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19.09.2022

ISKO opens CREATIVE ROOM GERMANY

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

By utilising ISKO’s patented recycling technology, they are now able to develop brand new garments by using fibres from post-consumer denim, finally closing the loop and giving a new and cutting-edge circular supply solution for their customers. As well as a hub for its customers, Creative Room Germany will also act as a platform for the wider denim community to share knowledge, create new and innovative ideas and to bring them to life.

“Building on from the success of our London facility, our goal will be to offer tailor made garment supply solutions for customers in the DACH, Benelux and Nordic markets and this facility will be the focal point of that offering. With a collaborative approach, we will fulfil our vision of bringing a new circular supply solution to the market.”
Pau Bruguera, Executive Director @ ISKO

More information:
Isko denim finishing Creative Room
Source:

ISKO

(c) PURE LOOP
07.09.2022

PURE LOOP: High-strength synthetic nonwoven made with a recycled content of 10 percent

Geosynthetics have become an indispensable part of the construction industry. PP nonwovens, for example - mechanically bonded continuous fibres made from specially UV-stabilised polypropylenes - are often used in blanket form as barriers, screens and filters, and their strength extends the service life of construction projects. Whether for road construction, or as barrier on glaciers or against weeds - there are myriad applications.

TenCate Geosynthetics uses the PURE LOOP ISEC evo technology to recycle this type of PP nonwoven. The European company, with locations in Austria, France and the Netherlands, is specialised in the development and production of geotextiles for modern civil engineering applications. The edge trimmings and production rejects generated during manufacturing used to be recycled at the Linz site, but not fed back into the company's own production process.

Geosynthetics have become an indispensable part of the construction industry. PP nonwovens, for example - mechanically bonded continuous fibres made from specially UV-stabilised polypropylenes - are often used in blanket form as barriers, screens and filters, and their strength extends the service life of construction projects. Whether for road construction, or as barrier on glaciers or against weeds - there are myriad applications.

TenCate Geosynthetics uses the PURE LOOP ISEC evo technology to recycle this type of PP nonwoven. The European company, with locations in Austria, France and the Netherlands, is specialised in the development and production of geotextiles for modern civil engineering applications. The edge trimmings and production rejects generated during manufacturing used to be recycled at the Linz site, but not fed back into the company's own production process.

"The demands on us were high," recalls Patrick Wiesinger, project manager at PURE LOOP. "The PP nonwoven is highly tear resistant, which means its a very challenging recycling process. Our ISEC evo machine conserves the quality of the production waste really well during recycling, so we were able to achieve the specified increase in quality for the recyclates."

Another advantage of PURE LOOP technology is the wide range of shapes in which the production scrap can be delivered for processing. "Our ifeed technology with double feed ram system and singleshaft shredder offers the ideal conditions for direct processing of these large rolls - and without the need for prior preparation of the input material by employees before the material is fed into the recycling process", emphasizes Patrick Wiesinger. With the ISEC evo recycling machine TenCate can now manufacture its high-strength PP nonwoven product with a recyclate content of up to 10 percent.

Source:

PURE LOOP, EREMA Group GmbH

02.09.2022

RGE: Closed-loop urban-fit textile-to-textile recycling solutions in Singapore

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings.

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings. The research centre will develop new technologies to recycle textile waste into fibre and create new, next-generation eco-friendly and sustainable textiles.

This move comes on the back of the tightening of waste import bans in countries such as China, India and Indonesia, which are among the world’s largest waste processors. The stricter import bans have left cities in need of viable local textile recycling solutions to tackle the immense textile waste generated.

RGE Executive Director, Mr Perry Lim, said, “Current textile recycling technologies, which rely primarily on a bleaching and separation process using heavy chemicals, cannot be implemented due to environmental laws. At the same time, there is an urgent need to keep textiles out of the brimming landfills.” He added, “As the world’s largest viscose producer, we aim to catalyse closed-loop, textile-to-textile recycling by developing optimal urban-fit solutions that can bring the world closer to a circular textile economy.”

Globally, an estimated 90 million tonnes of textile waste is generated and disposed of every year, with less than 1% being upcycled into new clothing or other textile materials. By 2030, the amount of global textile waste, which currently accounts for almost 10% of municipal solid waste, is expected to reach more than 134 million tonnes. The textile industry is also responsible for 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than international flights and maritime shipping combined.

At present, most of the available textile recycling technologies are open-loop, where textile waste is typically downcycled to lower-quality products (insulating materials, cleaning cloths, etc.) or be used in waste-to-heat recycling.

“Closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling processes, particularly chemical recycling, are still under development. Scaling up the technologies to industrial scale remains a challenge. A key bottleneck is that refabricating textile waste into fibre needs purity standards for feedstock. However, most of the clothes that we wear are made of a mixture of different synthetic and natural fibres, which makes separating the complex blends of materials challenging for effective recycling.

“Our aim is to address this industry pain point by developing viable solutions that use less energy, fewer chemicals and produces harmless and less effluents, and then potentially scale up across our global operations,” Mr Lim said.

To tackle the key challenges in closed-loop textile recycling, RGE-NTU SusTex is looking into four key research areas, namely cleaner and more energy efficient methods of recycling into new raw materials, automated sorting of textile waste, eco-friendly dye removal, and development of a new class of sustainable textiles that is durable for wear and, at the same time, lends itself to easier recycling.

Technologies developed by RGE-NTU SusTex will be test bedded at RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant in Singapore, which is projected for completion as early as 2024. If successful, RGE has plans to replicate the plant in other urban cities within its footprint.

 

Source:

Royal Golden Eagle

Beaulieu International Group
23.08.2022

BIG at EuroGeo7 with geotextile fibres & woven fabrics

Beaulieu International Group invites EuroGeo7 attendees to discover geotextile solutions promoting greater sustainability for future civil engineering projects. Specialists from Beaulieu Fibres International (BFI) and Beaulieu Technical Textiles (BTT) will present high-performance geosynthetics through high tenacity fibres for lightweight, nonwoven geotextiles, and a range of high durability woven geotextile solutions with an environmentally beneficial impact.

Beaulieu International Group invites EuroGeo7 attendees to discover geotextile solutions promoting greater sustainability for future civil engineering projects. Specialists from Beaulieu Fibres International (BFI) and Beaulieu Technical Textiles (BTT) will present high-performance geosynthetics through high tenacity fibres for lightweight, nonwoven geotextiles, and a range of high durability woven geotextile solutions with an environmentally beneficial impact.

“We are delighted to sponsor EuroGeo7 and to be finally on-site, following a two-year postponement of the event. EuroGeo7 is bringing the geotextile community together to further promote and develop geosynthetics in a fast changing global economy striving for growth while reducing its carbon footprint along the supply chain, " comment from Jefrem Jennard, Sales Director Fibres, and Roy Kerckhove, Sales Director Technical Textiles. “Geotextiles provide highly versatile, durable and natural resource-saving alternatives in large infrastructure works, and offer durable protection in erosion control and waste/water management projects. We are continuously developing our fibres and finished engineering textiles with proven sustainability-enhancing benefits to progress product development and customer sustainability goals on fossil carbon reduction, while taking concrete steps to reduce our own environmental footprint.”
 
Sustainability improvement is key to the long-term strategy of Beaulieu International Group, and it is committed to supporting the geotextile industry by targeting and accelerating change and communicating the sustainable performance of its products. The UN Sustainable Development Goals are integrated into its business and are the foundations of the new Route 2030 Sustainability Roadmap.


For manufacturers of nonwoven geotextiles, BFI’s high-tenacity HT8 staple fibres enable customers to achieve nonwovens with high mechanical performance at reduced fibre weight. The HT8 high tenacity fibres are designed in a way that customers can meet the industry durability standards for a longer service lifetime, supporting more sustainable design and resource reduction over time. BTT’s woven geotextiles are amongst the most sustainable in the industry and provide a wide range of functions, including separation, filtration, reinforcement and erosion control.

BFI and BTT have conducted lifecycle assessments to calculate their activities' carbon footprint and solutions and have received external recognition for their ongoing sustainability efforts. For example, in 2022, BFI was awarded a Silver EcoVadis sustainability rating, and BFI and BTT are proud recipients of the Voka Charter for Sustainable Entrepreneurship 2022.

Source:

Beaulieu International Group

Fashion Revolution
19.08.2022

Results of the FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2022

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

  • As new and proposed legislation focuses on greenwashing claims, almost half of major brands (45%) publish targets on sustainable materials yet only 37% provide information on what constitutes a sustainable material.
  • Only 24% of major brands disclose how they minimise the impacts of microfibres despite textiles being the largest source of microplastics in the ocean.
  • The vast majority of major brands and retailers (94%) do not disclose the number of workers in their supply chains who are paying recruitment fees. This paints an unclear picture of the risks of forced labour as workers may be getting into crippling debt to accept jobs paying poverty wages.
  • While many brands use their channels to talk about social justice, they need to go beyond lip service. Just 8% of brands publish their actions on racial and ethnic equality in their supply chains.

Despite these results, Fashion Revolution is encouraged by increasing supply chain transparency among many major brands, primarily with first-tier manufacturers where the final stage of production occurs, e.g. cutting, sewing, finishing and packing. Nine brands have disclosed their first-tier manufacturers for the first time this year. It is encouraging to see significant progress across market segments including luxury, sportswear, footwear and accessories and across different geographies.

Fashion Revolution’s co-founder and Global Operations Director Carry Somers says: “In 2016, only 5 out of 40 major brands (12.5%) disclosed their suppliers. Seven years later, 121 out of 250 major brands (48%) disclose their suppliers. This clearly demonstrates how the Index incentivises transparency but it also shows that brands really are listening to the millions of people around the world who keep asking them #WhoMadeMyClothes? Our power is in our persistence.”

More key findings from the Fashion Transparency Index 2022:

Progress on transparency in the global fashion industry is still too slow among 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers, with brands achieving an overall average score of just 24%, up 1% from last year
For another year, the initiative has seen major brands and retailers publicly disclose the most information about their policies, commitments and processes on human rights and environmental topics and significantly less about the results, outcomes and impacts of their efforts.

Most (85%) major brands still do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of overproduction and clothing waste
Thousands of tonnes of clothing waste are found globally. However, brands have disclosed more information about the circular solutions they are developing (28%) than on the actual volumes of pre- (10%) and post-production waste they produce (8%). Brands have sat by as waste importing countries foot the bill, resulting in serious human rights and environmental implications.

Just 11% of brands publish a responsible purchasing code of conduct indicating that most are still reluctant to disclose how their purchasing practices could be affecting suppliers and workers
Greater transparency on how brands interact with their suppliers ought to be a first step towards eliminating harmful practices and promoting fair purchasing practices. The poor performance on transparency in this vital area is a missed opportunity for brands to demonstrate they are serious about addressing the root causes of harmful working conditions, including the instances where they themselves are the key driver.

Despite the urgency of the climate crisis, less than a third of major brands disclose a decarbonisation target covering their entire supply chain which is verified by the Science-Based Targets Initiative
Many brands and retailers rely heavily on garment producing countries that are vulnerable to the impacts of the climate crisis, yet our research shows that only 29% of major brands and retailers publish a decarbonisation target covering their operations and supply chain which is verified by the Science Based Targets Initiative.

Only 11% of brands publish their supplier wastewater test results, despite the textile industry being a leading contributor to water pollution
The fashion industry is a major contributor to water pollution and one of the most water intensive industries on the planet. Only 11% of major brands publish their wastewater test result, and only 25% of brands disclose the process of conducting water-related risk assessments in their supply chain. Transparency on wastewater test results is key to ensuring that brands are held accountable for their potentially devastating impacts on local biodiversity, garment workers and their communities.

Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage nor do they disclose if they isolate labour costs
Insufficient progress is being made by most brands towards ensuring that the workers in their supply chain are paid enough to cover their basic needs and put aside some discretionary income. Just 27% of brands disclose their approach to achieving living wages for supply chain workers and 96% do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage. In response, we have joined forces with allies across civil society to launch Good Clothes, Fair Pay. The campaign demands groundbreaking living wage legislation across the garment, textile and footwear sector.

 

Source:

Fashion Revolution

02.08.2022

DNFI Award 2022 open for applications – Deadline 9 Sept

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.
More information:
DNFI DNFI award
Source:

DNFI

Photo: FET
02.08.2022

FET at Techtextil 2022: Principle theme was Sustainability

The company’s principle theme at Techtextil was Sustainability, since FET extrusion systems are ideally suited for both process and end-product development of sustainable materials. These systems are designed to be material efficient, can be bespoke designed and offer both flexibility and a high level of processing capability. They are supplied as self-contained units for ease of installation in a laboratory or small scale process evaluation environment.

FET’s enhanced Fibre Development Centre enables clients to develop and trial their own sustainable fibres and FET has now successfully processed almost 30 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats

The innovative stand at Techtextil was specifically designed to highlight FET’s total commitment to all aspects of sustainability. It utilised as many sustainable components as possible and met with much comment and approval from visitors.

The company’s principle theme at Techtextil was Sustainability, since FET extrusion systems are ideally suited for both process and end-product development of sustainable materials. These systems are designed to be material efficient, can be bespoke designed and offer both flexibility and a high level of processing capability. They are supplied as self-contained units for ease of installation in a laboratory or small scale process evaluation environment.

FET’s enhanced Fibre Development Centre enables clients to develop and trial their own sustainable fibres and FET has now successfully processed almost 30 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats

The innovative stand at Techtextil was specifically designed to highlight FET’s total commitment to all aspects of sustainability. It utilised as many sustainable components as possible and met with much comment and approval from visitors.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England enjoyed another successful Techtextil in Frankfurt, with high quality enquiries from technical companies and organisations worldwide, but in particular from customers based in Europe.

Source:

DAVID STEAD PROJECT MARKETING LTD for FET

(c) INNATEX
19.07.2022

INNATEX: Countdown to 50th international trade fair for sustainable textiles

The 50th INNATEX fair opens its gates to a Green Fashion trade audience from 29 to 31 July 2022 in Hofheim-Wallau, near Frankfurt. At this anniversary fair, over 200 labels will be exhibiting, a wide range of experts and organisations will be gathering, and elaborate features and facilities are planned for the Rhein-Main exhibition centre.

According to INNATEX project manager Alexander Hitzel, one highlight is the Community Area, which brings together a range of experts. In short lounge talks, they reveal insights into what they are currently working on and a dialogue format encourages personal discussion. Mirjam Smend, whom we know well from Greenstyle Munich, introduces her recently launched sustainability magazine, Pureviu, and facilitates the morning talks.

The 50th INNATEX fair opens its gates to a Green Fashion trade audience from 29 to 31 July 2022 in Hofheim-Wallau, near Frankfurt. At this anniversary fair, over 200 labels will be exhibiting, a wide range of experts and organisations will be gathering, and elaborate features and facilities are planned for the Rhein-Main exhibition centre.

According to INNATEX project manager Alexander Hitzel, one highlight is the Community Area, which brings together a range of experts. In short lounge talks, they reveal insights into what they are currently working on and a dialogue format encourages personal discussion. Mirjam Smend, whom we know well from Greenstyle Munich, introduces her recently launched sustainability magazine, Pureviu, and facilitates the morning talks.

Alongside standard bodies such as IVN and GOTS, which have taken part in INNATEX for many years, younger projects such as Fairmodel and the digital platform Retraced will be part of this special area. Fairtrade Germany, Femnet and the VDMD are to be found there too. Almost all of them are joining in with the Ask Me Anything dialouge format. Interested attendees can pre-book a slot of up to ten minutes for a personal discussion with the expert of their choice.

The supportive activities that had to be suspended during the pandemic are enjoying a comeback at this year’s summer fair: five newcomers to INNATEX designated DesignDiscoveries will be presenting their projects in another special area. Vegtus, from Barcelona, produces sneakers and other products from cactus leather. Natural textiles such as organic cotton are used by Lounge Cherie, a yoga fashion label.

Products for kids through to seniors, classics and streetwear, footwear and accessories
Nordlicht similarly relies on recyclable, renewable natural fibres for its outerwear, bags and accessories. The field of circular fashion is also served by the remaining two Design Discoveries. Both Nature is Future, with its handmade sneakers, and Freibeutler, with its functional rucksacks, make extensive use of recycled materials, while also paying due attention to broader sustainability aspects.

Regular INNATEX exhibitors include Lana, Chapati and Didymos, all of whom are also celebrating anniversaries. Labels such as Anokho with their colourful accessories in jacquard fabrics and Danish label Angel Circle with its plus-size fashion are exhibiting for the first time.

Source:

INNATEX / UBERMUT GbR

(c) adidas AG
15.07.2022

adidas launches its first product in collaboration with Spinnova

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

Made in part with Spinnova technology , a minimum of 30% of the fabric in the adidas TERREX HS1 comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* that are made by grinding wood pulp with water into a paste and then spun into a textile fibre.

The product also works with the material’s natural color. Since no dyeing or bleaching is applied, in turn this uses less water compared to the standard dyeing process.

* (Rayon) in US, (New type of cellulose fibre) in China

More information:
adidas Spinnova Fibers fibres Recycling
Source:

adidas AG

(c) VDMA
Award winners with foundation chairman and professors
23.06.2022

VDMA: Junior engineers with focus on sustainability

On the occasion of the Techtextil fair in Frankfurt, the Chairman of VDMA’s Walter Reiners-Stiftung Foundation, Peter D. Dornier, has awarded prizes to seven successful young engineers. For the first time, the Foundation awarded two Sustainability Awards. They are awarded to academic works in which, for example, solutions for resource-saving products and technologies are developed.

A Sustainability Prize in the category Project Work, endowed with 3.000 euros was awarded to Simon Hoebel, TU Dresden, for his thesis on recycled thermoplastic fibres for composite components.
Marina Michel, TU Dresden, received a Sustainability Award in the category Master, worth 3.500 euros. The topic of her master thesis was the functionalisation of yarns for the filtration of micro- and nanoplastics from water.

A Promotion Prize in the category Project Work, endowed with 4.000 euros, was awarded to a student group from RWTH Aachen. The teamwork of Luis Gleissner, Leopold Habersbrunner, Frederic Olbrich and Frederik Schicks was the construction of a test rig for tests on oil-adsorbing textiles.

On the occasion of the Techtextil fair in Frankfurt, the Chairman of VDMA’s Walter Reiners-Stiftung Foundation, Peter D. Dornier, has awarded prizes to seven successful young engineers. For the first time, the Foundation awarded two Sustainability Awards. They are awarded to academic works in which, for example, solutions for resource-saving products and technologies are developed.

A Sustainability Prize in the category Project Work, endowed with 3.000 euros was awarded to Simon Hoebel, TU Dresden, for his thesis on recycled thermoplastic fibres for composite components.
Marina Michel, TU Dresden, received a Sustainability Award in the category Master, worth 3.500 euros. The topic of her master thesis was the functionalisation of yarns for the filtration of micro- and nanoplastics from water.

A Promotion Prize in the category Project Work, endowed with 4.000 euros, was awarded to a student group from RWTH Aachen. The teamwork of Luis Gleissner, Leopold Habersbrunner, Frederic Olbrich and Frederik Schicks was the construction of a test rig for tests on oil-adsorbing textiles.

Felix Zerbes, RWTH Aachen, was awarded a Promotion Prize of 3.500 euros in the category Master. He developed a technical solution for air jet weaving to improve the quality of woven fabric.

Source:

VDMA e. V.

20.06.2022

Beaulieu Fibres International at Techtextil 22

  • Bio circular Fibre - Shaping Sustainable Living

The European staple fibre producer Beaulieu Fibres International turns the spotlight on future-focused solutions for nonwovens & engineered fabrics at Techtextil 22. A key priority is innovation in polyolefin fibres and bicomponent polyester/polyolefin fibres, to advance sustainable design, end-of-life recyclability, and resource and carbon footprint reduction for industrial and hygiene applications.

The new sustainability roadmap - Route 2030 outlines how the company is targeting the reduction of our environmental footprint to zero, taking care of people and doing business in a transparent, ethical way. Sustainability is key to Beaulieu Fibre International’s long-term strategy, and the company is heavily focused on defining its green portfolio to support evolution in diverse market applications and to work towards a circular economy with the whole supply chain.

  • Bio circular Fibre - Shaping Sustainable Living

The European staple fibre producer Beaulieu Fibres International turns the spotlight on future-focused solutions for nonwovens & engineered fabrics at Techtextil 22. A key priority is innovation in polyolefin fibres and bicomponent polyester/polyolefin fibres, to advance sustainable design, end-of-life recyclability, and resource and carbon footprint reduction for industrial and hygiene applications.

The new sustainability roadmap - Route 2030 outlines how the company is targeting the reduction of our environmental footprint to zero, taking care of people and doing business in a transparent, ethical way. Sustainability is key to Beaulieu Fibre International’s long-term strategy, and the company is heavily focused on defining its green portfolio to support evolution in diverse market applications and to work towards a circular economy with the whole supply chain.

Beaulieu Fibres International will offer ISCC Plus (International Sustainability and Carbon Certification Plus) certified bio circular MONO-PP and BICO PP/PE fibres in 1,3-8,9 dtex, available with all the main available finish classes. These drop-in solutions, with no loss in quality, will support customers reduce reliance on virgin fossil carbon in their nonwoven and engineered fibre applications, contributing to the transition towards a circular economy.

Source:

Beaulieu Fibres International

Graphic DNFI
19.06.2022

DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award Ceremony During Heimtextil

Natural fibers are among the most important raw materials in the textile and fashion industry worldwide. For centuries, they have fed millions of people through their cultivation or breeding, and it is impossible to imagine daily life without them. Especially at the moment, natural fibers are gaining special importance due to the intense discussions about sustainable living. Even though natural fibers have accompanied mankind for a long time, they are changeable, technical, and adaptable to the challenges of the textile industry.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) is celebrating natural fibres in a program to be conducted during Heimtextil in Frankfurt on 23 June. Anyone with an interest in the role of natural fibres in the world economy, economic indicators of textile activity, innovations in natural fibre research, and updates on proposed EU legislation affecting textiles is welcome to attend.

The program will include various presentations by the previous and current award winners, presentations, and discussions:

Overview of world natural fibre production, employment, and value,

Natural fibers are among the most important raw materials in the textile and fashion industry worldwide. For centuries, they have fed millions of people through their cultivation or breeding, and it is impossible to imagine daily life without them. Especially at the moment, natural fibers are gaining special importance due to the intense discussions about sustainable living. Even though natural fibers have accompanied mankind for a long time, they are changeable, technical, and adaptable to the challenges of the textile industry.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) is celebrating natural fibres in a program to be conducted during Heimtextil in Frankfurt on 23 June. Anyone with an interest in the role of natural fibres in the world economy, economic indicators of textile activity, innovations in natural fibre research, and updates on proposed EU legislation affecting textiles is welcome to attend.

The program will include various presentations by the previous and current award winners, presentations, and discussions:

Overview of world natural fibre production, employment, and value,

  • Economic indicators and impacts of coronavirus on textile industries,
  • Updates on innovative uses of natural fibres:
  • Use of wool in automobile insulation applications for enhanced sustainability,
  • Using cellulose from cotton to produce a biodegradable plastic substitute,
  • Manufacturing waterproof fabric from a blend of cotton and jute as sustainable
  • Substitute for polypropylene tarps
  • Proposed EU textile legislation and potential impacts on natural fibres
More information:
DNFI DNFI award Heimtextil
Source:

DNFI

07.06.2022

EPTA World Pultrusion Conference 2022 explores composites sustainability

The European Pultrusion Technology Association (EPTA) has published a report from its latest conference, which focuses on advances in sustainability and recycling.

More than 130 professionals from the global pultrusion community gathered at the 16th World Pultrusion Conference in Paris on 5-6 May 2022. Organised by EPTA in collaboration with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), the event featured 25 international speakers sharing insight on market trends, developments in materials, processing and simulation technologies, and innovative pultruded applications in key markets such as building and infrastructure, transportation and wind energy.

The European Pultrusion Technology Association (EPTA) has published a report from its latest conference, which focuses on advances in sustainability and recycling.

More than 130 professionals from the global pultrusion community gathered at the 16th World Pultrusion Conference in Paris on 5-6 May 2022. Organised by EPTA in collaboration with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), the event featured 25 international speakers sharing insight on market trends, developments in materials, processing and simulation technologies, and innovative pultruded applications in key markets such as building and infrastructure, transportation and wind energy.

‘Bio-pultrusion’:  
Composites based on natural fibres offer a number of benefits, including low density and high specific strength, vibration damping, and heat insulation. The German Institutes for Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) are developing pultrusion processes using bio-based resins and natural fibres. Projects include the BioMat Pavilion at the University of Stuttgart, a lightweight structure which combines ‘bamboo-like’ natural fibre-based pultruded profiles with a tensile membrane.

Applications for recycled carbon fibre (rCF):
The use of rCF in composite components has the potential to reduce their cost and carbon footprint. However, it is currently used to a limited extent since manufacturers are uncertain about the technical performance of available rCF products, how to process them, and the actual benefits achievable. Fraunhofer IGCV is partnering with the Institute for Textile Technology (ITA) in the MAI ÖkoCaP project to investigate the technical, ecological and economic benefits of using rCF in different industrial applications. The results will be made available in a web-based app.

Circularity and recycling:
The European Composites Industry Association (EuCIA) is drafting a circularity roadmap for the composites industry. It has collaborated with the European Cement Association (CEMBUREAU) on a position paper for the EU Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) which outlines the benefits of co-processing end-of-life composites in cement manufacturing, a recycling solution that is compliant with the EU’s Waste Framework Directive and in commercial operation in Germany. Initial studies have indicated that co-processing with composites has the potential to reduce the global warming impact of cement manufacture by up to 16%. Technologies to allow recovery of fibre and/or resin from composites are in development but a better understanding of the life cycle assessment (LCA) impact of these processes is essential. EuCIA’s ‘circularity waterfall,’ a proposed priority system for composites circularity, highlights the continued need for co-processing.

Sustainability along the value chain:
Sustainability is essential for the long-term viability of businesses. Resin manufacturer AOC’s actions to improve sustainability include programmes to reduce energy, waste and greenhouse gas emissions from operations, the development of ‘greener’ and low VOC emission resins, ensuring compliance with chemicals legislation such as REACH, and involvement in EuCIA’s waste management initiatives. Its sustainable resins portfolio includes styrene-free and low-styrene formulations and products manufactured using bio-based raw materials and recycled PET.

Source:

European Pultrusion Technology Association EPTA

(c) Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd.
17.05.2022

Cinte Techtextil China to address personal hygiene and sustainability demands

With global consumers becoming more conscious about personal hygiene and environmental protection, exhibitors at Cinte Techtexil China will spotlight materials and technologies for products that respond to these trends. The fair will probe into the associated growth opportunities as the country is one of the leading markets for nonwovens and technical textiles. The event will be held from 6 – 8 September at the Shanghai New International Expo Centre.

The technical textiles and nonwovens industries, the latter notably, are significantly expanding amid the pandemic. A recent forecast[1] predicts that the global polypropylene nonwoven fabric market will continue to rise at a CAGR of 6.7%, reaching USD 39.23 billion by 2028. The anticipated growth is bolstered by demands in end-use industries such as sanitation, medical, automotive and more. In 2020, Asia Pacific was named the largest regional market in the world and is expected to grow significantly over the forecasted period.

With global consumers becoming more conscious about personal hygiene and environmental protection, exhibitors at Cinte Techtexil China will spotlight materials and technologies for products that respond to these trends. The fair will probe into the associated growth opportunities as the country is one of the leading markets for nonwovens and technical textiles. The event will be held from 6 – 8 September at the Shanghai New International Expo Centre.

The technical textiles and nonwovens industries, the latter notably, are significantly expanding amid the pandemic. A recent forecast[1] predicts that the global polypropylene nonwoven fabric market will continue to rise at a CAGR of 6.7%, reaching USD 39.23 billion by 2028. The anticipated growth is bolstered by demands in end-use industries such as sanitation, medical, automotive and more. In 2020, Asia Pacific was named the largest regional market in the world and is expected to grow significantly over the forecasted period.

The prediction reaffirms the growth prospects of nonwovens. In this regard, industry players expressed much optimism about associated future opportunities during Cinte Techtextil China last year. “The field of nonwovens is poised for a positive growth as the awareness of personal hygiene and pandemic prevention sustains in the domestic market,” commented Mr James Gao, Head of Marketing and Textile Technologies, Uster Technologies (China) Co Ltd. He added: “We decided to join the fair and showcase our new launches as we remain confident in the future development of the industry, especially since China is dominating the global scene.”

Going green is the way forward
Turning to yarns and fibres, the sector is shifting to greener and smarter production that echoes the trend towards sustainability that is gaining considerable traction across the globe. Meanwhile in China, this movement was observed by many exhibitors at the 2021 edition, including Mr Roberto Galante, Plant Manager of FMMG Technical Textiles (Suzhou) Co Ltd, the Chinese subsidiary of the Fil Man Made Group. He mentioned: “The market is paying more attention to environmental protection, and we receive enquiries about special yarns for this every day. We focus on technical yarns for filtration as well as anti-bacterial properties, which are very important for the environment. The potential here in China is incredible and this is a big opportunity for everybody.”

Cinte Techtextil China’s product categories cover 12 application areas, which comprehensively span across a full range of potential uses in modern technical textiles and nonwovens. These categories also cover the entire industry, from upstream technology and raw material providers to finished fabrics, chemicals and other solutions. This scope of product groups and application areas ensures that the fair is an effective business platform for the entire industry.

25.04.2022

Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) seeks public input for standard revision

The worldwide leading textile processing standard for organic fibres, Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), seeks public input as it begins the revision process for GOTS standard version 7.0.

As a solution for sustainability-related challenges in textile processing, GOTS sets strict and binding requirements regarding ecological and social parameters. These are updated every three years in an open and transparent revision process which fosters constant progress towards the development of better textile processing methods. In this process of continuous improvement, GOTS collaborates with all relevant international stakeholders, including the textile and apparel industry, chemical suppliers, organic farming and environmental organisations, workers' rights groups and labour unions, to ensure ongoing relevance and account for changes in the industry.

The initial period of public input runs from 14 April through 12 June. During this phase, all interested parties, including industry representatives, NGO’s and consumers, are encouraged to participate by submitting comments, feedback, and ideas through GOTS’s online portal.

The worldwide leading textile processing standard for organic fibres, Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), seeks public input as it begins the revision process for GOTS standard version 7.0.

As a solution for sustainability-related challenges in textile processing, GOTS sets strict and binding requirements regarding ecological and social parameters. These are updated every three years in an open and transparent revision process which fosters constant progress towards the development of better textile processing methods. In this process of continuous improvement, GOTS collaborates with all relevant international stakeholders, including the textile and apparel industry, chemical suppliers, organic farming and environmental organisations, workers' rights groups and labour unions, to ensure ongoing relevance and account for changes in the industry.

The initial period of public input runs from 14 April through 12 June. During this phase, all interested parties, including industry representatives, NGO’s and consumers, are encouraged to participate by submitting comments, feedback, and ideas through GOTS’s online portal.

“We are looking forward to receiving input from stakeholders around the world for GOTS version 7.0. This open call for feedback is part of what keeps our certification requirements up-to-date with the most cutting-edge developments in the industry,” says GOTS Managing Director Rahul Bhajekar.

Beginning in 2022, the revision process will follow the newly developed Standard Setting Procedure, which provides for the constitution of a Standard Revision Committee (SRC) for each revision. This group will serve as the pivotal force behind decisions about the revisions. The SRC consists of experts from different stakeholder groups, including associations, organisations, companies and individuals. All input received by June 12 will be carefully considered by the SRC as well as compiled and made public for an additional 30-day consultation period later this year. All drafts of the standard will also be made public. GOTS standard version 7.0 will be finalised in early 2023, and will be available on the GOTS website.

The timeline for the revision to GOTS version 7.0 is as follows:

  1. Constitution of GOTS SRC- April 2022
  2. Release of first revision draft for public consultation - 14 April 2022
  3. First public consultation period - 60 days (April 14 to June 12)
  4. Deliberations by the SRC on input received - May to August 2022
  5. Release of second revision draft for public consultation - September 2022
  6. Second public consultation period - 30 days from release
  7. Deliberations by the SRC on input received - October to November 2022
  8. Finalisation of GOTS version 7.0 - February 2023
  9. Release of GOTS version 7.0 - March 2023
More information:
GOTS revision stakeholder
Source:

GOTS

Photo: Dibella b.v.
24.03.2022

Textile Service Industry: New cooperative brings closed chain closer

Five players in the textile service industry announce the establishment of Cibutex (Circular Business Textiles). This new cooperative is dedicated to the recycling and recovery of fibres from discarded textiles. Cibutex wants to contribute to a circular textile chain through cooperation in the whole sector.

Five players in the textile service industry announce the establishment of Cibutex (Circular Business Textiles). This new cooperative is dedicated to the recycling and recovery of fibres from discarded textiles. Cibutex wants to contribute to a circular textile chain through cooperation in the whole sector.

The textile service has been implementing key Circular Economy solutions for some time: rental, care, repair and reuse of textiles for professional use. "As an industry, we are in a position to delve even deeper into the world of the circular economy. Every linen rental company has many of the same products, which go through the same process every time: the textiles are washed, sorted and collected again after the period of use. After many washes, the textiles are rejected. With this rejected textile, we see a unique opportunity to finally put the idea of a closed textile chain into practice. The used textiles that have reached the end of their useful life can be recycled on an industrial scale and the fibre raw materials can be recovered to make new textiles. We want to exploit this potential to the full by founding Cibutex, a cooperative for all textile service providers in Europe," says Cibutex director Jan Lamme, explaining the background of the unique project.

Cross-competitive goal
The founders of Cibutex are four well-known, competing textile service companies and one supply partner: Blycolin Textile Services (Zaltbommel, NL), Dibella (Aalten), Edelweiss Groep (The Hague), Lamme Textile Management (Amsterdam, NL) and Nedlin (Elsloo, NL). The companies have deliberately joined forces in order to implement sustainability in textiles and clothing by means of closed material cycles throughout the sector.

"Important resources are hidden in our B2B used textiles. We want to recover these in cooperation with relevant recycling companies and thus promote textile recycling as demanded by the EU Commission. We have come together to achieve sufficient critical mass to determine the final recycling of our discarded laundry, with the goal of moving from textiles to textiles," says co-founder Luuk de Win (Nedlin).

Sustainable eco-balance
"By recycling the raw materials of our used textiles, we contribute to reducing the social, environmental and climate impacts of the textile industry related to cultivation and production, and this leads to a long-term improvement of the ecological footprint of our industry," adds co-founder Marc van Boekholt (Blycolin).

Increasing value
To make the final transformation step of the circular economic model "textile service" a success, any European textile service company can become a member of Cibutex. The cooperative takes care of the collection, transport to the recycling partners and remuneration for the old textiles, which are now limited to bed linen, table linen and bath linen. In the future, however, the group wants to develop solutions for other textiles as well. For example, the recycling of workwear is also on the agenda. The founders of Cibutex agree that this too is a treasure trove of resources that must be addressed.

 

Source:

Dibella b.v.

(c) FET
FET-100 Series Melt Spinning System
13.03.2022

FET gearing up for Techtextil 2022

With just 3 months to go before Techtextil Frankfurt, UK company Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET), is looking forward to exhibiting at this trade show once again. Techtextil attracts international blue-chip companies at the cutting edge of technology, seeking innovative solutions to technical challenges, so this event represents an ideal opportunity to demonstrate how FET can help achieve their goals.

FET is an acknowledged leader in laboratory and pilot meltspinning equipment for a vast range of applications, such as precursor materials used in high value technical textiles, sportswear, medical devices and specialised novel fibres from exotic and difficult to process polymers. Where melt spinning solutions are not suitable, FET provides a viable alternative with pilot and small scale production wet spinning systems.

However, FET will also showcase at Techtextil its more recent laboratory scale spunbond system, which enables client development of nonwoven fabrics in a number of formats and polymers. FET already has a number of spunbond systems in the field, including composite systems which utilise both spunbond and meltspun functions.

With just 3 months to go before Techtextil Frankfurt, UK company Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET), is looking forward to exhibiting at this trade show once again. Techtextil attracts international blue-chip companies at the cutting edge of technology, seeking innovative solutions to technical challenges, so this event represents an ideal opportunity to demonstrate how FET can help achieve their goals.

FET is an acknowledged leader in laboratory and pilot meltspinning equipment for a vast range of applications, such as precursor materials used in high value technical textiles, sportswear, medical devices and specialised novel fibres from exotic and difficult to process polymers. Where melt spinning solutions are not suitable, FET provides a viable alternative with pilot and small scale production wet spinning systems.

However, FET will also showcase at Techtextil its more recent laboratory scale spunbond system, which enables client development of nonwoven fabrics in a number of formats and polymers. FET already has a number of spunbond systems in the field, including composite systems which utilise both spunbond and meltspun functions.

A major theme to be highlighted on the FET stand is Sustainability. The FET range of laboratory and pilot extrusion lines is ideally suited for both process and end product development of sustainable materials.

FET has successfully processed almost 30 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and non-woven formats, collaborating with specialist companies worldwide to promote greater sustainability through innovative manufacturing processes.

Source:

DAVID STEAD PROJECT MARKETING LTD for FET

Lenzing’s pavilion makes a green debut at Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles (c) Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles
Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles
09.03.2022

Lenzing’s pavilion makes a green debut at Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles

Sustainability has become a major trend in the global home textiles industry. It is more common nowadays to find natural and sustainable fibres in an extensive range of home furnishing products. From this angle, the Lenzing Group (Lenzing) will take led in a brand new pavilion at Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles – Spring Edition. Lenzing is the world’s leading manufacturer of renewable specialty fibres, and will highlight the latest eco-friendly fibres that can meet the ever-rising sourcing demand. The fair is set to take place from 14 – 16 April 2022 at the National Exhibition and Convention Center (Shanghai).

Sustainability has become a major trend in the global home textiles industry. It is more common nowadays to find natural and sustainable fibres in an extensive range of home furnishing products. From this angle, the Lenzing Group (Lenzing) will take led in a brand new pavilion at Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles – Spring Edition. Lenzing is the world’s leading manufacturer of renewable specialty fibres, and will highlight the latest eco-friendly fibres that can meet the ever-rising sourcing demand. The fair is set to take place from 14 – 16 April 2022 at the National Exhibition and Convention Center (Shanghai).

As an upswing from the growing public awareness of environmental issues, consumers are now more willing to switch to sustainable products. According to a CottonWorks’ survey, 90% of the interviewed Chinese consumers want their home textiles to be environmentally friendly[1]. It also found that more consumers are paying attention to the fibre content that can deliver safe and sustainable home textiles.
Furthermore, the Chinese government’s ‘Outline Of the Development of the Textile Industry during the 14th Five Year Plan’, also encourages the acceleration of low cost, functional and sustainable renewable fibres in the local textile industry.

The Lenzing satellite pavilion: a one-stop platform for green home textile materials
To help home textile suppliers source a variety of eco-friendly materials efficiently, one of the fair’s long-time exhibitors is set to form a new pavilion at the upcoming Spring show. Lenzing, the Austrian brand widely known for its ecologically responsible production of specialty fibres made from renewable raw material wood, gathers seven of its local downstream supply chain manufacturers to showcase their renewable products.

Mr David Dai, Senior Commercial Director Textile China of Lenzing spoked about why they decided to organise a new pavilion at the show: “As we received positive feedback from our pavilion at Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, our business partners from the home textile supply chain were hoping for a similar arrangement in this sector. We believe all the participating manufacturers can benefit from this pavilion by finding ways to better serve their clients and consumers.”

Brands in the Lenzing satellite pavilion will include:
•    Lenzing Group will introduce the first Carbon-zero TENCEL™ fibres which are CarbonNeutral™ certified products by Natural Capital Partner.
•    Botou Jinglun Textiles Co Ltd focuses on new fibre yarns. The company develops multi-component yarns for cotton, wool, silk and linen with combinations of MODAL, TENCEL™ fibres and various functional materials.
•    Fujian Yongtai County Huaerjin Textile Co Ltd provides high-quality, natural, renewable pure and blended yarns including TENCEL™ fibres, US cotton, Australian cotton, acrylic cotton, silk and other plant-based yarns.
•    Jiangsu Dasheng Group Co Ltd has one of the largest cellulosic fibre yarn spinning mills in China and focuses on producing top-quality home textiles.
•    Qingdao Textiles Group produces natural fibres, cellulose fibres, copper antimicrobial fibres and other nature-based materials for home and contract textiles.
•    Suzhou Zhenlun Spinning Co Ltd is an advanced enterprise specialising in regenerated cellulose yarns like ECO VERO, FSC Viscose, Circulose, Carbon Zero Yarn and more.
•    Ton Design Industrial Co Ltd produces medium and high-end bedding fabrics. The brand’s TENCEL™ Lyocell fibres and TENCEL™ fibres blend cotton series products are certified by Lenzing.
•    Wuxi Tianmu Extra Width Printing Dyeing Co Ltd mainly produces extra-wide, high-count and high-density down-proof fabrics and fabrics for bedding. The technique can handle different procedures for dealing with pure cotton, bamboo fibres, TENCEL™ fibres and other fibre fabrics.

In addition to the new pavilion, a number of other featured exhibitors will also showcase their sustainable products at the fair. This includes Cotton Council International (CCI) promoting US cotton fibres and cotton products, and Zhangjiagang Coolist Life Technology Co Ltd bringing their unique bedding products made from organic and environmental-friendly materials.

02.03.2022

Sumo & Kelheim Fibres: Sustainable and high-performance absorbent washable diaper pad

Up to the age of three, a baby uses around 5,000 diapers. Despite the convenient handling of common disposable diapers, parents are increasingly looking for a healthy and sustainable alternative to these products to avoid waste. In Germany alone, 10 million diapers are disposed of every day.

Ways to solve this dilemma, would be disposable products that are made from bio-based or biodegradable materials, or reusable products with a longer life span replace disposable products.

Founding team Luisa Kahlfeldt and Caspar Böhme combine both with their "Sumo Diapers." These cloth diapers are made entirely of sustainable materials while offering high performance and innovative design.

The Sumo Diaper is a fitted cloth diaper that consists of a waterproof cover and absorbent inserts. The cover is sewn in such a way that a pocket is formed: this is where the absorbent pad is inserted to prevent slipping.

Up to the age of three, a baby uses around 5,000 diapers. Despite the convenient handling of common disposable diapers, parents are increasingly looking for a healthy and sustainable alternative to these products to avoid waste. In Germany alone, 10 million diapers are disposed of every day.

Ways to solve this dilemma, would be disposable products that are made from bio-based or biodegradable materials, or reusable products with a longer life span replace disposable products.

Founding team Luisa Kahlfeldt and Caspar Böhme combine both with their "Sumo Diapers." These cloth diapers are made entirely of sustainable materials while offering high performance and innovative design.

The Sumo Diaper is a fitted cloth diaper that consists of a waterproof cover and absorbent inserts. The cover is sewn in such a way that a pocket is formed: this is where the absorbent pad is inserted to prevent slipping.

To further enhance the performance of this absorbent pad, the Sumo team partners with the viscose special fibre manufacturer Kelheim Fibres, who brings decades of experience from the hygiene sector, especially for sensitive applications where high absorbency is required (such as tampons). Together, Sumo and Kelheim Fibres have developed a high-performance absorbent pad that uses no fossil materials.

The basis are functionalised specialty viscose fibres with adapted cross-sections. Needle-punched / thermobonded nonwovens with a blend of specialty viscose and PLA bicomponent fibres were chosen to ensure the product's washability. PLA stands for polylactic acid made from natural and renewable raw materials. By combining nonwovens, usually found mainly in the single-use sector, with reusable products, Sumo and Kelheim Fibres have chosen a completely new approach.

Inside the pad, the speciality fibres from Kelheim score with their special properties: In the distribution layer (ADL), the trilobal cross-section of the Galaxy® fibre forms capillary channels that enable efficient and optimized liquid distribution and thus optimum use of the capacity of the absorbent core, offering the lowest rewet values.

In the absorbent core, the segmented hollow fibre Bramante stores liquid not only between but also inside the fibre. The liquid remains there even when pressure is applied to the construction, providing excellent rewet values. Bramante can absorb up to 260% of its own weight in liquid. Cotton only achieves values of around 50% here.

The innovative nonwoven construction with the speciality fibres from Kelheim performs significantly better in tests in terms of air permeability, liquid absorption and rewetting than commercially available solutions made of synthetic fibres or cotton in knitted structures, and has earned Sumo diapers a place among the finalists for the IDEA® Long-Life Product Achievement Award.

The launch is scheduled for the first of May.

Source:

Kelheim Fibres

(c) adidas
25.02.2022

adidas unveils its first product with Spinnova

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

adidas is committed to helping end plastic waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be remade into entirely new products, and, in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1. Its outdoor brand, adidas TERREX , is leading the innovation of technical materials with the aim of helping drive better product solutions for adventurers in nature while ensuring there is no compromise on style or performance .

By 2025, nine out of 10 adidas articles will carry a more sustainable technology, material, design, or method of manufacturing and adidas’ partnership with Spinnova is a major part of this journey.