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(c) Dibella GmbH
22.03.2021

Dibella launches 2nd upcycling project: napkins become jeans

After starting the first "Dibella up" circular-flow concept in August 2020, thousands of high-quality bags have already been made from used hotel textiles. Now the company is presenting another upcycling project: As part of a feasibility study, organic Fairtrade napkins that could no longer be rented out by the company were turned into jeans.

The second "Dibella up" project promises successful recycling of used object textiles. Within the framework of a feasibility study, almost 5,000 discarded napkins were used for jeans production in Pakistan. The special feature of the process is the traceability of the raw materials through all processing stages.

The napkins made of pure organic Fairtrade cotton originated in India. There, the fibres were grown and harvested by micro-farmers of the Chetna cooperative and then processed into durable textiles by a certified company. From Dibella, the napkins went to Lamme Textile Management, where they went through the use process in laundry and catering for many years. All stages were traceable by means of a "Respect Code" with which each piece was marked.

After starting the first "Dibella up" circular-flow concept in August 2020, thousands of high-quality bags have already been made from used hotel textiles. Now the company is presenting another upcycling project: As part of a feasibility study, organic Fairtrade napkins that could no longer be rented out by the company were turned into jeans.

The second "Dibella up" project promises successful recycling of used object textiles. Within the framework of a feasibility study, almost 5,000 discarded napkins were used for jeans production in Pakistan. The special feature of the process is the traceability of the raw materials through all processing stages.

The napkins made of pure organic Fairtrade cotton originated in India. There, the fibres were grown and harvested by micro-farmers of the Chetna cooperative and then processed into durable textiles by a certified company. From Dibella, the napkins went to Lamme Textile Management, where they went through the use process in laundry and catering for many years. All stages were traceable by means of a "Respect Code" with which each piece was marked.

In the recycling project, the original supply chain was reversed: Dibella transported the organic Fairtrade napkins discarded by Lamme Textile Management to Pakistan. There, the goods were shredded and the organic Fairtrade cotton fibres recovered in a full-scale textile plant specialising in sustainability. In the next step, they were mixed with "fresh fibres", spun into yarns for denim production, woven, finished with sustainable processes, subjected to quality tests and then made up into jeans.

More information:
Dibella
Source:

Dibella GmbH

Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development ©Stäubli
Multilayer Aramid
17.03.2021

Swiss weaving: Fabrics of the future

  • Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development

Shoes and electronic calculators are probably not the first products people would associate with the textile weaving process. But they certainly signpost the future for woven fabrics, as two examples of the ever-wider possibilities of latest technology in the field. Fashion and function already combine in the increasing popularity of woven fabrics for shoes, and this is a present and future trend. Calculators in fabrics? That’s another story of ingenious development, using so-called ‘meander fields’ on the back and keys printed on the front of the material.

  • Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development

Shoes and electronic calculators are probably not the first products people would associate with the textile weaving process. But they certainly signpost the future for woven fabrics, as two examples of the ever-wider possibilities of latest technology in the field. Fashion and function already combine in the increasing popularity of woven fabrics for shoes, and this is a present and future trend. Calculators in fabrics? That’s another story of ingenious development, using so-called ‘meander fields’ on the back and keys printed on the front of the material.

These glimpses of the outlook for modern weavers are among the highlights of developments now being pioneered by Swiss textile machinery companies. All weaving markets require innovation, as well as speed, efficiency, quality and sustainability. Member firms of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association respond to these needs at every point in the process – from tightening the first thread in the warp to winding the last inch for fabric delivery. They also share a common advantage, with a leading position in the traditional weaving industry as well as the expertise to foster new and exciting applications.

Technology and research cooperation
The concept of a ‘textile calculator’ was developed by Jakob Müller Group, in cooperation with the textile research institute Thuringen-Vogtland. Müller’s patented MDW® multi-directional weaving technology is able to create the meander fields which allow calculator functions to be accessed at a touch. A novel and useful facility, which suggests limitless expansion.

Today, the latest woven shoes are appreciated for their precise and comfortable fit. They score through their durability, strength and stability, meeting the requirements of individual athletes across many sports, as well as leisurewear. Stäubli is well known as a leading global specialist in weaving preparation, shedding systems and high-speed textile machinery. Its jacquard machines offer great flexibility across a wide range of formats, weaving all types of technical textiles, lightweight reinforcement fabrics – and shoes.

It’s possible to weave new materials such as ceramics, mix fibers such as aramid, carbon and other, and produce innovative multi-layers with variable thicknesses. Such applications put special demands on weaving machines which are fulfilled by Stäubli high-performance TF weaving systems.

Great weaving results are impossible without perfect warp tension, now available thanks to the world-leading electronic warp feeding systems of Crealet. Some market segments in weaving industry today demand warp let-off systems which meet individual customer requirements. For example, the company has recognized expertise to understand that geotextile products often need special treatment, as provided by its intelligent warp tension control system. Individual and connective solutions are designed to allow external support via remote link. Crealet’s warp let-off systems are widely used in both ribbon and broadloom weaving, for technical textiles applied on single or multiple warp beams and creels.

Functional, sustainable, automated
Trends in the field of woven narrow fabrics are clearly focused on functionality and sustainability. The Jakob Müller Group has already embraced these principles – for example using natural fibers for 100% recyclable labels with a soft-feel selvedge. It also focuses as much as possible on the processing of recycled, synthetic materials. Both PET bottles and polyester waste from production are recycled and processed into elastic and rigid tapes for the apparel industry.

For efficient fabric production environments, it is now recognized that automated quality solutions are essential. Quality standards are increasing everywhere and zero-defect levels are mandatory for sensitive applications such as airbags and protective apparel.

Uster’s latest generation of on-loom monitoring and inspection systems offers real operational improvements for weavers. The fabric quality monitoring prevents waste, while the quality assurance system significantly improves first-quality yield for all applications. Protecting fabric makers from costly claims and damaged reputations, automated fabric inspection also removes the need for slow, costly and unreliable manual inspection, freeing operators to focus on higher-skilled jobs.

Smart and collaborative robotics (cobots) offer many automation possibilities in weaving rooms. Stäubli’s future oriented robotics division is a driver in this segment with first effective installations in warp and creel preparation.

Control and productivity
Willy Grob’s specialized solutions for woven fabric winding focus on reliable control of tension, keeping it constant from the start of the process right through to the full cloth roll. Continuous digital control is especially important for sensitive fabrics, while performance and productivity are also critical advantages. In this regard, the company’s large-scale batching units can provide ten times the winding capacity of a regular winder integrated in the weaving machine.

The customized concept by Grob as well as design and implementation result in great flexibility and functionality of the fabric winding equipment – yet another example of Swiss ingenuity in textile machinery.  
There is even more innovation to come in weaving – and in other segments – from members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association in future! This confident assertion is founded on an impressive statistic: the 4077 years of experience behind the creative power of the association’s member firms. It’s proof positive that their developments grow out of profound knowledge and continuous research.

Month's drapilux recommendation: The epitome of piece dyeing © drapilux
The epitome of piece dyeing: drapilux 115
16.03.2021

Month's drapilux recommendation: The epitome of piece dyeing

  • Inspiring Interiors

Textiles are an inseparable part of the interior as they give a room atmosphere and good acoustics. But which fabric is best suited for which purpose?
This month's drapilux recommendation is drapilux 115 and is aimed at classic and modern hotels as well as offices.

  • The epitome of piece dyeing: drapilux 115

Sustainable, flame retardant and a true eye-catcher – drapilux 115 combines all these features in one fabric. This decorative fabric, which resembles the material of a bedspread, has been created using an innovative yarn, part of which has been manufactured with sustainably produced fibres. The unusual look is achieved by means of a two-tone effect, as the woven material is dyed using a complex cationic/anionic process. The combination of sustainably produced fibres and flame retardancy makes drapilux 115 the quintessence of piece dyeing. Thanks to the modern colours, the fabric is very versatile.

  • Inspiring Interiors

Textiles are an inseparable part of the interior as they give a room atmosphere and good acoustics. But which fabric is best suited for which purpose?
This month's drapilux recommendation is drapilux 115 and is aimed at classic and modern hotels as well as offices.

  • The epitome of piece dyeing: drapilux 115

Sustainable, flame retardant and a true eye-catcher – drapilux 115 combines all these features in one fabric. This decorative fabric, which resembles the material of a bedspread, has been created using an innovative yarn, part of which has been manufactured with sustainably produced fibres. The unusual look is achieved by means of a two-tone effect, as the woven material is dyed using a complex cationic/anionic process. The combination of sustainably produced fibres and flame retardancy makes drapilux 115 the quintessence of piece dyeing. Thanks to the modern colours, the fabric is very versatile.

Source:

schönknecht : kommunikation
gesellschaft für public relations und marketing mbh

16.03.2021

Devan launches range of bio-based fragrances for textiles

Devan is launching a new range of bio-based fragrances, named SceNTL®. The range uses traceable raw materials and an external lab has confirmed that the bio-content of the fragrances is above 85%.

SceNTL® is a unique and wide range of encapsulated fragrances that can be integrated onto the fabric and are gradually released over time. Upon release, the fragrances appeal to the senses, promoting relaxation, wellbeing and feel-good sensations.

While synthetic fragrances are composed of synthetic, man-made ingredients, natural scents and oils are created by isolating natural aroma components from raw plant materials. This also explains why every SceNTL® batch can have a slight variation in smell. As natural conditions differ from time to time, every harvest is a little different from the previous one.

Although aromatherapy is still a young and understudied domain, recent studies have shown that essential oils can indeed have neurological effects. Linalool for example, a component found in Lavender and rosewood, is found to enhance sleep, while Limonene, a component found in the peel of citrus fruits, is clinically proven to have an uplifting effect.

Devan is launching a new range of bio-based fragrances, named SceNTL®. The range uses traceable raw materials and an external lab has confirmed that the bio-content of the fragrances is above 85%.

SceNTL® is a unique and wide range of encapsulated fragrances that can be integrated onto the fabric and are gradually released over time. Upon release, the fragrances appeal to the senses, promoting relaxation, wellbeing and feel-good sensations.

While synthetic fragrances are composed of synthetic, man-made ingredients, natural scents and oils are created by isolating natural aroma components from raw plant materials. This also explains why every SceNTL® batch can have a slight variation in smell. As natural conditions differ from time to time, every harvest is a little different from the previous one.

Although aromatherapy is still a young and understudied domain, recent studies have shown that essential oils can indeed have neurological effects. Linalool for example, a component found in Lavender and rosewood, is found to enhance sleep, while Limonene, a component found in the peel of citrus fruits, is clinically proven to have an uplifting effect.

At this moment, the SceNTL® range is intended for low-wash items such as mattress ticking, decorative pillows, upholstery, curtains, carpets, etc. It can also be used as a natural ‘masking scent’ for products that have a strong artificial smell caused by the production process. The company is already looking into further development of other scents and broader application use.

More information:
Devan Home textiles fragrance
Source:

Marketing Solutions NV