Textination Newsline

Reset
6 results
(c) Fraunhofer IKTS
02.08.2022

Fraunhofer technology: High-tech vest monitors lung function

Patients with severe respiratory or lung diseases require intensive treatment and their lung function needs to be monitored on a continuous basis. As part of the Pneumo.Vest project, Fraunhofer researchers have developed a technology whereby noises in the lungs are recorded using a textile vest with integrated acoustic sensors. The signals are then converted and displayed visually using software. In this way, patients outside of intensive care units can still be monitored continuously. The technology increases the options for diagnosis and improves the patient’s quality of life.

For over 200 years, the stethoscope has been a standard tool for doctors and, as such, is a symbol of the medical profession. In television hospital dramas, doctors are seen rushing through the halls with a stethoscope around their neck. Experienced doctors do indeed use them to listen very accurately to heartbeats and the lungs and, as a result, to diagnose illnesses.

Patients with severe respiratory or lung diseases require intensive treatment and their lung function needs to be monitored on a continuous basis. As part of the Pneumo.Vest project, Fraunhofer researchers have developed a technology whereby noises in the lungs are recorded using a textile vest with integrated acoustic sensors. The signals are then converted and displayed visually using software. In this way, patients outside of intensive care units can still be monitored continuously. The technology increases the options for diagnosis and improves the patient’s quality of life.

For over 200 years, the stethoscope has been a standard tool for doctors and, as such, is a symbol of the medical profession. In television hospital dramas, doctors are seen rushing through the halls with a stethoscope around their neck. Experienced doctors do indeed use them to listen very accurately to heartbeats and the lungs and, as a result, to diagnose illnesses.

Now, the stethoscope is getting some help. As part of the Pneumo.Vest project, researchers of the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS at the Berlin office have developed a textile vest with integrated acoustic sensors, presenting a high-performance addition to the traditional stethoscope. Piezoceramic acoustic sensors have been incorporated into the front and back of the vest to register any noise produced by the lungs in the thorax, no matter how small. A software program records the signals and electronically amplifies them, while the lungs are depicted visually on a display. As the software knows the position of each individual sensor, it can attribute the data to its precise location. This produces a detailed acoustic and optical picture of the ventilation situation of all parts of the lungs. Here is what makes it so special: As the system collects and stores the data permanently, examinations can take place at any given time and in the absence of hospital staff. Pneumo.Vest also indicates the status of the lungs over a period of time, for example over the previous 24 hours. Needless to say, traditional auscultation can also be carried out directly on the patients. However, instead of carrying out auscultation manually at different points with a stethoscope, a number of sensors are used simultaneously.

“Pneumo.Vest is not looking to make the stethoscope redundant and does not replace the skills of experienced pneumologists. However, auscultation or even CT scans of the lungs only ever present a snapshot at the time of the examination. Our technology provides added value because it allows for the lungs to be monitored continuously in the same way as a long-term ECG, even if the patient is not attached to machines in the ICU but has instead been admitted to the general ward,” explains Ralf Schallert, project manager at Fraunhofer IKTS.

Machine learning algorithms aid with diagnosis
Alongside the acoustic sensors, the software is at the core of the vest. It is responsible for storing, depicting and analyzing the data. It can be used by the doctor to view the acoustic events in specific individual areas of the lungs on the display. The use of algorithms in digital signal processing enables a targeted evaluation of acoustic signals. This means it is possible, for example, to filter out heartbeats or to amplify characteristic frequency ranges, making lung sounds, such as rustling or wheezing, much easier to hear.

On top of this, the researchers at Fraunhofer IKTS are developing machine learning algorithms. In the future, these will be able to structure and classify complex ambient noises in the thorax. Then, the pneumologist will carry out the final assessment and diagnosis.

Discharge from the ICU
Patients can also benefit from the digital sensor alternative. When wearing the vest, they can recover without requiring constant observation from medical staff. They can transfer to the general ward and possibly even be sent home and move about more or less freely. Despite this, the lungs are monitored continuously, and any sudden deterioration can be reported to medical personnel straight away.

The first tests with staff at the University Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy at the University of Magdeburg have shown that the concept is successful in practice. “The feedback from doctors was overwhelmingly positive. The combination of acoustic sensors, visualization and machine learning algorithms will be able to reliably distinguish a range of different lung sounds,” explains Schallert. Dr. Alexander Uhrig from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin is also pleased with the technology. The specialist in infectiology and pneumology at the renowned Charité hospital was one of those who initiated the idea: “Pneumo.Vest addresses exactly what we need. It serves as an instrument that expands our diagnostic options, relieves the burden on our hospital staff and makes hospital stays more pleasant for patients.”

The technology was initially designed for respiratory patients, but it also works well for people in care facilities and for use in sleep laboratories. It can also be used to train young doctors in auscultation.

Increased need for clinical-grade wearables
With Pneumo.Vest, the researchers at Fraunhofer IKTS have developed a product that is cut out for the increasingly strained situation at hospitals. In Germany, 385,000 patients with respiratory or lung diseases require inpatient treatment every year. Over 60 percent are connected to a ventilator for more than 24 hours. This figure does not account for the current increase in respiratory patients due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result of increasing life expectancy, the medical industry also expects the number of older patients with breathing problems to increase. With the help of technology from Fraunhofer IKTS, the burden on hospitals and, in particular, costly ICUs can be relieved as their beds will no longer be occupied for quite as long.

It should be added that the market for such clinical-grade wearables is growing rapidly. These are compact medical devices that can be worn directly on the body to measure vital signs such as heartbeat, blood oxygen saturation, respiratory rate or skin temperature. As a medical device that can be used flexibly, Pneumo.Vest fits in perfectly with this development. But do not worry: Doctors will still be using the beloved stethoscope in the future.

Fraunhofer “M³ Infekt” cluster project
Pneumo.Vest is just one part of the extensive M³ Infekt cluster project. Its objective is to develop monitoring systems for the decentralized monitoring of patients. The current basis of the project is the treatment of COVID-19 patients. With the SARS-CoV2 virus, it is common for even mild cases to suddenly deteriorate significantly. By continuously monitoring vital signs, any deterioration in condition can be quickly identified and prompt measures for treatment can be taken.

M3 Infekt can also be used for a number of other symptoms and scenarios. The systems have been designed to be modular and multimodal so that biosignals such as heart rate, ECG, oxygen saturation, or respiratory rate and volume can be measured, depending on the patient and illness.

A total of ten Fraunhofer institutes are working on the cluster project under the leadership of the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS in Dresden. Klinikum Magdeburg, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the University Hospitals of Erlangen and Dresden are involved as clinical partners.

Source:

Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technology and Systems IKTS

(c) Empa
05.04.2022

In the heat of the wound: Smart bandage

A bandage that releases medication as soon as an infection starts in a wound could treat injuries more efficiently. Empa researchers are currently working on polymer fibers that soften as soon as the environment heats up due to an infection, thereby releasing antimicrobial drugs.

It is not possible to tell from the outside whether a wound will heal without problems under the dressing or whether bacteria will penetrate the injured tissue and ignite an inflammation. To be on the safe side, disinfectant ointments or antibiotics are applied to the wound before the dressing is applied. However, these preventive measures are not necessary in every case. Thus, medications are wasted and wounds are over-treated.

A bandage that releases medication as soon as an infection starts in a wound could treat injuries more efficiently. Empa researchers are currently working on polymer fibers that soften as soon as the environment heats up due to an infection, thereby releasing antimicrobial drugs.

It is not possible to tell from the outside whether a wound will heal without problems under the dressing or whether bacteria will penetrate the injured tissue and ignite an inflammation. To be on the safe side, disinfectant ointments or antibiotics are applied to the wound before the dressing is applied. However, these preventive measures are not necessary in every case. Thus, medications are wasted and wounds are over-treated.

Even worse, the wasteful use of antibiotics promotes the emergence of multi-resistant germs, which are an immense problem in global healthcare. Empa researchers at the two Empa laboratories Biointerfaces and Biomimetic Membranes and Textiles in St. Gallen want to change this. They are developing a dressing that autonomously administers antibacterial drugs only when they are really needed.

The idea of the interdisciplinary team led by Qun Ren and Fei Pan: The dressing should be "loaded" with drugs and react to environmental stimuli. "In this way, wounds could be treated as needed at exactly the right moment," explains Fei Pan. As an environmental stimulus, the team chose a well-known effect: the rise in temperature in an infected, inflamed wound.

Now the team had to design a material that would react appropriately to this increase in temperature. For this purpose, a skin-compatible polymer composite was developed made of several components: acrylic glass (polymethyl methacrylate, or PMMA), which is used, for example, for eyeglass lenses and in the textile industry, and Eudragit, a biocompatible polymer mixture that is used, for example, to coat pills. Electrospinning was used to process the polymer mixture into a fine membrane of nanofibers. Finally, octenidine was encapsulated in the nanofibers as a medically active component. Octenidine is a disinfectant that acts quickly against bacteria, fungi and some viruses. In healthcare, it can be used on the skin, on mucous membranes and for wound disinfection.

Signs of inflammation as triggers
As early as in the ancient world, the Greek physician Galen described the signs of inflammation. The five Latin terms are still valid today: dolor (pain), calor (heat), rubor (redness), tumor (swelling) and functio laesa (impaired function) stand for the classic indications of inflammation. In an infected skin wound, local warmth can be as high as five degrees. This temperature difference can be used as a trigger: Suitable materials change their consistency in this range and can release therapeutic substances.

Shattering glove
"In order for the membrane to act as a "smart bandage" and actually release the disinfectant when the wound heats up due to an infection, we put together the polymer mixture of PMMA and Eudragit in such a way that we could adjust the glass transition temperature accordingly," says Fei Pan. This is the temperature, at which a polymer changes from a solid consistency to a rubbery, toughened state. Figuratively, the effect is often described in reverse: If you put a rubber glove in liquid nitrogen at –196 degrees, it changes its consistency and becomes so hard that you can shatter it like glass with one blow.

The desired glass transition temperature of the polymer membrane, on the other hand, was in the range of 37 degrees. When inflammation kicks in and the skin heats up above its normal temperature of 32 to 34 degrees, the polymer changes from its solid to a softer state. In laboratory experiments, the team observed the disinfectant being released from the polymer at 37 degrees – but not at 32 degrees. Another advantage: The process is reversible and can be repeated up to five times, as the process always "switches itself off" when it cools down. Following these promising initial tests, the Empa researchers now want to fine-tune the effect. Instead of a temperature range of four to five degrees, the smart bandage should already switch on and off at smaller temperature differences.

Smart and unsparing
To investigate the efficacy of the nanofiber membranes against wound germs, further laboratory experiments are now in the pipeline. Team leader Qun Ren has long been concerned with germs that nestle in the interface between surfaces and the environment, such as on a skin wound. "In this biological setting, a kind of no man's land between the body and the dressing material, bacteria find a perfect biological niche," says the Empa researcher. Infectious agents such as staphylococci or Pseudomonas bacteria can cause severe wound healing disorders. It was precisely these wound germs that the team allowed to become acquainted with the smart dressing in the Petri dish. And indeed: The number of bacteria was reduced roughly 1000-fold when octenidine was released from the smart dressing. "With octenidine, we have achieved a proof of principle for controlled drug release by an external stimulus," said Qun Ren. In future, she said, the technology could be applied to other types of drugs, increasing the efficiency and precision in their dosage.

The smart dressing
Empa researchers are working in interdisciplinary teams on various approaches to improve medical wound treatment. For example, liquid sensors on the outside of the dressing are to make it visible when a wound is healing poorly by changing their color. Critical glucose and pH values serve as biomarkers.

To enable bacterial infections to be contained directly in the wound, the researchers are also working on a polymer foam loaded with anti-inflammatory substances and on a skin-friendly membrane made of plant material. The cellulose membrane is equipped with antimicrobial protein elements and kills bacteria extremely efficiently in laboratory tests.

Moreover, digitalization can achieve more economical and efficient dosages in wound care: Empa researchers are developing digital twins of the skin that allow control and prediction of the course of a therapy using real-time modeling.

Further information:
Prof. Dr. Katharina
Maniura Biointerfaces
Phone +41 58 765 74 47
Katharina.Maniura@empa.ch

Prof. Dr. René Rossi
Biomimetic Membranes and Textiles
Phone +41 58 765 77 65
Rene.rossi@empa.ch

Source:

EMPA, Andrea Six

Photo: pixabay
17.08.2021

Innovative wound care: Customized wound dressings made from tropoelastin

Customized, biomedically applicable materials based on tropoelastin are being developed in a joint project by Skinomics GmbH from Halle, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS. The material combines biocompatibility, durability, biodegradability and favorable mechanical properties similar to those of skin. Preclinical tests have confirmed that it is suitable for use as a wound dressing material used in the treatment of chronic and complex wounds.

Customized, biomedically applicable materials based on tropoelastin are being developed in a joint project by Skinomics GmbH from Halle, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS. The material combines biocompatibility, durability, biodegradability and favorable mechanical properties similar to those of skin. Preclinical tests have confirmed that it is suitable for use as a wound dressing material used in the treatment of chronic and complex wounds.

Particularly in the context of an aging society, special wound dressings are gaining in importance. The treatment of complex wound diseases such as venous ulcers, leg ulcers, or foot ulcers is challenging for medical staff, long-term and painful for those affected and cost-intensive for the healthcare system. Innovative protein-based materials are now being used for the treatment of such wounds. However, since they are made from animal tissues, they carry increased risks of infection or can result in undesirable immune reactions. In addition, there are increasing reservations in the population about medical products of animal origin.

In the joint research project, the project partners are currently developing customized, biomedically applicable materials based on human tropoelastin. This precursor protein is converted in the body to elastin, a vital and long-lived structural biopolymer that has exceptional mechanical properties and thus gives the skin and other organs the elasticity and resilience they need to function.

“Elastin is chemically and enzymatically extremely stable, biocompatible and does not produce immunological rejections when used as a biomaterial in humans. Therefore, we want to create new and innovative solutions for the treatment of complex wounds based on human tropoelastin,” says Dr. Christian Schmelzer, Head of the Department of Biological and Macromolecular Materials at Fraunhofer IMWS.

Individual wound treatment
As part of the research project led by Prof. Dr. Markus Pietzsch of Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, the researchers succeeded in developing a biotechnological process for modifying tropoelastin. The modified tropoelastin is processed at Fraunhofer IMWS. Here, an electrospinning procedure is used to produce ultra-thin nanofibers with diameters of only a few hundred nanometers. The resulting nonwovens are further crosslinked to stabilize them for the respective application. The procedures developed have been optimized so that biomedical parameters such as pore size, stability and mechanical properties are variable and can thus be customized to meet the requirements of the respective wound treatment. The materials produced using the new procedures are being investigated by Skinomics GmbH in initial preclinical tests with regard to their skin compatibility and have already achieved promising results.

At the end of the project by the end of this year, applications for intellectual property rights are to be filed, building the basis for a subsequent product development phase for certified medical products.

TECHNICAL TEXTILES CONTINUE STEDAY RISE IN SHARE OF TOTAL EU TEXTILE PRODUCTION Foto: Gerd Altmann, Pixabay
26.11.2019

TECHNICAL TEXTILES CONTINUE STEDAY RISE IN SHARE OF TOTAL EU TEXTILE PRODUCTION

  • European Textile and Clothing Sector consolidates satisfactory evolution in 2018

The EU textile and Clothing industry finished the year 2018 with a consolidation of the positive key figures achieved over the last 5 years. First data published by Eurostat enhanced by EURATEX’s own calculations and estimates show a total industry turnover of € 178 billion, a minimal increase to last year’s € 177.6 billion, but significantly above the 2013 figure of € 163.8 billion. Investments of € 5.0 billion again increased slightly, as they did every year since 2013.

Employment of 1.66 million registered a small dip compared to 2017 but remained essentially unchanged over the last 5 years – a remarkable achievement for a sector that keeps realizing labour efficiencies. As a result, the average turnover per employee has increased from 97,000 € in 2013 to 107,000 € in 2018. Over the last 10 years, turnover and value-added per employee have increased by over 30%.

  • European Textile and Clothing Sector consolidates satisfactory evolution in 2018

The EU textile and Clothing industry finished the year 2018 with a consolidation of the positive key figures achieved over the last 5 years. First data published by Eurostat enhanced by EURATEX’s own calculations and estimates show a total industry turnover of € 178 billion, a minimal increase to last year’s € 177.6 billion, but significantly above the 2013 figure of € 163.8 billion. Investments of € 5.0 billion again increased slightly, as they did every year since 2013.

Employment of 1.66 million registered a small dip compared to 2017 but remained essentially unchanged over the last 5 years – a remarkable achievement for a sector that keeps realizing labour efficiencies. As a result, the average turnover per employee has increased from 97,000 € in 2013 to 107,000 € in 2018. Over the last 10 years, turnover and value-added per employee have increased by over 30%.

The brightest spot again is the export figure, which grew by 7% compared to last year and for the first time reached € 50 billion. The industry’s extra-EU exports which now stand at 28% of annual turnover, up from less than 20% 10 years ago, is the clearest proof of the increasing global competitiveness of Europe’s textile and clothing companies.

European high quality textiles and premium fashion products are in growing demand, both in high income countries such as the United States (our biggest export destination in non-European countries with € 6 billion), Switzerland, Japan or Canada, but also emerging countries such as China and Hong Kong (over € 6.7 billion in combined exports), Russia, Turkey and the Middle-East.

European exports benefit from faster economic growth in many non-European markets, but also from better market access as a result of successful EU trade negotiations with countries such as South Korea, Canada or Japan.

Since 2015, export growth has slightly outpaced import growth, which means that our trade deficit of approximately € 65 billion has stopped widening. Rather than an absolute import growth, recent  years have brought important shifts in the main import countries. While China remains by far the number one import source, lower cost countries such as Bangladesh, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam have gained in relative importance, especially for clothing.

Technical textiles are an undisputed success story of the European industry. Exact figures for this part of the industry are difficult to compute due to the dual use of many yarns and fabrics for both technical and conventional applications. National statistics become available only with a significant time lag or remain unpublished for smaller EU countries. For 2016, EURATEX estimates that EU industry turnover of technical textiles, (including yarn-type, fabric-type and non-woven materials but excluding any made-up articles) reached about € 24 billion or 27% of total textile industry turnover. Over the years this percentage has steadily grown and is expected to continue to do so in the future.

Italy and Germany are Europe’s biggest producers of technical textiles, each producing over € 4.5 billion worth of technical textiles per year. The highest share for technical textiles in national textile turnover is registered in Scandinavian countries such as Sweden and Finland and central European countries such as Germany, the Czech Republic or Slovenia. The fastest growth of technical textiles over the last 10 years has been achieved by Poland, followed by Belgium, Austria and Portugal. This clearly demonstrates that technical textiles are gaining in importance all over Europe.

Labour productivity is much higher in the technical textiles part of the industry. Turnover per employee stands at € 215,000, more than twice the average textile and clothing industry rate. In this regard, EURATEX Innovation & Skills Director Lutz Walter indicates how “innovation and employee expertise are fundamental to reach and defend the strong technical textile position of the EU industry”.

In terms of international trade, both exports and imports of technical textiles have grown continuously over the years, with an almost zero trade balance in Euro terms. However, when looking into the product category types, it is clear that Europe’s trade balance is massively positive in higher added value products such as medical textiles, highly technical finished fabrics and non-wovens, but negative in such categories as bags, sacks, tarpaulins or cleaning cloths.

Again the United States is Europe’s largest technical textiles customer, followed by China, which has registered very fast growth in recent years.

 

More information:
Euratex Technical Textiles
Source:

EURATEX

Industry Check in Asia Photo: Pixabay
19.06.2018

TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY IN ASIA: GTAI CHECKING THE SECTOR

Every day, GTAI experts observe and analyze the development of the most important German export industries on the world markets. Here you will find summarized information on the textile and clothing industry in Asian markets.
 
GTAI Industry Check - Vietnam
Textile and clothing industry: Vietnam needs more than sewing

Every day, GTAI experts observe and analyze the development of the most important German export industries on the world markets. Here you will find summarized information on the textile and clothing industry in Asian markets.
 
GTAI Industry Check - Vietnam
Textile and clothing industry: Vietnam needs more than sewing
The textile and clothing industry is one of the most important pillars of the Vietnamese industry and accounted for around 6 percent of total exports in 2017 with exports amounting to USD 26 billion. For 2018, the industry is aiming for growth of 7 to 8 percent and exports are expected to rise to over USD 33 billion. In order to comply with the rules of origin of the free trade agreements concluded by Vietnam, the country must achieve a higher added value. Domestic companies such as the Vinatex Group or Garco10, but also foreign companies are increasingly investing in technical innovations and expanding processes such as spinning, weaving and dyeing upstream of pure sewing. In addition, the first companies are beginning to automate their production processes.

GTAI Industry Check - Uzbekistan
Textile and clothing industry: Investments of more than USD 2 billion planned
The industry program for 2017 to 2020 lists around 130 projects with a total value of USD 2 billion. About half of the planned investments are to be
accounted for foreign commitments. The aim is to double the annual output of finished textile products during this period. With an annual production of more than 3 million tons of raw cotton, Uzbekistan is one of the world's largest producers of the white gold. A second industry programme foresees the implementation of five projects for the production of raw silk, silk wadding and silk fabrics and finished silk products between 2018 and 2021. The minimum investments required are estimated at USD 26 million.
 
GTAI Industry Check – Myanmar
Textile and clothing industry: Export strength through low wages
The lifting of sanctions by the EU and the US has noticeably revived the investment climate in the sector, especially as this was linked to the reactivation of the EU's GSP import status (Generalized System of Preferences). Most investors came from China, Hong Kong, Taiwan or South Korea, and Western brands such as GAP, H & M, Primark or Marks & Spencer were also included. Currently, about 400,000 workers are employed in almost 400 factories, mostly geared to CMP (cut-make-pack), including 171 foreign investors and 22 joint ventures. According to the Myanmar Garment Entrepreneurs Association, exports are expected to have increased by 40 percent to over USD 3 billion by 2017. For the first time the largest customer was the European Union, primarily Germany, ahead of Japan and South Korea.

GTAI Industry Check – Georgian Republic
Textile and clothing industry: Several expansion projects planned
The apparel industry produces garments for up to USD 70 million annually. The main products manufactured are international brands for export. Several new projects in the industry are in preparation. For example, the Turkish jeans manufacturer Baykanlar Textil plans to build a factory for the production of brand jeans in Ozurgeti by the end of 2018. A total of USD 15 million will be invested in the project. The Romanian company MGMtex, a subsidiary of the Swiss company Ottorose, is planning to start production of branded clothing in Kutaisi in cooperation with a local partner. The investments for the first and second project phases amount to more than USD 1.5 million. For the procurement of equipment, the company benefits from subsidies from the state program Produce in Georgia.

GTAI Industry Check - Turkmenistan
Textile and Clothing Industry: Investments of around 300 million US dollars planned
The textile and clothing industry represents 20 percent of Turkmenistan's industrial production and 30 percent of its manufacturing industry. A good USD 300 million will be invested in 2018 to 2020/21. The project list includes the construction of a large textile complex for the annual processing of up to 5,000 tons of fine-fibred cotton into semi-finished and finished products. Start March 2021; contractor: Cotam Enterprises Ltd, British Virgin Islands/Turkey) and a factory for the annual production of 6,000 tons of cotton yarn (2019/20, Hilli yol), the modernization of a textile factory (Daschogus), a cotton spinning mill (Tachtabasar) and a factory for medical wadding and cosmetic cotton (Ashgabat; 2018/2019 each). The potential of medical textiles, cotton fabrics, man-made fibers and the processing of wool and cocoons is still little used.
 
GTAI Industry Check – Azerbaijan
Textile and clothing industry: Light industry business park attracts investors
Azerbaijan launched several projects to revive the industry (output in 2017: USD 100 million). An industrial park for light industry has been under construction in Mingachevir since autumn 2016. Nine new factories are planned for cotton, acrylic and woolen yarn, clothing, hosiery and leather shoes. The project is worth up to USD 150 million. The first factory for the annual production of 20,000 tons of yarn is under construction. Under the umbrella organization for the Azerkhalcha carpet weaving mill founded in 2016, ten further smaller factories will be put into operation in 2018. Gilan Textil Park, Sumqayit, wants to expand its exports of home textiles. In the medium term, the construction of a silk spinning mill with an annual capacity of 3,000 tons of yarn is also planned.
 
GTAI Industry Check - Armenia
Textile and clothing industry: interest from abroad increases
Rising exports of clothing to Russia and western markets lead to expect further investments in the textile and clothing industry in 2018. Italian investors are planning to build a large jersey factory in Kapan (Sjunik region). The company SASSTEX in Artik (Schirak region) invests in two factories for the production of fashion (ZARA brand) and workwear. The Egyptian Wassef Group is considering the production of cotton fabrics and products therefrom. Yerevan-based hosiery and children's apparel manufacturer Alex Textile will continue its USD 28 million investment program in 2018 to expand apparel and hosiery production at several sites in Armenia.

More information:
Asia Export
Source:

Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

INDEX17:  Manage change in healthcare © INDEX™17 Press Office
04.04.2017

INDEX17: MANAGING CHANGE IN HEALTHCARE

An aging population is a critical issue facing the medical and healthcare industry. The European Wound Management Association (EWMA) maintains that persons aged 65 and over will account for 30% of the EU27’s population by 2060, compared to 17% in 2008, and that the highest share of inhabitants aged over 80 years in 2060, will be in Italy (14.9%), Spain (14.5%) and Germany (13.2%), closely followed by Greece (13.5 %).

There has been an exponential growth in healthcare costs mainly driven by the increased cost of medication and devices, and in tandem, a rise in the prevalence of chronic conditions. These trends have resulted in significant changes in European hospital services, with the number of hospital facilities, as well as the number of hospital beds decreasing. Furthermore, increasing pressures for early discharge from hospitals have caused a shift in the delivery of services from the hospital to the home, especially in the field of wound management.

An aging population is a critical issue facing the medical and healthcare industry. The European Wound Management Association (EWMA) maintains that persons aged 65 and over will account for 30% of the EU27’s population by 2060, compared to 17% in 2008, and that the highest share of inhabitants aged over 80 years in 2060, will be in Italy (14.9%), Spain (14.5%) and Germany (13.2%), closely followed by Greece (13.5 %).

There has been an exponential growth in healthcare costs mainly driven by the increased cost of medication and devices, and in tandem, a rise in the prevalence of chronic conditions. These trends have resulted in significant changes in European hospital services, with the number of hospital facilities, as well as the number of hospital beds decreasing. Furthermore, increasing pressures for early discharge from hospitals have caused a shift in the delivery of services from the hospital to the home, especially in the field of wound management.


Visitors and exhibitors at INDEX™17, the world’s leading nonwovens exhibition held in Geneva from 4th-7th April 2017, will have the opportunity to hear from “Big Picture” speaker Prof. Dr. Sebastien Probst, Professor of Tissue Viability and Wound Care at the School of Health Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland. “Chronic and highly-exuding wounds can often lead to the use of unreliable and costly treatments,” explains Prof. Dr. Probst. “Patients are frequently found to be at an increased risk of infection and delayed healing, which results in an enormous negative impact on their quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Superabsorbent nonwoven dressings are increasingly being used for a more effective wound care, removing bacteria and exudates and keeping the wound bed moist. Reducing healthcare costs while maintaining high quality of care remains paramount.” Another less visible but important benefit is that these products can contribute to reducing health associated infections (HAI) which still affect 1 out of 18 patients every day in Europe.

The rich three-day INDEX™17 programme, features a Medical & Healthcare seminar on 5th April organised in conjunction with market intelligence partners WTiN, where leading speaker Prof. Dr. Sebastien Probst will put forward the key challenges faced by the medical industry, and renowned experts in the field will then discuss how nonwovens are contributing to solving these challenges.

Medical & Healthcare seminar speakers include:

  • Dr. Parikshit Goswami, Associate Professor, Director of Research and Innovation, MSc Textiles Programme Leader, Technology Research Area Leader, will deliver a welcome note.
  • Prof. Dr. Sebastian Probst, DClinPrac, RN, Professor of Tissue Viability and Wound Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Geneva, will address global trends in nonwoven medical textiles.
  • Dionysia Patrinou, Intelligence Manager/Market Strategist, Advanced Medical Materials, World Textile Information Network (WTiN), will discuss opportunities in the medical market. .
  • Paul Greenhalgh, Director of Industrial Design, Team Consulting, will speak about a patient centric approach to medical technology development.
  • Dr. Bernd Schlesselmann, Head of R&D, Freudenberg Performance Materials, will discuss the future of nonwovens in advanced wound care..

Visitors from around the world will have the opportunity to gain first-hand knowledge of the latest developments in nonwovens for medical applications.
To attend INDEX™17, you can register online at www.index17.org/.