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Textildruckerei Heinrich Mayer GmbH, Michael Steidle (c) Textildruckerei Heinrich Mayer GmbH
21.07.2020

„COVID-19 - We could and should have appeared better as noble knights" Michael Steidle, Textildruckerei Heinrich Mayer GmbH

  • Interview with Michael Steidle, Managing Director Textildruckerei Heinrich Mayer GmbH

At least Europe seems to be able to breathe a sigh of relief after weeks of lockdown during the corona pandemic. The textile industry, an industry that has lived globalisation for so many years, is facing the challenge of maintaining its place in the new normal and building on its previous performance as quickly as possible.
Textination talked to three company representatives along the textile chain about personal and operational experiences.

  • Interview with Michael Steidle, Managing Director Textildruckerei Heinrich Mayer GmbH

At least Europe seems to be able to breathe a sigh of relief after weeks of lockdown during the corona pandemic. The textile industry, an industry that has lived globalisation for so many years, is facing the challenge of maintaining its place in the new normal and building on its previous performance as quickly as possible.
Textination talked to three company representatives along the textile chain about personal and operational experiences.

The Interview with Michael Steidle, managing director at the textile printing company Heinrich Mayer GmbH, marks the provisional end of our series that started with Wolfgang Müller, Head of Sales & Services at Mayer & Cie. GmbH & Co. KG and was continued by Andreas Merkel, managing director of Gebr. Otto Baumwollfeinzwirnerei GmbH & Co. KG. The textile printing company Mayer, a family business on the Swabian Alb, is a leader in textile printing, in screen, rouleaux, rotary, sublimation and flock printing and as well as in 3D coating. They are increasingly using these skills in the area of technical textiles.

How have you felt about the corona era to date - as a company and personally?
What would you on no account want to go through again and what might you even consider maintaining on a daily basis?

 The corona time hit us hard. At the beginning of April, sometimes it felt like the lights would go out within the next 24 hours. In numbers there is a drop in sales of 30 percent.
And that's not just the way we are, this crisis has incredibly broader implications. Involved in the word of the Chamber of Commerce I am concerned with many companies in the region. Sectors that would not come to mind spontaneously also feel the effects. This also includes recycling companies. After all, there is also less commercial waste when companies are on short-time work.
At a personal level you can deal with the crisis, hand hygiene, sneeze etiquette, you can learn all of this. But we miss people-to-people contacts. We have a teenage daughter; young people in particular lack the ability to be out and about with their peers.

 
What has the pandemic meant for your company so far?
As I said, the Corona period brought us a significant drop in sales. That means we think twice before spending money. At the beginning of the year we moved to our new, spacious company building. There are still a few small investments to be made. So far, we have put it off until the situation has calmed down again. And so do many. The economic network extremely got out of hand due to the lockdown.
We applied for short-time work, which has been running for three months now. However, you have to see how long that makes sense. Our customers also had a drop in sales, which they first of all have to recover.

 
What adjustments or innovations to your product portfolio have you felt obliged by the pandemic to undertake?
The mask production was a very strong topic in April and May, the phone almost rang continuously. This enabled us to compensate for many orders that were lost otherwise.
We reacted quickly, not only printing masks classically, but also developing coatings for medical face masks and protective clothing. The coatings that we offer are antibacterial and have the lotus effect. This results in the formation of droplets in the aerosols. We have had checked and certified these innovations in an urgent procedure.
We converted our machines ad hoc so that we could apply innovative coatings instead of paint. This was even possible for ready-made masks.
In general, I rate this ability to react quickly as one of our great strengths. We are a small company, so the path from idea to implementation is rather short. If we recognize a trend, an opportunity in our industry, we examine ourselves: Do we have resources that could be used or adapted to offer a solid, marketable solution in a very short time? This refers to know-how, ideas, machines and, for larger projects, also partners. Experience has shown that on the one hand we have the necessary imagination, but on the other hand we also have a fairly realistic view of ourselves. If we can answer the question with “yes”, then we get started without delay. We can evaluate a trial in the evening and continue working on it the next day. There is no need for a meeting with five persons beforehand.
 

What are your views on global supply chains in the future, and will you be drawing consequences for your procurement policy?
We cannot avoid global supply chains; and it will remain this way. In the short term, you may reflect on regional procurement, as far as that is still possible. Many things are simply no longer available and the development over the past 30 years cannot be turned back. Let's take pigment paint: it comes from India and China, otherwise it doesn't exist anymore. Nobody in Europe can keep the prices. And yes, that also means that the production of systemically relevant products can no longer be guaranteed.

          
How do you rate the importance of partnerships within the industry in the future? Does Covid-19 have the potential to promote the creation of new cooperation arrangements in the industry? Or have they already taken shape?
Existing partnerships are important. We must keep the ball rolling: Interrupted projects have to be continued with existing partners.
I think it is important to maintain partnerships at eye level. Sure, now everyone has to see how they can make ends meet. It will be shown, however, who works loyally in the long term and with respect to the business.
Personally, it is important for me to be true to my word. Only a few days ago I spoke to a student, whom we promised her internship and a corresponding payment in February. This young woman can start her internship with us; what paying is concerned, I had to tell her honestly that we have to talk about it again. Fortunately, that was not a problem. It is important to the student that she can complete the required internship at all. This is not so easy since most companies do not accept anyone right now. That is understandable too, but we will need the well-trained people again soon, that’s for sure!

 
What initiatives or approaches for your industry would you welcome for the near future?
I would be very interested in a positive and comprehensive description of what value added is still available in Germany. An initiative that illustrates that the textile industry is an important industry, with many companies that have been family-owned for generations, often with a young, dynamic management and high-quality products. Really nobody has that on his radar. Just today, two designers from a company nearby visited us. They were surprised which services we offer in the field of technical textiles - they were not even aware of it.
The textile industry has played itself down for a long time, that has to stop. Of course, we no longer have added value like the machine building industry. But now, in the corona crisis, it would have been the right time to take advantage of the situation and to initiate much-needed lobbying..


What would you like to see as part of the German textile industry? Do you feel that the status of the German textile industry has changed as a result of the pandemic, especially in respect of public procurement?
No, only at very short notice. Everything was taken during the crisis, the main thing was that the requested product, i.e. masks and protective clothing, was even available. Now the old cycle is back: I have a certain budget, where can I get the most for it? This is frustrating because the willingness to face this challenge was high on the part of the companies.
We also have driven the development and had our coatings for masks certified in an urgent process. Others have switched their entire production at a significant cost to meet demand. Nobody became a millionaire this way.
I think the textile industry could have sold better here. We could and should have appeared better as noble knights. Unfortunately, this was lost in the heat of the battle.

Until now the big issues have been globalisation, sustainability / climate change / environmental protection, digitisation, the labour market situation and so on. Where do they stand now and how must we rate them against the backdrop of the Covid-19 pandemic?
We take sustainability into account with our certifications, with GOTS and ISO 9001. Digitisation does not work quickly for us; it will take years before we can digitise processes. Sure, in administration we are now increasingly working with web meetings and video conferences, but personal contact is important to me. I regularly give lectures; my next one will be at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences and I very much hope that it can take place. I am just a guy for direct contact.
The labour market situation depends on the pandemic and how it develops. In any case, it remains difficult to get young people excited about textile professions. When I open a mobile phone store, I don't need a day to have my employees together. When we present ourselves at a training fair, we are happy to have a handful of good conversations.
Training is so valuable. Someone who has one will always have a different status than an unskilled person, even if - at some point - he works in a completely different branch. The dual training system is absolutely untouchable for me, because we live from this economic performance. We have nothing else but our knowledge. And we have to keep developing because only the high level gives the necessary output.
 

What lessons are to be learnt in respect of these targets for the post-corona era?
Innovation, innovation, innovation. You must not stand still. Nobody knows what to do next. But in three years from now I have to live from what I am developing today, just like I live from what I developed three years ago. Now, in times of Corona, it is much harder to remember, but it does not help: I can’t stand still, waiting for what is happening next, being like a deer caught in the headlights.

This interview was conducted by Ines Chucholowius, CEO Textination GmbH

Textildruckerei Mayer: Innovation management in Swabian © Textildruckerei Heinrich Mayer GmbH
03.09.2019

CEO Michael Steidle (Textildruckerei Mayer): Innovation Management in Swabian

  • “Keep it up! is not an option"

The textile printing company Mayer is a family business on the Swabian Alb. As a leader in textile printing, in screen, rouleaux, rotary, sublimation and flock printing and as well as in 3D coating, the enterprise is increasingly applying its leading expertise to the field of technical textiles. An in-house quality management system ensures the traceability of all production processes, an environmental portfolio the efficient use of energy, sustainability and resources. Textination talked to Managing Director Michael Steidle.

  • “Keep it up! is not an option"

The textile printing company Mayer is a family business on the Swabian Alb. As a leader in textile printing, in screen, rouleaux, rotary, sublimation and flock printing and as well as in 3D coating, the enterprise is increasingly applying its leading expertise to the field of technical textiles. An in-house quality management system ensures the traceability of all production processes, an environmental portfolio the efficient use of energy, sustainability and resources. Textination talked to Managing Director Michael Steidle.

Textildruckerei Heinrich Mayer GmbH is a family business that has been active in textile printing and finishing for 45 years. If you had to introduce yourself in 100 words to someone who doesn't know the company, what makes you unique?
Over the past ten years or so, our family-owned company based in rural Baden-Wurttemberg has changed from a classic textile printing company into a system supplier. A central precondition for this is our knowledge of our own strengths. We rely on proven printing solutions. We do not rush into exchanging them with the latest trend. Instead, we examine whether another, innovative application can be found for them. Or whether one it is possible to combine the tried and tested with a new approach. For example, we were able to solve electronic requirements by printing technology. This area is our second focus. I am a Master of electronic engineering and completed my apprenticeship at Bizerba, a worldwide leading specialist in industrial weighing and labeling technologies. My wife brought me to the textile industry.

In which product area do market and customers challenge you in particular? And on which socially relevant areas do you see a particularly great need for innovation in the upcoming 10 years? What is your assessment that textile finishing will be able to offer solutions?
Mobility is an issue that will be of great concern to all of us in the coming years. In this area trump is what brings little weight, can be produced in a resource-saving way and is easy to shape. All these requirements are met by textile carrier materials and composites. However, textiles as a pure material are still not well-known in public and in our target industries. This understanding should be promoted.

Were fashion and clothing yesterday and do hybrid product developments like your ceramic-coated high-tech fabrics represent the future? When would the company name have to be adjusted, and how long will you keep your broad range of products and services?
In any case, it is true that the textile market, especially the clothing sector, is becoming smaller and smaller in Germany, while the market for technical textile solutions is growing. Of course, this also has an impact on our business and our priorities. Textiles are now found in so many products - we would never have dreamed about before!

As far as the company name is concerned, we have discussed it extensively. We decided to keep it because it is still right. The textiles we talk about are mostly a functional material, but they still remain textiles. And the technology with which we manufacture our high-tech coatings continues to be the printing technology ...

"Without innovation no future" - In five years time, you celebrate the company’s 50th anniversary, with which fundamental corporate decisions will you then have secured the future of your customers and employees?
You already mentioned the landmark decision: "Innovation, innovation, innovation." We can secure our future through innovation only. This means that we must constantly question ourselves and be prepared to be widely interested in attending trade fairs and exhibitions and find out what people are looking for.

Innovation manager or tinkering: What does it mean for a medium-sized family business high up on the Swabian Alb having to profile on specialties in the niche? What advantages do you see compared to large companies?
The Swabian Alb is a traditional textile region. In 1980, about 30,000 people worked here in the textile industry. In 2005 it was barely a sixth. There is not much else left to do than to look for profitable niches and to show a clear profile. Perhaps the special thing about it is that we are not alone in this. Basically, all successful textile companies in our region have undergone a similar process.

As a small - and owner-managed - company, we have the shortest and fastest decision-making channels. That makes us more flexible than a big company. A budget is not questioned five times, but it is decided. If we make a trial, we can evaluate it in the evening and react the very next day. If something doesn't work, we don't need a meeting – then that's it.

At the same time, we do not automatically have a budget for research and development. We first have to carve this out elsewhere. And we do so in the knowledge that it can also be for the trash can. Within the framework of this budget, entrepreneurs have the greatest possible freedom.

To break new ground means decisiveness, overcoming fears - and thus the courage to fail. Not every project can succeed. Which entrepreneurial decision are you particularly glad to have made in retrospect? What makes you proud?
That's easy (Michael Steidle laughs)! We have realized a company’s request that has driven us for months, which in the end has also awakened personal ambition. That was the introduction to these technical coatings, the key and door opener for technical textiles in general. In doing so, I revived old resources, almost by chance. Meaning: my knowledge in electronics. That's when I realized that with a textile you can do completely different things. When you see the finished product on sale after two or three years, it makes the whole team proud!

Every man for himself, God for us all: With which sectors in the textile industry and from neighboring sectors do you want to get closer cooperation beyond competitive borders? For which higher-level problems do you consider this to be indispensable?
Actually, it is not so much a matter of competitive boundaries - cooperation with innovative competitors would always be good for the end product, but that is the case in every industry!

For us, cooperation with other companies in the textile chain is important, i.e. the upstream company. Let’s assume that I am looking for a special fabric for my coating, which in turn has to be made from a special yarn. Then I am already dependent on two companies. Fortunately, we have innovative companies right on our doorstep. But sometimes we have to go further to find the right partner. Characteristics such as willingness to take risks, a common entrepreneurial interest and a passion for the final product are enormously important in a successful cooperation.

Together with your customers, universities, specialist institutes and research institutes, porject-related you work on market-ready solutions. Do you think Germany is a good breeding ground for innovative entrepreneurs? What should happen to stay successful in international competition?
The cooperation with the institutes makes perfect sense; after all, it is their task to carry out research for companies that cannot shoulder such assignments on their own. This includes testing facilities as well as applying for funding, which is only possible in cooperation with research institutes. However, they are public institutions and therefore per se have a different objective than a company: We need to bring a promising idea to market as soon as possible so that it generates a return. A research institute does not have this pressure.

And Germany as a location? Germany is a brilliant location! But we have an infrastructure bottleneck: I mean roads and internet connections as well as access to funding or venture capital. That does not exist in Germany in the true sense anyway. Finding investors for an idea is therefore extremely difficult.

Let me give you an example: Over the years, I have received around 14,000 euros in subsidies for a coating innovation. An American entrepreneur had a very similar idea. He was able to raise about $ 35 million within three years through venture capital, crowd funding, and grants. In the end, he did not even know what he should spend the whole money on!

In addition, for us as a company in Germany, the large, open economic area of Europe is important!

You are the first textile printing company to be certified for screen printing as well as for rotary and rouleaux printing according to the GOTS standard. How important do you consider such certification as a unique selling point in the competition?
Such certifications are important because we work with clients in the upper and premium segments. Especially in times in which - undoubtedly justified - ever greater demands are placed on sustainable business and also the external presentation receives a steadily growing attention, we can support our clients this way. We therefore offer different printing methods, all of which are certified. One thing we have to be aware of is, that if we - and all the other members of the textile chain – charge the additional costs, the price mark-up would be so enormous that nobody would accept it anymore.

How do you feel about the willingness to perform of the succeeding generation? And who would you recommend to join the textile industry and to whom would you dissuade from it?
We work a lot with students and interns. Every year we give two students the opportunity to work and research in our company for their master's thesis. With these young talents, we often experience great commitment and the ambition to bring their own project to a meaningful completion. At the same time, it is difficult for us to fill our apprenticeships; the idea of working eight hours daily, five days a week seems daunting.

And who would I recommend to join the textile industry? For decades, we vehemently discouraged our offspring from working in the textile industry, because one said it has no future ... As a true high-tech industry, it is interesting for engineers, process engineers, chemists or electronic engenieers. Very important: for people with visions! If you are looking for the classic textile industry you have to be prepared to work worldwide and you will not be unemployed. Many companies are desperately looking for plant managers or managing directors for their non-European branches.

 

Copyright photos: MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt
06.08.2019

DIGITEX SHOW 2019 GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER MILESTONE

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

The 4th edition of the Show is gearing up incorporating DIGITEX Show highlighting the developments and innovations taking place in the digital textile printing technology, which is eventually picking up fast in the apparel manufacturing industry across the country. More than 20,000 enthusiastic visitors are expected to witness the latest developments during the three days of extreme business activities. They would not only take a glimpse of what new has hit the turf in the digital textile printing, but will also experience the newest technologies through various live demonstrations that the leading brands catering to the solution for soft signage and sublimation printing would put on the display.

The transformation in digital technologies over the past few years has been tremendous, which the organisers found important to bring forth under the DIGITEX @ Gartex Texprocess 2019. The advancement in technologies and rapidly increasing awareness has brought it at a revolution of sorts. Digitex hopes to become a one-stop solution hub for the latest machinery, inks, software and services to serious buyers and decision makers of the digital textile printing industry. The Show would also witness renowned brands offering live demo of their respective machines to let the visitors feel and appreciate the development taking place in the fabric digital printing arena which is slowly but steadily picking up.

Ever since direct to garment (DTG) printing has been introduced, textile printing industry has started finding new horizons with a fast and flexible production solution that delivers exceptional image quality, which in turn is opening up new doors of opportunities for those who are willing to enter into the apparel industry or are eager to expand their garmenting & textile business. Digitex @ Gartex Texprocess India is an important event for the digital printing technology leaders as it offers them the perfect Launchpad as far as Indian market is concerned.

Moreover, experts feel that increasing thrust and resultant R&D investment in progression of digital textile printing technology will further boost the growth avenues for the digital textile industry in near future. Meanwhile, increasing popularity of polyester as an alternative to cotton as a textile fabric further creates opportunities for digital textile printing equipment providers to expand their business. Attributing to such significant demand for digital textile printing technology, there is scope for manufacturers to enhance their business in time to come.

Many leading names like ColorJet India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Apsom Technologies, Kornit Digital, True Colors Group, Epson India, Jaysynth Dyestuff (India) Ltd., etc. are lined up with their new arrivals and eagerly awaiting the Show dates to launch their latest printers. Featuring continuous production and a wide range of printing capabilities, most of these new age digital textile printers work on minimal maintenance and come with easy cleaning options for smooth operation. All these activities clearly evince that overall textile printing technology market has positive growth prospects, riding on the back of the country’s burgeoning textile industry.

Companies like Arrow Digital, AT Inks, Britomatics, Cosmic Trends, DCC Print Vision Llp, E.I.DuPont India Pvt. Ltd. Electronics For Imaging India Pvt. Ltd. (Efi Optitex), Epson India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Ganpati Graphics, Grafica Flextronica, Green Printing Solution, Green Tech, Hi Tech Marketing, HP India Sales Pvt. Ltd., Jay Chemicals Industries Ltd., JN Arora & Co., Kamal Sales Corp., KNR Technology Company, Mac Printing Solutions, Mouvent, Negi Sign Systems & Supplies Co., Orange O Technology Pvt. Ltd., Somya Digital Technologies, Spintex Pvt. Ltd./Aura, Tanya Enterprises, Texzium International Pvt. Ltd./Wenli, Veekay Enterprises, & many more are coming up with their technological innovations to showcase their latest product range under the DIGITEX.
 
The extensive exhibit profile ranging from new printers and inks to upcoming techniques will explore new and exciting opportunities offered by digital printing for home furnishing & interior decoration, apparel & fashion and corporate interiors. On the display will be digital textile machinery, digital textile printing machines, dye sublimation process, screen printing machines, t-shirt printing machines, transfer printing process, digital textile printing chemicals, digital textile printing inks (disperse, reactive and pigment inks), heat transfer machines, sublimation paper, software & many more.

Moreover, it’s a great opportunity for digital printing companies, signage industry stakeholders, screen printing industry people from graphic arts industry, merchandisers and other industry players to interact with the leading digital printing technology suppliers and to witness the latest range and innovations in the sector. This is because following the advent of digital printing solution, the applications of fabric or textile is not limited only to the clothing and home furnishing, but has gone far beyond to include signage, flags, posters, back-lit, front-lit, etc. to bring forth a wholesome idea that where all digital textile printing technology can be used.

Points to be noted are numerous benefits of soft signage. Textile or soft signage presses are very eco-friendly, run over water-based inks with little to no odour and low power consumption. Soft signage facilitates customers save on shipping because of being much lighter in weight than other materials used in the signage and graphics industry. Also, fabric-printed signs fold up to create smaller packages, again decreasing shipping costs. But overall, the Show would be a win-win for business visitors as it has much more than focusing on digital printing technology, bringing entire value chain of garmenting and textile printing manufacturing solution under one roof.

Organised by the MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. in association with Messe Frankfurt India, Gartex Texprocess, this year, will have three more shows apart from the Digitex. These are namely, FABRIC & TRIMS SHOW: A focused area to source all embellishments & fabrics, DENIM SHOW: A zone that aims to bring together the denim supply chain under one roof, and INDIA LAUNDRY SHOW: An ideal platform offering a wide range of business and networking opportunities to manufacturers, suppliers and service providers in the laundry and dry-cleaning industries.

Additionally, there are a couple of focus areas i.e., EMBROIDERY ZONE highlighting the significant evolution that has been taking place in the invention of new technologies and machinery for embroidery. The top variants of embroidery machines, software & allied products will be highlighted in this dedicated segment. Another focus area is GARMENTING & APPAREL MACHINERY that would showcase technological developments in the Garment & Apparel Manufacturing Sector.

Broad exhibit categories at Gartex Texprocess 2019 include embroidery machines, cutting and sewing machines, fabrics & accessories, needles & threads, laundry & washing equipment, finishing equipment, laser cutting machines, digital textile printing machines, automation and software.

Source:

MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt

(c) FESPA Global Print Expo
07.05.2019

FESPA GLOBAL PRINT EXPO 2019: PRINT MAKE WEAR FAST FASHION-FACTORY

  • The Print Make Wear fast fashion factory feature at FESPA Global Expo 2019 in Munich (14-17 May 2019) will double in size compared with its launch in 2018 in response to positive visitor feedback.

The feature was introduced at the flagship FESPA event in Berlin in 2018 to meet the needs of visitors interested in the opportunities in printed fashion textiles and garments. Taking the form of a live production environment, Print Make Wear addresses every step in the garment production process. This begins with planning, design and prepress, progressing to printing, drying, cutting, sewing, welding and embellishment and finishing with packing and retail display.

  • The Print Make Wear fast fashion factory feature at FESPA Global Expo 2019 in Munich (14-17 May 2019) will double in size compared with its launch in 2018 in response to positive visitor feedback.

The feature was introduced at the flagship FESPA event in Berlin in 2018 to meet the needs of visitors interested in the opportunities in printed fashion textiles and garments. Taking the form of a live production environment, Print Make Wear addresses every step in the garment production process. This begins with planning, design and prepress, progressing to printing, drying, cutting, sewing, welding and embellishment and finishing with packing and retail display.

At FESPA Global Print Expo 2019 the expanded feature will allow more space to showcase an even more comprehensive range of garment printing technology solutions and consumables, as well as incorporating a staged area for presentations and debates and a catwalk for fashion shows. The visitor experience will also be enhanced with two separate guided tours, one with a focus on direct-to-garment production and the other tailored to visitors interested in roll-to-roll production.

The technologies showcased within Print Make Wear 2019 will include direct-to garment digital and screen printing presses with both automatic and manual presses printing on water-based inks, the roll-to-roll digital technologies will include dye-sublimation as well as other textile print technologies, with the support of brands including Adobe, Adelco, EFI, HP, Mimaki, Vastex MagnaColours, Easiway and Premier Textiles.

The garments produced and modelled within Print Make Wear will carry a striking series of exclusive designs on the theme of ‘Elements’, with the tagline Inspired by Nature – Powered by Print, which have been created specifically for FESPA by photographer and illustrator Jasper Goodall. FESPA is also working with young fashion designer Aminah Hamzaoui, who is collaborating on the design of the garments being produced using the roll-to-roll technologies.

FESPA Head of Events, Duncan MacOwan comments: “Year after year, independent market insights and visitor feedback reinforce the rising levels of interest in textile printing, while our own FESPA Census in 2018 indicated that sports apparel and fast fashion are two of the most dynamic growth applications in our community. Visitor response to the first Print Make Wear feature last year was extremely positive, with more than 2,000 visitors taking part in our expert-guided tours.”

He continues: “By increasing the floor space dedicated to this feature in Munich we can accommodate visitors more comfortably, enrich the overall experience and elevate the educational content. We’re confident that, whatever their level of knowledge or investment in garment printing, visitors to Print Make Wear 2019 in Munich will leave with a deeper understanding of the opportunities to optimise production, improve sustainability and boost profitability.”

Print Make Wear is free to attend for registered visitors to FESPA Global Print Expo 2019 and the co-located European Sign Expo. Guided tours can be pre-booked at https://www.fespaglobalprintexpo.com/features/print-make-wear. The feature is part of a programme of free educational content which also includes the new Colour L*A*B* colour management showcase and conference, Printeriors and a comprehensive schedule of live seminars in the Trend Theatre.

For more information about Print Make Wear, visit www.fespaglobalprintexpo.com/features/print-make-wear. To pre-register to attend FESPA Global Print Expo 2019 visit https://www.fespaglobalprintexpo.com/ and use code FESM906 for free entry.

 

 

Photo: pasja1000 Pixabay
19.03.2019

SRI LANKA'S APPAREL AND TEXTILE EXPORTS RECEIVE A BOOST

  • Modernization of production facilities required

Thanks to the reactivated GSP import status of the European Union, Sri Lanka's textile and clothing industry is looking to the future with confidence and expects better sales opportunities abroad.

The textile and clothing industry is of macroeconomic importance for Sri Lanka. The sector accounted for almost 43 per cent of the country's total exports in 2018 and provides employment for nearly 350,000 workers in the formal sector and about twice as many in the informal sector. In total, this is about 33 percent of all jobs in the manufacturing industry. The majority of employees are women.

  • Modernization of production facilities required

Thanks to the reactivated GSP import status of the European Union, Sri Lanka's textile and clothing industry is looking to the future with confidence and expects better sales opportunities abroad.

The textile and clothing industry is of macroeconomic importance for Sri Lanka. The sector accounted for almost 43 per cent of the country's total exports in 2018 and provides employment for nearly 350,000 workers in the formal sector and about twice as many in the informal sector. In total, this is about 33 percent of all jobs in the manufacturing industry. The majority of employees are women.

The textile and clothing industry contribute around 6 percent to the gross domestic product (GDP). "In view of the development of other sectors, it is very unlikely that another industry will reach this level of performance in the short to medium term," Jeevani Siriwardena, head of the Export Development Board (EDB), said in an interview with Germany Trade and Invest. The textile and clothing industry will continue to be an important sector for the Sri Lankan economy.

Short to medium-term prospects are good
On May 18th 2017, the European Union (EU) reactivated the Generalized Scheme of Preferences Plus (GSP+) status for Sri Lanka after a seven-year time-out. This means that when goods are exported to the EU, the island state is exempted from customs duties on more than 66 percent of customs tariff lines. "Without GSP status, Sri Lanka's export losses are said to have cost around 32 billion between 2010 and 2017," stressed Ravindi Ranaraja, Deputy Head of the Export Service Division of EDB, in a GTAI interview. In particular, the strongly export-oriented clothing and textile industry will benefit from the regained GSP status. Sri Lanka's textile and clothing industry is looking to the future with confidence and also expects better sales opportunities abroad.

Sri Lanka's textile and clothing exports to the EU and Germany in 2018
(in USD million; change year-on-year in %)  
HS-Code Definition
 
EU
 
Change
 
Germany *) Change
 
61 Articles of apparel and clothing accessories, knitted or crocheted 1,177 0.7 232.55 9.6
62 Garments and clothing accessories, not knitted or crocheted 874 7.6 151.59 18.1
63 Other made-up textile articles; sets worn clothing and used textile articles 52 18.2 7.8 13.5
Total   2,103 3.9 391.92 12.8

*) Estimation
Sources: Sri Lanka Apparel Exporters Association; press releases; calculations by Germany Trade & Invest; Destatis, February 2019

Positive impulses are already visible. According to the latest foreign trade figures available, Sri Lanka was able to increase its total exports of textiles and clothing (HS codes 61, 62 and 63) by almost 4.8 percent to approximately USD 5 billion in 2018. Exports to the EU increased by 3.9 percent to USD 2.1 billion. Exports to Germany were able to recover a plus of 12.8 percent.

It is not yet certain that Sri Lanka will be able to make up for the losses of the past. In the meantime, countries such as Bangladesh, India and Pakistan, which have already enjoyed tariff concessions in foreign trade with the EU for the entire current decade, have passed by the island state. Bangladesh in particular, recorded a strong increase in its clothing and textile exports compared with Sri Lanka..

Sri Lanka textile and clothing exports 2018 (HS codes 61, 62, 63)
Country In USD million 1)
China 172.4
Vietnam 36.0
Bangladesh 32.9
India 20.9
Indonesia 2) 14.0

1) Estimation; 2) Forecast
Sources: Press Releases; Calculations Germany Trade & Invest, February 2019

Sri Lanka focuses on higher quality products
Numerous domestic textile producers are switching to the production of higher-quality garments in order to maintain their competitiveness. "In Sri Lanka, the focus is not on mass but rather on higher quality products," confirmed M. Raghuram, Chief Executive Officer of Brandix, one of the country's largest clothing companies, in an interview with GTAI. The island state concentrates on the production of just a few product categories such as underwear, sportswear or lounge wear..

Sri Lanka has become a location for the manufacture of high-quality garments. This is also confirmed by the World Bank. In its 2016 study "Stitches to Riches" (website), it found that Sri Lanka outperformed its competitors India, Pakistan and Bangladesh in terms of quality, delivery times, reliability and sustainable social responsibility.

Sri Lanka serves fastidious international companies such as Victoria Secrets, GAP, Nike or Marks and Spencer. According to expert estimates, the production of the top 10 Sri Lankan textile and clothing companies accounts for around 85 percent of the industry's total exports.

The ambitious goal is to increase the garment industry's export revenues to USD 8 billion by 2025, which will require an annual growth of 6 percent. For this Sri Lanka must improve capacity, technology and resource problems. "It is becoming more and more difficult to find suitable personnel. For many young people working in the garment and textile industry in Sri Lanka is simply unattractive”, Nilanthi Sivapragasam, Chief Financial Officer of the conglomerate Aitkence Spence, told GTAI. The training of the workforce is also a major challenge. "Training new employees is very time-consuming and labor-intensive," confirms Sivapragasam.

Imports of German machinery decline
In addition, Sri Lanka's textile companies must modernize their machinery and expand their capacities in order to further increase productivity and added value. Accordingly, there is a great demand for technically sophisticated textile machines in the country. This offers good opportunities and chances for machine suppliers. According to experts, the demand for textile printing and dyeing machines, stenter frames and finishing technology will develop particularly dynamically in the future.
 
In Sri Lanka itself only relatively simple machines are being produced. High-end technology is mainly imported. China is the most important supplier of textile machinery, accounting for about one third of all imports. India has also been able to significantly increase its machine exports to Sri Lanka in recent years. In 2017, India achieved exports of USD 6.3 million, an increase of 46.7 percent, compared with exports of USD 2.6 million in 2010.

German machine exports suffered enormous losses. Sri Lanka's imports of textile machinery from Germany amounted to USD 16.5 million in 2017, a decrease of 54.2 percent. Over the past years, Germany has lost share of its deliveries. According to industry experts, this trend will continue: Made in Germany stands for quality and continues to be very popular in Sri Lanka; however, German machine manufacturers are often unable to keep up with the low-cost products from China or India.

Sri Lanka's imports of textile and clothing machinery
(SITC 724; USD million) 
Country 2016 2017 Change
China 56.3 51.8 -8.0
Japan 26.6 18.3 -31.1
Germany 36.0 16.5 -54.2
Singapore 13.6 14.5 -6.8
India 4.3 6.3 46.7
Total 192.8 155.3 -19.5

Source: UN Comtrade, March 2019

Contact addresses
Title Internet address Remark
Germany Trade & Invest http://www.gtai.de/srilanka Foreign trade information for the German export industry
AHK Sri Lanka http://www.srilanka.ahk.de Contact point for German companies
Sri Lanka Export Development Board http://www.srilankabusiness.com/edb State organization responsible for the development and promotion of exports in Sri Lanka. 

 

More information:
Sri Lanka
Source:

Heena Nazir, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

Texprocess 2017 © Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
18.04.2017

DIGITAL TEXTILE PRINTING A FOCAL-POINT THEME AT TEXPROCESS

  • First European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess
  • Exhibitors present the latest digital-printing Technologies

Colour and function: digital textile printing is one of the focal-point themes at this year’s Texprocess. For the first time, the World Textile Information Network (WTiN) is holding the European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess. And there will be a separate lecture block on digital printing in the programme of the Texprocess Forum. Moreover, the Digital Textile Microfactory in Hall 6.0 will present a textile production chain in action – from design, via digital printing and cutting, to making up. As well, numerous exhibitors, including Brother, Epson, Ergosoft and Mimaki, will be showing digital printing technologies.

  • First European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess
  • Exhibitors present the latest digital-printing Technologies

Colour and function: digital textile printing is one of the focal-point themes at this year’s Texprocess. For the first time, the World Textile Information Network (WTiN) is holding the European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess. And there will be a separate lecture block on digital printing in the programme of the Texprocess Forum. Moreover, the Digital Textile Microfactory in Hall 6.0 will present a textile production chain in action – from design, via digital printing and cutting, to making up. As well, numerous exhibitors, including Brother, Epson, Ergosoft and Mimaki, will be showing digital printing technologies.

„“We are expanding our programme on the subject of digital printing in response to the growing demand for digitalised technologies for processing garments, technical textiles and flexible materials. This programme is of particular interest to manufacturers of technical textiles and companies that process textiles”, says Michael Jänecke, Head of Brand Management, Textiles and Textile Technologies, Messe Frankfurt.

Elgar Straub, Managing Director, VDMA Textile Care, Fabric and Leather Technologies: “Thanks to digital textile printing, it is now possible to print apparel, shoes and technical textiles directly. Given the general trend towards individualisation, demand for individualised products is increasing in the apparel industry. This is turning digital textile printing into one of the future-oriented technologies for companies that process garments and textiles.”

European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess

In cooperation with Texprocess and Techtextil, the World Textile Information Network (WTiN) will hold the European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess for the first time. The focus of the conference will be on digital textile printing for adding functional and decorative features to technical textiles. The WTiN European Digital Textile Conference will take place in ‘Saal Europa’ of Hall 4.0 from 09.00 to 16.30 hrs on
10 May. Tickets for the conference can be obtained from WTiN under
https://www.digitaltextileconference.com/edtc2017/

The subjects to be covered in the lectures include direct yarn colouring in the embroidery plants (Coloreel, Sweden), plasma pre-treatment for textiles before digital printing (GRINP, Italy) and chemical finishing for textiles using inkjet printing technology (EFI-REGGIANI, USA).

Texprocess Forum to spotlight digital printing technology

Digital printing technology will also be the subject of a separate lecture block at Texprocess Forum. At this international conference, experts from science and industry will focus on the latest findings relating to subjects of major importance to the sector in over 30 lectures and panel discussions on all four days of the fair. Texprocess Forum is free of charge for visitors of Texprocess and Techtextil and will be held in Hall 6.0. For the first time, three partner organisations are organising the lecture blocks: DTB – Dialogue Textile Apparel, the International Apparel Federation (IAF) and the World Textile Information Network (WTiN).

Digital Textile Microfactory

In cooperation with the German Institutes of Textile and Fibre Research Denkendorf (DITF) and renowned textile companies, Texprocess presents the complete interlinked textile production chain – the Digital Textile Microfactory – live in Hall 6.0. The digital-printing station shows large-scale inkjet printing in the form of sublimation printing on polyester and pigment printing on cotton and blended fabrics. Production orders can be combined flexibly and printed colour consistently with a variety of printing parameters. Ensuring optimum printing results at this station are hardware and software partners, Mimaki and Ergosoft, and Coldenhove and Monti Antonio. In addition to the Microfactory partners, other renowned companies, including Brother and Epson, will be showing state-of-the-art printing processes for textiles and apparel at Texprocess.

Digital-printing Outlook

Originally developed for fashion fabrics, digital textile printing is also used for printing technical textiles, such as sports clothing, and textiles for the automobile industry whereby the primary focus is on functionalising textiles. For example, swimwear can be made more colour fast to resist frequent contact with water and chlorine, and exposure to the sun. Also, textiles can be finished by applying chemicals via an inkjet printer and thus be given dirt-repellent, antimicrobial and fire-retardant properties. Additionally, using an inkjet printer in the finishing process is advantageous in terms of sustainability and efficiency.

Apparel Show © Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
31.01.2017

TEXPROCESS RECORDS HIGHEST NUMBER OF REGISTRATIONS IN ITS HISTORY

Living in Space: special event at Techtextil showcases textile processing technologies for the space industry: Some four months before the start of Texprocess (9 to 12 May 2017), the leading international trade fair for processing textile and flexible materials reports the highest number of registrations in its history and thus continues its pattern of growth. Even now, more floor space has been booked than the previous edition had in total. “It is well worth our while continually developing Texprocess further, with regard to the technologies and processes on display, the hall layout and the complementary programme. With this fourth edition, Texprocess is now firmly established in the marketplace and is attracting other market leaders in the sector to Frankfurt,” says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies, Messe Frankfurt.

Living in Space: special event at Techtextil showcases textile processing technologies for the space industry: Some four months before the start of Texprocess (9 to 12 May 2017), the leading international trade fair for processing textile and flexible materials reports the highest number of registrations in its history and thus continues its pattern of growth. Even now, more floor space has been booked than the previous edition had in total. “It is well worth our while continually developing Texprocess further, with regard to the technologies and processes on display, the hall layout and the complementary programme. With this fourth edition, Texprocess is now firmly established in the marketplace and is attracting other market leaders in the sector to Frankfurt,” says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies, Messe Frankfurt.

Texprocess reports growing numbers of companies signing up, particularly in the CAD/CAM and Cutting, Making, Trimming (CMT) product groups. Technologies and material for Sewing, Joining and Fastening are growing steadily, too.

Among the companies that have already signed up are: Amann, Astas, assyst/Human Solutions, Barudan, Brother, bullmer, Caron Technology, Dürkopp Adler, Epson, Filiz Makina, Gemini CAD Systems, Gerber Technology, Gütermann, Juki, Kuris Spezialmaschinen, MACPI, Malkan, Mitsubishi, Morgan Tecnica, Pfaff, Serkon Tekstil Makina, SMRE, Strima, Tajima, Teseo, Tetas, Veit, Zünd.
The range of products at Texprocess once again covers all stages in the value-creation chain for textile goods, from design, IT, cutting out, sewing, seaming, embroidery and knitting to finishing, textile printing and logistics.

Change in placement for CAD/CAM and Cutting, Making, Trimming
To make the profiles of Techtextil and Texprocess even sharper, the bonding and separating technology, CMT (Cutting, Making, Trimming), CAD/CAM and printing product segments will be concentrated together at Texprocess in hall 4.0. Thus, visitors will find Techtextil exhibitors from these segments at Texprocess. These product groups will be deleted from the Techtextil nomenclature.
Apart from this change, the overall concept behind the halls at the previous event will be retained: trade visitors will find Design, IT, CAD/CAM, CMT and Printing as well as the special IT@Texprocess section in hall 4.0. Exhibitors of machines and accessories for sewing and seaming will be presenting their products in hall 5.0 and 5.1; and hall 6.0 will showcase embroidery technology, together with finishing techniques and logistics for textiles.

The technologies of textile processing for space travel
Both exhibitors and visitors at Texprocess will, this year, have the benefit of a rather special experience at the show: under the heading 'Living in Space', Techtextil will be showcasing the wide variety of applications for technical textiles in space travel, together with the processing involved. This is a cooperative venture between Techtextil, The European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). Close to the location for, amongst others, exhibitors of functional apparel textiles in Hall 6.1, and based on the areas of application for technical textiles, a special, interactive area is to be built to display, with the help of four thematic sections, the high-tech textiles and textile processing technologies that have emerged from and for space travel. The highlight of this area is a virtual-reality experience in which visitors to Techtextil and Texprocess get to go on a virtual journey through the universe, where they will learn about the application of technical textiles in space travel and the processing required to make them.

Complementary programme with focus on Digital Printing and international Innovative Apparel Show
Digital Printing will be one the thematic focusses of the Texprocess complimentary programme. The sector's information service, the World Textile Information Network (WtiN) will, for the first time, be organising the European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess. The conference will centre round technologies for digital printing on textiles and will be held on Wednesday 10 May in the Saal Europa in hall 4.0.
And digital printing on textiles will also be taken up as a topic in a dedicated series of lectures forming part of the Texprocess Forum. The forum offers, in hall 6.0, expert lectures on current issues in the sector, on all days of the trade fair. For the first time, the programme will have been designed jointly by three partners: the Dialog Textil-Bekleidung (DTB), die International Apparel Federation (IAF) and the World Textile Information Network (WTiN).

Following on from the success of its first edition, the Innovative Apparel Show is to be continued and set on an international footing. For the first time, there will be, as well as a German university, three European universities / colleges from outside Germany, showcasing, on the catwalk, their fashion designs from functional textiles and the processing stages that go into making them. The show will take place on all days of the trade fair. The participating universities / colleges are: Accademia Italiana, Florence / Italy; ESAD College of Art and Design, Matosinhos / Portugal; Esmod Paris/France, and the University of Trier / Germany. The young designers will be displaying designs relating to the three key themes of 'Textile Effects', 'Creative Engineering' and 'Smart Fashion'. Visitors will be able to vote for the public's award throughout the duration of the trade fair and the award will be presented at the last fashion show.

With the Texprocess Innovation Award, Messe Frankfurt seeks, for the fourth time, to honour the best new technological developments in the field. Submissions for the award may be made up until 20 February. The competition is open both to exhibitors at Texprocess 2017 and to other companies, institutes, universities, colleges and private individuals, who are not otherwise exhibiting at the fair. The awards in the various categories will be presented during the joint opening ceremony for Texprocess und Techtextil, on 9 May 2017. At the same time, there will be a special display area in Hall 4.0, showcasing all the prize-winning products at Texprocess.

Visitors will, once again, find many new IT solutions for the apparel industry in the IT@Texprocess section in Hall 4.0, where exhibitors will be presenting product life-cycle management systems (PLM), 'Cloud' applications and 3D CAD systems, which make it possible to create tailor-made clothes in real time and without the need for a Fitting.

Sewing and apparel-making technology record significant rise in Sales According to information provided by the Textile Care, Fabric and Leather Technologies section of the VDMA (Association of German machinery and plant manufacturers), conceptual partner of Texprocess, the German sewing and apparel-technology industry achieved an increase in turnover of 15.9 percent compared to the previous year in the period from January to October. “With export sales of € 523 million, Germany is in third place amongst exporting nations worldwide, behind China and Japan,” observes Elgar Straub, General Manager of the VDMA Textile Care, Fabric and Leather Technologies Association. “Our member companies are outstandingly well placed amongst the international competition. Above all, that is because they are continually developing and innovating. The individualisation of apparel, the digitalisation of the value creation chain and new technologies, such as digital printing and sustainable processing technologies, are currently at the heart of our members' planning for innovation.”

Texprocess will again be taking place in parallel to Techtextil, leading international trade fair for technical textiles and nonwovens (also from 9 to 12 May 2017). In all, 1,662 exhibitors from 54 different countries attended Texprocess and Techtextil in 2015, together with a total of 42,000 trade visitors. Over 13,300 of them came to see Texprocess. Added to that, there were around 7,600 additional visitors, who came across from the concurrently held Techtextil.

 

RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT SETS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM UNTIL 2025 FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY © Jerzy Sawluk / pixelio.de
28.06.2016

RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT SETS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM UNTIL 2025 FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY

  • Anticrisis Plan provides grants of nearly Ruble 1.5 Billion 

Moscow (GTAI) – In spring 2016 the Russian government has decided a "Strategy for the development of the light industry until 2025" and a "Federal program to support enterprises of the light industry" (anticrisis plan). Hence the Russian textile enterprises should be supported in the crisis. It is the aim of the Ministry of Industry and Trade to double the share of domestic producers on the clothing market from currently 25% to 50% in the year 2025.

  • Anticrisis Plan provides grants of nearly Ruble 1.5 Billion 

Moscow (GTAI) – In spring 2016 the Russian government has decided a "Strategy for the development of the light industry until 2025" and a "Federal program to support enterprises of the light industry" (anticrisis plan). Hence the Russian textile enterprises should be supported in the crisis. It is the aim of the Ministry of Industry and Trade to double the share of domestic producers on the clothing market from currently 25% to 50% in the year 2025.

According to the Ministry of Industry and Trade 14,000 companies (including 200 large enterprises) of the Russian light industry are producing clothing, textiles, footwear and leather goods. They generate annually a turnover of Ruble 270 billion. Of that 653 large and medium and 4,000 small businesses are operating in the yarn and textile industry. Because the purchasing power and consumer demand fell, the light industry slowed its production in 2015 by 12%.

To give the clothing and textile factories more security, the Russian government adopted in spring 2016 a "Strategy for the development of the light industry until 2025" and a "Federal program to support enterprises of the light industry" (anticrisis plan). It is the aim of the Ministry of Industry and Trade to double the share of domestic producers on the clothing market from currently 25% to 50% in the year 2025.  In this context up to 330,000 additional jobs should be achieved.

Anticrisis plan provides subsidies of Ruble 1.475 billion
In the anticrisis plan Ruble 1.475 billion will be granted. This should especially support manufacturers of school uniforms, children's apparel and textile factories that work on government orders. The financial support includes: subsidies for producers of school uniforms for the lower classes made out of Russian worsted fabrics (Ruble 600 million), subsidies for working capital loans to support purchases of raw materials (Ruble 800 million), subsidies for investment loans for technical modernization of enterprises (Ruble 75 million).

As part of the development program for the light industry an own development bank for the textile and clothing industry will be set up – following the example of the Rosselkhozbank. The hitherto in agriculture specialized state leasing company Rosagroleasing should accompany the technical modernization of the textile and clothing companies. In addition, the government ordinance no. 791 prohibits, as in  
the version of February, 17th 2016 on all three government levels (federal, regional, municipal), government procurement of imported textiles and garments when there are offers from domestic Producers.

Industrial parks and clusters for the light industry are growing
In addition, two industrial parks for the clothing and textile industry will be set up in the areas of Ivanovo and St. Petersburg. In addition, a regional cluster of the light industry in the Chelyabinsk region of the South Ural is growing. The fund for the development of the Russian industry promotes investments with low interest rates on credits, for example the project of Praimteks (Primetex) in the Ivanovo region for the production of textiles using digital textile printing (credit: Rubles 466 million rubles).

Further, the domestic producers of clothing and footwear should gain access in future to the funding instruments of the federal association for the development of small and medium-sized enterprises. Critics complain, that the subsidies reach mostly large companies only and above all companies working with government contracts.

Capacity building for chemical fibers 
Export opportunities are seen by the Ministry of Industry in synthetic fibers. In the textile cluster Ivanovo (http://invest-ivanovo.ru/data/prog.pdf) a chemical fiber plant is growing with public aid, scheduled to begin production from 2018. With that 250,000 t chemical fibers would additionally annually be available. Until now both manufac-turers Komitex and Wladimirski Polyefir produce together 33,000 t chemical fibers per anno. Viscose is currently not being produced at all in Russia. The import share of polyester is 74%, of polyamide 88%. 

In future the synthetic fibers may be supplied to BTK Textile and other customers. The production complex of BTK Textile in the textile City Shakhty in the Rostov region, was inaugurated in June 2015. The company manufactures high-tech textiles and knitwear made out of synthetic fibers of which work-wear, sport-wear and ski-wear are being sewn. BTK Textile has fabric production capacities of about 12 million square meters per year, General Director Sergey Bazoev says. Up to now BTK Textile has to buy the synthetic fibers and yarns predominantly in Asia. That could change soon. The BTK Group is the largest Russian manufacturer of men's clothing and uniforms.

Building new production facilities in Russia is not so easy: equipment of domestic manufacturing is not available and imported technology became very expensive due to the Ruble devaluation. So the technical facilities of BKT for manufacturing, impregnation or coating of fabrics and for apparel sewing (in total 250 units) are coming from Italy, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland and France. Long-term loans of over 8 to 12 years are not available and if - only at high interest rates. The lack of a variety of technologies and materials (establishing of extensive fabric and accessories inventories is too expensive) remains the main problem for Russian textile companies. Therefore, the number of new projects in the light industry is not yet clear.
Russian Federation - production of textiles and clothing (change in %)
Description 2015 Change 2015/2014
Cotton fiber (mio. bales) 111.0 4.4
Chemical fibers (mio. bales) 66.0 -4.5
Fabrics (mio. sqm) 4,542 14.7
.thereof from: :    
.Silk (1,000 sqm) 253,0 31.8
.Wool (1,000 sqm) 9.262,0 -20.9
.Linen 25,9 -26,6
.Cotton 1.176,0 -4,5
.Chemical fibers 237,0 14,2
Fabrics made out of other materials 3.084,0 25,1
Fabrics with plastic impregnation (mio. sqm) 32,3 14,6
Bed-linen (mio. pieces) 59,8 -9,6
Carpets (mio. sqm) 22,6 -3,7
Knitwear (1,000 t) 14,2 29,8
Stockings (mio. pair) 199 -5,6
Coats (1,000 pieces) 989 -22,1
Lined jackets (1,000 pieces) 1.887 -45,4
Suits (1,000 pieces) 4.690 -12,6
Men’s jackets and blazer (1,000 pieces) 870 14,1
Women’s coats with fur collar (pieces) 5.543 -46,1
Clothing made out of artificial fur (1,000 pieces) 24,5 21,0
Uniforms and workwear (mio. pieces) 20,7 -8,2
Work- and protective clothing (mio. pieces) 99,8 14,6
Overalls (1,000 pieces) 733 -62,4

Source: Rosstat 2016

Russian Federation - production of textiles and clothing (change in %)
Description 1st Quarter 2016 Change
1st Quarter 2016 / 1st Quarter 2015
Sewing thread made out of synthetic fibers (mio. reels)   14,0 -0,6
Fabrics (mio sqm) 1,2 23,3
Bed linen (mio pieces) 14,7 -7,7
Knitted stockings (mio. pairs) 55,4 34,0
Knitwear (mio. pieces) 24,8 -6,0
Workwear, uniforms (mio. pieces) 31,1 11,2
Coats (1,000 pieces) 269 9,1

Source: Rosstat 2016


Contact addresses:
Ministry of Industry and Trade

Department of Light Industry
Denis Klimentewitsch Pak, Director of the Department
109074 Moskau, Kitajgorodskij proesd 7
Tel.: 007 495/632 8004 (Sekretariat), Fax: -632 88 65
E-Mail: dgrvt@minprom.gov.ru, Internet: http://minpromtorg.gov.ru

(Sub) department of Light Industry: Director: Irina Alekseewna Iwanowa,
Tel.: -632 87 31, -346 04 73; E-Mail: ivanovaia@minprom.gov.ru
Internet: http://minpromtorg.gov.ru/ministry/dep/#!9&click_tab_vp_ind=1
"Strategy for the development of Light Industry until 2025."
http://www.kptf.ru/images/company/Presentation.pdf (Presentation of the strategy)
http://minpromtorg.gov.ru/docs/#!strategiya_razvitiya_legkoy_promyshlennosti_rossii_na_period_do_2025_goda (Text of the strategy and action plan)

Russian Union of Entrepreneurs of Textile and Light Industry
107023 Moskau, uliza Malaja Semenowskaja 3
Tel.: 007 495/280 15 48, Fax: -280 10 85
E-Mail: info@souzlegprom.ru, Internet: http://www.souzlegprom.ru

 

PAKISTAN’S TEXTILE AND GARMENT INDUSTRY HAS TO INVEST © Jerzy Sawluk / pixelio.de
07.06.2016

PAKISTAN’S TEXTILE AND GARMENT INDUSTRY HAS TO INVEST

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION INCREASES
  • COMPANIES HAVE TO MODERNIZE PRODUCTION AND INCREASE DEPTH OF PROCESSING

Dubai / Islamabad (GTAI) - Pakistan's textile and clothing industry has urgently to invest. The international competition has intensified. The companies need to modernize their technology and increase their processing depth. The country wants to get away from the production of simple fabrics and yarns. The GSP Plus agreement with the EU and an improvement in the security situation have improved the investment climate. In high-end machines Pakistan is dependent on imports. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION INCREASES
  • COMPANIES HAVE TO MODERNIZE PRODUCTION AND INCREASE DEPTH OF PROCESSING

Dubai / Islamabad (GTAI) - Pakistan's textile and clothing industry has urgently to invest. The international competition has intensified. The companies need to modernize their technology and increase their processing depth. The country wants to get away from the production of simple fabrics and yarns. The GSP Plus agreement with the EU and an improvement in the security situation have improved the investment climate. In high-end machines Pakistan is dependent on imports. 

Pakistan's textile and clothing industry expects better sales opportunities abroad in the next few years, particularly with the European Union. Early 2014 Pakistan has received from the EU the GSP Plus status (Generalized System of Preferences) that allows the country to supply goods at a lower rate of duty or even with a completely duty exempt in the EU. Particularly the textile and clothing industry benefits from the agreement, as the sector provides almost 80% of Pakistan's exports to the EU. The government even hopes on additional exports for the sector worth USD 1 billion per year.

Following the latest available trade figures, Pakistan increased in 2014, the year in which the GSP Plus agreement came into force, its total exports of clothing by almost 10% to around USD 5 billion. Official figures of exports to the EU are not available. According to the foreign trade statistics, in any case exports to Germany have increased in clothing by 13% to almost USD 500 million, in textiles by 18% to USD 434 million and in footwear by 27% to USD 34 million.

Pakistan's export of textiles, clothing and footwear (USD million)
SITC Productgroup 2013 2014 Change 2014/2013
Export        
65 Textiles 9,341 9.077 -2,8
84 Clothing 4,549 4.991 9,7
85 Shoes 109 132 21,1
26 Textile Fibres 370 308 -16,8
..2631 Cotton 217 181 -16,7
Import        
65 Textiles 1,245 1.545 24,2
84 Clothing 68 86 26,0
85 Shoes 67 84 25,2
26 Textile Fibres 1,369 1.287 -6,0

Source: UN Comtrade

Demand for textile machinery rises
Market observers anticipate increased investments in machinery. A particular dynamic effort is expected in the demand for textile printing machines, dyeing machines, tenter frames and other finishing techniques. Positive for the investment climate will be the effect of the expected increase in textile exports to the EU and the improvement of the security situation. In recent years power shortages and a precarious security situation have inhibited the production and investment activity.

The market for textile machinery (SITC 724) grew significantly since 2014. In the country itself only relatively simple machines are being manufactured. High-end equipment is mostly imported. The import of textile machinery rose to USD 585 million in 2014, an increase of 17% compared to 2013.

Import of Textilmaschinen*)
Year Value (in Mio. US$)
2014 585
2013 498
2012 439
2011 488
2010 455
2009 217
2008 385

*) SITC 724, including pieces
Source: UN Comtrade

German machinery manufacturers are losing market share
The PR China has superseded Japan as the major supplier of textile machinery in 2014. In fact Japan was able to increase its deliveries vigorously (+ 23%), but the Chinese succeeded to get even higher gains (+ 41%). The suppliers from Switzerland and India have also increased their exports to Pakistan significantly. German machinery manufacturers however were not able to benefit from the increasing demand.
Import of textile machinery by main supplier countries (in USD million, change over previous year and supply share in %) *)
Land   2014 Veränderung 2014/2013 Anteil
VR China 145 40.7 24.8
Japan 139 22.6 23.7
Schweiz 75 55.2 12.8
Deutschland 71 -24.9 12.1
Italien 50 9.3 8.6
Indien 15 28.0 2.6
Gesamt 585 17.5 100

*) SITC 724, including pieces

Investments urgently needed
Competition from PR China, Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka has intensified. Pakistan's textile industry needs to modernize and upgrade, to increase its productivity and the added value. Pakistan covers the entire value chain from fiber preparation from to the end product. Despite this well-position predominantly simple products are being produced. Only an estimated 40 companies are vertically integrated and cover the entire textile processing.
With an annual harvest of about 13 million bales Pakistan is the world's fourth largest cotton producer. In addition about 600.000 tons of synthetic fibers are being manufactured in the country. According to reports there are 21 manufacturers of filament yarn with a capacity of 100.000 t; the production is supported by a PTA plant with a capacity of 500.000 t.

Export of the textile industry by product group 07-01-2014 – 31-03-2015 (Changes compared to the same period of last year and in %)
Product Value (in Mio. US$) Change Share
Knitwear 1,792 7.5 18
Readymade Garment 1,548 8.5 15
Bed Wear 1,570 -2.4 15
Towels 580 1.8 6
Tent, Canvas, Tarpaulin 105 82.0 1
Made-ups (Other Textiles) 486 -0.5 5
Cotton Cloth 1,860 -26.5 18
Cotton Yarn 1,461 2.0 14
Raw Cotton 142 -9.4 1
Art-Silk& Synthetic Textile 274 -17.0 3
Other Textile Products 350 0.0 4
Summe 10,168 -1.6 100

Sources: Pakistan Bureau of Statistics; TMA - Towel Manufacturers Association

Yarn production has lost competitiveness
According to sector experts In the past decade yarn manufacturers made no larger investments to upgrade their production, although money would have been available for such investments.  The reason for that should have been the heavy competition from China, India and Bangladesch.  Ten years ago Pakistan used to be one of the most efficient yarn manufacturers worldwide. Because modernization investments failed to materialize, this technique applies as outdated in Pakistan today.

The companies complain about high production costs and are demanding more favorable electricity tariffs and protectionist measures against import competition. A negative effect on the production and the investment climate in the country also have the electricity shortages and the tense security Situation.

The textile sector in Pakistan is characterized by numerous large textile companies with quite a large number of small businesses opposite which mostly belong to the so-called informal sector. The informal sector, for example, includes small family companies or small productions, which are not taxable. The informal sector produces mainly simple products for the domestic market. It works with discarded equipment of the larger companies, imported used machinery or cheap equipment from China. The official statistics do not take the informal sector into account.

Import of textile machinery by product and top supplier countries (in USD thousands, change compared to the previous year in%)
SITC Productgroup 2013 2014 Veränd.
724.3 Sewing machines, from 18.508 31.034 67,7
  PR China 9.795 19.925 103,4
  Japan 2.596 3.694 42,3
  Vietnam 479 911 90,3
  Germany (Rank 5) 856 750 -12,4
724.4 Spinning and other machines for textile processing, from 255.311 258.348 1,2
  Japan 74.961 61.771 -17,6
  Switzerland 36.203 57.814 59,7
  Germany (Rank 3) 64.086 46.545 -27,4
724.5 Weaving machines, from 121.860 179.424 47,2
  Japan 29.997 68.090 127,0
  PR China 31.305 53.706 71,6
  Italy 6.666 11.275 69,1
  Germany (Rank 6) 5.290 6.097 15,2
724.6 Auxiliary machines, from 30.953 36.801 18,9
  PR China 8.797 11.935 35,7
  Germany (Rank 2) 6.429 4.880 -24,1
  Japan 2.055 3.614 75,9
724.7 Machines for dying, washing, drying, from 61.620 64.825 5,2
  PR China 9.855 12.455 26,4
  Italy 14.867 11.527 -22,5
   Germany (Rank 3) 16.652 11.494 -31,0
724.8 Machines for leather processing and footwear manufacturing, incl. parts, from 5.854 8.722 49,0
  Italy 3.674 4.985 35,7
  PR China 1.542 2.338 51,6
  Finland k.A 192 k.A.
  Germany (Rank 5) 29 140 381,6
724.9 Parts for textile machines, from 3.996 5.760 44,2
  PR China 2.107 2.854 35,5
  Germany (Rank 2) 617 669 8,4
  Italy 528 661 25,3