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(c) Hohenstein
27.01.2023

OEKO-TEX® ORGANIC COTTON - New label for organic cotton

From April 2023, OEKO-TEX® will officially launch its new ORGANIC COTTON label. Two initial pilot customers have already been certified by the testing service provider Hohenstein: the Indian textile supplier Milan Group and the Turkish cotton producer Akasya.

The new organic label ensures that all requirements for labeling as organic cotton are met. In addition to testing in accordance with OEKO-TEX® STANDARD 100, it ensures that the cotton contains less than ten percent genetically modified material, complies with pesticide limits and guarantees its organic origin.

Textile companies whose products have been certified with the OEKO-TEX® STANDARD 100 can now have their certificates extended to an ORGANIC COTTON certificate after ensuring ecological production.

"A combination with OEKO-TEX® MADE IN GREEN is ideal," explains Ivonne Schramm, Head of OEKO-TEX® at Hohenstein. "This ensures environmental friendliness, transparency and socially responsible conditions in a single certification."

From April 2023, OEKO-TEX® will officially launch its new ORGANIC COTTON label. Two initial pilot customers have already been certified by the testing service provider Hohenstein: the Indian textile supplier Milan Group and the Turkish cotton producer Akasya.

The new organic label ensures that all requirements for labeling as organic cotton are met. In addition to testing in accordance with OEKO-TEX® STANDARD 100, it ensures that the cotton contains less than ten percent genetically modified material, complies with pesticide limits and guarantees its organic origin.

Textile companies whose products have been certified with the OEKO-TEX® STANDARD 100 can now have their certificates extended to an ORGANIC COTTON certificate after ensuring ecological production.

"A combination with OEKO-TEX® MADE IN GREEN is ideal," explains Ivonne Schramm, Head of OEKO-TEX® at Hohenstein. "This ensures environmental friendliness, transparency and socially responsible conditions in a single certification."

The certificate can be used for ready-made articles (e.g. T-shirt, bedspread, etc.) as well as for textile intermediate products (e.g. intermediate products such as raw fibers, yarns, etc.). Mixtures of organic and conventional cultivation are not permitted.

Source:

Hohenstein

(c) nova-Institut GmbH
24.01.2023

Six nominees for„Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2023“

For the third time, nova-Institute awards the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award in the frame of the “Cellulose Fibres Conference 2023” (8-9 March 2023). The conference advisory board nominated six remarkable products, including cellulose fibres from textile waste, banana production waste and bacterial pulp, a novel technology for producing lyocell yarns and a hygiene product. The innovations will be put to the vote of the conference audience on the first day of the event, with the awards ceremony taking place in the evening. The innovation award “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2023” is sponsored by GIG Karasek (AT).

For the third time, nova-Institute awards the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award in the frame of the “Cellulose Fibres Conference 2023” (8-9 March 2023). The conference advisory board nominated six remarkable products, including cellulose fibres from textile waste, banana production waste and bacterial pulp, a novel technology for producing lyocell yarns and a hygiene product. The innovations will be put to the vote of the conference audience on the first day of the event, with the awards ceremony taking place in the evening. The innovation award “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2023” is sponsored by GIG Karasek (AT).

Here are the six nominees
Vybrana – The new generation banana fibre – GenCrest Bioproducts (India)

Vybrana is a Gencrest’s Sustainable Cellulosic Fibre upcycled from agrowaste. Raw fibres are extracted from the Banana Pseudo stem at the end of the plant lifecycle. The biomass waste is then treated by the Gencrest patented Fiberzyme technology. Here, cocktail enzyme formulations remove the high lignin content and other impurities and help fibre fibrillation. The company's proprietary cottonisation process provides fine, spinnable cellulose staple fibres suitable for blending with other staple fibres and can be spun on any conventional spinning systems giving yarns sustainable apparel. Vybrana is produced without the use of heavy chemicals and minimized water consumption and in a waste-free process where balance biomass is converted to bio stimulants Agrosatva and Bio Fertilizers & organic manure.

HeiQ AeoniQ™ – technology for more sustainability of textiles – HeiQ (Austria)
HeiQ AeoniQ™ is the disruptive technology and key initiative from HeiQ with the potential to change the sustainability of textiles. It is the first climate-positive continuous cellulose filament yarn, made in a proprietary manufacturing process and the first to reproduce the properties of polyester and nylon yarns in a cellulosic, biodegradable, and endlessly recyclable fibre.
HeiQ AeoniQ™ can be manufactured from different cellulosic raw materials such as pre- and post-consumer textile waste, biotech cellulose, and non-valorized agricultural waste, such as ground coffee waste or banana peels. It naturally degrades after only 12 weeks in the soil. Each ton of HeiQ AeoniQ™ saves 5 tons of CO2 emissions. The first garments made with this innovative cellulosic filament fiber were commercially launched in January 2023.

TENCEL™ LUXE – lyocell filament yarn – Lenzing (Austria)
TENCEL™ LUXE is LENZING’s new versatile lyocell yarn that offers an urgently needed sustainable filament solution for the textile and fashion industry. A possible botanical alternative for silk, long-staple cotton, and petrol-based synthetic filaments, is derived from wood grown in renewable, sustainably managed forests, and produced in an environmentally sound, closed-loop process that recycles water and reuses more than 99 % of organic solvent. Certified by The Vegan Society, it is suitable for a wide range of applications and fabric developments, from finer high fashion propositions to denim constructions, seamless and activewear innovations, and even agricultural and technical solutions.

Nullarbor™ – Nanollose & Birla Cellulose (Australia/India)
In 2020, Nanollose & Birla Cellulose started a journey to develop and commercialize tree-free lyocell from bacterial cellulose, called Nullarbor™. The name derives from the Latin “nulla arbor” which means “no trees”. Initial lab research at both ends led to a joint patent application with the patent “production of high-tenacity lyocell fibres made from bacterial cellulose”.
Nullarbor is significantly stronger than lyocell made from wood-based pulp; even adding small amounts of bacterial cellulose to wood pulp increases the fibre toughness. In 2022, the first pilot batch of 260kg was produced with 20 % bacterial pulp share. Several high-quality fabrics and garments were produced with this fibre. The collaboration between Nanollose & Birla Cellulose now focuses on increasing the production scale and amount of bacterial pulp in the fibre.

Circulose® – makes fashion circular – Renewcell (Sweden)
Circulose® made by Renewcell is a branded dissolving pulp made from 100 % textile waste, like worn-out clothes and production scraps. It provides a unique material for fashion that is 100 % recycled, recyclable, biodegradable, and of virgin-equivalent quality. It is used by fibre producers to make staple fibre or filaments like viscose, lyocell, modal, acetate or other types of man-made cellulosic fibres. In 2022, Renewcell, opened the world’s first textile-to-textile chemical recycling plant in Sundsvall, Sweden – Renewcell 1. The plant will eventually reach 120,000 tons of annual capacity.

Sparkle sustainable sanitary pads – Sparkle Innovations (United States)
Globally, around 300 billion period products are discarded every year, resulting in millions of tons of non-biodegradable waste. Since most conventional sanitary pads contain up to 90 % plastics, they do not biodegrade for around 600 years. Sparkle has designed sustainable, plastic-free, biodegradable and compostable Sparkle sanitary pads. From product to packaging, they are made up of around 90 % cellulose-based materials with top sheet, absorbent core, release paper, wrapping paper and packaging made of cellulose-based fibres. Whether Sparkle pads end up in a compost pit, are incinerated or end up in a landfill, they are a more sustainable alternative compared to conventional pads that contain large amounts of plastics, complex petro-chemical based ingredients and artificial fragrances. When tested according to ISO 14855-1 by a leading independent lab in Europe, Sparkle pads reached over 90 % absolute biodegradation within 90 days in commercial composting conditions.

(c) AkzoNobel
20.01.2023

AkzoNobel again a European Top Employer

AkzoNobel has been rated as a European Top Employer by the Top Employers Institute for the second consecutive year.

In the latest benchmark review, the company has been recognized in eight countries – Brazil, China, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, the UK and the US – all of them repeat certifications. AkzoNobel qualifies as a European Top Employer because five of the certified countries are in Europe.

Each year, the Top Employers Institute certifies organizations who are focused on putting people first through their HR policies. The survey covers six HR domains consisting of 20 topics, including people strategy, work environment, talent acquisition, learning, diversity and inclusion, and well-being.

The latest 2023 rating marks the second certification in a row for AkzoNobel in France, Germany and Sweden, the fourth for the Netherlands and the US, the seventh for Brazil, the tenth for China and the 11th for the UK.

AkzoNobel has been rated as a European Top Employer by the Top Employers Institute for the second consecutive year.

In the latest benchmark review, the company has been recognized in eight countries – Brazil, China, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, the UK and the US – all of them repeat certifications. AkzoNobel qualifies as a European Top Employer because five of the certified countries are in Europe.

Each year, the Top Employers Institute certifies organizations who are focused on putting people first through their HR policies. The survey covers six HR domains consisting of 20 topics, including people strategy, work environment, talent acquisition, learning, diversity and inclusion, and well-being.

The latest 2023 rating marks the second certification in a row for AkzoNobel in France, Germany and Sweden, the fourth for the Netherlands and the US, the seventh for Brazil, the tenth for China and the 11th for the UK.

Source:

AkzoNobel

20.01.2023

NCTO and USINFI tell Biden Administration Penalty Tariffs counteract China’s Unfair Trade Advantage

The Biden administration’s Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel counteract China’s unfair trade advantages and give U.S. manufactures a chance to compete, two key American textile manufacturing groups told the Biden administration. Removing tariffs, the associations said, would reward China, put U.S. manufacturers at a competitive disadvantage and do nothing to reduce inflation.

In a formal submission to the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) office, which is conducting a four-year statutory review of the tariffs, the associations, representing the entirety of the U.S. textile production chain, expressed strong support for the continuation of current Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel imports from China and outlined the effectiveness of U.S. tariff actions.

The Biden administration’s Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel counteract China’s unfair trade advantages and give U.S. manufactures a chance to compete, two key American textile manufacturing groups told the Biden administration. Removing tariffs, the associations said, would reward China, put U.S. manufacturers at a competitive disadvantage and do nothing to reduce inflation.

In a formal submission to the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) office, which is conducting a four-year statutory review of the tariffs, the associations, representing the entirety of the U.S. textile production chain, expressed strong support for the continuation of current Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel imports from China and outlined the effectiveness of U.S. tariff actions.

“In some cases, such as on finished apparel, the tariffs have worked to partially offset and counteract China’s unfair trade advantages,” the groups said. “The tariffs on finished textile and apparel items are giving U.S. manufacturers the chance to compete, and we are seeing encouraging investment and growth in moving some production and souring from China back to the Western Hemisphere.”

“The CAFTA-DR [Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement] region has seen more than $1 billion in new textile and apparel investment this year, for example, which is historic and due to the textile and apparel rules negotiated under the agreement and sourcing shifts from China,” they added. “This investment and growing U.S. imports from the Western Hemisphere is attributable in part to the 301 tariffs on finished apparel.  The tariffs on finished items in our sector are broadly supported by textile/apparel producers in the hemispheric co-production chain, and it is essential that they remain in place, absent China reforming its practices.”

The submission was filed by the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) and the U.S. Industrial and Narrow Fabrics Institute (USINFI), a division of the Advanced Textiles Association (AFA).

The groups have long advocated for a fair, transparent process to remove tariffs on textile machinery, certain chemicals and dyes and limited textile inputs that cannot be sourced domestically to help U.S. manufacturers compete against China.

They also stressed that lifting the tariffs on finished textiles and apparel products from China “will solidify their global dominance in this sector for generations to come and reward their abusive behaviors, exacerbate the migration crisis, hurt domestic manufacturers and workers, undermine our ability to recalibrate essential PPE supply chains, and blunt the positive supply chains shifts and investments in the Western Hemisphere that are happening.” They added it would “do nothing to solve the inflation crisis facing U.S. consumers and manufacturers right now.”

See the full submission here.

Source:

National Council of Textile Organizations

Photo: Texhibition Istanbul
20.01.2023

Third edition of TEXHIBITION Istanbul Fabric, Yarn and Textile Accessories Fair

  • Third edition of Texhibition Istanbul will take place from 8-10 March 2023 at the Istanbul Expo Center
  • Organizers focus on growth: more than 25,000 international visitors are targeted for March 2023
  • More than 400 exhibitors show fabrics, yarns and accessories at the Istanbul Expo Center
  • Trend seminars and trend area with special focus on sustainability presents the trends for spring/summer 2024

The third edition of Texhibition Istanbul Fabric, Yarn and Textile Accessories Fair, 8-10 March 2023 builds on the successful editions of the fair last year. The fair is organized by the Istanbul Textile Exporters' Association (ITHIB) and with the support of the Istanbul Chamber of Commerce (ICOC).

More than 400 exhibitors from the areas of knitwear, woven fabrics, denim, yarns and accessories will present their 2024 spring-summer collections on 15,000 square meters in the Istanbul Expo Center. These include well-known names such as Kipaş, Bossa, Yünsa, Btd, Çalık, Hefa, İskur, Universal, Gülle, and Migiboy.

  • Third edition of Texhibition Istanbul will take place from 8-10 March 2023 at the Istanbul Expo Center
  • Organizers focus on growth: more than 25,000 international visitors are targeted for March 2023
  • More than 400 exhibitors show fabrics, yarns and accessories at the Istanbul Expo Center
  • Trend seminars and trend area with special focus on sustainability presents the trends for spring/summer 2024

The third edition of Texhibition Istanbul Fabric, Yarn and Textile Accessories Fair, 8-10 March 2023 builds on the successful editions of the fair last year. The fair is organized by the Istanbul Textile Exporters' Association (ITHIB) and with the support of the Istanbul Chamber of Commerce (ICOC).

More than 400 exhibitors from the areas of knitwear, woven fabrics, denim, yarns and accessories will present their 2024 spring-summer collections on 15,000 square meters in the Istanbul Expo Center. These include well-known names such as Kipaş, Bossa, Yünsa, Btd, Çalık, Hefa, İskur, Universal, Gülle, and Migiboy.

At the last event in September 2022, a total of 20,606 visitors took the opportunity to start business discussions and place orders. Among them international visitors from 97 countries, including the EU, UK, USA, North Africa and the Middle East. Over 25,000 visitors are expected at the upcoming Texhibition in March 2023 such as large clothing manufacturers, purchasing managers of international chain stores and department stores, managers of international brands and chains with their own brand collections, managers of online sales platforms, importers, wholesalers, distributors, designers, etc.

The trend area at Texhibition will show the spring-summer 2024 trends with a focus on sustainable aspects.

Texhibition Istanbul completes the IFCO, Istanbul Fashion Connection, which takes place from 8.-11. February 2023, also for the third time at the Istanbul Expo Center.

Source:

Texhibition Istanbul / JANDALI

20.01.2023

Autoneum: Revenue growth in 2022

For the first time in two years, global automotive production recorded a significant increase in full-year 2022 with 82.0 million vehicles produced (2021: 77.2 million vehicles) and growth of 6.2%, driven by the regions Asia and North America, but remained below 2019 levels.
Autoneum's revenue in local currencies increased significantly by 8.5%, largely due to inflation-related compensation. In the regions Europe and Asia, Autoneum's production volumes developed below market. Compared to the July 2022 estimate, revenue was around CHF 90 million lower than assumed due to volume factors. The strong fluctuations in production volumes due to vehicle manufacturer supply chain issues continued in 2022 and were exacerbated by the war in Ukraine in Europe and by COVID-related lockdowns in Autoneum's Asian main market China. Consolidated revenue in Swiss francs increased by 6.1% year-on-year to CHF 1 804.5 million (2021: CHF 1 700.4 million) due to the strong Swiss franc.

For the first time in two years, global automotive production recorded a significant increase in full-year 2022 with 82.0 million vehicles produced (2021: 77.2 million vehicles) and growth of 6.2%, driven by the regions Asia and North America, but remained below 2019 levels.
Autoneum's revenue in local currencies increased significantly by 8.5%, largely due to inflation-related compensation. In the regions Europe and Asia, Autoneum's production volumes developed below market. Compared to the July 2022 estimate, revenue was around CHF 90 million lower than assumed due to volume factors. The strong fluctuations in production volumes due to vehicle manufacturer supply chain issues continued in 2022 and were exacerbated by the war in Ukraine in Europe and by COVID-related lockdowns in Autoneum's Asian main market China. Consolidated revenue in Swiss francs increased by 6.1% year-on-year to CHF 1 804.5 million (2021: CHF 1 700.4 million) due to the strong Swiss franc.

Revenue development in the regions
In local currencies, revenue of Business Group Europe increased by 2.7%, while production volumes of vehicle manufacturers decreased by 1.3%. The growth in revenue resulted from inflation compensation, while Autoneum's production volumes were significantly lower compared to the previous year. Business Group North America increased its revenue in local currencies by 11.0%. The number of vehicles produced increased by 9.7% year-on-year. Volume development at Autoneum’s North American plants clearly improved compared with 2021 due to the allocation of semiconductors to the vehicle models supplied by Autoneum. Revenue of Business Group Asia declined by 2.7% in local currencies, and thus was significantly below the market (+7.7%). Autoneum's production facilities in its main market China are located in regions that were hit particularly hard by the COVID-related lockdowns. Growth in China was also driven by Chinese vehicle manufacturers, with whom Autoneum generated only little revenue last year.
Business Group SAMEA (South America, Middle East and Africa) achieved hyperinflation-adjusted revenue growth in local currencies of 65.2% year-on-year. This increase was mainly due to inflation compensation and in terms of volume slightly outperformed the market, which grew by 7.5%.

Due to significantly lower production volumes in Autoneum's regions Europe and Asia of around CHF 90 million compared to the half-year estimate and further increases in energy costs in the second half of the year, Autoneum expects the full-year 2022 result to be at the lower end of the guidance published on June 15, 2022.

The full year-end financial statements and the Annual Report 2022 will be presented at the Media Conference on March 1, 2023.

Source:

Autoneum Management AG

Photo Jandali/IFCO
19.01.2023

Istanbul Fashion Connection (IFCO) fully booked

IFCO, Istanbul Fashion Connection taking place from February 8th to 11th, 2023 is fully booked. Over 600 exhibitors present themselves on 45,000 square meters in the Istanbul Exhibition Center and will be giving an overview of the new collections in the areas of womenswear, menswear, kidswear, denim, sportswear, night dresses, wedding dresses, lingerie, socks, leather and furs in 9 halls.

The CORE İSTANBUL, the new designer space at IFCO, will showcase the latest creations from Istanbul Fashion Week designers, such as Arzu Karpol, Aslı Filinta, Ceren Ocak, Gül Ağış, Çiğdem Akın etc. At IFCO Brands market leaders such as İpekyol, Damat, Kiğılı, Altınyıldız, B&G Store, Lufian, Jakamen or Tudors fly the flag and use the trade fair as a platform to expand their international customer network. LinExpo, a separate platform for lingerie and hosiery at IFCO, presents 140 manufacturers and FashionIST offers a wide range of wedding dresses, evening wear and suits, over 100 brands are shown here.

IFCO, Istanbul Fashion Connection taking place from February 8th to 11th, 2023 is fully booked. Over 600 exhibitors present themselves on 45,000 square meters in the Istanbul Exhibition Center and will be giving an overview of the new collections in the areas of womenswear, menswear, kidswear, denim, sportswear, night dresses, wedding dresses, lingerie, socks, leather and furs in 9 halls.

The CORE İSTANBUL, the new designer space at IFCO, will showcase the latest creations from Istanbul Fashion Week designers, such as Arzu Karpol, Aslı Filinta, Ceren Ocak, Gül Ağış, Çiğdem Akın etc. At IFCO Brands market leaders such as İpekyol, Damat, Kiğılı, Altınyıldız, B&G Store, Lufian, Jakamen or Tudors fly the flag and use the trade fair as a platform to expand their international customer network. LinExpo, a separate platform for lingerie and hosiery at IFCO, presents 140 manufacturers and FashionIST offers a wide range of wedding dresses, evening wear and suits, over 100 brands are shown here.

IFCO Sourcing offers the opportunity to network with manufacturing companies such as Talu, Zevigas, Bozkurt, Bilce Tekstil, Gelişim, Karar, Akademi, Bozpaor Demezoğlu. These international manufacturers provide insight into their performance profile in terms of production, delivery times, etc.
The manufacturing sector is an important branch of the economy for the industry, over 80% of the companies in Türkiye are active in this sector. Many competitive advantages result from production in Türkiye, such as short delivery times, the possibility of small minimum order quantities, high production quality, young and well-trained employees. However, Türkiye also has a lively and creative design scene and high-quality fashion brands that are redefining the image of "Made in Türkiye". IFCO brings these brands to the stage and puts the Turkish fashion world in a new light.

The program offers seminars and lectures. The special focus is on the topic of sustainability, which is curated by Ekoteks Laboratorium, the association's sustainability institute. Accademia de la Moda and WGSN give latest trend information. Up to ten shows will take place on the catwalk in the Fashion Show Center, including presentations showcasing their latest collections.

In combination with Texhibition, the trade fair for fabrics, trimmings and yarns, which takes place from March 8th to 10th, 2023 in the Istanbul Exhibition Center, ITKIB / IHKIB offers with IFCO the complete offer for the international textile industry and trade.

Source:

Jandali/IFCO

17.01.2023

ECHA adds nine hazardous chemicals to Candidate List

ECHA has added nine chemicals to the Candidate List because of their hazardous properties. They are used for example in flame retardants, paints and coatings, inks and toners, coating products, plasticisers and in the manufacture of textile, leather or fur and paper.

Entries added to the Candidate List on 17 January 2023:

  • 1,1'-[ethane-1,2-diylbisoxy]bis[2,4,6-tribromobenzene]
  • 2,2',6,6'-tetrabromo-4,4'-isopropylidenediphenol
  • 4,4'-sulphonyldiphenol
  • Barium diboron tetraoxide
  • Bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate covering any of the individual isomers and/or combinations thereof
  • Isobutyl 4-hydroxybenzoate
  • Melamine
  • Perfluoroheptanoic acid and its salts
  • reaction mass of 2,2,3,3,5,5,6,6-octafluoro-4-(1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropan-2-yl)morpholine and 2,2,3,3,5,5,6,6-octafluoro-4-(heptafluoropropyl)morpholine

Information on these substances' uses and reasons for inclusion on the Candidate List is available here.

 

ECHA has added nine chemicals to the Candidate List because of their hazardous properties. They are used for example in flame retardants, paints and coatings, inks and toners, coating products, plasticisers and in the manufacture of textile, leather or fur and paper.

Entries added to the Candidate List on 17 January 2023:

  • 1,1'-[ethane-1,2-diylbisoxy]bis[2,4,6-tribromobenzene]
  • 2,2',6,6'-tetrabromo-4,4'-isopropylidenediphenol
  • 4,4'-sulphonyldiphenol
  • Barium diboron tetraoxide
  • Bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate covering any of the individual isomers and/or combinations thereof
  • Isobutyl 4-hydroxybenzoate
  • Melamine
  • Perfluoroheptanoic acid and its salts
  • reaction mass of 2,2,3,3,5,5,6,6-octafluoro-4-(1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropan-2-yl)morpholine and 2,2,3,3,5,5,6,6-octafluoro-4-(heptafluoropropyl)morpholine

Information on these substances' uses and reasons for inclusion on the Candidate List is available here.

 

More information:
ECHA chemicals hazardous
Source:

European Chemicals Agency

(c) FET Ltd
17.01.2023

FET looks forward following sucessful year

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England, a supplier of laboratory and pilot melt spinning systems, is celebrating a record breaking year of sales and product innovation. “Sales revenue for 2022 has easily beaten our previous high” said FET Managing Director, Richard Slack “and the research projects we have collaborated in have become increasingly challenging in terms of technical specification.”

Prestigious new projects during 2022 included a multifilament melt spinning line for Senbis Polymer Innovations, Netherlands enabling the development of textile fibres from recycled polymers or biopolymers; a FET-200LAB wet spinning system at the University of Manchester which will play a major part in advanced materials research in collaboration with the renowned Henry Royce Institute; and a FET-103 Monofilament line for RHEON LABS of London to help develop a hyper viscoelastic fibre from RHEON™ which displays high strain-rate sensitive properties. The latter two of these examples were aided by significant UK grants to develop advanced materials.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England, a supplier of laboratory and pilot melt spinning systems, is celebrating a record breaking year of sales and product innovation. “Sales revenue for 2022 has easily beaten our previous high” said FET Managing Director, Richard Slack “and the research projects we have collaborated in have become increasingly challenging in terms of technical specification.”

Prestigious new projects during 2022 included a multifilament melt spinning line for Senbis Polymer Innovations, Netherlands enabling the development of textile fibres from recycled polymers or biopolymers; a FET-200LAB wet spinning system at the University of Manchester which will play a major part in advanced materials research in collaboration with the renowned Henry Royce Institute; and a FET-103 Monofilament line for RHEON LABS of London to help develop a hyper viscoelastic fibre from RHEON™ which displays high strain-rate sensitive properties. The latter two of these examples were aided by significant UK grants to develop advanced materials.

FET is now looking forward to 2023 with a record order book. The company’s newly opened Fibre Development Centre features over £1.5 million investment in customer laboratory systems that will further enable fibre trials and product R&D. Three new polymer types were developed with clients in 2022 and several more are lined up in 2023, which is expected to bring the total of different polymer types to more than 40 in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats.

FET will be exhibiting at two major exhibitions in 2023; INDEX 23, a leading Nonwovens show at Geneva in April; and ITMA, Milan, an international textile and garment technology exhibition in June.

Source:

FET Ltd

(c) MUNICH FABRIC START
13.01.2023

MUNICH FABRIC START announces programme for upcoming event

The Munich Fabric Start Exhibitions GmbH announces the programme for the upcoming editions of MUNICH FABRIC START (24 to 26 January 2023) and BLUEZONE & KEYHOUSE (24 and 25 January 2023).
From 24 to 26 January 2023, visitors can expect a range of the latest trends, fabric, accessories and denim highlights from around 900 international exhibitors, an event programme with expert panels, keynotes and trend lectures, as well as numerous networking opportunities.

Economic Environment
Conflicts, inflation, recession, energy crisis, massive inequality, climate change - how companies can position themselves securely in a volatile market environment - this is deciphered by trend analyst David Shah in his key note "Self-Empowerment" and numerous industry experts, futurologists and leading fashion editors in the lecture series "The Status Quo of Fashion" by strategy and communication consultants Alex Vogt and Jana Kern.

The Munich Fabric Start Exhibitions GmbH announces the programme for the upcoming editions of MUNICH FABRIC START (24 to 26 January 2023) and BLUEZONE & KEYHOUSE (24 and 25 January 2023).
From 24 to 26 January 2023, visitors can expect a range of the latest trends, fabric, accessories and denim highlights from around 900 international exhibitors, an event programme with expert panels, keynotes and trend lectures, as well as numerous networking opportunities.

Economic Environment
Conflicts, inflation, recession, energy crisis, massive inequality, climate change - how companies can position themselves securely in a volatile market environment - this is deciphered by trend analyst David Shah in his key note "Self-Empowerment" and numerous industry experts, futurologists and leading fashion editors in the lecture series "The Status Quo of Fashion" by strategy and communication consultants Alex Vogt and Jana Kern.

Next to David Shah (View-Publications), the panel will include Siems Luckwaldt (CAPITAL and BUSINESS PUNK, RTL Germany), Shamin Vogel (WeAr Global Magazine), Ben Hanson (The Interline), Maria Cristina Pavarini (The SPIN OFF) and Carl Tillessen (DMI)

Digital Era
From digital colour apps, digital twins and virtual models to 3D simulation and virtual dressing rooms - the world of digital fashion will not only be discussed in numerous lectures in Munich, but also brought to life in the new Assyst Experience. Whether it's Carola Seybold, Head of Global Key Accounts at Pantone, Jan Hilger from Roland Berger, Arndt Johannes from Verce, Dr. Stefan Hauswiesner, CEO of Reactive Reality or the experts of the panel "Textilfabrik X.0 - New Marketing Buzz Words or One Step Ahead": everyone will be looking at virtual fashion from a different angle and providing insights into the latest state of the art. In her trend presentation "The weird & wonderful world of fashion cores" at BLUEZONE, Angela Velasquez (Rivet) sheds light on how viral TikTok trends are reshaping denim merchandising.

Sustainable Future
Digitisation and sustainability - the third major theme of the event programme - could not be more closely intertwined. Lisa Lang, Director of Policy & EU Affairs Orchestrator of EIT Climate KIC in an interview with Muchaneta ten Napel (Shape Innovate) kicks things off about the importance of a green transformation for the industry. Other topics in focus: Liv Simpliciano from Fashion Revolution gives an overview of where the world's biggest fashion brands and retailers stand in terms of transparency. Tricia Carey from Renewcell, David Shah (View-Publications), Lien van der Schueren and Guy Buyle (CISUTAC & HEREWEAR), Mateusz Wielopolski (Circulix) and Mario Malzacher (Circular.Fashion) critically discuss whether the circular economy is really the solution for everything or just a placebo. Circular ecosystems are also presented by Franziska von Becker from Hachmeister & Partner.

The race of the new sustainable materials of the future will be opened by Kirsi Terho from Infinited Fiber, Kuben Edwards from Onezero8, Marianne Uddman from Trustrace and Simon Angel, Sustainable Innovations Curator of MUNICH FABRIC START in a panel discussion with Muchaneta ten Napel (Shape Innovate). New products for a sustainable future in the denim industry will be discussed at BLUEZONE.
Another highlight: In cooperation with the Transformers Foundation, an expert panel will also be held at BLUEZONE on both days of the trade show.

Trends Spring.Summer 2024
Gerd Müller-Thomkins, Carl Tillessen and Niels Holger Wien from the Deutsches Mode Institut (DMI) see a "vibe shift" - a turning point. They will analyse what this means for fashion in their trend presentation on Wednesday. The Women's Fashion Trends SS 24 with the must haves of the season will be analysed by Karin Schmitz from the Trend Forecast Institute Peclers Paris - from the glamorous appearance in everyday life, to the play with gender identity, to simplicity combined with functionality and mobility.

Source:

MUNICH FABRIC START / KERN. Consulting

13.01.2023

Source Fashion: New international fashion sourcing platform in UK

The international fashion sourcing platform Source Fashion, taking place from 12th – 14th February at Olympia London, has announced a compelling line-up of country pavilions and over 150 audited, quality manufacturers from around the world including Peru, India, China, Pakistan, Italy, Spain, Greece, North Macedonia,  the UAE, Madagascar, Jordan, Uzbekistan, Turkey, the UK and many more who will join the inaugural show, which runs parallel to Pure London.

Bringing a textile pavilion to the UK for the first time, the Peru Pavilion will showcase six manufacturers specialising in high-quality alpaca wool from the raw material right through to garment production, as well as cotton and other natural mixtures.

The international fashion sourcing platform Source Fashion, taking place from 12th – 14th February at Olympia London, has announced a compelling line-up of country pavilions and over 150 audited, quality manufacturers from around the world including Peru, India, China, Pakistan, Italy, Spain, Greece, North Macedonia,  the UAE, Madagascar, Jordan, Uzbekistan, Turkey, the UK and many more who will join the inaugural show, which runs parallel to Pure London.

Bringing a textile pavilion to the UK for the first time, the Peru Pavilion will showcase six manufacturers specialising in high-quality alpaca wool from the raw material right through to garment production, as well as cotton and other natural mixtures.

The main Indian Pavilion at this year’s Source Fashion, in collaboration with the Wool and Woollens Export Promotion Council, will showcase 20 established garment and textile exporters specialising in wool, woollen and acrylic fibres. The exhibitors will be showing full garments including men’s, women’s and kidswear as well as a selection of fabrics and raw materials. These exhibitors are regular export partners to the UK retail industry and already work with some big retailers in white label production.

The China Pavilion will present a selection of high-quality Chinese manufacturers ranging from full garment manufacturing through to raw materials, fabrics, cashmere and components.

Other producers and manufacturers attending Source Fashion from across Europe and the UK include:

  • Mivania - an Italian knitwear manufacturer producing garments in 100% cashmere and cashmere blends.
  • SATCoL (Salvation Army Trading Company) - a charity-owned textiles collector in the UK, actively working with retailers to reduce their carbon footprints.
  • Kusilas - a Spanish company monitoring all the stages of the production process.
  • Prime Casual - based in Leicester, UK, they specialise in the design and manufacture of ladies clothing from fast fashion, wholesale to bespoke tailoring.
  • Athos Pallas - a fashion and textile agency located in Thessaloniki, Greece.

 

Source:

Source Fashion by Hyve / Good Results PR

09.01.2023

Shelton Vision AI: Tailored machine learning solutions for the textiles industry

Over the past three years, a dedicated AI development team at BTMA member Shelton Vision has been developing tailored machine learning solutions for the textiles industry.

The aim has been to elevate the detection process and the accuracy of naming and grading subtle defects in textiles, in real time within production environments.

“Big Data ‘off-the-shelf’ systems such as those behind technolgies like facial recognition and Google Maps involve reading many thousands of single images each second and simply take too long to accumulate sufficient data for what’s required in this specific case,” says Shelton Vision CEO and Managing Director Mark Shelton. “A feature of the textile industry is that in many sectors, the product range changes several times within a year and it is not uncommon to have to inspect hundreds, if not thousands of different styles in a year based on precise settings.”

In terms of defect types, he adds, there may typically be over 100 that need to be accurately detected, classified (named) and graded in real time.

Over the past three years, a dedicated AI development team at BTMA member Shelton Vision has been developing tailored machine learning solutions for the textiles industry.

The aim has been to elevate the detection process and the accuracy of naming and grading subtle defects in textiles, in real time within production environments.

“Big Data ‘off-the-shelf’ systems such as those behind technolgies like facial recognition and Google Maps involve reading many thousands of single images each second and simply take too long to accumulate sufficient data for what’s required in this specific case,” says Shelton Vision CEO and Managing Director Mark Shelton. “A feature of the textile industry is that in many sectors, the product range changes several times within a year and it is not uncommon to have to inspect hundreds, if not thousands of different styles in a year based on precise settings.”

In terms of defect types, he adds, there may typically be over 100 that need to be accurately detected, classified (named) and graded in real time.

“Added to this is the need to ‘filter out’ the random occurrence of ‘non defects’, such as loose threads, lint and dust on the surface – the number of which can be higher than actual defects – and it is clear that a bespoke system is required.”
The development team has consequently established metadata for identifying defect properties, enabling the successful identification of faults from a much smaller number of images.

“The system employs a unique combination of machine learning for automated style training and novel algorithms for defect detection, to provide high quality images for the AI real time defect classification and grading software,” Shelton explains. “Due to the inherent variation in fabric features – raw materials, construction, texture, colour and finishes, as well as the differing product quality standards in value chains and the regional variations in what defects are called – our AI engine uses models built for each individual company or group of companies, or product value chain.”

The AI models are constructed so that the user operatives can populate them with their own data produced by the vision system or by obtaining defect images from another imaging source (eg a mobile phone camera).  

The occurrence of defects is sporadic and many defect types occur infrequently, although when they do, they can have severe consequences. These scenarios re-enforce the need for the AI engine to be quickly set up and able to operate accurately with limited data sets of typically between 30 and 50 good quality images per defect type.

A further feature is a tool enabling the user to periodically ‘clean up’ the AI data during the set up phase. This is used to resolve conflicting data and to correct mis-named images.

Generally, the highest cost component of fabric production is the raw material and in addition to finished product inspection, a cost effective use for vision systems is in process operation.

Generally, the highest cost component of fabric production is the raw material and in addition to finished product inspection, a cost effective use for vision systems is in process operation.

“There is a need for the real time detection of defects that are being created in separate processes, such as printing or coating and for real time automated systems that can accurately determine the defects and their severity and provide a reliable signal for an operative to rectify the issue, This can result in considerable savings.

Prior to Shelton introducing powerful customised machine vision and real time defect classification, the only systems available were those that required manual sifting through vast numbers of images, which included both real defects and ‘non defect’ images. The task was very often overwhelming and did not provide much benefit beyond manual fabric inspection.

More information:
Shelton Vision fabric inspection
Source:

AWOL for British Textile Machinery Association (BTMA)

(c) Oeko-Tex GmbH
06.01.2023

OEKO-TEX®: New Branding for 30th anniversary

In its 30th year of dedication to safer textiles and leather, OEKO-TEX® has created a new brand identity. The global certifier of textile and leather products and production worked with branding agency Schwitzke ID to build the clear and unified OEKO-TEX® World.

Based on scientific principles, OEKO-TEX® has been promoting transparency in the textile and leather industry for three decades. Transparency is essential for enabling companies and consumers to make responsible decisions. “The new branding reflects the active, solution-oriented and positive approach. With our independent test institutes, we certify to clear, globally uniform criteria, which we communicate openly," says Inga Bleyer, Global Head of Marketing. "Our new look is clear, consistent and transparent."

In its 30th year of dedication to safer textiles and leather, OEKO-TEX® has created a new brand identity. The global certifier of textile and leather products and production worked with branding agency Schwitzke ID to build the clear and unified OEKO-TEX® World.

Based on scientific principles, OEKO-TEX® has been promoting transparency in the textile and leather industry for three decades. Transparency is essential for enabling companies and consumers to make responsible decisions. “The new branding reflects the active, solution-oriented and positive approach. With our independent test institutes, we certify to clear, globally uniform criteria, which we communicate openly," says Inga Bleyer, Global Head of Marketing. "Our new look is clear, consistent and transparent."

The most visible change is the new OEKO-TEX® logo, based on a geometric square and an organic circle, which reflect the scientific approach of OEKO-TEX® and the nature it aims to protect. The logo typo is supported by a stylized, organic form reminiscent of natural structures, such as leaves, drops or textile loops. The reduced colour palette highlights the umbrella brand with a new OEKO-TEX® Green plus black and white. A related colour palette supplements communication about OEKO-TEX® products. The product logos are subordinate to the umbrella brand, creating a unified hierarchy.

The lengthy transition period through 2024 considers sustainability. Customers should start the conversion now and may use any existing labels through the end of 2024.

Source:

Oeko-Tex GmbH

(c) International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF)
04.01.2023

17th ITMF Global Textile Industry Survey

  • Business situation has worsened markedly but not expectations.

The 17th ITMF Global Textile Industry Survey (GTIS, formerly known as ITMF Corona-Survey) shows that on average the business situation in the global textile industry has deteriorated further in November 2022. At the same time, global business expectations in six months’ time remained in negative territory but did not get gloomier. The indicators for order intake, order backlog, and capacity utilisation rate dropped, globally.

  • Business situation has worsened markedly but not expectations.

The 17th ITMF Global Textile Industry Survey (GTIS, formerly known as ITMF Corona-Survey) shows that on average the business situation in the global textile industry has deteriorated further in November 2022. At the same time, global business expectations in six months’ time remained in negative territory but did not get gloomier. The indicators for order intake, order backlog, and capacity utilisation rate dropped, globally.

According to the survey, the business situation in the three Asian regions and Europe remained especially poor. In North & Central America the business situation has improved again markedly. Except for the textile machinery segment that still benefits on average from a long order backlog, all other segments found themselves in negative business situations, especially fibre producers and spinners. Global business expectations have remained negative but “stabilized” around -10 percentage points (pp) since July 2022. Expectations have improved significantly in South Asia to +10pp, and Europe to -30pp. Business expectations in all segments remain negative territory with four out of seven recording improvements.

Order intake nose-dived in November, in line with weaker business situation and weaker demand, currently the biggest concern for the global textile value chain. Only companies in North & Central America registered on average a good order intake, while all other regions were faced with an unsatisfactory order situation. Except for South-East Asia and North & Central America order backlog fell. The only segments where order backlog increased were the down-stream segments garments and home textiles. Capacity utilization rate dropped in all regions in November 2022. It only increased in the textile machinery segment but fell otherwise.

“Weakening demand” is by far the biggest concern in the global textile industry, followed by the root causes of demand reduction, namely high energy and raw material prices which lead to high inflation rates. Good news is that logistical costs are not much of a concern anymore. Concerns about geopolitics on the other hand have increased again in the past two months.

More information:
ITMF market survey
Source:

International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF)