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19.09.2022

ISKO opens CREATIVE ROOM GERMANY

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

By utilising ISKO’s patented recycling technology, they are now able to develop brand new garments by using fibres from post-consumer denim, finally closing the loop and giving a new and cutting-edge circular supply solution for their customers. As well as a hub for its customers, Creative Room Germany will also act as a platform for the wider denim community to share knowledge, create new and innovative ideas and to bring them to life.

“Building on from the success of our London facility, our goal will be to offer tailor made garment supply solutions for customers in the DACH, Benelux and Nordic markets and this facility will be the focal point of that offering. With a collaborative approach, we will fulfil our vision of bringing a new circular supply solution to the market.”
Pau Bruguera, Executive Director @ ISKO

More information:
Isko denim finishing Creative Room
Source:

ISKO

08.09.2022

Kelheim Fibres at the Global Fiber Congress 2022 in Dornbirn

Shorter product life cycles and rapid technological progress are changing the product landscape at an ever-faster pace. The ability to anticipate future changes and to proactively shape the change is therefore an increasingly decisive competitive factor for modern companies. Trends are considered to be important indicators of impending

Kelheim Fibres, a leading manufacturer of viscose speciality fibres, stands out in the industry not least for its innovative strength, as evidenced by numerous awards such as the Techtextil Innovation Award 2022 in the “New Concept” category. At this year’s Global Fiber Congress Dornbirn, Innovation Manager Ilka Kaczmarek will give an insight into the innovation management of the Bavarian fibre experts in her presentation “Trend Management meets Open Innovation: Best Practice Examples from Kelheim”. Ilka Kaczmarek will show how successful product solutions were developed in a short time by focusing on customer needs and working closely with partners along the value chain.

Shorter product life cycles and rapid technological progress are changing the product landscape at an ever-faster pace. The ability to anticipate future changes and to proactively shape the change is therefore an increasingly decisive competitive factor for modern companies. Trends are considered to be important indicators of impending

Kelheim Fibres, a leading manufacturer of viscose speciality fibres, stands out in the industry not least for its innovative strength, as evidenced by numerous awards such as the Techtextil Innovation Award 2022 in the “New Concept” category. At this year’s Global Fiber Congress Dornbirn, Innovation Manager Ilka Kaczmarek will give an insight into the innovation management of the Bavarian fibre experts in her presentation “Trend Management meets Open Innovation: Best Practice Examples from Kelheim”. Ilka Kaczmarek will show how successful product solutions were developed in a short time by focusing on customer needs and working closely with partners along the value chain.

Natalie Wunder, Project Manager at Kelheim Fibres, will explain one of these examples in detail in her presentation “Development of Menstruation Pants using Speciality Viscose Fibres”. Based on the current trend and the desire of end customers for reusable products, Kelheim Fibres was able to develop a washable and thus reusable, yet bio-based solution for feminine hygiene products.

Source:

Kelheim Fibres

(c) PURE LOOP
07.09.2022

PURE LOOP: High-strength synthetic nonwoven made with a recycled content of 10 percent

Geosynthetics have become an indispensable part of the construction industry. PP nonwovens, for example - mechanically bonded continuous fibres made from specially UV-stabilised polypropylenes - are often used in blanket form as barriers, screens and filters, and their strength extends the service life of construction projects. Whether for road construction, or as barrier on glaciers or against weeds - there are myriad applications.

TenCate Geosynthetics uses the PURE LOOP ISEC evo technology to recycle this type of PP nonwoven. The European company, with locations in Austria, France and the Netherlands, is specialised in the development and production of geotextiles for modern civil engineering applications. The edge trimmings and production rejects generated during manufacturing used to be recycled at the Linz site, but not fed back into the company's own production process.

Geosynthetics have become an indispensable part of the construction industry. PP nonwovens, for example - mechanically bonded continuous fibres made from specially UV-stabilised polypropylenes - are often used in blanket form as barriers, screens and filters, and their strength extends the service life of construction projects. Whether for road construction, or as barrier on glaciers or against weeds - there are myriad applications.

TenCate Geosynthetics uses the PURE LOOP ISEC evo technology to recycle this type of PP nonwoven. The European company, with locations in Austria, France and the Netherlands, is specialised in the development and production of geotextiles for modern civil engineering applications. The edge trimmings and production rejects generated during manufacturing used to be recycled at the Linz site, but not fed back into the company's own production process.

"The demands on us were high," recalls Patrick Wiesinger, project manager at PURE LOOP. "The PP nonwoven is highly tear resistant, which means its a very challenging recycling process. Our ISEC evo machine conserves the quality of the production waste really well during recycling, so we were able to achieve the specified increase in quality for the recyclates."

Another advantage of PURE LOOP technology is the wide range of shapes in which the production scrap can be delivered for processing. "Our ifeed technology with double feed ram system and singleshaft shredder offers the ideal conditions for direct processing of these large rolls - and without the need for prior preparation of the input material by employees before the material is fed into the recycling process", emphasizes Patrick Wiesinger. With the ISEC evo recycling machine TenCate can now manufacture its high-strength PP nonwoven product with a recyclate content of up to 10 percent.

Source:

PURE LOOP, EREMA Group GmbH

02.09.2022

RGE: Closed-loop urban-fit textile-to-textile recycling solutions in Singapore

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings.

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings. The research centre will develop new technologies to recycle textile waste into fibre and create new, next-generation eco-friendly and sustainable textiles.

This move comes on the back of the tightening of waste import bans in countries such as China, India and Indonesia, which are among the world’s largest waste processors. The stricter import bans have left cities in need of viable local textile recycling solutions to tackle the immense textile waste generated.

RGE Executive Director, Mr Perry Lim, said, “Current textile recycling technologies, which rely primarily on a bleaching and separation process using heavy chemicals, cannot be implemented due to environmental laws. At the same time, there is an urgent need to keep textiles out of the brimming landfills.” He added, “As the world’s largest viscose producer, we aim to catalyse closed-loop, textile-to-textile recycling by developing optimal urban-fit solutions that can bring the world closer to a circular textile economy.”

Globally, an estimated 90 million tonnes of textile waste is generated and disposed of every year, with less than 1% being upcycled into new clothing or other textile materials. By 2030, the amount of global textile waste, which currently accounts for almost 10% of municipal solid waste, is expected to reach more than 134 million tonnes. The textile industry is also responsible for 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than international flights and maritime shipping combined.

At present, most of the available textile recycling technologies are open-loop, where textile waste is typically downcycled to lower-quality products (insulating materials, cleaning cloths, etc.) or be used in waste-to-heat recycling.

“Closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling processes, particularly chemical recycling, are still under development. Scaling up the technologies to industrial scale remains a challenge. A key bottleneck is that refabricating textile waste into fibre needs purity standards for feedstock. However, most of the clothes that we wear are made of a mixture of different synthetic and natural fibres, which makes separating the complex blends of materials challenging for effective recycling.

“Our aim is to address this industry pain point by developing viable solutions that use less energy, fewer chemicals and produces harmless and less effluents, and then potentially scale up across our global operations,” Mr Lim said.

To tackle the key challenges in closed-loop textile recycling, RGE-NTU SusTex is looking into four key research areas, namely cleaner and more energy efficient methods of recycling into new raw materials, automated sorting of textile waste, eco-friendly dye removal, and development of a new class of sustainable textiles that is durable for wear and, at the same time, lends itself to easier recycling.

Technologies developed by RGE-NTU SusTex will be test bedded at RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant in Singapore, which is projected for completion as early as 2024. If successful, RGE has plans to replicate the plant in other urban cities within its footprint.

 

Source:

Royal Golden Eagle

Beaulieu International Group
23.08.2022

BIG at EuroGeo7 with geotextile fibres & woven fabrics

Beaulieu International Group invites EuroGeo7 attendees to discover geotextile solutions promoting greater sustainability for future civil engineering projects. Specialists from Beaulieu Fibres International (BFI) and Beaulieu Technical Textiles (BTT) will present high-performance geosynthetics through high tenacity fibres for lightweight, nonwoven geotextiles, and a range of high durability woven geotextile solutions with an environmentally beneficial impact.

Beaulieu International Group invites EuroGeo7 attendees to discover geotextile solutions promoting greater sustainability for future civil engineering projects. Specialists from Beaulieu Fibres International (BFI) and Beaulieu Technical Textiles (BTT) will present high-performance geosynthetics through high tenacity fibres for lightweight, nonwoven geotextiles, and a range of high durability woven geotextile solutions with an environmentally beneficial impact.

“We are delighted to sponsor EuroGeo7 and to be finally on-site, following a two-year postponement of the event. EuroGeo7 is bringing the geotextile community together to further promote and develop geosynthetics in a fast changing global economy striving for growth while reducing its carbon footprint along the supply chain, " comment from Jefrem Jennard, Sales Director Fibres, and Roy Kerckhove, Sales Director Technical Textiles. “Geotextiles provide highly versatile, durable and natural resource-saving alternatives in large infrastructure works, and offer durable protection in erosion control and waste/water management projects. We are continuously developing our fibres and finished engineering textiles with proven sustainability-enhancing benefits to progress product development and customer sustainability goals on fossil carbon reduction, while taking concrete steps to reduce our own environmental footprint.”
 
Sustainability improvement is key to the long-term strategy of Beaulieu International Group, and it is committed to supporting the geotextile industry by targeting and accelerating change and communicating the sustainable performance of its products. The UN Sustainable Development Goals are integrated into its business and are the foundations of the new Route 2030 Sustainability Roadmap.


For manufacturers of nonwoven geotextiles, BFI’s high-tenacity HT8 staple fibres enable customers to achieve nonwovens with high mechanical performance at reduced fibre weight. The HT8 high tenacity fibres are designed in a way that customers can meet the industry durability standards for a longer service lifetime, supporting more sustainable design and resource reduction over time. BTT’s woven geotextiles are amongst the most sustainable in the industry and provide a wide range of functions, including separation, filtration, reinforcement and erosion control.

BFI and BTT have conducted lifecycle assessments to calculate their activities' carbon footprint and solutions and have received external recognition for their ongoing sustainability efforts. For example, in 2022, BFI was awarded a Silver EcoVadis sustainability rating, and BFI and BTT are proud recipients of the Voka Charter for Sustainable Entrepreneurship 2022.

Source:

Beaulieu International Group

Fashion Revolution
19.08.2022

Results of the FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2022

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

  • As new and proposed legislation focuses on greenwashing claims, almost half of major brands (45%) publish targets on sustainable materials yet only 37% provide information on what constitutes a sustainable material.
  • Only 24% of major brands disclose how they minimise the impacts of microfibres despite textiles being the largest source of microplastics in the ocean.
  • The vast majority of major brands and retailers (94%) do not disclose the number of workers in their supply chains who are paying recruitment fees. This paints an unclear picture of the risks of forced labour as workers may be getting into crippling debt to accept jobs paying poverty wages.
  • While many brands use their channels to talk about social justice, they need to go beyond lip service. Just 8% of brands publish their actions on racial and ethnic equality in their supply chains.

Despite these results, Fashion Revolution is encouraged by increasing supply chain transparency among many major brands, primarily with first-tier manufacturers where the final stage of production occurs, e.g. cutting, sewing, finishing and packing. Nine brands have disclosed their first-tier manufacturers for the first time this year. It is encouraging to see significant progress across market segments including luxury, sportswear, footwear and accessories and across different geographies.

Fashion Revolution’s co-founder and Global Operations Director Carry Somers says: “In 2016, only 5 out of 40 major brands (12.5%) disclosed their suppliers. Seven years later, 121 out of 250 major brands (48%) disclose their suppliers. This clearly demonstrates how the Index incentivises transparency but it also shows that brands really are listening to the millions of people around the world who keep asking them #WhoMadeMyClothes? Our power is in our persistence.”

More key findings from the Fashion Transparency Index 2022:

Progress on transparency in the global fashion industry is still too slow among 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers, with brands achieving an overall average score of just 24%, up 1% from last year
For another year, the initiative has seen major brands and retailers publicly disclose the most information about their policies, commitments and processes on human rights and environmental topics and significantly less about the results, outcomes and impacts of their efforts.

Most (85%) major brands still do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of overproduction and clothing waste
Thousands of tonnes of clothing waste are found globally. However, brands have disclosed more information about the circular solutions they are developing (28%) than on the actual volumes of pre- (10%) and post-production waste they produce (8%). Brands have sat by as waste importing countries foot the bill, resulting in serious human rights and environmental implications.

Just 11% of brands publish a responsible purchasing code of conduct indicating that most are still reluctant to disclose how their purchasing practices could be affecting suppliers and workers
Greater transparency on how brands interact with their suppliers ought to be a first step towards eliminating harmful practices and promoting fair purchasing practices. The poor performance on transparency in this vital area is a missed opportunity for brands to demonstrate they are serious about addressing the root causes of harmful working conditions, including the instances where they themselves are the key driver.

Despite the urgency of the climate crisis, less than a third of major brands disclose a decarbonisation target covering their entire supply chain which is verified by the Science-Based Targets Initiative
Many brands and retailers rely heavily on garment producing countries that are vulnerable to the impacts of the climate crisis, yet our research shows that only 29% of major brands and retailers publish a decarbonisation target covering their operations and supply chain which is verified by the Science Based Targets Initiative.

Only 11% of brands publish their supplier wastewater test results, despite the textile industry being a leading contributor to water pollution
The fashion industry is a major contributor to water pollution and one of the most water intensive industries on the planet. Only 11% of major brands publish their wastewater test result, and only 25% of brands disclose the process of conducting water-related risk assessments in their supply chain. Transparency on wastewater test results is key to ensuring that brands are held accountable for their potentially devastating impacts on local biodiversity, garment workers and their communities.

Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage nor do they disclose if they isolate labour costs
Insufficient progress is being made by most brands towards ensuring that the workers in their supply chain are paid enough to cover their basic needs and put aside some discretionary income. Just 27% of brands disclose their approach to achieving living wages for supply chain workers and 96% do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage. In response, we have joined forces with allies across civil society to launch Good Clothes, Fair Pay. The campaign demands groundbreaking living wage legislation across the garment, textile and footwear sector.

 

Source:

Fashion Revolution

02.08.2022

DNFI Award 2022 open for applications – Deadline 9 Sept

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.
More information:
DNFI DNFI award
Source:

DNFI

Photo: FET
02.08.2022

FET at Techtextil 2022: Principle theme was Sustainability

The company’s principle theme at Techtextil was Sustainability, since FET extrusion systems are ideally suited for both process and end-product development of sustainable materials. These systems are designed to be material efficient, can be bespoke designed and offer both flexibility and a high level of processing capability. They are supplied as self-contained units for ease of installation in a laboratory or small scale process evaluation environment.

FET’s enhanced Fibre Development Centre enables clients to develop and trial their own sustainable fibres and FET has now successfully processed almost 30 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats

The innovative stand at Techtextil was specifically designed to highlight FET’s total commitment to all aspects of sustainability. It utilised as many sustainable components as possible and met with much comment and approval from visitors.

The company’s principle theme at Techtextil was Sustainability, since FET extrusion systems are ideally suited for both process and end-product development of sustainable materials. These systems are designed to be material efficient, can be bespoke designed and offer both flexibility and a high level of processing capability. They are supplied as self-contained units for ease of installation in a laboratory or small scale process evaluation environment.

FET’s enhanced Fibre Development Centre enables clients to develop and trial their own sustainable fibres and FET has now successfully processed almost 30 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats

The innovative stand at Techtextil was specifically designed to highlight FET’s total commitment to all aspects of sustainability. It utilised as many sustainable components as possible and met with much comment and approval from visitors.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England enjoyed another successful Techtextil in Frankfurt, with high quality enquiries from technical companies and organisations worldwide, but in particular from customers based in Europe.

Source:

DAVID STEAD PROJECT MARKETING LTD for FET

(c) adidas AG
15.07.2022

adidas launches its first product in collaboration with Spinnova

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

Made in part with Spinnova technology , a minimum of 30% of the fabric in the adidas TERREX HS1 comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* that are made by grinding wood pulp with water into a paste and then spun into a textile fibre.

The product also works with the material’s natural color. Since no dyeing or bleaching is applied, in turn this uses less water compared to the standard dyeing process.

* (Rayon) in US, (New type of cellulose fibre) in China

More information:
adidas Spinnova Fibers fibres Recycling
Source:

adidas AG

© Natalie Wunder
From left: Patrick Engel (STFI), Caspar Böhme (Sumo), Ilka Kaczmarek (KF), Dr. Marina Crnoja-Cosic (KF)
22.06.2022

Kelheim Fibres wins Techtextil Innovation Award

The viscose specialities manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has won the Techtextil Award in the "New Concept" category for their project "Cellulose-based nonwovens for highly absorbent reusable products".
This award is intended to make cutting-edge developments visible, promote unconventional thinking and intensify the dialogue between researchers, manufacturers.

The starting point for the innovation was the search for a washable and thus reusable absorbent pad made of completely bio-based materials for the cloth diaper of the Berlin-based start-up Sumo.
Two main requirements of the application are obvious: A fast and efficient liquid distribution and high absorbency should minimise rewetting and leakage. Both are ensured by speciality viscose fibres from Kelheim, which have been making this essential contribution to absorbent hygiene products such as tampons for many years. The obvious solution was therefore to optimally utilise the synergies between knitted and woven structures with nonwovens.

The viscose specialities manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has won the Techtextil Award in the "New Concept" category for their project "Cellulose-based nonwovens for highly absorbent reusable products".
This award is intended to make cutting-edge developments visible, promote unconventional thinking and intensify the dialogue between researchers, manufacturers.

The starting point for the innovation was the search for a washable and thus reusable absorbent pad made of completely bio-based materials for the cloth diaper of the Berlin-based start-up Sumo.
Two main requirements of the application are obvious: A fast and efficient liquid distribution and high absorbency should minimise rewetting and leakage. Both are ensured by speciality viscose fibres from Kelheim, which have been making this essential contribution to absorbent hygiene products such as tampons for many years. The obvious solution was therefore to optimally utilise the synergies between knitted and woven structures with nonwovens.

In doing so, the advantages of nonwovens in combination with speciality viscose fibres in terms of absorbency (through e.g. more open-pored structures) have been perfectly transferred from the field of disposable to the world of reusable products. For reusable products, however, there is another challenge to overcome: they must remain stable during washing and over several cycles of use. To ensure this, an innovative nonwoven construction was developed in close cooperation with the STFI. These nonwovens can be used as a stand-alone solution or integrated into a textile structure.

Source:

Kelheim Fibres

20.06.2022

Beaulieu Fibres International at Techtextil 22

  • Bio circular Fibre - Shaping Sustainable Living

The European staple fibre producer Beaulieu Fibres International turns the spotlight on future-focused solutions for nonwovens & engineered fabrics at Techtextil 22. A key priority is innovation in polyolefin fibres and bicomponent polyester/polyolefin fibres, to advance sustainable design, end-of-life recyclability, and resource and carbon footprint reduction for industrial and hygiene applications.

The new sustainability roadmap - Route 2030 outlines how the company is targeting the reduction of our environmental footprint to zero, taking care of people and doing business in a transparent, ethical way. Sustainability is key to Beaulieu Fibre International’s long-term strategy, and the company is heavily focused on defining its green portfolio to support evolution in diverse market applications and to work towards a circular economy with the whole supply chain.

  • Bio circular Fibre - Shaping Sustainable Living

The European staple fibre producer Beaulieu Fibres International turns the spotlight on future-focused solutions for nonwovens & engineered fabrics at Techtextil 22. A key priority is innovation in polyolefin fibres and bicomponent polyester/polyolefin fibres, to advance sustainable design, end-of-life recyclability, and resource and carbon footprint reduction for industrial and hygiene applications.

The new sustainability roadmap - Route 2030 outlines how the company is targeting the reduction of our environmental footprint to zero, taking care of people and doing business in a transparent, ethical way. Sustainability is key to Beaulieu Fibre International’s long-term strategy, and the company is heavily focused on defining its green portfolio to support evolution in diverse market applications and to work towards a circular economy with the whole supply chain.

Beaulieu Fibres International will offer ISCC Plus (International Sustainability and Carbon Certification Plus) certified bio circular MONO-PP and BICO PP/PE fibres in 1,3-8,9 dtex, available with all the main available finish classes. These drop-in solutions, with no loss in quality, will support customers reduce reliance on virgin fossil carbon in their nonwoven and engineered fibre applications, contributing to the transition towards a circular economy.

Source:

Beaulieu Fibres International

(c) DiloGroup
13.05.2022

DiloGroup at Techtextil with nonwovens technology

The DiloGroup informs at Techtextil in Frankfurt (June 21 – 24, 2022) about new developments aimed at improving production technologies with a focus on needlefelts.

It becomes more evident that the textile industry comes into the focus of regulatory authorities who push respecting sustainability principles and who initiate a new body of laws. Hence all industrial sectors are requested to achieve savings in material and energy. The textile machine building, of course, plays an important role by seizing this initiative and offering solutions for fibre pulp recycling and reduction of energy, water and ancillaries. DiloGroup has made big efforts to meet these challenges together with a circle of partner companies. In this regard focal points of the development work are:

The DiloGroup informs at Techtextil in Frankfurt (June 21 – 24, 2022) about new developments aimed at improving production technologies with a focus on needlefelts.

It becomes more evident that the textile industry comes into the focus of regulatory authorities who push respecting sustainability principles and who initiate a new body of laws. Hence all industrial sectors are requested to achieve savings in material and energy. The textile machine building, of course, plays an important role by seizing this initiative and offering solutions for fibre pulp recycling and reduction of energy, water and ancillaries. DiloGroup has made big efforts to meet these challenges together with a circle of partner companies. In this regard focal points of the development work are:

  1. Intense Needling
    Needling per se is a mechanical production method with a high energy efficiency. For this reason, the development efforts of DiloGroup aim at producing nonwovens by “intense needling” instead of water entangling, even for light nonwovens made of fine fibres for the medical and hygiene sector with an area weight of 30 – 100 g/m². This would result in a reduction of the environmentally relevant production costs; per annum to about 1/3 to 1/5 of current.
    Despite the prospective advantages of the mechanical intense needling method over the hydrodynamical, water entanglement is at the moment the most important production method for low area weights and highest production capacity and is also offered by the DiloGroup as general contractor in cooperation with partner companies.
  2. “Fibre Pulp Recycling”
    Fibrous material in nonwovens and particularly used clothes can be successfully recycled, if staple length can be conserved in the tearing process. In the classical tearing process, staple lengths are dramatically reduced and therefore these fibres can only be used as base material for inferior uses in thermal or acoustic insulation or in protective textiles, transportation or protective covers etc.
    When recycling textile waste in the context of the collection of used clothes, the so called “filament-saving” tearing using special tearing machines and methods must be used to produce fibres with longer staple lengths which can be fed to a nonwoven installation. Hence product characteristics can be better specified and controlled.
  3. Additive nonwoven production
    The additive production method of the “3D-Lofter” is especially suited for automotive parts with differently distributed masses; but there may also be potential for increasing uses in the sector of apparel and shoe production.
  4. “IsoFeed”-card feeding
    In the field of card feeding, the “IsoFeed” method offers great potential for a more homogeneous card feeding at the same time reducing the variation in cross-machine fibre mass distribution and thus the fibre consumption while conserving the end product quality.
Source:

DiloGroup

Photo: Ralph Koch für Gebr. Otto
13.05.2022

Gebr. Otto with a specialised portfolio at Techtextil 2022

Gebr. Otto is exhibiting at this year’s Techtextil from 21 to 24 June in Frankfurt. The Dietenheim-based textile company manufactures a selected range of functional high-tech yarns made, for example, of conductive, high-strength and flame-retardant fibres. Gebr. Otto’s aim at the trade fair is to make personal contacts and to expand regional technology chains. The textile solution provider is to be found, as in past years, at the BW-I joint stand in Hall 12.1 at Booth No. C80.

Gebr. Otto is exhibiting at this year’s Techtextil from 21 to 24 June in Frankfurt. The Dietenheim-based textile company manufactures a selected range of functional high-tech yarns made, for example, of conductive, high-strength and flame-retardant fibres. Gebr. Otto’s aim at the trade fair is to make personal contacts and to expand regional technology chains. The textile solution provider is to be found, as in past years, at the BW-I joint stand in Hall 12.1 at Booth No. C80.

Growing demand for technical yarns
“In the industry Gebr. Otto is mostly known for its cotton yarns and twines,” says Robin Hefter, who is in charge of technical textiles at Gebr. Otto. Cotton is the fibre that is mainly spun in the company’s spinning mill. It has been Gebr. Otto’s main line of business for over 100 years. The technical yarns that have been in the company’s product range for a good five years are, by contrast, still relative newcomers. They account for around 10 per cent of the company’s output, their share of which is on the increase. “Technical textiles have proved to be a growth sector in recent years,” Hefter explains, “and due to current political events demand for them has increased even further.”

Portfolio with a protective character
That is a reference to personal protective equipment – clothing and gloves. Gebr. Otto’s highperformance functional yarns, many of which are based on high-tech fibres, are specially designed for use in this area. In addition to flame-retardant yarns made of meta-aramid Gebr. Otto processes antistatic or conductive fibres.

As a rule many chemical fibres are easily electrically chargeable without being able to discharge by themselves due to their low moisture absorption. That is why undesired discharges occur,
maybe even the next time you shake hands. In some situations, they can be life-threatening. “Imagine the team at a pit stop in a Formula 1 race,” Robin Hefter says. “refuelling a racing car
under pressure of time. There must not be a single spark, no matter how small.” That is why Gebr. Otto adds antistatic fibres to its technical yarns. They prevent electrostatic charging and
offer safety not only to pit stop teams but also to filling station attendants. If electric conductivity is required, conductive fibres are added. And high-strength fibres are used if high or ultra-high tensile strength is required.

Colour fastness rather than safety is required when it comes to spun-dyed yarns. The fibres take up the pigments more homogeneously than if they are dyed as yarn. They are much more colourfast and fade markedly less in sunlight because the pigment particles are better enclosed in the fibre.

Source:

Gebr. Otto Baumwollfeinzwirnerei GmbH + Co. KG

JEC World: METYX and ITA officially join forces (c) METYX
METYX and ITA officially join forces
11.05.2022

JEC World: METYX and ITA officially join forces

The ITA Group, consisting of the Institute for Textile Technology of RWTH Aachen University (ITA) and their research and development service provider ITA Technologietransfer GmbH (ITA GmbH) are proud to announce their new partnership with METYX Composites, Turkey today at JEC World in Paris. METYX is a globally leading manufacturer of high-performance technical textiles for applications in the transportation, wind energy, construction, sports and leisure industries.

Ugur Ustunel, CEO METYX Composites: “The access to ITA´s competences along the entire textile composite value chain and to the impressive machine parks with over 250 machines from lab scale to industrial scale and the exchange with other partners will be very welcome for our future pre-competitive developments.” Dr. Christoph Greb, Scientific Director of ITA: “We are very happy to welcome METYX to our
network and to collaborate in many joint projects and studies on topics like recycling and sustainability, tapes and hybrid yarns or natural fibres just to name a few.”

The ITA Group, consisting of the Institute for Textile Technology of RWTH Aachen University (ITA) and their research and development service provider ITA Technologietransfer GmbH (ITA GmbH) are proud to announce their new partnership with METYX Composites, Turkey today at JEC World in Paris. METYX is a globally leading manufacturer of high-performance technical textiles for applications in the transportation, wind energy, construction, sports and leisure industries.

Ugur Ustunel, CEO METYX Composites: “The access to ITA´s competences along the entire textile composite value chain and to the impressive machine parks with over 250 machines from lab scale to industrial scale and the exchange with other partners will be very welcome for our future pre-competitive developments.” Dr. Christoph Greb, Scientific Director of ITA: “We are very happy to welcome METYX to our
network and to collaborate in many joint projects and studies on topics like recycling and sustainability, tapes and hybrid yarns or natural fibres just to name a few.”

Dr. Michael Effing, Managing Director of AMAC GmbH: „I am very happy to support ITA in developing and growing their network. ITA is located in the centre of the RWTH Aachen University Campus in close proximity to numerous other institutes for lightweight developments.”

(c) Hexcel Corporation
29.04.2022

Hexcel Composite Solutions for the Automotive, Marine, Wind Energy and Recreation Markets at JEC World 2022

Hexcel will present a wide range of high-performance composite innovations for the Automotive, Marine, Wind Energy and Recreation markets during JEC World 2022 in Paris on May 3 – 5.

Hexcel will present a wide range of high-performance composite innovations for the Automotive, Marine, Wind Energy and Recreation markets during JEC World 2022 in Paris on May 3 – 5.

G-Vent Technology for Marine Structures
Hexcel has developed a new technology for out-of-autoclave (OoA) processing that delivers a game-changing reduction in process time and cost for marine manufacturers without compromising mechanical performance. Hexcel has leveraged its experience in aerospace and wind energy to develop its new G-Vent technology for OoA processing of highly loaded, thick section marine structures such as masts, foils, and wind-assisted ship propulsion (WASP) components. A full range of Hexcel marine prepregs are now available with integrated G-Vent technology, reducing the requirement for debulking steps and ensuring extremely low porosity (<1%) regardless of the laminate thickness. Leading marine non-destructive testing specialists Q.I. Composites recently confirmed that the thick section G-Vent panels they had evaluated had void contents and laminate quality in line with state-of-the-art autoclaved prepreg components. Visitors to the Hexcel stand will see a unique 400mm carbon cube cured in a single stage using 695 layers of HexPly M79 carbon fiber UD600 prepreg with G-Vent technology.

New HexPly® Nature Range Sustainable Prepregs
HexPly® Nature Range prepregs feature proven resins such as HexPly M49, M78 and M79 with bio-derived epoxy resin content. Created for use in all industrial markets, HexPly Nature Range materials can be seamlessly integrated into existing production processes, maintaining consistent mechanical performance and processing properties. A dedicated sustainability corner of the Hexcel stand will detail Nature Range products optimized for automotive, marine, wind energy and winter sport applications. The display will include an alpine ski produced by leading manufacturer Tecnica Group Ski Excellence Center which produces skis for Blizzard and for Nordica using HexPly Nature M78.1 UD flax prepreg material. In addition to the reduced environmental impact of the sustainably grown reinforcement, the flax fiber laminates also improve impact resistance and vibration damping in the ski.

HexPly® XF Surface Technology for Improved Part Surface Finish Quality
HexPly XF is a lightweight, semi-preg material that replaces traditional in-mold gel coat. It eliminates time-consuming refinishing work typically required to obtain a paint-ready surface and produces lighter, more consistent parts with shorter cycle times and a cleaner working environment. Visitors to the stand will see a composite panel illustrating a high-quality painted surface enabled with XF technology in a diverse range of industrial applications such as super yacht roof parts, Class A surface automotive panels, and both prepreg and infused wind turbine blades.

HexPly® M49 Prepreg for Automotive Visual Carbon Parts
HexPly M49 is easy to process and is especially suitable for visual carbon fiber-look applications such as the Brabus hood scoop on display on the Hexcel stand at JEC.

HexPly® Prepregs and HiMax® Reinforcements for Performance Marine Structures
Using a scale model of a Gunboat 68 performance sailing catamaran, Hexcel will illustrate how its HexPly and HiMax materials provide manufacturers with a complete set of lightweight composite solutions for high-performance marine structures. HexPly prepreg was selected for critical structural parts of the Gunboat 68 and provides very high mechanical performance including high dry and wet Tg.

Heavyweight HiMax reinforcements offer high deposition rates and remain easy to handle after cutting, making them highly suitable for industrial applications. In combination with a lightweight PrimeTex® woven fabric, the package of carbon fiber HiMax materials developed for the Gunboat 68 enabled consistent resin flow during infusion with reduced surface print-through.

Hexcel Fibers and Reinforcements for Lightweight Sporting Equipment
Sporting equipment manufacturers rely on Hexcel composite materials to deliver the ultimate performance at the lowest possible weight. Hexcel will exhibit a number of the latest high-performance sporting equipment applications such as a Bauer hockey stick featuring PrimeTex 98 gsm AS4C 3K fabric and a Corima tri-spoke cycling wheel made with lightweight Hexcel carbon fiber UD tape. Hexcel will also demonstrate how its HexTow® carbon fibers are used in key leisure and marine applications by displaying an AEROrazr solid carbon rigging component manufactured by spar and rigging manufacturer Future Fibres for the 36th America’s Cup.

 

Source:

Hexcel Corporation / 100% Marketing

25.04.2022

Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) seeks public input for standard revision

The worldwide leading textile processing standard for organic fibres, Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), seeks public input as it begins the revision process for GOTS standard version 7.0.

As a solution for sustainability-related challenges in textile processing, GOTS sets strict and binding requirements regarding ecological and social parameters. These are updated every three years in an open and transparent revision process which fosters constant progress towards the development of better textile processing methods. In this process of continuous improvement, GOTS collaborates with all relevant international stakeholders, including the textile and apparel industry, chemical suppliers, organic farming and environmental organisations, workers' rights groups and labour unions, to ensure ongoing relevance and account for changes in the industry.

The initial period of public input runs from 14 April through 12 June. During this phase, all interested parties, including industry representatives, NGO’s and consumers, are encouraged to participate by submitting comments, feedback, and ideas through GOTS’s online portal.

The worldwide leading textile processing standard for organic fibres, Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), seeks public input as it begins the revision process for GOTS standard version 7.0.

As a solution for sustainability-related challenges in textile processing, GOTS sets strict and binding requirements regarding ecological and social parameters. These are updated every three years in an open and transparent revision process which fosters constant progress towards the development of better textile processing methods. In this process of continuous improvement, GOTS collaborates with all relevant international stakeholders, including the textile and apparel industry, chemical suppliers, organic farming and environmental organisations, workers' rights groups and labour unions, to ensure ongoing relevance and account for changes in the industry.

The initial period of public input runs from 14 April through 12 June. During this phase, all interested parties, including industry representatives, NGO’s and consumers, are encouraged to participate by submitting comments, feedback, and ideas through GOTS’s online portal.

“We are looking forward to receiving input from stakeholders around the world for GOTS version 7.0. This open call for feedback is part of what keeps our certification requirements up-to-date with the most cutting-edge developments in the industry,” says GOTS Managing Director Rahul Bhajekar.

Beginning in 2022, the revision process will follow the newly developed Standard Setting Procedure, which provides for the constitution of a Standard Revision Committee (SRC) for each revision. This group will serve as the pivotal force behind decisions about the revisions. The SRC consists of experts from different stakeholder groups, including associations, organisations, companies and individuals. All input received by June 12 will be carefully considered by the SRC as well as compiled and made public for an additional 30-day consultation period later this year. All drafts of the standard will also be made public. GOTS standard version 7.0 will be finalised in early 2023, and will be available on the GOTS website.

The timeline for the revision to GOTS version 7.0 is as follows:

  1. Constitution of GOTS SRC- April 2022
  2. Release of first revision draft for public consultation - 14 April 2022
  3. First public consultation period - 60 days (April 14 to June 12)
  4. Deliberations by the SRC on input received - May to August 2022
  5. Release of second revision draft for public consultation - September 2022
  6. Second public consultation period - 30 days from release
  7. Deliberations by the SRC on input received - October to November 2022
  8. Finalisation of GOTS version 7.0 - February 2023
  9. Release of GOTS version 7.0 - March 2023
More information:
GOTS revision stakeholder
Source:

GOTS

(c) Eton
22.04.2022

More localised and automated textile manufacturing with TMAS technologies

At the forthcoming Texprocess, Techtextil and Heimtextil shows taking place in Frankfurt from June 21-24 – members of the Swedish Textile Machinery Association TMAS will be showcasing a range of solutions aligning with the growing trend for more localised and automated textile manufacturing.

Digitalisation and the push for more sustainable, shorter and less expensive supply chains are currently making manufacturing in high-cost countries within Europe more attractive and there have been many other contributing factors to this over the past two years.

The Covid-19 pandemic exposed the vulnerability of many countries to shortages of essential items like PPE while at the same time making the full exploitation of new digital options essential during national lock-downs and long periods of restricted travel. The escalating cost of global transportation, as well as the growth of online retailing and the associated benefits of on-demand digital manufacturing, are further reinforcing the many benefits of short-run and near-shore new operations.

At the forthcoming Texprocess, Techtextil and Heimtextil shows taking place in Frankfurt from June 21-24 – members of the Swedish Textile Machinery Association TMAS will be showcasing a range of solutions aligning with the growing trend for more localised and automated textile manufacturing.

Digitalisation and the push for more sustainable, shorter and less expensive supply chains are currently making manufacturing in high-cost countries within Europe more attractive and there have been many other contributing factors to this over the past two years.

The Covid-19 pandemic exposed the vulnerability of many countries to shortages of essential items like PPE while at the same time making the full exploitation of new digital options essential during national lock-downs and long periods of restricted travel. The escalating cost of global transportation, as well as the growth of online retailing and the associated benefits of on-demand digital manufacturing, are further reinforcing the many benefits of short-run and near-shore new operations.

Secure supply
At Texprocess, for example, Eton Systems will be unveiling its latest Ingenious software solution which further enhances the company’s Opta Unit Production System (UPS) introduced in 2021.

“Our automated technology has already had a great impact on the productivity of thousands of garment production lines,” says Eton’s Managing Director Jerker Krabbe. “Our systems help producers across the world to reduce repetitive manual tasks and increase efficiency, which evens out some of the differences between production in high and low-cost countries, making reshoring a feasible option. Creating a diversified production portfolio with a mix of production facilities, some closer to home, makes for a more secure product supply.”

Flexibility
Imogo meanwhile recently installed the first industrial scale dyeing system in Sweden for many years. The Dye-Max spray dyeing line has the potential to slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems. It is capable of carrying out the application of a wide range of fabric pre-treatments and finishing processes, providing users with unbeatable flexibility in production.

“Here in Scandinavia, we are currently seeing an explosion of companies developing sustainable new cellulosic fibres – many from waste clothing – but a problem is that all of the environmental benefits they deliver can potentially be lost in the further processing, and especially in conventional dyeing,” observes the company’s Founding Partner Per Stenflo. “The Dye-Max system positively addresses this, but interest in it has not just been confined to Europe. We are currently seeing a lot of activity in Turkey – largely as a near-shore partner to European brands – but also in Bangladesh.”

Robotics at Heimtextil
ACG Kinna Automatic specialises in automation solutions for filled products such as quilts, pillows and mattresses and its live demonstrations of robotics in action have proved a magnet for visitors to Heimtextil. This year’s show will be no exception.

“The use of robotics is now standard across many industries dealing in solid goods, but the handling of soft materials such as textiles is a little more complex,” says Managing Director Christian Moore. “Nevertheless, it’s something we have successfully mastered, and our robotic systems are proving highly beneficial to their users. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution when it comes to automation and our approach is always to carefully examine where it will make the difference in each bespoke system. A focus is on identifying and eliminating bottlenecks which will increase product flows.”

During the Covid-19 pandemic, ACG Kinna drew on all of its automation know-how and extensive network of contacts to build a new nonwovens fabric converting and single-use garment making-up plant in a matter of weeks, in order to supply the Swedish authorities with urgently-needed medical gowns.

Instant colour
Localised textile production is also booming in the USA, where Coloreel has recently secured multiple orders for its instant thread colouration technology via its US partner Hirsch.

“Coloreel technology enables the high-quality and instant colouring of a textile thread while it is actually being used in production and can be paired with any existing embroidery machine without modification, while also making it possible to produce gradients in an embroidery for the first time,” explains VP of Sales Sven Öquist.

“Advanced rapid colour formulation software and high-speed drive technology allow a single needle to carry out what it previously required many multiples of them to do – and with much more consistent stitch quality. By instantly colouring a recycled white base thread during production, our system enables complete freedom to create unique embroideries without any limitations. Colour changes along the thread can either be made rapidly from one solid colour to another, or gradually, to make smooth transitions or any colouring effect desired. This provides big benefits when it comes to sustainability and design creativity.”

Milestone
Svegea will be promoting its latest EC 300 collarette cutting machine at Texprocess 2022. This machine is used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as waistbands, cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements. With its E-Drive 2 system and fully automatic FA500 roll slitter, the EC 300 has an output of around 20,000 metres per hour.

“Advances in automation are only making the specialised, bespoke machines we engineer even more efficient and we are expecting a very busy year,” says Managing Director Håkan Steene. “The garment components our collarette cutters produce make it logical for them to be integrated into the operations of making-up operations, wherever they are.”

Sensors
The advanced yarn tension monitoring technologies of Eltex of Sweden meanwhile play an essential role in rectifying defects in  weaving, tufting and composite reinforcement operations.

“A correct tension of the warp and weft threads ensures proper machine operation,” explains Eltex Global Marketing and Sales Manager Anoop K. Sharma “The constant tension monitoring and automatic control of the tension of the thread help to overcome unnecessary problems.

“We continue to make advances in both the hardware and software of our tension monitoring systems, such as the EyE™ for the warping process. With the EyE™, the yarn tension values from all yarns are continuously updated and displayed on screen. In addition, tension values outside the warning level are indicated both on the sensor’s LEDs and on the screen for complete quality control. No fabric can be woven without the appropriate and correct tension.”

Source:

AWOL Media

Hypetex at JEC World 2022 (c) Hypetex
Hypetex® to Showcase Coloured Carbon and Flax Fibre Solutions
20.04.2022

Hypetex at JEC World 2022

  • Hypetex® to Showcase Coloured Carbon and Flax Fibre Solutions
  • Hypetex, London, April 20 2022, Booth R52, Hall 6

Hypetex, the market leaders in colouring carbon and natural fibre materials, will demonstrate both the processing and sustainability benefits of its patented colourisation technology when it exhibits for the first time at JEC World 2022.

  • Hypetex® to Showcase Coloured Carbon and Flax Fibre Solutions
  • Hypetex, London, April 20 2022, Booth R52, Hall 6

Hypetex, the market leaders in colouring carbon and natural fibre materials, will demonstrate both the processing and sustainability benefits of its patented colourisation technology when it exhibits for the first time at JEC World 2022.

Exhibiting as part of the Composites UK stand (Booth R52), Hypetex will display its portfolio of uniquely coloured carbon fibre materials including 3K woven styles, ultra-lightweight spread tow fabrics, UD, and 3D materials. Hypetex will also present details of its latest eco-friendly coloured flax materials  which combine sustainably grown natural flax with sustainable colouring technologies. Hypetex patented colouring technology, available in an extensive palette of standard and bespoke colours and shades, can be applied to traditional woven fabric constructions, non-woven UDs, spread tow and bespoke fabric designs. The technology replaces a traditional coloured painted finish, providing an exceptional depth of colour to any composite part, improving thermal conductivity and reducing heat absorption ,whilst reducing the overall weight and processing time with no compromise to the mechanical performance of the composite structure.

By removing the need for painting, and the associated preparation steps, Hypetex technology provides manufacturers with a repeatable straight out of the mould coloured finish, that is not only easy to integrate into all composite processes, but also takes additional materials, consumables, and process time out of the component cost. As part of its continued commitment to leading the drive for more sustainable composite solutions, and its focus on improvements based on the ESG framework. Hypetex will also display its new range of coloured flax fibre textiles. The advanced colouring technology used protects the natural flax fibres throughout the high temperature processes required for composite production, avoiding burning or any discolouration issues common to natural fibres. In addition, Hypetex colouring solution is an ecofriendly sustainable alternative to traditional dyeing processes which are a significant cause of global water pollution.

The Hypetex team will be on hand throughout the show to provide additional details on Hypetex materials and their integration into the manufacturing process. Visitors to the Hypetex stand will be able see Hypetex carbon and flax products in raw fabric, and how its unique colour palette translates into the most distinctive finished moulded components. Hypetex partners SHD Composites, Textreme, Sigmatex and Angeloni will also have materials and components on display at JEC World 2022, including sporting equipment such as racquets, sticks, and skateboards, which highlight the massive range of processing options and potential applications for this novel technology. One such application, the adidas Kromaskin field hockey stick, with a unique Hypetex coloured Textreme spread tow carbon finish, will also be part of the JEC Innovation Planets feature.

Source:

100% Marketing

Participants Embrace Renewed Face-to-Face Business with Global Leaders in Nonwovens & Engineered Materials at IDEA® 2022 and FiltXPO™ (c) INDA
IDEA22 Ribbon Cutting
06.04.2022

IDEA® Achievement Award honorees

  • Participants Embrace Renewed Face-to-Face Business with Global Leaders in Nonwovens & Engineered Materials at IDEA® 2022 and FiltXPO™

Approximately 5,000 participants embraced the opportunity to again engage in face-to-face business meetings with global leaders in nonwovens and engineered materials at IDEA® 2022 in Miami Beach, Fla., co-located with the second FiltXPO™,  North American’s only exhibition and conference dedicated exclusively to filtration and separation.

Industry participants at IDEA® 2022,  the 21 st edition of the world’s preeminent event for nonwovens and engineered fabric professionals, expressed their business confidence through the floor exhibits and the return to face-to-face business interaction. Scott Beir, Executive Officer, CFM Global, called IDEA® 2022 “an exceptional show.”

Bob Usher, Technical Director, US Fibers, added that his company made valuable business connections. According to Rolk Kammermann, Head of Sales and Marketing, Innovative Swiss Made Nonwovens, “the size and scope of IDEA and FiltXPO have been excellent for us as both exhibitors and as visitors.”

  • Participants Embrace Renewed Face-to-Face Business with Global Leaders in Nonwovens & Engineered Materials at IDEA® 2022 and FiltXPO™

Approximately 5,000 participants embraced the opportunity to again engage in face-to-face business meetings with global leaders in nonwovens and engineered materials at IDEA® 2022 in Miami Beach, Fla., co-located with the second FiltXPO™,  North American’s only exhibition and conference dedicated exclusively to filtration and separation.

Industry participants at IDEA® 2022,  the 21 st edition of the world’s preeminent event for nonwovens and engineered fabric professionals, expressed their business confidence through the floor exhibits and the return to face-to-face business interaction. Scott Beir, Executive Officer, CFM Global, called IDEA® 2022 “an exceptional show.”

Bob Usher, Technical Director, US Fibers, added that his company made valuable business connections. According to Rolk Kammermann, Head of Sales and Marketing, Innovative Swiss Made Nonwovens, “the size and scope of IDEA and FiltXPO have been excellent for us as both exhibitors and as visitors.”

Organized by INDA, IDEA® also featured five essential nonwovens training classes; market presentations from China, Asia, Europe, North America and South America; industry recognitions with the IDEA® Achievement Awards and the IDEA® Lifetime Achievement Awards; and a welcome reception celebration.

Also, organized by INDA, FiltXPO™ featured five panels of global leaders in filtration and separation for the first-ever “Summit for Global Change,” discussing societal challenges such as indoor air quality, environmental sustainability, pandemic readiness, clean water, and filtration standards.  The event also featured a 1.5-day filter media training course, and sessions highlighting filter media market trends and filtration industry statistics.  

Exhibitors and attendees noted the welcome return to meeting face-to-face among industry senior leaders participating in the three-day event.

A highlight of IDEA® was the announcement of the IDEA® Achievement Awards by INDA, in partnership with Nonwovens Industry magazine. Moderated by Rousse and Karen McIntyre, Editor, Nonwovens Industry the awards recognize the leading introductions in equipment, raw materials, short-life, long-life and nonwovens products, and sustainability, since the previous IDEA® Exposition in 2019.

In addition, INDA presented the IDEA® 2022 Lifetime Achievement Award to Val Hollingsworth, board chair and CEO of Hollingsworth & Vose, and Nonwovens Industry presented the IDEA® Entrepreneur Achievement Award to Doug Brown, president of Biax-Fiberfilm/5K Fibres at the event.

IDEA® 2022 Achievement Awards winners:

  • IDEA®  Equipment Achievement Award – Elastic Thread Anchoring (ETA) Sonotrode – Herrmann Ultrasonics, Inc.
  • IDEA®  Raw Material Achievement Award – ODOGard – Rem Brands, Inc.
  • IDEA® Short-Life Product Achievement Award – LifeSavers Wipes – LifeSavers LLC
  • IDEA® Long-Life Product Achievement Award – Nanofiber Cabin Air Filter – MANN + HUMMEL GmbH
  • IDEA®  Sustainability Advancement Award – Fiber-based Screw Caps – Glatfelter Corp. and Blue Ocean Closures
  • IDEA®  Nonwoven Product Achievement Award – HYDRASPUN® Aquaflo – Sustainable Nonwoven Substrates – Suominen Corporation
  • IDEA®, the Preeminent Event for the Nonwovens & Engineered Fabrics Industry, will next be held on its new 24-month schedule on April 23-25, 2024 in Miami Beach, Florida.

 

Names of the IDEA® Achievement Award honorees pictured:

Row 1, Left to right:
IDEA® Long-Life Product Achievement Award winner, Jon Nichols, MANN + HUMMEL, GmbH and Dave Rousse – Nanofiber Cabin Air Filter – MANN + HUMMEL, GmbH
IDEA®  Nonwoven Product Achievement Award winners, Pramod Shanbhag, Suominen Corporation, Karen McIntyre, Nonwovens Industry Magazine, and Avinav Nandgaonkar, HYDRASPUN® Aquaflo – Sustainable Nonwoven Substrates – Suominen Corporation
Row 2, left to right:
IDEA® Short-Life Product Achievement Award winner, Georgia Crawford, LifeSavers Wipes – LifeSavers LLC, and Karen McIntyre, Nonwovens Industry Magazine
IDEA® 2022 Lifetime Achievement Award winner, Val Hollingsworth, Hollingsworth & Vose, and Dave Rousse, President, INDA
IDEA®  Equipment Achievement Award winners, Uwe Peregi, Dave Rousse, and Thomas Herrmann – Elastic Thread Anchoring (ETA) Sonotrode – Herrmann Ultrasonics Inc.
Row 3, left to right:
IDEA®  Raw Material Achievement Award winner, David Schneider, ODOGard – Rem Brands, Inc. and Dave Rousse, INDA
IDEA®  Sustainability Advancement Award winner, Chris Astley, and Karen McIntyre Fiber-based Screw Caps – Glatfelter Corp. and Blue Ocean Closures
IDEA® Entrepreneur Achievement Award winner, Doug Brown, Biax-Fiberfilm / 5K Fibres

Beaulieu International Group
24.03.2022

Beaulieu Fibres International at IDEA®22

  • Complete fibre portfolio for geotextiles, hygiene & wipes, floor coverings, automotive, upholstery, filtration, RTM and construction
  • Increasing nonwoven & engineered fabric performance with new fibres that reduce carbon footprint & support design for recycling
  • Exploring new possibilities for collaboration using BFI’s expertise, pilot line and equipment

 Beaulieu Fibres International, the largest and most differentiated European staple fibre producer, turns the spotlight on future-focused solutions for nonwovens & engineered fabrics at IDEA®22, 28-31 March. A key priority is innovation in polyolefin and BICO fibres to advance sustainable design, end-of-life recyclability, and resource and carbon footprint reduction for industrial and hygiene applications.

Sustainability is key to Beaulieu Fibre International’s long-term strategy, and the company is heavily focused on defining its green portfolio to support evolution in diverse market applications.

  • Complete fibre portfolio for geotextiles, hygiene & wipes, floor coverings, automotive, upholstery, filtration, RTM and construction
  • Increasing nonwoven & engineered fabric performance with new fibres that reduce carbon footprint & support design for recycling
  • Exploring new possibilities for collaboration using BFI’s expertise, pilot line and equipment

 Beaulieu Fibres International, the largest and most differentiated European staple fibre producer, turns the spotlight on future-focused solutions for nonwovens & engineered fabrics at IDEA®22, 28-31 March. A key priority is innovation in polyolefin and BICO fibres to advance sustainable design, end-of-life recyclability, and resource and carbon footprint reduction for industrial and hygiene applications.

Sustainability is key to Beaulieu Fibre International’s long-term strategy, and the company is heavily focused on defining its green portfolio to support evolution in diverse market applications.

Bio-based fibres
From June 2022, Beaulieu Fibres International will offer ISCC+ certification on mono-PP and BICO PP/PE fibres. The fibres will be offered in 1,3-8,9 dtex and will be available with all the main available finish classes (ie. hydrophilic, hydrophobic, etc.) suitable for the main carding and consolidation technologies. These drop-in solutions with no loss in quality will support customers looking to reduce reliance on virgin fossil carbon in their nonwoven and engineered fibre applications. The bio-based fibres enable customers to contribute to the transition towards a circular economy.

Achieving material savings
For customers in industrial segments like geotextiles, high-tenacity HT8 staple fibres enable customers to achieve nonwovens for construction projects with high mechanical performance but with 15% less weight. The durability of the fibres means that customers can use less raw material for a longer service lifetime, supporting more sustainable design in addition to resource reduction.
For hygiene nonwovens, the Meralux fibres provide significant sustainable design advantages. Meralux fibres deliver substantial sustainability benefits including around 55% savings in raw materials, with equivalent carbon emission savings. These emission savings are thanks to weight reduction in nonwovens with the same coverage level and also the higher recyclability of PP/PE compared to BICO materials.

Source:

Beaulieu International Group