different materials to semi-finished hybrid products.

In various presentations, experts will provide an overview of new products in manufacturing and joining technology as well as applications and lightweight engineering references from the automotive, aerospace and construction sectors. Support for the Lightweight Technologies Forum is provided by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy.

From digitalisation to recycling: Know-how in the supporting programme
A presentation programme, themed tours and special areas complete the COMPOSITES EUROPE lineup. Manufacturing technology, recycling, digitalisation and thermoplastics will be central themes in the programme of the COMPOSITES Forum, which will also feature exhibitors presenting application examples from automotive engineering, aerospace, construction, mechanical engineering, wind energy and shipbuilding.

Themed guided tours, meanwhile, will lead visitors straight to the stands of selected exhibitors ready to explain the latest innovations in fibreglass, thermoplastics, automotive engineering, wind energy and construction.

Special areas and group stands to highlight new ideas
Hosting the special area “Industry meets Science”, the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV), the leading European research institute for plastics technology based in Aachen, will showcase developments in process technology, design, quality assurance and repair.

The exhibitors at the “Bio-Based Composites Pavilion”, which will again be set up in cooperation with the nova-Institute, will reflect the development of the market for green composites. The focus will be on application options of wood-polymer composites (WPC), natural fibre composites (NFC), bio-based thermoplastics and thermosets for composites, and bio-based plastics.

Moreover, numerous young companies will thrill visitors with fresh ideas: the industry newcomers will present themselves at a group stand funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). They will cover a wide range of topics from semi-finished carbon-fibre products to metal foams to production lines for multi-material 3D fibre laminates.

Even the automotive experts of tomorrow will have their own forum at the trade fair: under the banner of “Formula Student”, students and apprentices will show visitors racecars they themselves have designed.

Kick-off event: 4th International Composites Congress (ICC)
The International Composites Congress (ICC) will once again kick off COMPOSITES EUROPE. In a series of presentations starting the day before the trade fair (5 and 6 November), international experts at the event with the headline topic “Composites – On the Path to Becoming a Key Industry?” will speak about and discuss applications, materials, process technologies and market prospects.

More information:
Composites Composites Europe
Source:

Reed Exhibitions Deutschland GmbH

26.09.2017

TAIWAN'S TEXTILES AND CLOTHING ARE EXPECTING HIGHER DEMAND

  • Production and Exports on a recreation Course
  • Investments in Capacity and Modernization

Taipei (GTAI) - Taiwanese textile and clothing manufacturers see improved sales prospects in 2017 and 2018, following a weak development in the previous year. With its range of functional textiles in particular, the country occupies a position of great importance throughout the world. In order to maintain competitiveness, the sector companies invest in new equipment and product innovations. One of the most important machine suppliers is, among others, Germany in third place behind China and Japan.

  • Production and Exports on a recreation Course
  • Investments in Capacity and Modernization

Taipei (GTAI) - Taiwanese textile and clothing manufacturers see improved sales prospects in 2017 and 2018, following a weak development in the previous year. With its range of functional textiles in particular, the country occupies a position of great importance throughout the world. In order to maintain competitiveness, the sector companies invest in new equipment and product innovations. One of the most important machine suppliers is, among others, Germany in third place behind China and Japan.

Taiwan's textile industry is looking more optimistically on business performance in the current year as well as for 2018. This is attributable to the high level of consumer spending in the most important sales markets, price increases and major international sports events such as the FIFA World Cup and the Winter Olympics in South Korea. The island is the world's leading supplier of functional textiles used in sports and outdoor clothing.

According to the Taiwan Textile Research Institute, this textile sector accounts for about 50 percent of the world's production value of functional textiles. In order to maintain this position, the manufacturers are investing in capacity expansion, new technologies and the development of innovative textiles, while focusing on the diversification at production sites.

Production is recovering

Despite shrinking production development, the number of companies in the textile and clothing industry has risen over the last few years and, according to the Taiwan Textile Federation, at the end of 2016 to 4,361 companies. Of these, 3,205 (2015: 3,163) belonged to the textile segment and 1,156 (2015: 1,144) to the garment sector. The number of employees however is declining, as companies invest in automation.

According to the Ministry of Economic Affairs the production value of the sector fell by 5.9 per cent in 2016 over 2015. The development in the first half of 2017 however indicated that the weakness phase is declining. In particular textile production, which represents the most important area, showed signs of recovery. Here a more efficient utilization in the second half of the year was expected, as inventories are declining and orders are rising.

On the other hand the production of clothing and accessories and the production of synthetic fibers and yarns have shown a further shrinking trend in the recent years. Most of the industrial companies have moved their production towards abroad. At the end of the first half of 2017 the clothing segment accounted for only 4.9 percent of the total apparel segment.

Production (in NT$ billion; change compared to the previous year in %)
  2015 2016 Change 1st half 2017 Change
Fibers and yarns 102.6 91.0 -11.4 45.4 -3.1
Textiles 284.7 272.4 -6.2 131.5 -1.3
Clothing  21.9 21.8 -0.2 9.1 -4.7
Total 409.3 385.2 -5.9 186.1 -1.9
Source: Ministry of Economic Affairs, 2017

Rising foreign trade expected

Export development also offers a better outlook. According to figures for the first six months of 2017 the export value of the textile and clothing sector shrank by only 0.3 per cent. For the full year 2016 the Taiwan Textile Federation statistics show a decline of 8.3% to USD 9.9 billion. The exports of textiles reached a value of USD 6.7 billion.

Exports of textiles and clothing are three times higher than imports. While exports are dominated by textile products with a share of 68%, imports of clothing accounts for 55%. Imports of textiles in 2016 were worth only about USD 427 Million.

Foreign trade in textiles and clothing
(in USD million; change compared to the previous year in %)
  2015 2016 Change 1st half 2017 Change
Import 3,458 3,308 1.0 1,566 0.2
Export 10,804 9,904 -8.3 4,968 -0.3
Source: Taiwan Textile Federation, 2017

Investment activities are growing

According to the reports of at the stock market listed companies, it looks good on the orders received from existing as well as from new customers. As a result, the capacities are expanded, as at the Far Eastern New Century. The company is looking above all at Vietnam, where USD 760 million will be invested in the expansion of a supply chain for textiles and clothing over the next three years.

Other manufacturers such as Eclat and Makalot are also expanding their activities in Vietnam. It also will be invested in Taiwan, where, for example, Eclat Textile wants to spend between USD 26 million and USD 33 million to build new facilities for digital textile products. Makalot Industrial has announced plans to create smart production lines in Vietnam and Taiwan to increase efficiency.

With Shinkong Synthetic Fibers, another large textile producer on the island, wants to expand production. The company plans to increase the production of artificial fibers during 2018 from 50,000 tons to 110,000 tons. This is to serve orders from European and Japanese customers from the automotive sector.

Finishing equipment imports show little dynamics

The investment activities and plans of the textile and clothing manufacturers are expected to lead to increasing finishing equipment imports and exports. However, imports of textile machinery show an overall decline in the first six months of 2017. Only China and Japan, the most important suppliers, were able to boast high growth rates. Germany, the third largest supplier, was much less successful.

Main supplier countries of textile machinery
(in USD millions, change compared to the previous year in %) *)
  2015 2016 Change 1.st Half 2017 Change
Total 383.8 405.4 5.6 190.0 -2.5
PR China 93.6 108.7 16.1 65.5 28.8
Japan 107.3 97.2 -9.4 46.9 20.7
Germany 78.3 82.5 5.4 34.2 -28.4
Italy 20.4 32.8 60.5 11.0 -38.0
USA 11.9 19.2 61.2 5.9 10.5
*) HS-Pos. 8444-8453, ohne 8450; Source: Customs Statistics, Ministry of Finance, 2017

In the first six months of 2017, textile machine exports rose by 7.5 percent to USD 543 million. It is mainly supplied to the overseas production plants in China and Vietnam, to where in this period about USD 111 million was exported. At the third place follow the USA with USD 40 million.

More information:
Asien textile industry
Source:

Jürgen Maurer, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

CHINA'S TEXTILE INDUSTRY CONTINUES TO AUTOMATE © Carola Langer / pixelio.de
11.07.2017

CHINA'S TEXTILE INDUSTRY CONTINUES TO AUTOMATE

  • Japan replaces Germany as the most important supplier of textile machines
  • Digitization is the trend of the future

Beijing (GTAI) - China, the largest apparel export apparel nation, is losing international market share due to rising personnel costs. The companies react with increased automation and production dis-placements. While imports of textile machines from Japan are gro-wing, deliveries from Germany are falling above average. The next wave of modernization will involve more digitization.

  • Japan replaces Germany as the most important supplier of textile machines
  • Digitization is the trend of the future

Beijing (GTAI) - China, the largest apparel export apparel nation, is losing international market share due to rising personnel costs. The companies react with increased automation and production dis-placements. While imports of textile machines from Japan are gro-wing, deliveries from Germany are falling above average. The next wave of modernization will involve more digitization.

Internationally, the PRC is by far the largest exportation nation of clothing. According to UN Comtrade after decades of ascent the peak seems to have crossed in 2014 with a record share of global clothing exports of 39.3%. Since then things are developing slowly but continuously downwards. In 2016, the Chinese share was estimated to be 37.1% (compared to 3.8% in Germany).  China loses market shares particular in favor of ASEAN countries such as Vietnam, Bangladesh or India. 

Export of clothing by country (SITC 84, export in USD million, share of world exports in %)
  2008 Share 2014 Share 2015 Share 2016 Share
World export1) 380,000 100 469,000 100 454,000 100 430,000 100
.PR China 120,405 31.7 186,614 39.3 174,702 39.3 159,645 37.1
.ASEAN, thereof: 26,410 7.0 39,928 8.4 40,859 9.0 n.a. -
.Vietnam 8,724 2.3 20,174 4.3 21,948 4.8 n.a. -
.Bangladesch2) 12,035 3.2 24,584 5.2 26,603 5.9 29,540 6.9
.India 10,986 2.9 17,650 3.7 18,168 4.0 17,932 4.2
.Germany 18,183 4.8 20,349 4.3 17,382 3.8 16,400 3.8

1) from 2014 estimation of world export; 2) based on information provided by partner countries; Source: UN Comtrade

Domestic textile machine manufacturers catching up

In fact, the Chinese textile industry is under considerable pressure because of the increase in personnel expenses. According to a Euromonitor study, the hourly wages of Chinese workers tripled between 2005 and 2016 from USD 1.20 to USD 3.60. Thus the People's Republic not only left classic emerging countries like Thailand ( USD 2.20 ) or Mexico (USD 2.20) behind  - not to mention USD 0.70 in India - but is already approaching individual European countries like Portugal (USD 4,50).

More information (in German) on wages and salary costs in China can be found at:
http://www.gtai.de/GTAI/Navigation/DE/Trade/Maerkte/Geschaeftspraxis/lohn-und-lohnnebenkosten,t=lohn-und-lohnnebenkosten--vr-china,did=1718070.html

Many companies face the challenge by greater automation. The Chinese textile companies can increasingly rely on textile machinery made in the country itself. While in 2016, according to official statistics, investments in the sector rose by 8.5% year on year to Yuan 1,142.4 billion (RMB, around USD 172 billion, 1 USD =6.642 RMB, annual average price in 2016), imports of textile machinery fell by 12.5% to USD 2.8 billion. However, there are no statistics on the extent to which sales are distributed by purely local companies or to those with a foreign background.

The fact is that, for example, German textile machine manufacturers have invested heavily locally in recent years in order for being able to meet the needs of their local customers. Against this backdrop, Germany was still able to defend its top spot with an import share of 29.5% against Japan in 2016, but had to cope with a strong minus of 30.6%, while the Japanese increased by 5.8%. Italy, ranked third and the most important Europe an competitor recorded a drop of 16.1%.

Textile machinery imports in the PRC by selected countries
(in USD millions, year-on-year change and share 2016 in %)
  2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Change Share
Total, thereof: 4,518.0 4,477.3 4,209.6 3,246.8 2,84.,9 -12.5 100.0
.Germany 1,499.5 1,330.1 1,435.0 1,209.5 839.5 -30.6 29.5
.Japan 1,327.3 1,357.8 1,281.4 721.5 763.3 5.8 26.9
.Italy  479.5 416.7 435.2 407.1 341.6 -16.1 12.0
.Taiwan 189.9 233.6 227.5 207.2 186.9 -9.8 6.6
.Belgium 126.6 211.6 118.5 133.0 123.3 -7.3 4.3

Source: China Customs, GTAI calculation

In the current year 2017, however, the Japanese seem to take the rank of the competitor Germany with an increase of 51% in the first four months. The overall textile machinery import grew by a strong 19.7% after the weak previous year before. Import from Germany however did not benefit from this and fell by 8.9%. As a result the German share of machinery supply decreased from 29.5% (2016 as a whole) to 25.0% in the first four months of 2017, while Japanese companies increased their share from 26.9% to 31.9%.

Recent import development for textile machinery in 2017, in USD million, changes against last year and share in %
  Januar bis April 2017 Change  Share
Total, thereof: 1,131.0 19.7 100.0
.Japan 360.4 51.6 31.9
.Germany 282.9 -8.9 25.0
.Italy 130.1 16.8 11.5
.Taiwan 65.4 17.4 5.8
.Belgium 65.3 25.2 5.8

Source: China Customs, GTAI calculations

Production shift continues

Many Chinese textile companies are also thinking about a dislocation production - either to cheaper foreign countries or to the more favorable Chinese hinterland. In 2016, the Autonomous Region of Xinjiang became the main destination for new settlements in the western part of the People's Republic. On average, two new textile factories were opened every day in Xinjiang.

The regional textile industry office in Xinjiang is expecting an even greater run for 2017, thanks to massive political and financial support. Many jobs however are not created there. On-site visitors report about state-of-the-art facilities operated by only a few specialists. The political message is clear: Chinese textile production should remain in the country, be of a higher quality and, if necessary, be reoriented in the direction of technical textiles.However, at least private fashion manufacturers are skeptical about whether the politically favored "Go-West" actually pays for them. Because there too, wages are likely to rise sooner or later, according to the justified Apprehension.

The fact that Vietnam, Bangladesh, South Korea and Cambodia have entered the league of important PRC purchasing countries within a few years is a result not least of the fact that Chinese (and other) manufacturers already have dislocated production capacities. They return their products from there for sale to China.Nevertheless, the very large displacement wave so far has not yet happened. In fact, certain limits are imposed on the shift, since the target countries often encounter their capacity limits. Added to this is the extraordinary advantageous network of the various production stages in China: from cotton harvesting to textile processing and final finishing.

Future theme digitization As part of the country-wide "Made in China 2025" strategy, the textile industry is trying to exploit the many and new opened possibilities of digitization. In view of the increasing individualization of consumption, more machines will probably be required in the future, which are, for example, able to knit sweaters according to the size, color and pattern of the individual customer. In principle, intelligent networking of production, real shops and e-commerce are seen as the challenge of the future.

 

The Smart Home at the BAU 2017 © Messe München GmbH
10.01.2017

COMFORTABLE LIVING IN A "SMART HOME"

BAU 2017: Theme “interconnected buildings”: A Smart Home is a comfort zone. The lights come on automatically, the door unlocks as soon as an occupant approaches the building. Prior to this, the HVAG system has set the radiators to a comfortable temperature. The letterbox sends a text message when the mail arrives; the washing machine uses the cheapest electricity rates, if electricity has to be paid for at all, as the Smart Building is energy self-sufficient. It knows its occupants' habits and makes their lives as convenient as possible. Even Smart Cities can be created, just by linking these extremely smart buildings. Science Fiction? Not at all. BAU 2017 shows how far digital technology has as yet advanced.

BAU 2017: Theme “interconnected buildings”: A Smart Home is a comfort zone. The lights come on automatically, the door unlocks as soon as an occupant approaches the building. Prior to this, the HVAG system has set the radiators to a comfortable temperature. The letterbox sends a text message when the mail arrives; the washing machine uses the cheapest electricity rates, if electricity has to be paid for at all, as the Smart Building is energy self-sufficient. It knows its occupants' habits and makes their lives as convenient as possible. Even Smart Cities can be created, just by linking these extremely smart buildings. Science Fiction? Not at all. BAU 2017 shows how far digital technology has as yet advanced.

In wintertime, when Julia König returns home after a long day at work, everything has been prepared: the apartment is nice and warm, the lights have been switched on in the hallway and the living room, and the blinds are already down. All relaxed she drops into her favourite armchair and looks forward to the evening ahead. When the young doctor leaves the house in the morning, the heating system automatically reduces the temperature, the security system is activated and all devices unnecessarily consuming electricity are being switched off.
There is no doubt: the smart home makes people's lives easier as it relies on intelligent building technology. What has been a "toy for techies" a few years ago has become reality today. Interconnectivity starts with simple sensors, switches and lights, and can lead to various living room scenarios – including the control of temperature, brightness, movement, door and window contacts, household appliances, communication technology, and entertainment electronics. In the case of a fire, smoke detectors save lives; motion sensors detect suspicious activity in the dark, whilst they have a deterrence effect; and alarm systems protect the house from burglars. From afar you can check whether the stove and the washing machine are off, and the gate is shut.

Smart Home Boom: New applications every week

Almost weekly, new applications are launched into the market. Smart homes thus become increasingly interesting for homeowners and tenants. Another reason is the level of comfort provided to the elderly.
Experts already call it a smart home boom. This is primarily due to one driver: the Smartphone. Since almost all users have an operating system in their pocket that can control more and more applications of the building technology in a very simple way. Apps are connected via Bluetooth Smartphone and Wi-Fi, or remotely via a mobile phone connection.
Hence, the market gets moving, as home automation system providers are finding new solutions in various communication protocols (radio and bus systems). They join up to facilitate more complex control options by combining individual solutions, and to further optimize the use of Smart Home applications.

Enhanced quality of life thanks to interconnectivity
Beyond merely managing heating, lighting and the home's security system these state of the art smart home applications offer far more. The latest developments even enable the connection of building components, such as glazing, doors, and windows; and turn them into intelligent systems that enhance the living comfort and energy efficiency of buildings.

One result could be, for instance, an intelligent facade. It converts smart homes into smart buildings. Smart energy management, shading control, security systems and monitoring functions, as well as real-time monitoring of all consumption and fabrication data of the building pave the way to intelli-gent and future oriented building construction. When this concept is rolled out from the individual building to an entire district, we get a Smart City.

One result could be, for instance, an intelligent facade. It converts smart homes into smart buildings. Smart energy management, shading control, security systems and monitoring functions, as well as real-time monitoring of all consumption and fabrication data of the building pave the way to intelligent and future oriented building construction. When this concept is rolled out from the individual building to an entire district, we get a Smart City.

Smart home solutions capture the market

The interconnected home faces a bright future. More and more smart home technologies are ready to be applied. Over the next few years they will have a major impact on our lives. At BAU 2017 in Munich, every two years the place to meet for everybody in the construction industry, you will be able to see the most significant novelties in this field.

 

Wind energy plant © Timo Klostermeier / pixelio.de
11.10.2016

WIND POWER INDUSTRY AT COMPOSITES EUROPE 2016

Offshore expansion and onshore repowering ensure growth

  • Wind theme day with guided tour November 29th
  • Lectures about material trends

With an investment volume of EUR 14 billion in the offshore sector alone, the European wind power industry has set a new record high in the first half of 2016. This figure and the view on the still open approval procedures in this segment as well as the onshore upcoming generational change from existing to modern facilities (repowering) show that the potential for growth is far from being exploited. Also in America as well as in Asia and the Pacific area a new emerging wind energy sector is also driving demand for fiber composites. The COMPOSITES EUROPE exhibition will be showing in Dusseldorf from November 29th to December 1st 2016 the latest trends and developments.

Theme Day: Wind meets Composites

Offshore expansion and onshore repowering ensure growth

  • Wind theme day with guided tour November 29th
  • Lectures about material trends

With an investment volume of EUR 14 billion in the offshore sector alone, the European wind power industry has set a new record high in the first half of 2016. This figure and the view on the still open approval procedures in this segment as well as the onshore upcoming generational change from existing to modern facilities (repowering) show that the potential for growth is far from being exploited. Also in America as well as in Asia and the Pacific area a new emerging wind energy sector is also driving demand for fiber composites. The COMPOSITES EUROPE exhibition will be showing in Dusseldorf from November 29th to December 1st 2016 the latest trends and developments.

Theme Day: Wind meets Composites

Sector specialists such as Gaugler & Lutz, DD Compound, 3D Core, LAP and Power & Composite Technology will be showing current technologies at the COMPOSITES EUROPE, latest machine tools and manufacturing processes for the wind power industry. A highlight for all wind experts: On November 29th will be the theme day „Wind meets Composites" at the fair. This day will be sponsored by GUNNAR International, Weissenberger, Hexion and SAERTEX. Engineers of aerodynamics, materials science, lightweight construction and production technology will be able to exchange ideas with purchasers, exhibitors and wind energy specialists in the composite sector. The focus will be, among other things, on topics such as the influence of material selection, on design, weight, stability, processing or production processes as well as on certification, standardization and automation in rotor blade construction.
 
Guided theme walks

An optimal overview of exhibitors' offer on the topic wind is given to visitors by the opportunity of taking part at guided tours. Here they will specifically directed to various exhibitors from the wind segment, where they can get within 10 minutes information about their products and innovations. There will be two guided tours on November 29th: tour 1 will take place between 12:00 AM and 01.00 PM and tour 2 in the afternoon between 02:00 and 03:00 PM. Participating exhibitors include Airtech, GUNNAR International, Agilent Technologies, RH Cutting Technology, Granta Design, DD Compound and Armacell Benelux. The lecture is in English. Participation is free, but the number of participants is limited. Between the two round trips the participants have the opportunity to strengthen themselves at the "Wind Lunch" at the booth of Hexion (Hall 8a / booth G31).
Click here to register for the guided tours: www.composites-europe.com/guided-tours

 
Lectures at COMPOSITES Forum

On the afternoon of the wind theme day the COMPOSITES Forum provides an overview of the latest challenges in research, design, quality management, transportation and production of rotor blades. Starting at 3:00 PM Sinoi will discuss "Challenges and approaches in the construction of large onshore blades". Euros will hold a lecture on "Potentials and limits of composites in rotor blade construction" and the Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology will be presenting "Composite trends for wind turbine blades". Pontis Engineering also has a slot in the lecture program. From 04.00 PM it will be about "Challenges in design and manufacturing of large wind turbine blades". Access to the lecture area is free of charge for visitors. The COMPOSITES Forum is located in Hall 8, Booth B45.

Click here for a complete overview on the topic wind:
https://www.composites-europe.com/windenergie_527.html

About COMPOSITES EUROPE:
350 exhibitors from 30 countries will attend the COMPOSITES EUROPE, European Trade Fair and Forum for Composite Materials, Technology and Applications from November 29th to December 1st in Dusseldorf. The exhibition shows the entire range of fiber-reinforced plastics, from raw materials to manufacturing processes, to lightweight construction innovations in automotive engineering, aviation, boat building, wind power industry and construction. COMPOSITES EUROPE is organized by Reed Exhibitions in cooperation with the European sector association EuCIA and the economic association Composites Germany, a consortium of branch associations and clusters AVK, CCeV, CFK-Valley Stade and VDMA AG Hybrid Light Construction Technologies.

 

Japan's Machinery Engineers defy Competition © mg-projects.at / pixelio.de
04.10.2016

INDUSTRY COMPACT: JAPAN'S MACHINERY ENGINEERS DEFY COMPETITION

Large Companies focus on abroad and the Digitization 

Tokyo (GTAI) - Japan's machinery and facility manufacturers expect increasing orders again. An increase is expected, especially for the international business. They saw the slight financial doldrums of 2015 before. However, there were exceptions - for example at the robot technology. The big companies have a strong interest in the subject of Industry 4.0. Here are cooperation opportunities for German companies, also on third markets.

The Asian region remains high on the Agenda

Large Companies focus on abroad and the Digitization 

Tokyo (GTAI) - Japan's machinery and facility manufacturers expect increasing orders again. An increase is expected, especially for the international business. They saw the slight financial doldrums of 2015 before. However, there were exceptions - for example at the robot technology. The big companies have a strong interest in the subject of Industry 4.0. Here are cooperation opportunities for German companies, also on third markets.

The Asian region remains high on the Agenda

Japan's economy is not yet in full swing. A new in August released stimulus package of the government is to ensure the recovery. In total Yen 28.1 billion (EUR 246.49 billion, in early September 2016: 1 Euro = Yen 114) amounts to the "package” which is funded to about 25% directly from the state treasury. The investment plans of the manufacturing industry are looking promising in the fiscal year 2016 (4.1 to 3.31.). They could rise by 14.5% over the previous year, according to the result of a survey of the Development Bank of Japan (DBJ) in July 2016.

This is confirmed by a survey of the business newspaper Nikkei with 1,140 participating companies. In the fiscal year 2016 they want to investment a volume of Yen 25.28 billion. This would be an increase over the investments made in the fiscal year of 2015 of 8.3%. If the expansion plans will actually be implemented, it would be the seventh consecutive increase year. Manufacturers of electronic machines have the most ambitious investment plans: Yen 3,64 billion, they have scheduled approximately 9.4% more than in the previous year.

Meanwhile lean foreign Business

According to the sector association JSIM (Japan Society of Industrial Machinery Manufacturers) in the fiscal year 2015 the incoming orders for industrial machinery remained below the expectations. Incoming orders came nearly to Yen 5.50 billion.  These were almost 10% less than the year before. Industry experts had already expected in advance that particularly the foreign business would suffer after the exceptionally successful year 2014. For the fiscal year 2016 the JSIM experts expect an increase of 4.6% to Yen 5.73 billion.

Not as positive as in the preceding years the situation looks in the machine tool segment. According to the industry association JMTBA (Japan Machine Tool Builders' Association) the orders declined in 2015 over the previous year by 11.4% and reached around Yen 1.40 billion. - This is justified by an overcapacity abroad. In fact it was the overseas business which fell by 22.1% to just under Yen 820 billion, while there was still an increase of 9.9% to Yen 579 billion yen domestically. With a view on the 1st quarter of 2016 the association has to state that the foreign business has not yet recovered. With more than one-quarter the orders declined compared to the same period last year.

The domestic market thus wins in importance for Japan's machinery builders. Generally, there is a need of modernization of the partly obsolete equipment at the local businesses. In addition, the reconstruction of the earthquake regions is required too. In addition, the hosting of the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo is considered quasi as a guarantor of business orders from the construction sector.

Orders by machine type, fiscal years 2014 to 2016 (in billion Yen), change in %)
  2014, total 1) 2015, total 2) 2016, total 3) 2016, domestic  2016, abroad Change 2016/15, total
Boilers, Turbines 1,809 1,796 1,896 1,390 506 5.6
Mining 23 29 31 28 3 6.9
Chemistry 4) 2,097 1,405 1,455 828 628 3.6
Tanks 30 47 56 26 30 18.7
Plastic processing 194 211 216 87 129 2.5
Pumps 336 358 373 270 103 4.3
Compressors 267 267 274 136 138 2.5
Ventilators 28 28 30 25 5 8.6
Boost material 355 400 433 282 150 8.3
Drive technology 50 53 54 45 8 2.5
Metalworking 162 182 186 79 107 2.5
Others 5) 725 703 725 535 189 3.1
Total  6,075 5,477 5,729 3,732 1,997 4.6

 
 1) actual results; 2) preliminary; 3) forecast; 4) also included in category: pulp- and paper machines, chillers, equipment for air- and water cleaning; 5) among others: equipment for waste treatment, industrial washing machines
Source: Japan Society of Industrial Machinery Manufacturers, February 2016

A high importance is given to the field of environmental and energy technology for the machinery industry in Japan. Although reactors, that meet stringent safety regulations, are expected to enter the net again in the next few years, renewable energy will be pushed up. In addition, there are intelligent power networks (smart grids) in the focus. Especially in areas with high priority, such as the energy and environmental technology, German suppliers with innovative technologies and customized solutions can win the points.

Connection links by Industry 4.00

Digitalization and with it topics related to Industry 4.0 keep the Japanese machinery and factory builders now very much interested. In June 2015, the "Industrial Value Chain Initiative (IVI)" was launched. About 40 Japanese companies belong to this interest group – like as the branches of the German Bosch and Beckhoff Automation GmbH. End April 2016 the German Federal Ministry of Economics (BMWi) signed with the Japanese Ministry of Economy (Meti) a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for joint cooperation in the region.
Equipment manufacturers from abroad should observe under cooperation aspects with big business interests the international activities of the Japanese mechanical and plant engineering. The Japanese abroad generated production shares are not far from the 40% mark the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) determined the end of 2015. This creates opportunities for third-market operations, which are often controlled by the parent companies in Japan.

In foreign projects the PRC stands not as strong in the foreground as it used to be. The focus is increasingly directed on the ASEAN countries („Association of Southeast Asian Nations"), while currently the general economic activities in the emerging markets are critically observed. In the longer term India has been planned as a manufacturing location. Single, large companies dominate.

According to preliminary data from the industry association JMF (Japan Machinery Federation) Japanese engineering companies manufactured machines worth of about Yen 13.55 billion in the fiscal year 2015. This was 2% less than last year. Important were cooling machines, (Yen 1.98 billion, 4.8%) as well as equipments for manufacturing of semiconductors and flat panel monitors -Yen 1.61billion, 2,8%. The manufacturer of metalworking machines had a production decline over the previous year by 5.9% to Yen 1.18 billion. Growth rates of just over 10% are registered in the robotics segment since several years.

In general the concentration in the individual equipment segments is high. According to the Yano Economic Research Institute in the fiscal year 2015, slightly more than two thirds of the NC milling machine production came from three companies: Makino Milling, Okuma and OKK. In general metalworking machines Amada, Kobe Steel and Kawasaki Hydromechanics (subsidiary of Kawasaki Steel) came on a market share of about three-quarters. Other important tool machine vendors are Yamazaki Mazak and Mori Seiki. Also in construction, textile, packaging and food processing equipment the three leading manufacturers account for at least 60% of domestic production for themselves.

Production by selected machines, Fiscal years 2014-2016
(in billion Yen, change in %)
  2014 1) 2015 2) 2016 3) Change 2016/15
Boilers, Turbines 1,433 1,193 1,127 1,9
Pumps, Ventilators 440 486 498 2.5
Compressors 677 666 669 0.4
Boost Equipment 533 533 595 7.5
Robotics 594 681 750 10.2
Drive – technology 419 413 418 1.2
Agricultural machinery 456 444 422 -5.0
Metalworking 1,257 1,183 1,120 -5.4
Food processing machines 448 518 520 0.5
Chillers  1,894 1,984 1,958 -1.3
Machines for the production of semiconductors and flat Monitors 1,564 1,608 1,772 10.2
Total machinery 13,838 13,554 13,784 1.7

1) actual results; 2) preliminary; 3) forecast
Source: Japan Machinery Federation (JMF), July 2016

Japan imports partly from our own production abroad

The Japanese imports of machinery and equipment continue to increase. It should be noted, that some of the imports are based on the foreign production of local companies. The largest share of supplies from abroad accounts for the category pumps and compressors. According to the United Nations Comtrade database this category reached on the basis of USD around USD 3.57 billion in 2015. This was 6.5% less than in the last year.

Just over 30% of the supplies came from the PRC; probably to a not inconsiderable proportion from Japanese production. The latter is also the case with electrical machines. According to Comtrade these reached in 2015 an import value of slightly more than USD 55 billion (-8%). More than a third of this was accounted for the PRC; about one-fifth to Asian emerging markets. In the import statistics Germany is especially noted in machine tools and food and packaging machines.

Despite displacements to abroad Japanese exports continue to play a role. In 2016 they are likely to suffer from the resurgent Yen. Moreover, the economic slowdown in the Asian emerging markets is becoming more noticeable.

Import of machinery to Japan (in million Yen)
HS Description of goods 2014 2015 From Germany(2015)
8429 bis 30, 8474, 8479.10 Construction- and Constructionmaterial machines, Mining machinery 41,275.5 48,946.3 4,699.8
8444 bis 49, 8451 bis 53 Textile- and Leathermachines 65,712.2 64,431.0 4,934.5
8439 bis 42, 8443.11 bis 19 Printing and Papermachines 43,089.1 43,239.5 15,835.5
8422.30 bis 40, 8437, 8438, 8479.20 Food- and Packaging machines 38,155.9 49,887.9 11,197.5
8465, 8479.30 Woodworking machinery 8,466.0 8,099.7 2,215.3
8477 Plastic- and Rubber machines 67,477.2 64,335.5 6,783.4
8413, 8414 Pumps and Compressors 403,986.5 432,352.1 26,565.7
8425 bis 28 Boost Technology 61,233.1 65,326.0 13,124.7
8456 bis 63 Machine tools for metalworking  93,513.9 111,394.1 26,701.5

Source: Japanese custom statistics

 
Commercial practice

Relevant provisions for machine and plant engineering in Japan will be supplied by the following institutions: Japan Customs, the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), the Center for Information on Security Trade Control Japanese Standards Association (http://www.jsa.or.jp), the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee , the Japan Accreditation Board for Conformity Assessment  and the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO ). JETRO published in February 2010 the still actual report "Handbook for Industrial Products Import Regulations 2009", which contains the specific import requirements for some types of machines, especially for machine tools, food processing and packaging machines.

Detailed information on commercial and tax laws are available at http://www.gtai.de/recht and for import arrangements, tariffs and NTB under http://www.gtai.de/zoll

Internetadresses
Name Internet addresses Comments
Germany Trade & Invest http://www.gtai.de/japan Foreign Trade Information for German Export
AHK Japan http://japan.ahk.de Information place for German companies
Minstry of Economy, Trade and Industry http://www.meti.go.jp Responsible for strategy and planning for industrial
machinery engineering and related sectors
Japan Machinery Federation http://www.jmf.or.jp Association of Machinery Engineering
Japan Society of Industrial Machinery Manufacturers http://www.jsim.or.jp Association of Industrial Machinery Manufacturers
Japan Machine Tool Builders' Association http://www.jmtba.or.jp Association of Machine Tool BuildersHerstellerverband für Werkzeugmaschinen
JIMTOF/Japan International Machine Tool Fair Tokyo Big Sight      http://www.jimtof.org Largest and most important machine tool exhibition
(every two years, next date November
17th – 22nd 2016)


The series “Sector compact” provides analysis on important key sectors of German export economy.
Other country reports for machinery and plant engineering and other industries can be found at http://www.gtai.de/branche-kompakt .
Contact for engineering: Roland Lorenz; E-Mail: roland.lorenz@gtai.de