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27.01.2023

SMCCREATE 2023: Call for Speakers

The AVK Working Group SMC/BMC and the European Alliance for SMC BMC are jointly organising SMCCreate 2023 - a conference on designing with SMC and BMC composites. The event, which offers insights into the entire product design process from idea to part manufacture, is aimed at both experienced designers and those new to the use of these materials.

Around 60 participants from all over Europe attended the first SMCCreate design conference, which took place in Antwerp in June 2022. SMCCREATE 2023 will take place in Prague (Czech Republic) on 7-8 November 2023 at the Vienna House by Wyndham Diplomat Prague; conference language is English. After a successful launch, AVK and the European Alliance for SMC BMC are looking forward to the second edition of the event and invite speakers to apply with their presentation proposals by 27 February. (Mail address: info@avk-tv.de).

The AVK Working Group SMC/BMC and the European Alliance for SMC BMC are jointly organising SMCCreate 2023 - a conference on designing with SMC and BMC composites. The event, which offers insights into the entire product design process from idea to part manufacture, is aimed at both experienced designers and those new to the use of these materials.

Around 60 participants from all over Europe attended the first SMCCreate design conference, which took place in Antwerp in June 2022. SMCCREATE 2023 will take place in Prague (Czech Republic) on 7-8 November 2023 at the Vienna House by Wyndham Diplomat Prague; conference language is English. After a successful launch, AVK and the European Alliance for SMC BMC are looking forward to the second edition of the event and invite speakers to apply with their presentation proposals by 27 February. (Mail address: info@avk-tv.de).

The aim of the conference is to help designers and engineers choose the best material solution for their applications. Presentations will focus on best practices and industrial solutions, SMC and BMC component manufacturing, material selection and product development throughout the product life cycle, from design to sustainability.

(Mail address: info@avk-tv.de).

Source:

AVK - Industrievereinigung Verstärkte Kunststoffe e. V.

20.01.2023

NCTO and USINFI tell Biden Administration Penalty Tariffs counteract China’s Unfair Trade Advantage

The Biden administration’s Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel counteract China’s unfair trade advantages and give U.S. manufactures a chance to compete, two key American textile manufacturing groups told the Biden administration. Removing tariffs, the associations said, would reward China, put U.S. manufacturers at a competitive disadvantage and do nothing to reduce inflation.

In a formal submission to the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) office, which is conducting a four-year statutory review of the tariffs, the associations, representing the entirety of the U.S. textile production chain, expressed strong support for the continuation of current Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel imports from China and outlined the effectiveness of U.S. tariff actions.

The Biden administration’s Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel counteract China’s unfair trade advantages and give U.S. manufactures a chance to compete, two key American textile manufacturing groups told the Biden administration. Removing tariffs, the associations said, would reward China, put U.S. manufacturers at a competitive disadvantage and do nothing to reduce inflation.

In a formal submission to the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) office, which is conducting a four-year statutory review of the tariffs, the associations, representing the entirety of the U.S. textile production chain, expressed strong support for the continuation of current Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel imports from China and outlined the effectiveness of U.S. tariff actions.

“In some cases, such as on finished apparel, the tariffs have worked to partially offset and counteract China’s unfair trade advantages,” the groups said. “The tariffs on finished textile and apparel items are giving U.S. manufacturers the chance to compete, and we are seeing encouraging investment and growth in moving some production and souring from China back to the Western Hemisphere.”

“The CAFTA-DR [Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement] region has seen more than $1 billion in new textile and apparel investment this year, for example, which is historic and due to the textile and apparel rules negotiated under the agreement and sourcing shifts from China,” they added. “This investment and growing U.S. imports from the Western Hemisphere is attributable in part to the 301 tariffs on finished apparel.  The tariffs on finished items in our sector are broadly supported by textile/apparel producers in the hemispheric co-production chain, and it is essential that they remain in place, absent China reforming its practices.”

The submission was filed by the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) and the U.S. Industrial and Narrow Fabrics Institute (USINFI), a division of the Advanced Textiles Association (AFA).

The groups have long advocated for a fair, transparent process to remove tariffs on textile machinery, certain chemicals and dyes and limited textile inputs that cannot be sourced domestically to help U.S. manufacturers compete against China.

They also stressed that lifting the tariffs on finished textiles and apparel products from China “will solidify their global dominance in this sector for generations to come and reward their abusive behaviors, exacerbate the migration crisis, hurt domestic manufacturers and workers, undermine our ability to recalibrate essential PPE supply chains, and blunt the positive supply chains shifts and investments in the Western Hemisphere that are happening.” They added it would “do nothing to solve the inflation crisis facing U.S. consumers and manufacturers right now.”

See the full submission here.

Source:

National Council of Textile Organizations

Photo Jandali/IFCO
19.01.2023

Istanbul Fashion Connection (IFCO) fully booked

IFCO, Istanbul Fashion Connection taking place from February 8th to 11th, 2023 is fully booked. Over 600 exhibitors present themselves on 45,000 square meters in the Istanbul Exhibition Center and will be giving an overview of the new collections in the areas of womenswear, menswear, kidswear, denim, sportswear, night dresses, wedding dresses, lingerie, socks, leather and furs in 9 halls.

The CORE İSTANBUL, the new designer space at IFCO, will showcase the latest creations from Istanbul Fashion Week designers, such as Arzu Karpol, Aslı Filinta, Ceren Ocak, Gül Ağış, Çiğdem Akın etc. At IFCO Brands market leaders such as İpekyol, Damat, Kiğılı, Altınyıldız, B&G Store, Lufian, Jakamen or Tudors fly the flag and use the trade fair as a platform to expand their international customer network. LinExpo, a separate platform for lingerie and hosiery at IFCO, presents 140 manufacturers and FashionIST offers a wide range of wedding dresses, evening wear and suits, over 100 brands are shown here.

IFCO, Istanbul Fashion Connection taking place from February 8th to 11th, 2023 is fully booked. Over 600 exhibitors present themselves on 45,000 square meters in the Istanbul Exhibition Center and will be giving an overview of the new collections in the areas of womenswear, menswear, kidswear, denim, sportswear, night dresses, wedding dresses, lingerie, socks, leather and furs in 9 halls.

The CORE İSTANBUL, the new designer space at IFCO, will showcase the latest creations from Istanbul Fashion Week designers, such as Arzu Karpol, Aslı Filinta, Ceren Ocak, Gül Ağış, Çiğdem Akın etc. At IFCO Brands market leaders such as İpekyol, Damat, Kiğılı, Altınyıldız, B&G Store, Lufian, Jakamen or Tudors fly the flag and use the trade fair as a platform to expand their international customer network. LinExpo, a separate platform for lingerie and hosiery at IFCO, presents 140 manufacturers and FashionIST offers a wide range of wedding dresses, evening wear and suits, over 100 brands are shown here.

IFCO Sourcing offers the opportunity to network with manufacturing companies such as Talu, Zevigas, Bozkurt, Bilce Tekstil, Gelişim, Karar, Akademi, Bozpaor Demezoğlu. These international manufacturers provide insight into their performance profile in terms of production, delivery times, etc.
The manufacturing sector is an important branch of the economy for the industry, over 80% of the companies in Türkiye are active in this sector. Many competitive advantages result from production in Türkiye, such as short delivery times, the possibility of small minimum order quantities, high production quality, young and well-trained employees. However, Türkiye also has a lively and creative design scene and high-quality fashion brands that are redefining the image of "Made in Türkiye". IFCO brings these brands to the stage and puts the Turkish fashion world in a new light.

The program offers seminars and lectures. The special focus is on the topic of sustainability, which is curated by Ekoteks Laboratorium, the association's sustainability institute. Accademia de la Moda and WGSN give latest trend information. Up to ten shows will take place on the catwalk in the Fashion Show Center, including presentations showcasing their latest collections.

In combination with Texhibition, the trade fair for fabrics, trimmings and yarns, which takes place from March 8th to 10th, 2023 in the Istanbul Exhibition Center, ITKIB / IHKIB offers with IFCO the complete offer for the international textile industry and trade.

Source:

Jandali/IFCO

DNFI
09.01.2023

World Natural Fibre Update - January 2023

Price Trends

Price Trends

  • The nearby cotton futures contract on the Intercontinental Exchange was down just 1% in December and closed the year at $1.84 per kilogram. A year earlier, the March contract closed at $2.30 per kilogram.  

    Cotton futures have been inverted for nearly three years because of supply chain disruptions that prevented normal on-time deliveries of international shipments. With the easing of container shortages and increased sailings, cotton futures are gradually reverting to the normal pattern in which contracts for forward delivery exceed nearby contracts by the cost of insurance, storage and interest between delivery months. The May and July 2023 contracts also finished 2022 at $1.84 per kilogram. In November, the May and July contracts were each several cents per kilogram lower than the March contract.
  • The Eastern Market Indicator of prices for fine wool in Australia rose 9% in December to US$9.06 per kilogram. A year earlier, the EMI was $9.66. Australian analysts note that sheep for meat, cattle, and grain production, are competing alternatives for the use of land, and wool prices must continue upward if production is to be maintained in 2023.
  • Prices quoted by the Indian Jute Balers Association (JBA) at the end of December converted to US$ fell 2% from a month earlier to an average of 74 cents per kilogram. The decline occurred entirely because of a weakening exchange rate. Prices in Rupee rose marginally. A year earlier, quoted prices averaged 84 cents per kilogram. The 16-percent decline year-on-year was caused about equally by a decline in quoted prices in Rupee and a weakening of the exchange rate.  

    The Indian jute industry is almost entirely focused on domestic demand, while half of total demand in Bangladesh comes from exports. Because of shortages of higher quality jute, export prices in Bangladesh are reportedly rising.
    (https://www.wgc.de/en/produkte/jute)

    India extended the anti-dumping duty at the end of December on jute and jute products imported from Bangladesh and Nepal for a period of five years. Bangladesh had urged the Indian government not to accept recommendations for extension, while the Indian industry was lobbying to ensure the duty remained in place. The duty rates range from approximately $6 per tonne at current exchange rates for low-quality fibres to $350 per tonne for finished products. The duty was originally imposed in January 2017 and was to expire at the end of 2022.
  • Prices of silk in China rose 2% during December to US$28.0 per kilogram. Prices in yuan fell marginally during the month, but the RMB rose 3% against the USD. Prices of textile-grade silk in China were essentially unchanged at the end of 2022 compared with the end of 2021. However, prices closed 2022 about 40% above the average level pre-Covid. https://www.sunsirs.com/uk/prodetail-322.html and  https://businessanalytiq.com/procurementanalytics/index/raw-silk-price-index/ .
  • Coconut coir fibre in India quoted in US$ remained in a narrow range, averaging $0.205 per kilogram in December. Prices in Rupee have been stable, and changes in dollar prices reflect changes in the exchange rate.

 
Production
 
World Natural Fibre Production in 2022 is estimated as of early January at 32 million tonnes, approximately one million below production in 2021 and down 900,000 tonnes compared with the estimate in early December.

World cotton production is estimated at 24.2 million tonnes in 2022/23 (August to July), 700,000 tonnes lower than in 2021/22 (ICAC.org). World cotton production rose from 20 million tonnes to 25 million between 2020/21 and 2005/06, but there has been no growth in the nearly two decades since.  
 
World production of jute is forecast down nearly 400,000 tonnes in 2022 because of inadequate rainfall during the harvest period to permit proper retting. Production in India is estimated up by 100,000 tonnes to 1.7 million tonnes, but production in Bangladesh fell by nearly one-third to just one million tonnes.
 
Production of coir, flax and sisal in 2022 are each estimated based on recent trends. Coir and flax have each been trending upward over the past decade, while world sisal production has been largely stable.

World wool production is forecast up 5% in 2022 to 1.09 million tonnes (clean), the highest since 2018. The Australian Wool Production Forecasting Committee issued its third estimate of 2022/23 production in December, keeping the estimate unchanged from September. Above-average rainfall in Australia, and across most of the Southern Hemisphere, is resulting in better pasture conditions and a rebuilding of sheep numbers. Sheep numbers shorn in Australia are climbing from 67 million in 2020/21 to 72 million in 2021/22 and to an estimated 75 million in 2022/23. https://www.wool.com/market-intelligence/wool-production-forecasts/  
 
According to the International Sericulture Commission (https://www.inserco.org/), silk production in China dropped from 170,000 tonnes in 2015 to 53,000 in 2020, with further declines estimated during Covid. Consequently, world silk production dropped from 202,000 tonnes in 2015 to 92,000 in 2020, and estimates of production during 2022 remain below 100,000 tonnes.

More information:
natural fibers textiles market
Source:

DNFI

(c) International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF)
04.01.2023

17th ITMF Global Textile Industry Survey

  • Business situation has worsened markedly but not expectations.

The 17th ITMF Global Textile Industry Survey (GTIS, formerly known as ITMF Corona-Survey) shows that on average the business situation in the global textile industry has deteriorated further in November 2022. At the same time, global business expectations in six months’ time remained in negative territory but did not get gloomier. The indicators for order intake, order backlog, and capacity utilisation rate dropped, globally.

  • Business situation has worsened markedly but not expectations.

The 17th ITMF Global Textile Industry Survey (GTIS, formerly known as ITMF Corona-Survey) shows that on average the business situation in the global textile industry has deteriorated further in November 2022. At the same time, global business expectations in six months’ time remained in negative territory but did not get gloomier. The indicators for order intake, order backlog, and capacity utilisation rate dropped, globally.

According to the survey, the business situation in the three Asian regions and Europe remained especially poor. In North & Central America the business situation has improved again markedly. Except for the textile machinery segment that still benefits on average from a long order backlog, all other segments found themselves in negative business situations, especially fibre producers and spinners. Global business expectations have remained negative but “stabilized” around -10 percentage points (pp) since July 2022. Expectations have improved significantly in South Asia to +10pp, and Europe to -30pp. Business expectations in all segments remain negative territory with four out of seven recording improvements.

Order intake nose-dived in November, in line with weaker business situation and weaker demand, currently the biggest concern for the global textile value chain. Only companies in North & Central America registered on average a good order intake, while all other regions were faced with an unsatisfactory order situation. Except for South-East Asia and North & Central America order backlog fell. The only segments where order backlog increased were the down-stream segments garments and home textiles. Capacity utilization rate dropped in all regions in November 2022. It only increased in the textile machinery segment but fell otherwise.

“Weakening demand” is by far the biggest concern in the global textile industry, followed by the root causes of demand reduction, namely high energy and raw material prices which lead to high inflation rates. Good news is that logistical costs are not much of a concern anymore. Concerns about geopolitics on the other hand have increased again in the past two months.

More information:
ITMF market survey
Source:

International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF)