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10.05.2022

Stahl releases annual ESG report with focus on sustainability and transparency

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has published its 2021 Environment, Social, and Governance (ESG) Report. The report outlines the company’s sustainable development ambitions and its achievements over the year. It also features Stahl’s ambitious climate mitigation targets for 2030, such as the transition to more renewable feedstocks.

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has published its 2021 Environment, Social, and Governance (ESG) Report. The report outlines the company’s sustainable development ambitions and its achievements over the year. It also features Stahl’s ambitious climate mitigation targets for 2030, such as the transition to more renewable feedstocks.

The 2021 Stahl ESG Report is a cornerstone of Stahl’s commitment to reporting transparently on its progress toward a more sustainable chemicals value chain. This acknowledges the important role that industry must play in tackling climate change while enabling a higher quality of life for more people. A key focal point of the new report is a progress update on Stahl’s ESG Roadmap. Introduced last year, this ten-year plan outlines the company’s ESG commitments and targets for 2023 and 2030.
 
Climate action
Stahl is focused on mitigating climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from all activities over which it has influence. This includes investing in renewable energy and process efficiencies to lower the GHG emissions caused directly by Stahl’s own operations and the energy used to power them. On this point, progress was made toward the 2023 and 2030 targets in 2021, including a reduction in Scope 1 and 2 CO2 emissions of 15%. Also covered are Stahl’s indirect value-chain impacts, for example, from the raw materials it buys. Looking beyond Stahl’s direct environmental impacts and fostering greater supply-chain transparency will be vital for tackling emissions on a wider scale.

Creating responsible chemistry, together
In 2021, advances were made regarding the company’s diversity and safety targets, which are areas of continuous improvement. Stahl is committed to ensuring a safe working environment, as well as nurturing a diverse and inclusive workplace to continuously improve employee skills.

EcoVadis Gold rating
Fostering ethical behavior through exemplary leadership and governance is key to Stahl’s ambitions. Achieving the EcoVadis Gold rating was an important milestone in this respect. This well-established award reflects the company’s ongoing commitment to supply chain transparency and working with partners to improve the sustainability of its products and operations.

Source:

Stahl Holdings B.V.

Archroma Launches Nylosan® (a) Archroma
Archroma launches long-awaited metal-free* and halogen-free* Nylosan® S navy and black colors for sportswear.
23.03.2022

Archroma Launches Nylosan®

  • Long-awaited metal-free* and halogen-free* NYLOSAN® S NAVY and BLACK COLORS for Sportwear
  • Iconic black and navy polyamides of major sportswear brands can finally be perfectly matched with safer dyestuffs
  • Significant resource savings when dyeing with Archroma new signature CONSCIOUSLY DEEP system

Archroma, a global leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, today announced the addition of two new metal-free* and halogen-free* acid dyes in its Nylosan® S range.

Dark shades represent approximately 80% of the outdoor and sportswear textile market, which is also under pressure to offer more sustainable articles. In this context, the new Nylosan® Navy S-3R and Black S-3N, especially developed by Archroma for polyamides and blends, meet four long-standing market demands for blacks and navies.

  • Long-awaited metal-free* and halogen-free* NYLOSAN® S NAVY and BLACK COLORS for Sportwear
  • Iconic black and navy polyamides of major sportswear brands can finally be perfectly matched with safer dyestuffs
  • Significant resource savings when dyeing with Archroma new signature CONSCIOUSLY DEEP system

Archroma, a global leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, today announced the addition of two new metal-free* and halogen-free* acid dyes in its Nylosan® S range.

Dark shades represent approximately 80% of the outdoor and sportswear textile market, which is also under pressure to offer more sustainable articles. In this context, the new Nylosan® Navy S-3R and Black S-3N, especially developed by Archroma for polyamides and blends, meet four long-standing market demands for blacks and navies.

  • First, the Nylosan® S range offers metal-free* alternatives to dyestuff generally used to dye polyamide and nylon and which usually contain metals. The new Nylosan® Navy S-3R and Black S-3N are taking the industry standard one step further by offering a halogen-free* option to those manufacturers, brands and retailers who are looking to offer the safest grade available.
  • Second, the Nylosan® S range now comprises a wide gamut of colors, with these new dyes targeting the color matching and fastness specifications of the iconic blacks and navies of major sportswear brands. In order to support this color matching process, Archroma makes available the colorimetric dye primaries for the mills in order to (re)match the color standards.
  • Third, the new navy and black dyes display the same color constancy as the dyes used in many leading color standards, which means the navy and black colors created with Nylosan® S range will be non-metameric to the color standard under multiple light sources, whether artificial or natural, indoor or outdoor.
  • And fourth, the introduction of the new Nylosan® Black S-3N makes dyeing a metal-free* black on polyamide finally possible – something that was not available before.

Both dyes display the other usual features allowed of the Nylosan® S range, i.e., high fastness and buildup, and a wide shading gamut for industry-leading metal-free* acid dyes. They are REACH registered and bluesign® approved.

In addition, with the new Nylosan® Navy S-3R and Black S-3N at the core of its new CONSCIOUSLY DEEP system, Archroma is offering another very welcome benefit in the production of polyamide articles: resource saving. As most sportswear manufacturers and brands know, creating durable dark colors on nylon is a complex process that uses massive amounts of water and energy. Archroma therefore designed the new CONSCIOUSLY DEEP system to allow a highly efficient scour dyeing process reduced from 6 to 2 baths. This results into reducing the process time by up to 36%, water consumption by up to 64%, energy by up to 46%, and CO2 emissions by up to 41% compared to conventional benchmark process.

Source:

EMG

Six Carbon Capture and Utilisation technologies for a sustainable chemical and fuel production nominated for the innovation award “Best CO2 Utilisation 2022”
CCU-2022 Award-Nominees
14.03.2022

“Best CO2 Utilisation 2022” Award Nominees

  • Six Carbon Capture and Utilisation technologies for a sustainable chemical and fuel production nominated for the innovation award “Best CO2 Utilisation 2022”
  • Conference on CO2-based Fuels and Chemicals 2022 – Cologne (Germany) and online, hybrid conference, 23-24 March 2022

Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU) Innovations of the Year 2022: A lot of technologies are in place and in development to face the challenges of a sustainable chemicals and fuels production based on the utilisation of captured CO2 from industrial off-gases or directly from the atmosphere. To honor these, nova-Institute grants its annual award, “Best CO2 Utilisation”, within the framework of the “Conference on CO2-based Fuels and Chemicals” taking place in Cologne on 23-24 March 2022. Great submissions reached the nova-Institute and six nominees now get the chance to demonstrate their full potential to a wide audience in Cologne (Germany) and online.

Here are the six nominees:

  • Six Carbon Capture and Utilisation technologies for a sustainable chemical and fuel production nominated for the innovation award “Best CO2 Utilisation 2022”
  • Conference on CO2-based Fuels and Chemicals 2022 – Cologne (Germany) and online, hybrid conference, 23-24 March 2022

Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU) Innovations of the Year 2022: A lot of technologies are in place and in development to face the challenges of a sustainable chemicals and fuels production based on the utilisation of captured CO2 from industrial off-gases or directly from the atmosphere. To honor these, nova-Institute grants its annual award, “Best CO2 Utilisation”, within the framework of the “Conference on CO2-based Fuels and Chemicals” taking place in Cologne on 23-24 March 2022. Great submissions reached the nova-Institute and six nominees now get the chance to demonstrate their full potential to a wide audience in Cologne (Germany) and online.

Here are the six nominees:

  • Acies Bio (SI) – OneCarbonBio
  • Air Company (US) – Air Eau de Parfum
  • Avecom (BE) – Power To Protein
  • CleanO2 Carbon Capture Technologies (CA) – CleanO2 Soap
  • Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB (DE) – eBioCO2n Technology
  • Nordic Electrofuel (NO) – E-Fuel 1
24.02.2022

Renewable Carbon as a Guiding Principle for Sustainable Carbon Cycles

  • Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI) published a strategy paper on the defossilisation of the chemical and material industry with eleven policy recommendations

The Renewable Carbon Initiative, an interest group of more than 30 companies from the wide field of the chemical and material value chains, was founded in 2020 to collaboratively enable the chemical and material industries to tackle the challenges in meeting the climate goals set by the European Union and the sustainability expectations held by societies around the globe.

RCI addresses the core of the climate problem: 72% of anthropogenic climate change is caused directly by extracted fossil carbon from the ground. In order to rapidly mitigate climate change and achieve our global ambition for greenhouse gas emission reductions, the inflow of further fossil carbon from the ground into our system must be reduced as quickly as possible and in large scale.

  • Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI) published a strategy paper on the defossilisation of the chemical and material industry with eleven policy recommendations

The Renewable Carbon Initiative, an interest group of more than 30 companies from the wide field of the chemical and material value chains, was founded in 2020 to collaboratively enable the chemical and material industries to tackle the challenges in meeting the climate goals set by the European Union and the sustainability expectations held by societies around the globe.

RCI addresses the core of the climate problem: 72% of anthropogenic climate change is caused directly by extracted fossil carbon from the ground. In order to rapidly mitigate climate change and achieve our global ambition for greenhouse gas emission reductions, the inflow of further fossil carbon from the ground into our system must be reduced as quickly as possible and in large scale.

In the energy and transport sector, this means a vigorous and fast expansion of renewable energies, hydrogen and electromobility, the so-called decarbonisation of these sectors. The EU has already started pushing an ambitious agenda in this space and will continue to do so, for instance with the recently released ‘Fit for 55’ package.

However, these policies have so far largely ignored other industries that extract and use fossil carbon. The chemical and material industries have a high demand for carbon and are essentially only possible with carbon-based feedstocks, as most of their products cannot do without carbon. Unlike energy, these sectors cannot be “decarbonised”, as molecules will always need carbon. The equivalent to decarbonisation via renewable energy in the energy sector is the transition to renewable carbon in the chemical and derived materials industries. Both strategies avoid bringing additional fossil carbon from the ground into the cycle and can be summarised under the term “defossilisation”.

To decouple chemistry from fossil carbon, the key question is which non-fossil carbon sources can be used in the future. Rapid developments in biosciences and chemistry have unlocked novel, renewable and increasingly affordable sources of carbon, which provide us with alternative solutions for a more sustainable chemicals and materials sector. These alternative sources are: biomass, utilisation of CO2 and recycling. They are combined under the term “renewable carbon”. When used as a guiding principle, renewable carbon provides a clear goal to work towards with sufficient room to manoeuvre for the whole sector. It enables the industry to think out of the box of established boundaries and stop the influx of additional fossil carbon from the ground.

The systematic change to renewable carbon will not only require significant efforts from industry, but must be supported by policy measures, technology developments and major investments. In order to implement a rapid and high-volume transition away from fossil carbon, and to demonstrate its impact, a supportive policy framework is essential. The emphasis should be put on sourcing carbon responsibly and in a manner that does not adversely impact the wider planetary boundaries nor undermines societal foundations. An overarching carbon management strategy is required that also takes specific regional and application-related features into account, to identify the most sustainable carbon source from the renewable carbon family. This will allow for a proper organisation of the complex transition from today’s fossil carbon from the ground to renewable energy and to renewable carbon across all industrial sectors.

RCI has developed eleven concrete policy recommendations on renewable carbon, carbon management, support for the transformation of the existing chemical infrastructure and the transformation of biofuel plants into chemical suppliers. The policy paper “Renewable Carbon as a Guiding Principle for Sustainable Carbon Cycles” is freely available for download in both a short version and a long version.


Link for Download: https://renewable-carbon-initiative.com/media/library/

Source:

Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI)

Trützschler Nonwovens auf der IDEA (c) Trützschler Nonwovens & Man-Made Fibers GmbH
A Carded/Pulp (CP) line for biodegradable composite nonwovens from pulp and viscose fibers
21.02.2022

Trützschler Nonwovens at IDEA

IDEA, the North American nonwovens show, will take place in Miami from March 28th to 31st. Trützschler’s booth focuses on the needs of the American market. It's about local service, the efficient production of sustainable nonwovens and the digital support of production processes.

Tomorrow’s products are sustainable
In addition to the in-depth know-how, Trützschler Nonwovens has a broad portfolio of line concepts for the production of sustainable, biodegradable nonwovens. Cotton is an important raw material for American producers, which is why Trützschler is showing solutions for processing raw cotton, comber noils and blends of viscose and cotton. Another focus is on the Voith/Trützschler concepts for wet-laid, hydroentangled WLS and CP nonwovens. Nonwovens made from viscose fibers and NBSK pulp, the raw material for the paper industry, not only offer a good cost/performance ratio, but also a small CO2 footprint.

IDEA, the North American nonwovens show, will take place in Miami from March 28th to 31st. Trützschler’s booth focuses on the needs of the American market. It's about local service, the efficient production of sustainable nonwovens and the digital support of production processes.

Tomorrow’s products are sustainable
In addition to the in-depth know-how, Trützschler Nonwovens has a broad portfolio of line concepts for the production of sustainable, biodegradable nonwovens. Cotton is an important raw material for American producers, which is why Trützschler is showing solutions for processing raw cotton, comber noils and blends of viscose and cotton. Another focus is on the Voith/Trützschler concepts for wet-laid, hydroentangled WLS and CP nonwovens. Nonwovens made from viscose fibers and NBSK pulp, the raw material for the paper industry, not only offer a good cost/performance ratio, but also a small CO2 footprint.

Digital solutions optimize the production floor
In order to ensure lasting quality, Trützschler Nonwovens presents a modular, digital work environment that systematizes, digitizes and simplifies typical work processes. With the help of Industry 4.0 technologies, line, process and quality data relevant to a production lot can be stored, aggregated, visualized and analyzed with regard to process improvements.

Trützschler USA
With its headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina, and more than 100 employees, Trützschler USA is the first point of contact for all matters relating to American nonwovens producers. The company is able to equip and convert machines according to customer specifications (certified UL508A panel shop), carry out factory acceptance tests and a wide range of repairs in Charlotte.

Source:

Trützschler Nonwovens & Man-Made Fibers GmbH

01.02.2022

C.L.A.S.S. welcomes Circular Systems into its Material Hub

After the C.L.A.S.S. recent evolution of its communication tools, they are really pleased to introduce Circular Systems as new C.L.A.S.S. Material Hub partner.

Circular Systems is a California based materials science company, focused on creating a net positive impact on environment, society and economy through innovation. Its circular plus regenerative technologies provide systemic solutions for transforming waste into valuable fibre, yarns, and fabrics for the fashion industry.

Textile waste and agriculture residues are a huge problem, often burned, left to rot in the fields, or sent to landfills creating massive amounts of CO2. Circular Systems is looking at these waste streams as valuable resources, turning problem into a solution by converting them into high value materials for the fashion industry. The “Lightest Touch™“ philosophy, defines their mission to retain maximum amount of embedded energy in waste inputs while creating the “highest-value outputs” with the lowest impacts. Integration of these technologies into global supply chains is key without compromising quality, thus extending the life cycle of these materials.

After the C.L.A.S.S. recent evolution of its communication tools, they are really pleased to introduce Circular Systems as new C.L.A.S.S. Material Hub partner.

Circular Systems is a California based materials science company, focused on creating a net positive impact on environment, society and economy through innovation. Its circular plus regenerative technologies provide systemic solutions for transforming waste into valuable fibre, yarns, and fabrics for the fashion industry.

Textile waste and agriculture residues are a huge problem, often burned, left to rot in the fields, or sent to landfills creating massive amounts of CO2. Circular Systems is looking at these waste streams as valuable resources, turning problem into a solution by converting them into high value materials for the fashion industry. The “Lightest Touch™“ philosophy, defines their mission to retain maximum amount of embedded energy in waste inputs while creating the “highest-value outputs” with the lowest impacts. Integration of these technologies into global supply chains is key without compromising quality, thus extending the life cycle of these materials.

Circular Systems has three waste-to-fibre platforms that offer an efficient management of textile and agricultural waste:

  • The Agraloop™ refines natural fibers derived from agricultural crops into textile-grade fiber called Agraloop™ BioFibre™.  A NEW Natural Fiber mindfully sourced for circularity. With our specialized processing technique, cellulose fiber from stems and leaves are purified into soft fiber bundles ready to spin into yarns. The Agraloop™ processes leftovers from various food and medicine crops including, oilseed hemp/flax, CBD hemp, banana, and pineapple.
  • Texloop™ Recycling produces high-quality GRS (Global Recycled Standard) certified recycled cotton fibre called RCOT™. Texloop™ preserves fiber quality for the next generation of recycled materials and blends with GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard) certified organic cotton and Canopy approved man-made cellulosics to create near virgin quality yarns for knitting and weaving.
  • Orbital™ hybrid yarns create high-quality materials with high-performance, using organic and recycled fiber inputs. Orbital's patent-pending technology produces inherent wicking and fast dry performance materials, even with 50%-70% natural fiber composition, eliminating the need for chemical finishes to create high-performance fabrics.

All Circular Systems yarns are GRS, OCS and/or GOTS certified and are in the process of developing  their own Crop Residue Standard with Textile Exchange that would relate to the Agraloop™ platform technology.

01.02.2022

EURATEX: High energy costs undermine crucial transformation of the textile and clothing industry

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

  1. The apparel and textile industry needs a safe supply with sufficient green energy (electricity and gas) at internationally competitive prices.
  2. The transformation of industry requires access to very significant amounts of renewable energy at competitive costs. Additional investments in infrastructure will also be needed to guarantee access to new renewable energy supplies.
  3. Until a global (or at least G 20 level) carbon price or other means for a global level playing field in climate protection are implemented, competitive prices for green energy must be granted at European or national levels (e.g. CCfDs, reduction on levies, targeted subsidies).
  4. As the European textile and clothing sector faces global competition mainly form countries/regions with less stringent climate ambitions, it is of utmost importance that the European textile and clothing companies are prevented form direct and indirect carbon leakage.
  5. EU-policy should support solutions, e.g. through targeted subsidies (for hydrogen, energy grids, R&D, technology roadmap studies etc.).
  6. A dedicated approach for SMEs might be appropriate as SMEs do not have the skills/know-how to further improve their energy efficiency and/or becoming carbon neutral.
  7. CAPEX and OPEX support will be necessary for breakthrough technologies, like hydrogen.
  8. The Fit-for-55-Package must support the European Textile and Clothing industry in decarbonization and carbon neutrality. The EU must therefore advocate a global level playing field more than before. The primary goal must be to establish an internationally uniform, binding CO2 pricing, preferably in the form of a standard at G-7 / G-20 level.
  9. EU-policy must not hinder solutions, e.g. we need reasonable state aid rules (compensating the gap between national energy or climate levies and a globally competitive energy price should not be seen as a subsidy).
  10. The European Textile and Clothing industry has made use of economically viable potentials to continuously improve energy efficiency over many years and decades. The obligation to implement further measures must be taken considering investment cycles that are in line with practice. Attention must be paid to the proportionality of costs without weakening the competitive position in the EU internal market or with competitors outside the EU.

Please see the attached position paper for more information.

Source:

EURATEX

10.01.2022

OEKO-TEX® New Regulations 2022

The OEKO-TEX® Association has published its annual update of the applicable test criteria, limit values and guidelines for its certifications. All new regulations will finally come into force on 1 April 2022 after a transition period. In addition, the new Impact Calculator is now available for STeP by OEKO-TEX® customers. The tool, which was developed specifically for textile industry operations, provides data on the CO2 and water footprint necessary to achieve the climate targets.

In mid-2022, the association will introduce RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS by OEKO-TEX®, a new certification for brands and retailers committed to international agreements for human rights and environmental protection. OEKO-TEX® aims to support companies in fulfilling due diligence obligations within their own operations and their global supply chains. RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS by OEKO-TEX® was developed in accordance with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the relevant OECD Guidelines on Responsible Business Conduct.

The OEKO-TEX® Association has published its annual update of the applicable test criteria, limit values and guidelines for its certifications. All new regulations will finally come into force on 1 April 2022 after a transition period. In addition, the new Impact Calculator is now available for STeP by OEKO-TEX® customers. The tool, which was developed specifically for textile industry operations, provides data on the CO2 and water footprint necessary to achieve the climate targets.

In mid-2022, the association will introduce RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS by OEKO-TEX®, a new certification for brands and retailers committed to international agreements for human rights and environmental protection. OEKO-TEX® aims to support companies in fulfilling due diligence obligations within their own operations and their global supply chains. RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS by OEKO-TEX® was developed in accordance with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the relevant OECD Guidelines on Responsible Business Conduct.

New and updated limited values
OEKO-TEX® has added bisphenol B (BPB) in the STANDARD 100, LEATHER STANDARD and ECO PASSPORT by OEKO-TEX® certifications and to the STeP by OEKO-TEX® MRSL. The same applies to two additional colourants based on Michler’s ketone/base.

New substances under observation
In 2022, OEKO-TEX® will continue to monitor various substances based on the latest scientific findings and conformity with relevant specifications. This primarily concerns some process preservative agents and the bisphenols F, S and AF. The 2022 new regulations are available in detail for all OEKO-TEX® products on the website www.oeko-tex.com/news.

More information:
STeP OekoTex
Source:

Oeko-Tex

Political Tailwind for Alternative Carbon Sources (c) Renewable Carbon Initiative
European Policy under the new green deal
22.12.2021

Political Tailwind for Alternative Carbon Sources

  • More than 30 leading pioneers of the chemical and material sector welcome the latest political papers from Brussels, Berlin and Düsseldorf

The political situation for renewable carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling for the defossilisation of the chemical and materials industry has begun to shift fundamentally in Europe. For the first time, important policy papers from Brussels and Germany take into consideration that the term decarbonisation alone is not sufficient, and that there are important industrial sectors with a permanent and even growing carbon demand. Finally, the need for a sustainable coverage of this carbon demand and the realisation of sustainable carbon cycles have been identified on the political stage. They are elemental to the realisation of a sustainable chemical and derived materials industry.

  • More than 30 leading pioneers of the chemical and material sector welcome the latest political papers from Brussels, Berlin and Düsseldorf

The political situation for renewable carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling for the defossilisation of the chemical and materials industry has begun to shift fundamentally in Europe. For the first time, important policy papers from Brussels and Germany take into consideration that the term decarbonisation alone is not sufficient, and that there are important industrial sectors with a permanent and even growing carbon demand. Finally, the need for a sustainable coverage of this carbon demand and the realisation of sustainable carbon cycles have been identified on the political stage. They are elemental to the realisation of a sustainable chemical and derived materials industry.

The goal is to create sustainable carbon cycles. This requires comprehensive carbon management of renewable sources, which includes carbon from biomass, carbon from Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU) – the industrial use of CO2 as an integral part – as well as mechanical and chemical recycling. And only the use of all alternative carbon streams enables a true decoupling of the chemical and materials sector from additional fossil carbon from the ground. Only in this way can the chemical industry stay the backbone of modern society and transform into a sustainable sector that enables the achievement of global climate goals. The Renewable Carbon Initiative’s (RCI) major aim is to support the smart transition from fossil to renewable carbon: utilising carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling instead of additional fossil carbon from the ground. This is crucial because 72% of the human-made greenhouse gas emissions are directly linked to additional fossil carbon. The RCI supports all renewable carbon sources available, but the political support is fragmented and differs between carbon from biomass, recycling or carbon capture and utilisation (CCU). Especially CCU has so far not been a strategic objective in the Green Deal and Fit-for-55.

This will change fundamentally with the European Commission's communication paper on “Sustainable Carbon Cycles” published on 15 December. The position in the paper represents an essential step forward that shows embedded carbon has reached the political mainstream – supported by recent opinions from members of the European parliament and also, apparently, by the upcoming IPCC assessment report 6. Now, CCU becomes a recognised and credible solution for sustainable carbon cycles and a potentially sustainable option for the chemical and  material industries. Also, in the political discussions in Brussels, the term “defossilation” is appearing more and more often, complementing or replacing the term decarbonisation in those areas where carbon is indispensable. MEP Maria da Graça Carvahlo is among a number of politicians in Brussels who perceive CCU as an important future industry, putting it on the political map and creating momentum for CCU. This includes the integration of CCU into the new Carbon Removal Regime and the Emission Trading System (ETS).

As the new policy documents are fully in line with the strategy of the RCI, the more than 30 member companies of the initiative are highly supportive of this new development and are ready to support policy-maker with data and detailed suggestions for active support and the realisation of sustainable carbon cycles and a sound carbon management. The recent political papers of relevance are highlighted in the following.

Brussels: Communication paper on “Sustainable Carbon Cycles”
On 15 December, the European Commission has published the communication paper “Sustainable Carbon Cycles” . For the first time, the importance of carbon in different industrial sectors is clearly stated. One of the key statements in the paper is the full recognition of CCU for the first time as a solution for the circular economy, which includes CCU-based fuels as well. The communication paper distinguishes between bio-based CO2, fossil CO2 and CO2 from direct air capture when addressing carbon removal and it also announces detailed monitoring of the different CO2 streams. Not only CCU, but also carbon from the bioeconomy is registered as an important pillar for the future. Here, the term carbon farming has been newly introduced, which refers to improved land management practices that result in an increase of carbon sequestration in living biomass, dead organic matter or soils by enhancing carbon capture or reducing the release of carbon. Even though the list of nature-based carbon storage technologies is non-exhaustive in our view, we strongly support the paper’s idea to deem sustainable land and forest management as a basis for the bioeconomy more important than solely considering land use as a carbon sink. Surprisingly, chemical recycling, which is also an alternative carbon source that substitutes additional fossil carbon from the ground (i.e. carbon from crude oil, natural gas or from coal), is completely absent from the communication paper.

Berlin: Coalition paper of the new German Government: “Dare more progress – alliance for freedom, justice and sustainability”
The whole of Europe is waiting to see how the new German government of Social Democrats, Greens and Liberals will shape the German climate policy. The new reform agenda focuses in particular on solar and wind energy as well as especially hydrogen. Solar energy is to be expanded to 200 GW by 2030 and two percent of the country's land is to be designated for onshore wind energy. A hydrogen grid infrastructure is to be created for green hydrogen, which will form the backbone of the energy system of the future – and is also needed for e-fuels and sustainable chemical industry, a clear commitment to CCU. There is a further focus on the topic of circular economy and recycling. A higher recycling quota and a product-specific minimum quota for the use of recyclates and secondary raw materials should be established at European level. In the coalition paper, there is also a clear commitment to chemical recycling to be found. A significant change for the industry is planned to occur in regards to the so-called “plastic tax” of 80 cents per kilogram of non-recycled plastic packaging. This tax has been implemented by the EU, but most countries are not passing on this tax to the manufacturers and distributors, or only to a limited extent. The new German government now plans to fully transfer this tax over to the industry.

Düsseldorf: Carbon can protect the climate – Carbon Management Strategy North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW)
Lastly, the RCI highly welcomes North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW, Germany) as the first region worldwide to adopt a comprehensive carbon management strategy, a foundation for the transformation from using additional fossil carbon from the ground to the utilisation of renewable carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling. For all three alternative carbon streams, separate detailed strategies are being developed to achieve the defossilisation of the industry. This is all the more remarkable as North Rhine-Westphalia is the federal state with the strongest industry in Germany, in particular the chemical industry. And it is here, of all places, that a first master plan for the conversion of industry from fossil carbon to biomass, CO2 and recycling is implemented. If successful, NRW could become a global leader in sustainable carbon
management and the region could become a blueprint for many industrial regions.

 Radici: Mehr Nachhaltigkeit auf der Piste (c) RadiciGroup
Die RadiciGroup und DKB präsentieren den ersten „zirkulären“ Skianzug
01.12.2021

Radici: The sustainability our mountains deserve

  • RadiciGroup and DKB introduce the first “circular” ski suit
  • A garment made of yarn obtained from recycled materials and designed with end-of-life recyclability in mind, without compromising style, design and technical performance.
  • RadiciGroup Ski Club athletes will be the first ambassadors of this sustainability project

The first truly sustainable ski suit, featuring Italian style and design and a zero-kilometre supply chain, is finally here. Two Bergamo companies of excellence played the leading roles in the conception and realization of this highly innovative fashion-sport garment: RadiciGroup, a world leading producer of chemical intermediates, polyamide polymers, high-performance engineering polymers and advanced textile solutions, and DKB, a company specializing in technical sportswear with the same brand name.

  • RadiciGroup and DKB introduce the first “circular” ski suit
  • A garment made of yarn obtained from recycled materials and designed with end-of-life recyclability in mind, without compromising style, design and technical performance.
  • RadiciGroup Ski Club athletes will be the first ambassadors of this sustainability project

The first truly sustainable ski suit, featuring Italian style and design and a zero-kilometre supply chain, is finally here. Two Bergamo companies of excellence played the leading roles in the conception and realization of this highly innovative fashion-sport garment: RadiciGroup, a world leading producer of chemical intermediates, polyamide polymers, high-performance engineering polymers and advanced textile solutions, and DKB, a company specializing in technical sportswear with the same brand name.

The ski suit, consisting of jacket and trousers, is fashioned with a fabric made of RENYCLE, a RadiciGroup yarn obtained from mechanically recycled polyamide (nylon), which affords notable savings in energy and water consumption, as well as lower CO2 emissions. In addition, the suit’s padding and numerous accessories, such as zippers, Velcro, buttons and thread, are also made of polyamide.

This achievement was made possible by the great teamwork of RadiciGroup and DKB on the research and development of chemically compatible materials that can be used in special applications requiring high technical performance. The end result is an almost mono-material garment that significantly facilitates end-of-life recycling. It can be more easily converted into polymers for use in the manufacture of ski boot components and bindings, in addition to applications in the automotive and furnishing industries, or in any other sector requiring the characteristics of high performance polyamides.

The ski suit by RadiciGroup is thus an all-round application of ecodesign and circular economy principles to fashion and garment making, which justifies the claim “Una sostenibilità all’altezza delle nostre montagne” [Sustainability worthy of our mountains] written in a logo patch on the inside of the jacket.

“I am particularly proud of this achievement, a synthesis of my passion and effort,” said Angelo Radici, president of RadiciGroup. “I’ve always loved mountaineering and skiing, and, together with my collaborators, I work hard at our company day in and day out to find innovative solutions that improve the sustainability of our industry. This ski suit is concrete proof of the fact that textiles and apparel can be made sustainable without compromising on comfort, design, looks or performance. I will never get tired of repeating that collaboration among the firms along the production chain is crucial to manufacturing goods with an ecodesign approach, considering their end-of-life recyclability and, thus, potentially giving them unlimited durability. Upstream producers, like us, gladly share our know-how in materials chemistry and experience in recycling with our downstream partners, so that, together, we can find sustainable and viable solutions in the various sectors where we operate.”

Source:

RadiciGroup

17.11.2021

C.L.A.S.S. welcomes Sensil® BioCare by NILIT into its material hub

C.L.A.S.S. MATERIAL HUB is a careful selection of smart ingredients made by cutting-edge companies and innovators across the globe. The wide range includes transparent and traceable products, which can be natural/organic, up or re-cycled/able, or innovative and always representing a new generation of innovation that is minimizing its impact on people, environment, animals and oceans.

C.L.A.S.S. MATERIAL HUB is a careful selection of smart ingredients made by cutting-edge companies and innovators across the globe. The wide range includes transparent and traceable products, which can be natural/organic, up or re-cycled/able, or innovative and always representing a new generation of innovation that is minimizing its impact on people, environment, animals and oceans.

Sensil® BioCare sustainable premium Nylon fiber is enhanced with a technology, that helps lessen the persistence of textile waste in sea water and in landfills. With its embedded technology, if any microfibers of Sensil® BioCare garments are released during washing, they will be broken down at a quicker rate compared to conventional Nylon 6.6 fibers when they end up in the oceans. Tests were conducted in both landfill soil and sea water simulations to understand the potential impact of Sensil® BioCare on both ecosystems. Specifically, initial testing following the ASTM D6691 Standard Test Method For Determining Aerobic Biodegradation Of Plastic Materials In The Marine Environment and the ASTM D5511 Standard Test Method For Determining Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Plastic Materials Under High-Solids Anaerobic-Digestion Conditions indicates that Sensil® BioCare yarns break down more rapidly (with a biodegradation of about 40% in 500 days) than conventional nylon. These promising findings point to reduced waste accumulation in both oceans and landfills.

NILIT, owner of the sustainable brand SENSIL®, has also teamed up with The Ocean Foundation’s Blue Resilience Initiative to reestablish and safeguard essential ocean meadows and other coastal habitats. These marine grasslands, which are being damaged at a rate of two football fields every hour, are vital ecosystems for sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere, thus reducing global warming and ocean acidification. In addition, ocean grasslands sustain sea life, defend coast lines against erosion and storm surge, and support economies around the world.

NILIT’s plant in Israel, who produce Sensil ® Biocare boosts, renowned certifications such as GRS (Global Recycled Standard)*, ISO 9001**, ISO 14001*** and ISO 45001****. Moreover, the company has already announced that all other plants in  the USA, China and Brazil will be ISO 14001 certified within 2021 and ISO 45001 certified within 2025. Worth to mention, 40% of Nilit’s team is made up of women.

Source:

C.L.A.S.S.

(c) Abu Dhabi Government Media Office
15.11.2021

Partnership between ADNOC and Borealis to expand Borouge Facility

  • ADNOC and Borealis confirm final investment agreement to build Borouge 4 in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE), which will produce 1.4 million tons of polyethylene per annum
  • Expansion project includes construction of a 1.5 million tonnes ethane cracker, two state-of-the-art Borstar® polyethylene plants and a cross-linked polyethylene plant
  • Borouge 4 will meet growing customer demand across the Middle East, Africa and Asia with differentiated polyolefin solutions in energy, infrastructure, and advanced packaging
  • New facility will benefit from industry-leading technologies to significantly improve energy efficiency and lower emissions, with carbon capture study underway
  • Upon expansion, Borouge will be the world's largest single-site polyolefin complex and will supply feedstock to TA'ZIZ Industrial Chemicals Zone Body

ADNOC and Borealis AG signed an USD 6.2 billion investment agreement to build the fourth Borouge facility – Borouge 4 – at the polyolefin manufacturing complex in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

  • ADNOC and Borealis confirm final investment agreement to build Borouge 4 in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE), which will produce 1.4 million tons of polyethylene per annum
  • Expansion project includes construction of a 1.5 million tonnes ethane cracker, two state-of-the-art Borstar® polyethylene plants and a cross-linked polyethylene plant
  • Borouge 4 will meet growing customer demand across the Middle East, Africa and Asia with differentiated polyolefin solutions in energy, infrastructure, and advanced packaging
  • New facility will benefit from industry-leading technologies to significantly improve energy efficiency and lower emissions, with carbon capture study underway
  • Upon expansion, Borouge will be the world's largest single-site polyolefin complex and will supply feedstock to TA'ZIZ Industrial Chemicals Zone Body

ADNOC and Borealis AG signed an USD 6.2 billion investment agreement to build the fourth Borouge facility – Borouge 4 – at the polyolefin manufacturing complex in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

The world-scale expansion confirms both partners’ commitment to the growth of Borouge and to support chemical production, and advanced manufacturing and industry in Ruwais, a key pillar of Abu Dhabi and the UAE’s technology, innovation and industrial development strategy. Borouge produces crucial industrial raw materials, which are exported to customers globally and used by local companies, boosting local industrial supply chains and enhancing In-Country Value.

Borouge 4 will capitalize on the projected growth in customer demand for polyolefins, driven by their use in manufactured products in the Middle East, Africa and Asia. The facility will also enable the next phase of growth at the Ruwais Industrial Complex by supplying feedstock to the TA’ZIZ Industrial Chemicals Zone.

Borouge 4 will have an industry-leading focus on sustainability leveraging the capabilities of both shareholders. The facility will utilize Borealis’ proprietary Borstar technology, to produce a product portfolio focused on durable applications for energy, infrastructure, advanced packaging, and agriculture sectors. This unique technology, in combination with hexene co-monomer, will enable the production of advanced packaging grades with up to 50% recycled polyethylene content.

Subject to an in-depth study, a Carbon Capture unit that would reduce CO2 emissions by 80% could also be operational in time for Borouge 4’s start-up. The facility is also designed to capitalize on ADNOC’s recent initiatives on clean energy, decarbonizing its power supply through access to Abu Dhabi’s clean power sources. These initiatives are aligned with the UAE Net Zero by 2050 Strategic Initiative.

The first Borouge facility, producing 450,000 tons of polyethylene per annum was commissioned in 2001. Borouge 2 and Borouge 3 took capacity to 2 million tons and 4.5 million tons of polyethylene and polypropylene per annum in 2010 and 2014 respectively.  Borouge 4 will boost the company’s annual polyolefin production to 6.4 million tons, making Borouge one of the world’s largest single-site polyolefin facilities.

The new Borouge 4 facility will comprise:

  • An ethane cracker, with 1.5 million tons ethylene output per annum, which will be the fourth cracker in Borouge’s integrated petrochemical complex in Ruwais
  • Two additional Borstar® polyethylene (PE) plants, each with 700 thousand tons per annum capacity, using state-of-the-art Borealis Borstar third generation (3G) technology
  • A cross-linked PE (XLPE) plant of 100 thousand tons per annum capacity.
  • A hexene-1 unit, which will produce co-monomers for certain grades of polyethylene.
Source:

Borealis

09.11.2021

Alchemie Technology asks fashion industry to reduce emissions

Alchemie Technology, an innovator of low energy, waterless, textile dyeing and finishing technology, is calling on COP26 leaders to support the global fashion industry in the adoption of new manufacturing technology, which will dramatically reduce carbon emissions and fashion’s impact on climate change.

While the fashion industry is one of the most polluting on the planet, second only to oil and gas, and greenhouse gas emissions from textile dyeing at around 3% of global emissions outweigh that of all international flights and maritime shipping combined, it is an industry that can also reduce CO2 emissions the fastest, just by changing the way it dyes fabrics.  

Alchemie Technology, an innovator of low energy, waterless, textile dyeing and finishing technology, is calling on COP26 leaders to support the global fashion industry in the adoption of new manufacturing technology, which will dramatically reduce carbon emissions and fashion’s impact on climate change.

While the fashion industry is one of the most polluting on the planet, second only to oil and gas, and greenhouse gas emissions from textile dyeing at around 3% of global emissions outweigh that of all international flights and maritime shipping combined, it is an industry that can also reduce CO2 emissions the fastest, just by changing the way it dyes fabrics.  

Fabric dyeing is the most polluting part of fashion and activewear manufacturing, involving industrial scale dye baths and huge amounts of dye chemicals, steam, electrical power, and consequent high CO2 emissions.  Repeated washing of the dyed fabric, required to remove dye residue, is responsible for 20% of the world’s wastewater pollution and excess dye is discharged into waterways, affecting the health of some of the world’s poorest communities. In more regulated areas, water pollution is reduced through reliance on energy intensive water treatment plants.

However, an environmental step change can be achieved by adopting new digital technology that can dye fabrics with an 85% reduction in energy consumption and a dramatic 95% reduction of the 1.3 trillion litres of water currently used by the industry each year.

For example, dyeing one polyester shirt using current methods generates 4.5 litres of wastewater and produces 0.17 Kg of CO2, compared to low energy digital technology, which uses less than 0.2 litres of water and reduces carbon emissions to 0.03 Kg.  Multiply these numbers by the billions of garments dyed each year and the scale of the environmental problem, if nothing changes, is clear to see. Equally, the amount by which the textile industry can improve its carbon footprint is dramatic and can be done quickly if action is taken now.

Source:

Alchemie Technology Ltd

(c) Alchemie Technology
03.11.2021

COPS26: Governments support critical to help fashion industry reduce emissions the fastest

  • Alchemie Technology asks world leaders to cut energy and CO2 emissions from global fashion industry

Alchemie Technology, innovator of low energy, waterless, textile dyeing and finishing technology, is calling on COP26 leaders to support the global fashion industry in the adoption of new manufacturing technology, which will dramatically reduce carbon emissions and fashion’s impact on climate change.

While the fashion industry is one of the most polluting on the planet, second only to oil and gas, and greenhouse gas emissions from textile dyeing at around 3% of global emissions outweigh that of all international flights and maritime shipping combined, it is an industry that can also reduce CO2 emissions the fastest, just by changing the way it dyes fabrics.  

  • Alchemie Technology asks world leaders to cut energy and CO2 emissions from global fashion industry

Alchemie Technology, innovator of low energy, waterless, textile dyeing and finishing technology, is calling on COP26 leaders to support the global fashion industry in the adoption of new manufacturing technology, which will dramatically reduce carbon emissions and fashion’s impact on climate change.

While the fashion industry is one of the most polluting on the planet, second only to oil and gas, and greenhouse gas emissions from textile dyeing at around 3% of global emissions outweigh that of all international flights and maritime shipping combined, it is an industry that can also reduce CO2 emissions the fastest, just by changing the way it dyes fabrics.  

Fabric dyeing is the most polluting part of fashion and activewear manufacturing, involving industrial scale dye baths and huge amounts of dye chemicals, steam, electrical power, and consequent high CO2 emissions.  Repeated washing of the dyed fabric, required to remove dye residue, is responsible for 20% of the world’s wastewater pollution and excess dye is discharged into waterways, affecting the health of some of the world’s poorest communities. In more regulated areas, water pollution is reduced through reliance on energy intensive water treatment plants.

However, an environmental step change can be achieved by adopting new digital technology that can dye fabrics with an 85% reduction in energy consumption and a dramatic 95% reduction of the 1.3 trillion litres of water currently used by the industry each year.

For example, dyeing one polyester shirt using current methods generates 4.5 litres of wastewater and produces 0.17 Kg of CO2, compared to low energy digital technology, which uses less than 0.2 litres of water and reduces carbon emissions to 0.03 Kg.  Multiply these numbers by the billions of garments dyed each year and the scale of the environmental problem, if nothing changes, is clear to see.  Equally, the amount by which the textile industry can improve its carbon footprint is dramatic and can be done quickly if action is taken now.
Dr Simon Kew, Managing Director, Alchemie Technology comments “The technology now exists to enable the textile industry to make a significant contribution to helping meet the world’s net zero, climate change goals. But it requires the support of governments through investment, grants and legislation and the critical effort of brands, and their manufacturing supply chains to work together to make the change.”

Source:

Alchemie Technology

28.10.2021

The Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI) celebrates its first anniversary

After its launch on 20 September 2020, the RCI is proud to celebrate its first anniversary this fall. The balance sheet of the first year is impressive: starting from 11 founding members, that number increased to 30 member companies within 12 months. Numerous webinars, press releases, background information, a glossary and a comic allowed to convey the “Renewable Carbon” concept to the public. The RCI is actively working on labelling and policy analysis, and more activities will follow in the next year.

After its launch on 20 September 2020, the RCI is proud to celebrate its first anniversary this fall. The balance sheet of the first year is impressive: starting from 11 founding members, that number increased to 30 member companies within 12 months. Numerous webinars, press releases, background information, a glossary and a comic allowed to convey the “Renewable Carbon” concept to the public. The RCI is actively working on labelling and policy analysis, and more activities will follow in the next year.

Key for this success: the topic of renewable carbon in chemicals and materials is increasingly becoming a focus of politics and industry. Larger companies will have to report their GHG emissions and also the footprint of their products as part of legislative changes surrounding the European Green Deal. In this context, indirect emissions and the carbon sources of materials will play a much more crucial role. The RCI is actively working on solutions for companies to shift from fossil to renewable carbon, which consists of the use of bio-based feedstock, CO2-based resources and recycling. In the future, reporting on GHG emissions will also include Scope 3 emissions, which are all indirect emissions that occur along the company’s value and supply chain and where the used raw materials account for a large proportion of the footprint. Here is where the carbon source of chemicals and plastics comes into play as an important contributor to the carbon footprint. Without a shift from fossil to renewable carbon feedstocks (combining bio-based, CO2-based and recycled), a sustainable future and the Paris climate targets will be almost impossible to master.

To discuss, promote and realise the shift, 30 innovative companies have already joined forces to support the transition to renewable carbon, considering both technological and economical approaches – and helping to shape the political framework accordingly.

For the second year, RCI plans to focus on a comprehensive understanding of the expected political framework conditions in Europe and across the globe, since they will determine the future of chemistry and materials more than ever. Building on this knowledge, the topic of renewable carbon could then to be systematically integrated into new political directives, which has so far not been effectively managed.

In reality, the political focus lies on the strategy of decarbonising the energy sector, a very central and Herculean task. However, it cannot be applied to the chemical and material world because carbon is usually the central building block that cannot be dispensed with. On the contrary, the demand for carbon in the chemical and materials sectors is expected to more than double by 2050. In order to meet this demand in a sustainable manner, we must move towards quitting fossil carbon. For the first time in industrial history, it is possible to decouple chemistry and materials from petrochemicals and completely cover the demand through the utilisation of biomass, CO2 and recycling.

Source:

Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI)

With the "SmartTex" shirt, astronauts can wear the necessary sensors comfortably on their bodies. © DLR
SmartTex Shirt
27.10.2021

Research for cosmic missions: SmartTex provides data on vital functions

It looks like a normal shirt, but it has it all: The new SmartTex shirt uses integrated sensors to transfer physiological data from astronauts to Earth via a wireless communication network. In this way, the effects of the space environment on the human cardiovascular system will be evaluated and documented, especially with regard to long-term manned space missions. Developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in cooperation with DSI Aerospace Technology, the Medical Faculty of Bielefeld University and textile research partner Hohenstein, SmartTex will be tested for the first time as part of the Wireless Compose-2 (WICO2) project by German ESA astronaut Dr. Matthias Maurer, who will leave for his ‘Cosmic Kiss’ mission on the International Space Station (ISS) for six months on October 30, 2021.

It looks like a normal shirt, but it has it all: The new SmartTex shirt uses integrated sensors to transfer physiological data from astronauts to Earth via a wireless communication network. In this way, the effects of the space environment on the human cardiovascular system will be evaluated and documented, especially with regard to long-term manned space missions. Developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in cooperation with DSI Aerospace Technology, the Medical Faculty of Bielefeld University and textile research partner Hohenstein, SmartTex will be tested for the first time as part of the Wireless Compose-2 (WICO2) project by German ESA astronaut Dr. Matthias Maurer, who will leave for his ‘Cosmic Kiss’ mission on the International Space Station (ISS) for six months on October 30, 2021.

"We were already able to gain valuable insights into the interaction of the body, clothing and climate under microgravity conditions during the previous projects Spacetex (2014) and Spacetex2 (2018)," explains Hohenstein Senior Scientific Expert Dr. Jan Beringer. The insights provided at the time by the mission of ESA astronaut Dr. Alexander Gerst have now been directly incorporated into the development of the new SmartTex shirt at Hohenstein. "Matthias Maurer can wear his tailor-made shirt comfortably on his body during his everyday work on the International Space Station. For this, we used his body measurements as the basis for our cut development and the production of the shirt. We integrated the necessary sensors as well as data processing and communication modules into the shirt's cut in such a way that they interfere as little as possible and are always positioned in the right place, regardless of the wearing situation. This is the prerequisite for reliably measuring the relevant physiological data." The SmartTex shirt is intended to provide a continuous picture of the vital functions of astronauts. This will be particularly relevant for future long-term manned space missions to the Moon and Mars.

For example, during the BEAT experiment (Ballistocardiography for Extraterrestrial Applications and long-Term missions), Matthias Maurer will be the first astronaut to wear a T-shirt equipped with sensors that measure his ballistocardiographic data such as pulse and relative blood pressure. For this purpose, the sensors were calibrated in the :envihab research facility at the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine in Cologne. Details on the contraction rate and opening and closing times of the heart valves, which are normally only accessible via sonography or computer tomography, can also be read from the data material. The goal is to study the effects of the space environment on the human cardiovascular system. To be able to analyse these effects realistically, Matthias Maurer's ballistocardiographic data will be recorded before, during and after his stay on the ISS. For the future, a technology transfer of the SmartTex shirt for application in the field of fitness or even in telemedicine is conceivable.

Wireless Compose-2 (WICO2)
The project was planned and prepared by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and its cooperation partners DSI Aerospace Technology, Hohenstein and the University of Bielefeld. The wireless communication network reads sensor data and can determine the position of people and objects in space by propagation times of radio pulses. It is also available as a platform for several experiments on the ISS. The determined data is temporarily stored within the network and read out at regular intervals by the astronauts. These data packets are then transferred to Earth via the ISS link and analysed by the research teams. It can generate its own energy from artificial light sources via solar cells.

 

 

ESA astronaut Dr. Matthias Maurer in summer 2021 during preliminary talks on the Cosmic Kiss mission in DLR's :envihab in Cologne. © DLR


Sensors measure physiological data during a test run on Earth. © DLR


With the "SmartTex" shirt, astronauts can wear the necessary sensors comfortably on their bodies. © DLR

Dr. Jan Beringer, Hohenstein Senior Scientific Expert. © Hohenstein

26.10.2021

We aRe SpinDye with its resource-saving dyeing technology in new collaboration

With its resource-saving dyeing technology, We aRe SpinDye takes place in H&M's latest Innovation Stories collection called Co-exist.

The use of We aRe SpinDye's technology contributes to reducing both water consumption and CO2 emissions, which in turn leads to a lower impact on the world's ecosystem and creates conditions for our co-existence with nature.

Up to 24% of a garment's entire climate footprint occurs during dyeing. We aRe SpinDye's technology can reduce the consumption of the earth's resources in textile production. On average, the reduction of water is -75%, chemicals -90% and energy consumption and CO2 emissions -30%.

In just one year, the clothing industry uses 9 billion cubic meters of water (which is in line with the annual need for drinkingwater for the entire population of our planet) and 168 million tons of process chemicals to dye fabrics. We aRe SpinDye now hopes that more players in the industry will pay attention to the ways that are available when it comes to resource-efficient dyeing process and quickly implement this technology in their production.

With its resource-saving dyeing technology, We aRe SpinDye takes place in H&M's latest Innovation Stories collection called Co-exist.

The use of We aRe SpinDye's technology contributes to reducing both water consumption and CO2 emissions, which in turn leads to a lower impact on the world's ecosystem and creates conditions for our co-existence with nature.

Up to 24% of a garment's entire climate footprint occurs during dyeing. We aRe SpinDye's technology can reduce the consumption of the earth's resources in textile production. On average, the reduction of water is -75%, chemicals -90% and energy consumption and CO2 emissions -30%.

In just one year, the clothing industry uses 9 billion cubic meters of water (which is in line with the annual need for drinkingwater for the entire population of our planet) and 168 million tons of process chemicals to dye fabrics. We aRe SpinDye now hopes that more players in the industry will pay attention to the ways that are available when it comes to resource-efficient dyeing process and quickly implement this technology in their production.

"The enormous resource consumption in the dyeing process is a global problem that must be addressed on a broad front. It is therefore inspiring to work with major brands with an organization that is sensitive to cutting-edge expertise and at the same time shows a willingness to work together to achieve common goals", says Andreas Andrén, CEO of We aRe SpinDye.

Source:

We aRe SpinDye

Recycling secures raw materials for a climate-neutral Europe © ALBA Group
Newly published: the studie “resources SAVED by recycling”.
06.10.2021

Recycling secures raw materials for a climate-neutral Europe

Recycling is the key factor in achieving the EU climate targets. This is shown by the results of the "resources SAVED by recycling" study published today, which Fraunhofer UMSICHT prepared on behalf of the ALBA Group, one of the ten leading recycling companies worldwide. According to the study, 3.5 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and 28.8 million tons of primary resources could be saved in 2020 alone. Further potential could be raised, for example, through minimum quotas for the use of recycled raw materials.

Recycling is the key factor in achieving the EU climate targets. This is shown by the results of the "resources SAVED by recycling" study published today, which Fraunhofer UMSICHT prepared on behalf of the ALBA Group, one of the ten leading recycling companies worldwide. According to the study, 3.5 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and 28.8 million tons of primary resources could be saved in 2020 alone. Further potential could be raised, for example, through minimum quotas for the use of recycled raw materials.

“Fit for 55” thanks to the circular economy: the recycling of raw materials leads to a systematic reduction in the greenhouse gas emissions of our civilisation – and can therefore make a key contribution to achieving the EU climate goals. This is the outcome of the “resources SAVED by recycling” study presented today, which the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT prepared on behalf of the ALBA Group. Thanks to the closed-loop circulation of 4.8 million tonnes of recyclable materials, the ALBA Group succeeded in preventing some 3.5 million tonnes of climate-damaging greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2020 alone. This amount is equivalent to the emissions from some five million return flights between Frankfurt am Main and Mallorca. At the same time, recycling also secures valuable raw materials for the industry: in 2020, in comparison with primary production, recycling saved 28.8 million tonnes of resources, such as crude oil and iron ore.

“The circular economy is one of the strongest pace-setters on the journey to achieving climate neutrality,” highlights Dr. Axel Schweitzer, CEO of the ALBA Group. “We will only achieve the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55 per cent throughout Europe by 2030 if we make consistent use of recycled raw materials.” This includes the area of plastics, for example: compared with primary plastics made from crude oil, the use of high-quality recycled plastics achieves a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions of more than 50 per cent. “It is now necessary to lever this potential,” explains Schweitzer. “We are expecting the new Federal Government in Germany to act decisively and push ahead directly with the transition to a circular economy. The environmental benefits of recycling due to its clearly superior CO2 balance should also find reflection in prices. As immediate climate protection measures, clear industry standards for recyclates combined with minimum quotas on the use of recycled raw materials in products and packaging are also urgently necessary. Last but not least, the state sector is also called upon to prioritise resource protection in the area of procurement. Sustainable procurement can ultimately provide a significant boost to the circular economy”.

Plastics, metals, waste electrical (and electronic) equipment, wood, paper, cardboard, cartons or glass: the Fraunhofer UMSICHT has now been researching the specific benefits of recycling for 14 years. Detailed comparisons have also been made of the primary processes and recycling processes for the various material flows. “This means we can precisely quantify the extent to which the recycling activities of the ALBA Group can contribute to reducing the burden on the environment,” explains Dr.-Ing. Markus Hiebel, Director of the Department for Sustainability and Participation at Fraunhofer UMSICHT. Hiebel believes that the greatest savings can be achieved if the entire value chain is aligned consistently with the circular principle: “The transformation towards a genuine circular economy requires completely new thinking. Products should be designed and managed to ensure that they contain recycled raw materials right from the start – which enables them to be recycled appropriately.”

Source:

Fraunhofer-Institut für Umwelt-, Sicherheits- und Energietechnik UMSICHT

 

EPTA highlights opportunities for pultruded composites in energy-efficient building (c) EPTA
Arte Charpentier Architectes
06.10.2021

EPTA highlights opportunities for pultruded composites in energy-efficient building

Buildings are responsible for approximately 40% of all energy consumption and 36% of CO2 emissions in the EU. Improving energy efficiency in buildings therefore has a key role to play in achieving the ambitious goal of carbon neutrality by 2050 set out in the European Green Deal. A new briefing from the European Pultrusion Technology Association (EPTA) discusses how composite materials can help improve the thermal performance of the building envelope to satisfy increasingly stringent energy efficiency regulations. The EPTA report, Opportunities for pultruded composites in energy-efficient buildings, explains how pultruded profiles offer durable,  low maintenance solutions which can help reduce both operational and embodied carbon emissions from buildings in applications including energy-saving windows, thermal break connectors, and solar shading and cladding systems.   

Buildings are responsible for approximately 40% of all energy consumption and 36% of CO2 emissions in the EU. Improving energy efficiency in buildings therefore has a key role to play in achieving the ambitious goal of carbon neutrality by 2050 set out in the European Green Deal. A new briefing from the European Pultrusion Technology Association (EPTA) discusses how composite materials can help improve the thermal performance of the building envelope to satisfy increasingly stringent energy efficiency regulations. The EPTA report, Opportunities for pultruded composites in energy-efficient buildings, explains how pultruded profiles offer durable,  low maintenance solutions which can help reduce both operational and embodied carbon emissions from buildings in applications including energy-saving windows, thermal break connectors, and solar shading and cladding systems.   

“Economic and population growth mean energy demand is set to rise, making energy efficiency measures even more critical,“ comments Dr Elmar Witten, Secretary of EPTA. “Regulations and standards will continue to push for lower U-values for building elements, driving the increase use of materials and designs which minimise operational carbon emissions. Pultruded profiles offer an attractive combination of properties for designers of energy-efficient buildings – low thermal conductivity to minimise thermal bridging, together with excellent mechanical performance, durability, and design freedom.“  
 
It is estimated that today, roughly 75% of the EU building stock is energy inefficient, meaning that a large part of the energy used goes to waste. This energy loss can be minimised by improving existing buildings and striving for smart solutions and energy efficient materials for new builds. Areas of focus include improving glazing systems, better insulation of envelope components, and reducing unwanted solar heat gains. The low thermal conductivity of composites is being exploited in components and structures that help to minimise energy required for space conditioning. 

  • Energy-saving windows and doors
  • Thermal break connectors and structural assemblies
  • Solar shading systems
  • Rainscreen cladding and curtain wall facades
  • Building a sustainable future
01.10.2021

Archroma celebrates 8 Years of creating positive impact

Archroma celebrates 8 years of leading the way to a sustainable world, with innovations and solutions aimed at creating added value sustainable for its partners, consumers and the planet.

Archroma came to life on 1st October 2013 from textile, paper and emulsions businesses acquired from Clariant by SK Capital Partners.
Building on decades of commitment to developing safer eco-friendlier chemistry, Archroma has become in the past 8 years a prominent name for more sustainable colors and performance, collaborating with leading brands such as Primark, G-Star, Patagonia, Esprit and more.

Archroma has introduced innovations, such as the EarthColors® made from non-edible plant waste from the food and herbal industry, Denisol® Pure, an indigo for aniline-free* denim, aniline being a category 2 carcinogen substance, and Smartrepel®, a PFC-free* water repellent solution. The company is also about to launch a new plant-based softener.

Archroma celebrates 8 years of leading the way to a sustainable world, with innovations and solutions aimed at creating added value sustainable for its partners, consumers and the planet.

Archroma came to life on 1st October 2013 from textile, paper and emulsions businesses acquired from Clariant by SK Capital Partners.
Building on decades of commitment to developing safer eco-friendlier chemistry, Archroma has become in the past 8 years a prominent name for more sustainable colors and performance, collaborating with leading brands such as Primark, G-Star, Patagonia, Esprit and more.

Archroma has introduced innovations, such as the EarthColors® made from non-edible plant waste from the food and herbal industry, Denisol® Pure, an indigo for aniline-free* denim, aniline being a category 2 carcinogen substance, and Smartrepel®, a PFC-free* water repellent solution. The company is also about to launch a new plant-based softener.

The company started to develop holistic solutions designed to bring innovation and performance, whilst reducing the impacts on water, energy and other natural resources. The savings generated by these 70+ system solutions are demonstrated by Archroma's proprietary ONE WAY Impact Calculator, a tool launched in 2012 and continuously upgraded to simulate and optimize the footprint of application processes.

Archroma also recently launched CASUAL X SMART, a sulfur dyeing system for trendy wash-down effects to make clothes that look smart at home and at work. The colors won't fade in the washing cycle, and the application process allows resource savings of up to 33% water, 21% energy and 35% chemical usage compared to a benchmark reactive & pigment garment dyeing.

With ONE WAY, a brand can calculate how much impact their current production and the Archroma Way collection will have on water, energy, chemical, raw material or CO2 footprint.