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19.09.2022

ISKO opens CREATIVE ROOM GERMANY

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

By utilising ISKO’s patented recycling technology, they are now able to develop brand new garments by using fibres from post-consumer denim, finally closing the loop and giving a new and cutting-edge circular supply solution for their customers. As well as a hub for its customers, Creative Room Germany will also act as a platform for the wider denim community to share knowledge, create new and innovative ideas and to bring them to life.

“Building on from the success of our London facility, our goal will be to offer tailor made garment supply solutions for customers in the DACH, Benelux and Nordic markets and this facility will be the focal point of that offering. With a collaborative approach, we will fulfil our vision of bringing a new circular supply solution to the market.”
Pau Bruguera, Executive Director @ ISKO

More information:
Isko denim finishing Creative Room
Source:

ISKO

13.09.2022

Ionofibres a new track for smart and functional textiles

Electronically conductive fibres are already in use in smart textiles, but in a recently published research article, ionically conductive fibres have proven to be of increasing interest. The so-called ionofibres achieve higher flexibility and durability and match the type of conduction our body uses. In the future, they may be used for such items as textile batteries, textile displays, and textile muscles.

The research project is being carried out by doctoral student Claude Huniade at the University of Borås and is a track within a larger project, Weafing, the goal of which is to develop novel, unprecedented garments for haptic stimulation comprising flexible and wearable textile actuators and sensors.

In Claude Huniade’s project, the goal is to produce conductive yarns without conductive metals.
"My research is about producing electrically conductive textile fibres, and ultimately yarns, by coating non-metals sustainably on commercial yarns. The biggest challenge is in the balance between keeping the textile properties and adding the conductive feature," said Claude Huniade.

Electronically conductive fibres are already in use in smart textiles, but in a recently published research article, ionically conductive fibres have proven to be of increasing interest. The so-called ionofibres achieve higher flexibility and durability and match the type of conduction our body uses. In the future, they may be used for such items as textile batteries, textile displays, and textile muscles.

The research project is being carried out by doctoral student Claude Huniade at the University of Borås and is a track within a larger project, Weafing, the goal of which is to develop novel, unprecedented garments for haptic stimulation comprising flexible and wearable textile actuators and sensors.

In Claude Huniade’s project, the goal is to produce conductive yarns without conductive metals.
"My research is about producing electrically conductive textile fibres, and ultimately yarns, by coating non-metals sustainably on commercial yarns. The biggest challenge is in the balance between keeping the textile properties and adding the conductive feature," said Claude Huniade.

Currenty, the uniqueness of his research leans towards the strategies employed when coating. These strategies expand to the processes and the materials used.

Uses ionic liquid
One of the tracks he investigates is about a new kind of material as textile coating, ionic liquids in combination with commercial textile fibres. Just like salt water, they conduct electricity but without water. Ionic liquid is a more stable electrolyte than salt water as nothing evaporates.

"The processable aspect is an important requirement since textile manufacturing can be harsh on textile fibres, especially when upscaling their use. The fibres can also be manufactured into woven or knitted without damaging them mechanically while retaining their conductivity. Surprisingly, they were even smoother to process into fabrics than the commercial yarns they are made from," explained Claude Huniade.

Ionofibres could be used as sensors since ionic liquids are sensitive to their environment. For example, humidity change can be sensed by the ionofibers, but also any stretch or pressure they are subjected to.

"Ionofibres could truly shine when they are combined with other materials or devices that require electrolytes. Ionofibres enable certain phenomena currently limited to happen in liquids to be feasible in air in a lightweight fashion. The applications are multiple and unique, for example for textile batteries, textile displays or textile muscles," said Claude Huniade.

Needs further research
Yet more research is needed to combine the ionofibres with other functional fibres and to produce the unique textile devices.

How do they stand out compared to common electronically conductive fibres?
"In comparison to electronically conductive fibres, ionofibers are different in how they conduct electricity. They are less conductive, but they bring other properties that electronically conductive fibers often lack. Ionofibres achieve higher flexibility and durability and match the type of conduction that our body uses. They actually match better than electronically conductive fibres with how electricity is present in nature," he concluded.

Source:

University of Borås - The Swedish School of Textiles

Fashion Revolution
19.08.2022

Results of the FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2022

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

  • As new and proposed legislation focuses on greenwashing claims, almost half of major brands (45%) publish targets on sustainable materials yet only 37% provide information on what constitutes a sustainable material.
  • Only 24% of major brands disclose how they minimise the impacts of microfibres despite textiles being the largest source of microplastics in the ocean.
  • The vast majority of major brands and retailers (94%) do not disclose the number of workers in their supply chains who are paying recruitment fees. This paints an unclear picture of the risks of forced labour as workers may be getting into crippling debt to accept jobs paying poverty wages.
  • While many brands use their channels to talk about social justice, they need to go beyond lip service. Just 8% of brands publish their actions on racial and ethnic equality in their supply chains.

Despite these results, Fashion Revolution is encouraged by increasing supply chain transparency among many major brands, primarily with first-tier manufacturers where the final stage of production occurs, e.g. cutting, sewing, finishing and packing. Nine brands have disclosed their first-tier manufacturers for the first time this year. It is encouraging to see significant progress across market segments including luxury, sportswear, footwear and accessories and across different geographies.

Fashion Revolution’s co-founder and Global Operations Director Carry Somers says: “In 2016, only 5 out of 40 major brands (12.5%) disclosed their suppliers. Seven years later, 121 out of 250 major brands (48%) disclose their suppliers. This clearly demonstrates how the Index incentivises transparency but it also shows that brands really are listening to the millions of people around the world who keep asking them #WhoMadeMyClothes? Our power is in our persistence.”

More key findings from the Fashion Transparency Index 2022:

Progress on transparency in the global fashion industry is still too slow among 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers, with brands achieving an overall average score of just 24%, up 1% from last year
For another year, the initiative has seen major brands and retailers publicly disclose the most information about their policies, commitments and processes on human rights and environmental topics and significantly less about the results, outcomes and impacts of their efforts.

Most (85%) major brands still do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of overproduction and clothing waste
Thousands of tonnes of clothing waste are found globally. However, brands have disclosed more information about the circular solutions they are developing (28%) than on the actual volumes of pre- (10%) and post-production waste they produce (8%). Brands have sat by as waste importing countries foot the bill, resulting in serious human rights and environmental implications.

Just 11% of brands publish a responsible purchasing code of conduct indicating that most are still reluctant to disclose how their purchasing practices could be affecting suppliers and workers
Greater transparency on how brands interact with their suppliers ought to be a first step towards eliminating harmful practices and promoting fair purchasing practices. The poor performance on transparency in this vital area is a missed opportunity for brands to demonstrate they are serious about addressing the root causes of harmful working conditions, including the instances where they themselves are the key driver.

Despite the urgency of the climate crisis, less than a third of major brands disclose a decarbonisation target covering their entire supply chain which is verified by the Science-Based Targets Initiative
Many brands and retailers rely heavily on garment producing countries that are vulnerable to the impacts of the climate crisis, yet our research shows that only 29% of major brands and retailers publish a decarbonisation target covering their operations and supply chain which is verified by the Science Based Targets Initiative.

Only 11% of brands publish their supplier wastewater test results, despite the textile industry being a leading contributor to water pollution
The fashion industry is a major contributor to water pollution and one of the most water intensive industries on the planet. Only 11% of major brands publish their wastewater test result, and only 25% of brands disclose the process of conducting water-related risk assessments in their supply chain. Transparency on wastewater test results is key to ensuring that brands are held accountable for their potentially devastating impacts on local biodiversity, garment workers and their communities.

Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage nor do they disclose if they isolate labour costs
Insufficient progress is being made by most brands towards ensuring that the workers in their supply chain are paid enough to cover their basic needs and put aside some discretionary income. Just 27% of brands disclose their approach to achieving living wages for supply chain workers and 96% do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage. In response, we have joined forces with allies across civil society to launch Good Clothes, Fair Pay. The campaign demands groundbreaking living wage legislation across the garment, textile and footwear sector.

 

Source:

Fashion Revolution

(c) INNATEX
19.07.2022

INNATEX: Countdown to 50th international trade fair for sustainable textiles

The 50th INNATEX fair opens its gates to a Green Fashion trade audience from 29 to 31 July 2022 in Hofheim-Wallau, near Frankfurt. At this anniversary fair, over 200 labels will be exhibiting, a wide range of experts and organisations will be gathering, and elaborate features and facilities are planned for the Rhein-Main exhibition centre.

According to INNATEX project manager Alexander Hitzel, one highlight is the Community Area, which brings together a range of experts. In short lounge talks, they reveal insights into what they are currently working on and a dialogue format encourages personal discussion. Mirjam Smend, whom we know well from Greenstyle Munich, introduces her recently launched sustainability magazine, Pureviu, and facilitates the morning talks.

The 50th INNATEX fair opens its gates to a Green Fashion trade audience from 29 to 31 July 2022 in Hofheim-Wallau, near Frankfurt. At this anniversary fair, over 200 labels will be exhibiting, a wide range of experts and organisations will be gathering, and elaborate features and facilities are planned for the Rhein-Main exhibition centre.

According to INNATEX project manager Alexander Hitzel, one highlight is the Community Area, which brings together a range of experts. In short lounge talks, they reveal insights into what they are currently working on and a dialogue format encourages personal discussion. Mirjam Smend, whom we know well from Greenstyle Munich, introduces her recently launched sustainability magazine, Pureviu, and facilitates the morning talks.

Alongside standard bodies such as IVN and GOTS, which have taken part in INNATEX for many years, younger projects such as Fairmodel and the digital platform Retraced will be part of this special area. Fairtrade Germany, Femnet and the VDMD are to be found there too. Almost all of them are joining in with the Ask Me Anything dialouge format. Interested attendees can pre-book a slot of up to ten minutes for a personal discussion with the expert of their choice.

The supportive activities that had to be suspended during the pandemic are enjoying a comeback at this year’s summer fair: five newcomers to INNATEX designated DesignDiscoveries will be presenting their projects in another special area. Vegtus, from Barcelona, produces sneakers and other products from cactus leather. Natural textiles such as organic cotton are used by Lounge Cherie, a yoga fashion label.

Products for kids through to seniors, classics and streetwear, footwear and accessories
Nordlicht similarly relies on recyclable, renewable natural fibres for its outerwear, bags and accessories. The field of circular fashion is also served by the remaining two Design Discoveries. Both Nature is Future, with its handmade sneakers, and Freibeutler, with its functional rucksacks, make extensive use of recycled materials, while also paying due attention to broader sustainability aspects.

Regular INNATEX exhibitors include Lana, Chapati and Didymos, all of whom are also celebrating anniversaries. Labels such as Anokho with their colourful accessories in jacquard fabrics and Danish label Angel Circle with its plus-size fashion are exhibiting for the first time.

Source:

INNATEX / UBERMUT GbR

(c) adidas AG
15.07.2022

adidas launches its first product in collaboration with Spinnova

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

Made in part with Spinnova technology , a minimum of 30% of the fabric in the adidas TERREX HS1 comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* that are made by grinding wood pulp with water into a paste and then spun into a textile fibre.

The product also works with the material’s natural color. Since no dyeing or bleaching is applied, in turn this uses less water compared to the standard dyeing process.

* (Rayon) in US, (New type of cellulose fibre) in China

More information:
adidas Spinnova Fibers fibres Recycling
Source:

adidas AG

(c) adidas
25.02.2022

adidas unveils its first product with Spinnova

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

adidas is committed to helping end plastic waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be remade into entirely new products, and, in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1. Its outdoor brand, adidas TERREX , is leading the innovation of technical materials with the aim of helping drive better product solutions for adventurers in nature while ensuring there is no compromise on style or performance .

By 2025, nine out of 10 adidas articles will carry a more sustainable technology, material, design, or method of manufacturing and adidas’ partnership with Spinnova is a major part of this journey.

27.01.2022

Radici Yarn certified to ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems

Over 400 employees work hard every day to improve the environmental performance of Radici Yarn’s site. Through teamwork and continuous improvement in energy efficiency, Radici Yarn has obtained ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems certification, which attests to the organization’s commitment to contain and progressively reduce energy consumption.

Radici Yarn, one of the companies in the RadiciGroup Advanced Textile Solutions Business Area, is engaged in the production and sale of polyamide 6 polymer, PA6 and PA66 continuous filament and staple yarn, and other synthetic fibres, including products made of recycled or bio-based materials.

All the processes - polymerization and spinning (Villa d'Ogna plant), as well as warping and draw-warping (Ardesio plant) - are run under constant monitoring with the goal of achieving maximum energy efficiency and lower consumption. Both sites are powered by two hydroelectric power plants owned by Geogreen, a RadiciGroup partner and energy supplier. The share of energy consumption from renewable sources and reduced environmental impact (natural gas) sources  is constantly increasing.

Over 400 employees work hard every day to improve the environmental performance of Radici Yarn’s site. Through teamwork and continuous improvement in energy efficiency, Radici Yarn has obtained ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems certification, which attests to the organization’s commitment to contain and progressively reduce energy consumption.

Radici Yarn, one of the companies in the RadiciGroup Advanced Textile Solutions Business Area, is engaged in the production and sale of polyamide 6 polymer, PA6 and PA66 continuous filament and staple yarn, and other synthetic fibres, including products made of recycled or bio-based materials.

All the processes - polymerization and spinning (Villa d'Ogna plant), as well as warping and draw-warping (Ardesio plant) - are run under constant monitoring with the goal of achieving maximum energy efficiency and lower consumption. Both sites are powered by two hydroelectric power plants owned by Geogreen, a RadiciGroup partner and energy supplier. The share of energy consumption from renewable sources and reduced environmental impact (natural gas) sources  is constantly increasing.

The energy issue has always been a priority for Radici Yarn, whose products serve numerous sectors, including automotive, clothing and furnishings.

"Already at the beginning of the 1990s, Radici Yarn started investing in cogeneration, the simultaneous production of electricity and steam,” pointed out Laura Ravasio, energy manager of Radici Yarn SpA. “We have recently started up an advanced trigeneration plant – a highly efficient system that produces not only electricity and steam, but also chilled water for our production processes. One of the first results recorded in 2021 was a 30% reduction in water consumption. Thus, ISO 50001 certification seemed like the next logical step to take in formalizing a long-term approach to energy.”

The ISO 50001 certification, which is voluntary and valid for a period of three years, was added to the ISO 14001 Environmental and ISO 9001 Quality Management system certifications previously achieved by Radici Yarn.

Source:

RadiciGroup

(c) ISKO
22.12.2021

ISKO’s at lablaco’s virtual-reality (VR) Circular Fashion Summit 2021

As part of its mission to a fully circular fashion industry, ISKO has joined forces with the CFS by lablaco to show its commitment to this important cause. At Grand Palais Éphémère in Paris on 9-12 December, ISKO engaged with industry leaders from across the world to demonstrate its approach to circularity.
 
At its virtual gallery, ISKO guided its guests through its Metaverse and discussed its goal to eliminate virgin fibres in its fabrics and how it plans to achieve it.
 
Guests were able to dress their avatars in their very own ISKO VR denim jacket and ISKO worked with the Institute of Digital Fashion (IoDF) to design this VR art installation, which represents how it is pushing the boundaries of what is possible, making fabrics from textile waste.

As part of its mission to a fully circular fashion industry, ISKO has joined forces with the CFS by lablaco to show its commitment to this important cause. At Grand Palais Éphémère in Paris on 9-12 December, ISKO engaged with industry leaders from across the world to demonstrate its approach to circularity.
 
At its virtual gallery, ISKO guided its guests through its Metaverse and discussed its goal to eliminate virgin fibres in its fabrics and how it plans to achieve it.
 
Guests were able to dress their avatars in their very own ISKO VR denim jacket and ISKO worked with the Institute of Digital Fashion (IoDF) to design this VR art installation, which represents how it is pushing the boundaries of what is possible, making fabrics from textile waste.

More information:
Isko textile waste circularity
Source:

ISKO / Menabò Group

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge Photo: pixabay
10.12.2021

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

  • more reliant on non-renewable resources,
  • less biodegradable, and
  • increasingly prone to releasing microplastics.

The increased consumption is also discretionary, driven by consumer desire and remains unchecked. Thus, the long-term trend in the textile industry parallels the intentional addition of microplastics to products such as cosmetics. The contrast is that the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has recommended such intentional additions be restricted, whereas the over-consumption of synthetic fibres continues unchecked. One way for the EU to account for and mitigate microplastic pollution is through an EU-backed methodology measuring and reporting microplastic emissions, so that consumers and procurement officers have the information needed to minimise microplastic pollution resulting from their purchasing decisions.

There is a critical opportunity to address microplastic pollution in the fashion textile industry through the EU Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) methodology. To meet the environmental objectives of the Circular Economy Action Plan, the EU is proposing that companies substantiate their products’ environmental credentials using this harmonised methodology. However, microplastic pollution is not accounted for in the PEF methodology. This omission has the effect of assigning a zero score to microplastic pollution and would undermine the efforts of the European Green Deal, which aim “to address the unintentional release of microplastics in the environment.”

The incorporation of microplastic pollution as an indicator would increase the legitimacy of the PEF method as well as better inform consumer purchasing decisions, especially as the European Green Deal seeks to “further develop and harmonise methods for measuring unintentionally released microplastics, especially from tyres and textiles, and delivering harmonised data on microplastics concentrations in seawater.”

Whilst we continue to learn about the damage of microplastics and there is new knowledge emerging on the toxic impacts along the food chain, there is sufficient information on the rate of microplastic leakage into the environment to implement a basic, inventory level indicator in the PEF now. This is consistent with the recommendations of a review of microplastic pollution originating from the life cycle of apparel and home textiles. There are precedents in PEF for basic level (e.g., ‘resource use, fossils’) and largely untested (e.g. land occupation and toxicity indicators) indicators, and therefore an opportunity for the EU to promote research and development in the measurement and modelling of microplastic pollution by including such emissions in the PEF methodology. For such an indicator, the long and complex supply chains of the apparel and footwear industry would be a test case with high-impact and a global reach.

Source:

DNFI / IWTO – 2021

15.11.2021

Kelheim Fibres once again finishes high in Canopy's Hot Button Ranking

In the Canopy’s 2021 Hot Button Ranking, Kelheim Fibres once again occupies a leading position: With a increase of 2.5 points in the evaluation, the Bavarian viscose speciality fibre manufacturer tied for third place out of around 40 viscose fibre manufacturers worldwide and a dark green/green shirt for the second year running. The Hot Button Report not only stands for responsible raw material sourcing - it is an overall sustainability indicator for viscose fibre producers.

Especially in the areas of transparency and procurement, the NGO Canopy, which is committed to the preservation of ancient and endangered forests, awarded Kelheim Fibres top points: Kelheim Fibres is the only EMAS-certified viscose fibre manufacturer worldwide and publishes all environmentally relevant data publicly.

Kelheim Fibres also gained points in the area of "Next Generation Solutions" - the use of alternative raw materials in fibre production. Together with the Swedish textile recycling company Renewcell, the fibre experts are planning to realise the large-scale production of high-quality viscose fibres from up to 10,000 tonnes of the 100% textile recyclate Circulose® per year.

In the Canopy’s 2021 Hot Button Ranking, Kelheim Fibres once again occupies a leading position: With a increase of 2.5 points in the evaluation, the Bavarian viscose speciality fibre manufacturer tied for third place out of around 40 viscose fibre manufacturers worldwide and a dark green/green shirt for the second year running. The Hot Button Report not only stands for responsible raw material sourcing - it is an overall sustainability indicator for viscose fibre producers.

Especially in the areas of transparency and procurement, the NGO Canopy, which is committed to the preservation of ancient and endangered forests, awarded Kelheim Fibres top points: Kelheim Fibres is the only EMAS-certified viscose fibre manufacturer worldwide and publishes all environmentally relevant data publicly.

Kelheim Fibres also gained points in the area of "Next Generation Solutions" - the use of alternative raw materials in fibre production. Together with the Swedish textile recycling company Renewcell, the fibre experts are planning to realise the large-scale production of high-quality viscose fibres from up to 10,000 tonnes of the 100% textile recyclate Circulose® per year.

Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres form collaboration to establish a European closed loop for fashion
Logo
20.10.2021

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres form collaboration to establish a European closed loop for fashion

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres Gmbh have signed a Letter of Intent for a long term commercial collaboration to add the crucial missing link for a circular economy for textiles in Europe. Together, the two technology leaders will collaborate on developing com mercial scale production of superior quality viscose fibers from up to 10 000 tonnes of Renewcell’s 100% textile recycled material Circulose® annually. The collaboration paves the way toward a fully European closed loop in which textile waste is collected, recycled and regenerated into new Circulose® fibers for people that want to reduce their fashion footprint significantly.

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres Gmbh have signed a Letter of Intent for a long term commercial collaboration to add the crucial missing link for a circular economy for textiles in Europe. Together, the two technology leaders will collaborate on developing com mercial scale production of superior quality viscose fibers from up to 10 000 tonnes of Renewcell’s 100% textile recycled material Circulose® annually. The collaboration paves the way toward a fully European closed loop in which textile waste is collected, recycled and regenerated into new Circulose® fibers for people that want to reduce their fashion footprint significantly.

"European fashion consumption has great impact on climate and the environment globally. It also contributes to tremendous amounts of waste going into landfill and incinerators either in Europe or abroad after export. We will now work with Kelheim to prevent waste and reduce the need for virgin resources, while also enabling a fully regional supply of low impact circular fibers for text iles” comments Patrik Lundström, CEO of Renewcell. “We are thrilled for the opportunity to work closely with a partner like Kelheim, who is at the leading edge of innovation and sustainability in this industry” he adds.

Craig Barker, CEO at Kelheim Fibres adds: "We see an excellent fit between our two companies, not only on the technical side with Renewcell we have found a highly professional partner who shares our vision for future forward technologies that enable full circularity in the textile chain. Finding the answers to the challenges of our times is what drives us every day. Our recycled cellulose fibre solution made of Renewcell’s Circulose® and manufactured using environmentally sound processes at our Kelheim plant is an answer to the fashi on industries need for sustainable, resource and waste reducing solutions, and a more regional and reliable supply chain."

Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH

13.10.2021

Ralph Lauren and Dow release manual for dyeing processes

Dow and Ralph Lauren Corporation released a detailed manual on how to dye cotton more sustainably and more effectively than ever before using ECOFAST™ Pure Sustainable Textile Treatment. With this manual, Ralph Lauren and Dow are open-sourcing this improved dyeing process to encourage adoption in the textile industry and help standardize a more sustainable and efficient cotton dyeing system for positive environmental impact.  

The co-developed, step-by-step manual details how to use ECOFAST™ Pure, a cationic cotton treatment developed by Dow, with existing dyeing equipment. Ralph Lauren, the first brand to use ECOFAST™ Pure, partnered with Dow to optimize and implement the technology in its cotton dyeing operations as part of its new Color on Demand platform.

Dow and Ralph Lauren Corporation released a detailed manual on how to dye cotton more sustainably and more effectively than ever before using ECOFAST™ Pure Sustainable Textile Treatment. With this manual, Ralph Lauren and Dow are open-sourcing this improved dyeing process to encourage adoption in the textile industry and help standardize a more sustainable and efficient cotton dyeing system for positive environmental impact.  

The co-developed, step-by-step manual details how to use ECOFAST™ Pure, a cationic cotton treatment developed by Dow, with existing dyeing equipment. Ralph Lauren, the first brand to use ECOFAST™ Pure, partnered with Dow to optimize and implement the technology in its cotton dyeing operations as part of its new Color on Demand platform.

Conventional fabric dyeing processes require trillions of liters of water each year, generating roughly 20% of the world’s wastewater.1, 2 Pretreating fabric with ECOFAST™ Pure helps significantly reduce the amount of water, chemicals and energy needed to color cotton, by enabling up to 90% less process chemicals, 50% less water, 50% less dyes and 40% less energy without sacrificing color or quality.3

Ralph Lauren began integrating Color on Demand into its supply chain earlier this year and first launched product utilizing ECOFAST™ Pure as part of the Company’s Team USA collection for the Olympic & Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020. Designed to help address water scarcity and pollution caused by cotton dyeing, Color on Demand is a multi-phased system with a clear ambition to deliver over time the world’s first scalable zero wastewater cotton dyeing system. By 2025, the brand aims to use the Color on Demand platform to dye more than 80% of its solid cotton products.

 

1 Drew, Deborah and Genevieve Yehounme. “The Apparel Industry’s Environmental Impact in 6 Graphics.” World Resources Institute, July 5, 2017. https://www.wri.org/blog/2017/07/apparel-industrys-environmental-impact-6-graphics
2 Rep. A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future. Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Circular Fibres Initiative, 2017. https://ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/a-new-textiles-economy
3 A full third-party reviewed and validated life cycle assessment is available by request at www.dow.com/ecofast.

 

Source:

Dow / G&S Business Communications

31.05.2021

C.L.A.S.S: The journey of Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei towards responsible fashion

Laying the bases for a more sustainable world, adopting responsible strategies is no longer an option but an indispensable and compulsory structural revolution today and for the future to come. This topic is the subject of the Smart Voice "The Circular Stories of C.L.A.S.S.: the journey of Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei towards a smart, responsible and contemporary luxury" organised by C.L.A.S.S. eco hub that has taken place on Thursday 27th May at 4 pm CET. 4 unique and complimentary design realities has been sharing  the  Bemberg ™ choice as unique and precious fibre ingredient that gives rise to a performing design incorporating new generation values, for their unique paths of style and fashion to offer to the contemporary consumer.

Specialist and expert of innovative fibres, during the session Ettore Pellegrini, Marketing & Sales Manager-Marketing & Sales Manager Asahi Kasei Fibers Italia, illustrated the history of Bemberg™ starting from its origins to nowadays, reporting its various applications that have been then illustrated in their uniqueness by the speakers of the session.

Laying the bases for a more sustainable world, adopting responsible strategies is no longer an option but an indispensable and compulsory structural revolution today and for the future to come. This topic is the subject of the Smart Voice "The Circular Stories of C.L.A.S.S.: the journey of Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei towards a smart, responsible and contemporary luxury" organised by C.L.A.S.S. eco hub that has taken place on Thursday 27th May at 4 pm CET. 4 unique and complimentary design realities has been sharing  the  Bemberg ™ choice as unique and precious fibre ingredient that gives rise to a performing design incorporating new generation values, for their unique paths of style and fashion to offer to the contemporary consumer.

Specialist and expert of innovative fibres, during the session Ettore Pellegrini, Marketing & Sales Manager-Marketing & Sales Manager Asahi Kasei Fibers Italia, illustrated the history of Bemberg™ starting from its origins to nowadays, reporting its various applications that have been then illustrated in their uniqueness by the speakers of the session.

Paolo Verdoia, Lining research and development raw materials at Ermenegildo Zegna, who has been involved in the development of accessory raw materials for the Ermenegildo Zegna Group for 14 years. During the digital meeting he talked about priority collaborations with responsible and high quality materials such as Bemberg™, the brand's approach to sustainability and future projects.

The session has also been attended by new generation designer Gilberto Calzolari winner of C.L.A.S.S. ICON 2020, who used Bemberg™ in his latest AW 2021-22 collection entitled "At this stage".

Camilla Carrara, founder and zero-waste designer Zerobarracento says "We select Bemberg™ for our creations for two fundamental reasons: firstly, from a stylistic point of view for its extreme versatility: in the various collections we have adopted it to create Kimonos, padded jackets, wrap dresses as well as for the interiors of our garments, which are intended to be soft embraces for total physical and mental comfort. The second but no less important reason is that this fibre has circular values in line with our zero-waste commitment."

“By choosing to work with Bemberg™, we have made an exclusive and sustainable choice in order to offer tailors, designers, brands and garment manufacturers who believe in and are committed to responsible but at the same time premium and exclusive fashion a new business opportunity" says Alessandro Ivaldi Director Business Unit of Carnet, a division of Ratti Group that produces and distributes worldwide fabrics for the creation of made-to-measure garments for men and women.

Source:

C.L.A.S.S.

13.04.2021

Origin Materials and PrimaLoft develop Carbon-Negative Insulating Fiber

  • PrimaLoft and Origin Materials have launched a program to develop high-performance, carbon-negative insulating fibers for diverse apparel applications, including for leading outdoor, fashion, and lifestyle brands, as well as home goods applications such as hypoallergenic insulated bedding.
  • PrimaLoft, an advanced material technology company and a world leader in the development of high-performance insulations and fabrics, will develop the fibers with Origin Materials to address demand for sustainable, high-performance materials from its over 900 global brand partners. PrimaLoft iconic brand partners include Patagonia, Stone Island, L.L. Bean, Lululemon, adidas and Nike.
  • The program will focus on carbon-negative PET and next-generation polymers produced by the Origin Materials patented technology platform, which turns sustainable wood residue into cost-advantaged, carbon-negative materials that reduce the need for fossil resources.

Origin Materials, Inc.

  • PrimaLoft and Origin Materials have launched a program to develop high-performance, carbon-negative insulating fibers for diverse apparel applications, including for leading outdoor, fashion, and lifestyle brands, as well as home goods applications such as hypoallergenic insulated bedding.
  • PrimaLoft, an advanced material technology company and a world leader in the development of high-performance insulations and fabrics, will develop the fibers with Origin Materials to address demand for sustainable, high-performance materials from its over 900 global brand partners. PrimaLoft iconic brand partners include Patagonia, Stone Island, L.L. Bean, Lululemon, adidas and Nike.
  • The program will focus on carbon-negative PET and next-generation polymers produced by the Origin Materials patented technology platform, which turns sustainable wood residue into cost-advantaged, carbon-negative materials that reduce the need for fossil resources.

Origin Materials, Inc. (“Origin Materials”), a leading carbon negative materials company, and PrimaLoft, an advanced material technology company and a leader in the development of high-performance insulations and fabrics, announced a new program to develop carbon-negative, insulating, high-performance fibers. The fibers will be used across a diverse array of end products, including insulating fiber for leading outdoor, fashion, and lifestyle brands, as well as home goods applications such as hypoallergenic insulated bedding.

The companies will work to rapidly develop and commercialize new products derived from Origin Materials’ platform. The collaboration will leverage the leadership position of PrimaLoft as a specialty producer of insulating fibers and filaments with over 900 global brand partners, as well as a large global network of manufacturers that employ a wide array of textile processes to make its products, including extrusion, carding, spinning, finishing, weaving, knitting, dyeing, airlaid, meltblown, and other technologies.

The collaboration builds on PrimaLoft’s “Relentlessly Responsible™” mission to elevate both performance and sustainability, through innovation. The platform includes PrimaLoft® Bio™, which was developed and launched into the market in late 2018 as an effort to battle microplastics in the ocean; PrimaLoft® P.U.R.E.™, which provides materials manufactured with greater than 50% CO2 savings; and PrimaLoft’s post-consumer recycling initiative. The next frontier for the company is non-petroleum based raw materials, including products that biodegrade and other circular economy solutions.

Source:

crystal communications

How to do more with less explored at Kingpins24 Flash (c) Monfords
Monforts has a leading position in the field of denim finishing with its well proven Thermex continuous dyeing systems, Montex stenter dryers and other lines for resource-efficient and economical processing.
09.03.2021

How to do more with less explored at Kingpins24 Flash

  • Major Monforts denim customers continue to pioneer new initiatives that are pushing the boundaries of sustainable production.

Recycling their cotton waste has become one way these companies can do more with less, and at the recent Kingpins24 Flash online event, Sedef Uncu Aki, director of Orta, headquartered in Istanbul, Turkey, announced a new partnership with leading recycling operation Gama Recycle.

Traceable
“Through this local partnership we will supply the waste from our spinning mills and return around 3,000 tons of premium quality cotton back to them,” she said. “We have established a truly controlled and traceable system and partnering with a domestic recycling centre is important because a lot the carbon emissions associated with recycling usually come from transportation.”

  • Major Monforts denim customers continue to pioneer new initiatives that are pushing the boundaries of sustainable production.

Recycling their cotton waste has become one way these companies can do more with less, and at the recent Kingpins24 Flash online event, Sedef Uncu Aki, director of Orta, headquartered in Istanbul, Turkey, announced a new partnership with leading recycling operation Gama Recycle.

Traceable
“Through this local partnership we will supply the waste from our spinning mills and return around 3,000 tons of premium quality cotton back to them,” she said. “We have established a truly controlled and traceable system and partnering with a domestic recycling centre is important because a lot the carbon emissions associated with recycling usually come from transportation.”

Orta’s ZeroMax range meanwhile uses no cotton at all, being based on Lenzing’s Tencel cellulosic fibre, while the company’s involvement in denim production for a recent launch by Levi Strauss, of jeans made with organic cotton and Circulose – a breakthrough material developed by re:newcell of Sweden and partners – was hailed as a further step forward.

To make Circulose, re:newcell repurposes discarded cotton textiles, such as worn-out denim jeans, through a process akin to recycling paper. The incoming waste fabrics are broken down using water. The colour is then stripped from these materials using an eco-friendly bleach and after any synthetic fibres are removed from the mix, the slurry-like mixture is dried and the excess water is extracted, leaving behind a sheet of Circulose. This sheet is then made into viscose fibre which is combined with cotton and woven into new fabrics.

Circular Park
Omer Ahmed, CEO of Artistic Milliners also announced plans for his company’s new 70,000 square-foot Circular Park in Karachi, Pakistan, at Kingpins24 Flash.

Once complete, this will add three million square metres of additional denim capacity a month to the company’s production and take its total recycled output to a monthly five million metres.
Ahmed observed that there is currently a lack of sustainable fibres that are readily available to use for denim production at scale.

“Organic cotton is too expensive, and in my opinion always will be,” he said. “Cottonised hemp is also not cheap and it’s hard to mix with cotton, while the new regenerated cellulose fibres that are now emerging are promising, but currently in short supply. Recycled polyester is meanwhile still based on petroleum resources which we want to move away from. As a consequence, there are only a few other options for us as a manufacturer and this new project will help us minimise our own waste while significantly lowering our carbon footprint.”

Other Monforts denim customers to introduce cotton fibre recycling operations at their plants recently include AGI Denim, Bossa and Soorty.

Vertical savings
Refresh is the name of the latest collection from AGI Denim – reflecting the company’s significant reduction in water consumption.

The company has just opened new fibre spinning and denim mills at its complex in Karachi, Pakistan.

“Over the years we’ve gone through a series of backward integration steps to become fully vertical,” said AGI Denim executive director Ahmed Javed, at Kingpins24 Flash. “In our latest expansion, we revisited every step of the production processes in order to make resource savings.”

Innovations have included the installation of proprietary robotics for garment finishing, but the most attention has been paid to water savings.

“Pakistan is one of the largest cotton-producing companies in the world and we’re fortunate that the type of cotton that is grown here is well suited to denim production and also helps us lower our carbon footprint, with everything done in close proximity,” Javed said. “In the lifecycle of a pair of denim jeans, however, cotton fibre production contributes 68% of water consumption. While we cannot control how much water cotton needs for it to grow, we can rethink the way we use it in our factory.”

Refresh-branded denims are washed from 100% recycled water as a result of the company’s new wastewater treatment plant, which puts production wastewater through a series of steps beginning with equalisation, followed by aeration and concluding with sedimentation. The water travels through filtration and ultrafiltration systems before being subjected to an activated carbon system and finally a reverse osmosis system to reduce any dissolved salts.

AGI now recycles 4.4 million gallons of water each month – enough to wash a million pairs of jeans.

Sustainable
Monforts has a leading position in the field of denim finishing with its well proven Thermex continuous dyeing systems, Montex stenter dryers and other lines for resource-efficient and economical processing.

“Our denim partners are constantly setting themselves new goals in respect of sustainable production – and more importantly, achieving them,” says Hans Wroblowski, Monforts Head of Denim. “We work closely with them with the aim of constantly optimising processing parameters and achieving further savings in energy, water and raw materials throughout the dyeing and finishing stages of production.”

The latest Monforts innovation for denim is the CYD yarn dyeing system. This technology is based on the effective and established dyeing process for denim fabrics that is now being applied for yarn dyeing. The CYD system integrates new functions and processes into the weaving preparation processes to increase quality, flexibility, economic viability and productivity. A full CYD line is now available for trials at the company’s Advanced Technology Centre in Mönchengladbach, Germany.”

08.03.2021

Tessitura Colombo: Intimissimi's new Sustainable Collection

Intimissimi, a famous lingerie brand, gives an edge of responsible innovation with Tessitura Colombo recycled and plant-based colored ingredients.

Intimissimi, a renowned lingerie brand, constantly engaged in research and development of innovative collections expressed through its performances: for this collection, the lingerie brand has selected made in Italy ingredients of Tessitura Colombo, a lace manufacturer that has always prioritized the protection of the environment and natural resources.

"Nature's dream", coming to stores this spring, is the name of the new line that wants to be inspired by nature and where sustainability is fully integrated throughout premium recycled ingredients and natural plant dyed process. "Nature's dream" is part of the sustainable families of the #intimissimicares collection, that is created to comply with short and long-term sustainability objectives: attention to the usage of natural resources, protection of the environment, control of the supply chain and choice of sustainable fibres.

Intimissimi, a famous lingerie brand, gives an edge of responsible innovation with Tessitura Colombo recycled and plant-based colored ingredients.

Intimissimi, a renowned lingerie brand, constantly engaged in research and development of innovative collections expressed through its performances: for this collection, the lingerie brand has selected made in Italy ingredients of Tessitura Colombo, a lace manufacturer that has always prioritized the protection of the environment and natural resources.

"Nature's dream", coming to stores this spring, is the name of the new line that wants to be inspired by nature and where sustainability is fully integrated throughout premium recycled ingredients and natural plant dyed process. "Nature's dream" is part of the sustainable families of the #intimissimicares collection, that is created to comply with short and long-term sustainability objectives: attention to the usage of natural resources, protection of the environment, control of the supply chain and choice of sustainable fibres.

05.03.2021

Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles to feature leading suppliers

With the spring textile trade fair season in China just around the corner, a number of leading domestic and international suppliers are confirmed to take part in Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles – Spring Edition. The fair will now take place at a slightly later date of 17 – 19 March. Together with the concurrent fairs Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, Yarn Expo, CHIC and PH Value, these five events will form the first major in-person gathering for the textile industry this year.

From bedding and towelling, rugs and table & kitchen linen to home textile technologies and textile designs, buyers will have a wide range of the latest collections to source from this month at Shanghai’s National Exhibition and Convention Center. International exhibitors such as Lenzing and Cotton Council International as well as leading domestic brands including Coolist, Luolai, Soluffy and Yunjie Textile are amongst those signed up to take part this year.

Exhibitor highlights

With the spring textile trade fair season in China just around the corner, a number of leading domestic and international suppliers are confirmed to take part in Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles – Spring Edition. The fair will now take place at a slightly later date of 17 – 19 March. Together with the concurrent fairs Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, Yarn Expo, CHIC and PH Value, these five events will form the first major in-person gathering for the textile industry this year.

From bedding and towelling, rugs and table & kitchen linen to home textile technologies and textile designs, buyers will have a wide range of the latest collections to source from this month at Shanghai’s National Exhibition and Convention Center. International exhibitors such as Lenzing and Cotton Council International as well as leading domestic brands including Coolist, Luolai, Soluffy and Yunjie Textile are amongst those signed up to take part this year.

Exhibitor highlights

  • Lenzing Fibers: will showcase their flagship brand for textiles, TENCEL™. Used for a variety of highly specialised applications, TENCEL™ fibres are soft to the skin and excellent in thermal regulation and moisture absorption.
  • Cotton Council International (CCI) is a non-profit association that promotes US cotton fibre and cotton products throughout the world.
  • Zhangjiagang Coolist Life Technology: this Chinese company designs and produces a range of functional pillow collections including their Filmless Gel, Hydrophilic, Air, Flexible and Organic pillow series. Their unique Coolist design features patented technology, and is made from organic and environmental-friendly materials.
  • Anhui Million Feather: located in Anhui province’s Lu’an city, known in China as the ‘Kingdom of Geese’, the company produces a range of down and feather products and various bedding items.
  • Wujiang City Yunjie Textiles: specialising in wide-width fabrics including microfibre, satin and suede.
  • Yantai Zhonglian Industry: their main products include sheets, pillowcases, quilt covers, bed skirts, comforters, coverlets, pillows and more.
25.02.2021

GOTS certifications in 2020 reach five figures for the first time

In 2020, the number of GOTS certified facilities grew by 34% globally, to a new high of 10,388 from 7,765 in 2019. 16 GOTS Approved Certification Bodies report that over 3 million people in over 72 countries were working in GOTS certified facilities.

Significant increases are seen in all regions. Top 10 countries for certified facilities are India (2,994), Bangladesh (1,584), Turkey (1,107), China (961), Germany (684), Italy (585), Portugal (449), Pakistan (391), USA (167) and Sri Lanka (126).
GOTS approved chemical inputs now number 25,913, an increase of 13% in 2020. This confirms that these inputs are increasingly used as a risk management tool by wet processors to satisfy legal and commercial residue requirements.

“The exceptional increase in this unprecedented year shows that decision makers value GOTS as an important tool to drive sustainable transformation in a comprehensive way - from field to fashion. Using organic fibres and processing them under strict GOTS criteria definitely provides a credible and strong base for market players to be successful in the future” says GOTS Managing Director Claudia Kersten.

In 2020, the number of GOTS certified facilities grew by 34% globally, to a new high of 10,388 from 7,765 in 2019. 16 GOTS Approved Certification Bodies report that over 3 million people in over 72 countries were working in GOTS certified facilities.

Significant increases are seen in all regions. Top 10 countries for certified facilities are India (2,994), Bangladesh (1,584), Turkey (1,107), China (961), Germany (684), Italy (585), Portugal (449), Pakistan (391), USA (167) and Sri Lanka (126).
GOTS approved chemical inputs now number 25,913, an increase of 13% in 2020. This confirms that these inputs are increasingly used as a risk management tool by wet processors to satisfy legal and commercial residue requirements.

“The exceptional increase in this unprecedented year shows that decision makers value GOTS as an important tool to drive sustainable transformation in a comprehensive way - from field to fashion. Using organic fibres and processing them under strict GOTS criteria definitely provides a credible and strong base for market players to be successful in the future” says GOTS Managing Director Claudia Kersten.

GOTS version 6.0, to be implemented from 1 March 2021, includes stricter social and environmental criteria. Certified Entities will now have to calculate the gap between wages paid to 'Living Wages'  and will be encouraged to work towards closing this gap. Specific references to OECD Due Diligence Guidance and Good Practice Guidance for Social Criteria and Risk Assessment as well as Ethical Business Practises have been explicitly included.

Source:

Global Standard

24h Collection by TINTEX: a journey into contemporary real people daily life © 2021 classecohub
SS 2022 24H Collection by TINTEX Textiles, dress by Maria Gambina
23.02.2021

24h Collection by TINTEX: a journey into contemporary real people daily life

  • Every moment of our day is important: TINTEX knows it and for SS 2022 is proposing solutions to enhance our wellbeing, fitting all our possible and different needs 24 hours a day.

From sunrise to sunset

Last season TINTEX “RAW” collection has successfully explored the modern human being dimensions with no more genders and races, and today the new SS 2022 collection confirms the Naturally Advanced Evolution vision built on a strong environment-driven approach and cutting-edge technology able to offer contemporary consumer a brand new smart and performing choice.

  • Every moment of our day is important: TINTEX knows it and for SS 2022 is proposing solutions to enhance our wellbeing, fitting all our possible and different needs 24 hours a day.

From sunrise to sunset

Last season TINTEX “RAW” collection has successfully explored the modern human being dimensions with no more genders and races, and today the new SS 2022 collection confirms the Naturally Advanced Evolution vision built on a strong environment-driven approach and cutting-edge technology able to offer contemporary consumer a brand new smart and performing choice.

How? The SS2022 TINTEX 24h collection is offering solutions that can fit the different moments of our daily lives to rediscover ourselves in the outside world, leaving behind the social isolation that we all experienced in 2020. Freedom, comfort, flexibility and movement are the concepts the company explores looking not only to fashion moments, but to all the occasions of life where the most comfortable yet performing and responsible materials - from recycled synthetics to organic cotton - are the “right value choice”.
 
From there, the concept of giving life to 10 fabrics that truly embody our daily lifestyle: comfort, versatility, wellbeing.

Colours. A journey through warm and vivid colors - from reddish apples to sunny oranges with notes of starry blues - encourages wellbeing, feeling of relief, freedom and happiness because we feel that "we are alive again” when we go outside, doing everything we have always done, but that we were forced to put on pause. “RADIANT YELLOW it’s TINTEX color of the season, with its inherent positivity and strength. An energetic color that calls for a natural freedom to explore the world; a warm sensation of summer that feels like home” declares Ana Eusebio, designer at TINTEX Textiles.
 
All the collection focuses on the interlock structure, able to “concretely” deliver the value of versatility  and  fulfil performances needs of different moments of life. The idea is to create a collection that explores only one structure taking it to the limit, recreating, re-inventing and re-exploring its possibilities in order to meet the value of duality. Yes, in a single knit TINTEX challenged the way interlock is usually constructed by exploring each side of the articles and combining texturized with plain surfaces as well as light and heavy weights. Interlock offers natural stretch performances and exceptional dimensional stability.

Moreover, an important eye on responsible performances improvement to meet contemporary challenges and make us feel comfortable and safe! Always thanks to TINTEX DNA that is showing once more its consistent and evolved skills in making smart fabrics combined with unique eco-high-tech finishings.
 
Materials & finishings. A soft performances journey where it’s all about our dynamic daily lives. Through light and heavier fabrics, we find a well thought blend of innovative and responsible fibres. Strong focus is given to exceptional “transformation” technologies such as Newlife™, Q-Nova®, and ROICA™ EF by Asahi Kasei. While Organic cotton, TENCEL™ Lyocell fibers and TENCEL™ Lyocell fibers with Micro technology offer a unique natural and precious touch.

Fresh fibres and finishings that enhance freshness and comfort. Polygiene® STAY FRESH and Polygiene® Odor Crunch for active odor control performances, Hydroperm® by Archroma technical hydrophilic finishing for a fast dry, comfortable surface and a fresh look. Absolute novelty of the season is the TASTEX®COOL-EX by TANATEX, a skin-care treatment agent based on micelles, which gives a special cool sensation using dynamic temperature control.
 
Lastly, TINTEX addresses the accessories and outerwear markets with a “look-like leather” created with a water-based coating technology that incorporates pine shell.

Wardrobe solutions. 10 versatile articles that can perfectly fit the different areas of our daily wardrobe: from casual to formal wear, from athleisure to sports, from loungewear to underwear.  10 innovations that have become a  REAL  24th hours smart wardrobe   thanks to the unique design interpretation of these fabrics  by  5 contemporary and innovative Portuguese  designers such as : Rita Sá, David Catalán, Maria Gambina, Maria Meira and Behén.

Unique pieces designed and created by them   to show once more the beauty, the versatility, the smart performances of TINTEX collection that has been able to transform itself into a naturally advanced valuable wardrobe where fabrics have concretely come to life to make our everyday life smart in each moment! You can have a real look at this wardrobe that fully represent the values behind the collection, smartly interpreted by the Portuguese designers at this video  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppPHPK0Zyu8 .

Thinking about what is happening around us as planet and individuals in an era of unpredictable challenges, we need to be creative constantly reinventing ourselves, aware of a new society and way of consuming where environment and human needs count.  And TINTEX, that has over-time established itself as a global leader in smart innovation, decided to focus exactly on that. The company DNA and vision of Naturally Advanced Evolution is centered on this new way of life that must adapt, but NEVER - now more than ever - compromises neither nature nor new generation’s performance.

14.01.2021

Hologenix and Kelheim Fibres launch Celliant Viscose

Hologenix, creators of Celliant®, infrared responsive technology, and Kelheim Fibres, a world-leading manufacturer of viscose specialty fibers, have partnered to launch Celliant Viscose at ISPO Munich 2021. Celliant Viscose is a finalist in Best Products by ISPO and will be showcased in the Fibers & Insulations Category for ISPO Textrends, where realistic views and 3-D simulations will be available for each material.

The introduction of nature-based Celliant Viscose will be the first in-fiber infrared sustainable solution on the market and meets a consumer demand for more environmentally friendly textiles. An alternative to synthetic fibers and extremely versatile, Celliant Viscose blends beautifully with cotton, micromodal, lyocell, wool varieties including cashmere. It also has many applications across industries as it is ideal for performance wear, luxury loungewear, casual wear and bedding.

Hologenix, creators of Celliant®, infrared responsive technology, and Kelheim Fibres, a world-leading manufacturer of viscose specialty fibers, have partnered to launch Celliant Viscose at ISPO Munich 2021. Celliant Viscose is a finalist in Best Products by ISPO and will be showcased in the Fibers & Insulations Category for ISPO Textrends, where realistic views and 3-D simulations will be available for each material.

The introduction of nature-based Celliant Viscose will be the first in-fiber infrared sustainable solution on the market and meets a consumer demand for more environmentally friendly textiles. An alternative to synthetic fibers and extremely versatile, Celliant Viscose blends beautifully with cotton, micromodal, lyocell, wool varieties including cashmere. It also has many applications across industries as it is ideal for performance wear, luxury loungewear, casual wear and bedding.

Celliant Viscose features natural, ethically sourced minerals embedded into plant-based fibers to create infrared products that capture and convert body heat into infrared, increasing local circulation and improved cellular oxygenation. This results in stronger performance, faster recovery and better sleep.

Celliant Viscose provides all the benefits of being a viscose fiber — lightweight, soft, highly breathable, excellent moisture management — as well as fiber enhancements from Celliant infrared technology. Celliant’s proprietary blend of natural minerals allows textiles to capture and convert body heat into full-spectrum infrared energy, resulting in stronger performance, faster recovery and better sleep. In addition, Celliant is durable and will not wash out, lasting the useful life of the product it powers.

An Affordable, Long-lasting Solution with Diverse Applications
As opposed to other IR viscose products which are coatings based, Celliant Viscose’s in-fiber solution increases wearability and longevity with a soft feel, durability from washing and longer life. The combination of Kelheim’s distinctive technology and the Celliant additives creates this unique fiber that provides full functionality without the need for any additional processing step — a new standard in the field of sustainable IR viscose fibers. This single processing also makes Celliant Viscose more cost-effective and time-efficient than coatings.

In addition, Kelheim’s flexible technology allows targeted interventions in the viscose fiber process. By modifying the fiber’s dimensions or cross sections or by incorporating additives into the fiber matrix, Kelheim can precisely define the fiber’s properties according to the specific needs of the end product.

Highly Sustainable
Celliant Viscose is a plant and mineral-based solution for brands seeking an alternative to synthetic fibers. It contains natural raw materials that are from the earth and can return safely to the earth.

Nature-based Celliant Viscose is certified by FSC® or PEFC™, which guarantees the origin in sustainably managed plantations, and is part of the CanopyStyle initiative to protect ancient and endangered forests. The production of Celliant Viscose takes place exclusively at the Kelheim facilities in Germany, complying with the country’s strict environmental laws and guaranteeing an overall eco-friendly product.

Backed by Science
Celliant is rigorously tested by a Science Advisory Board composed of experts in the fields of physics, biology, chemistry and medicine. The Science Advisory Board has overseen 10 clinical, technical and physical trials, and seven published studies that demonstrate Celliant’s effectiveness and the benefits of infrared energy.

For more information, visit www.celliant.com/celliant-viscose/

Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH