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AMAC kooperiert mit ITA (Institut für Textiltechnik der RWTH Aachen und deren ITA GmbH) für die weitere Geschäftsentwicklung im Bereich Composites  © AMAC
fltr: Markus Beckmann, Prof. Thomas Gries, Dr. Michael Effing, Dr. Christoph Greb
19.04.2021

AMAC cooperates with ITA

AMAC cooperates with ITA (Institute for Textile Technology of RWTH Aachen University and their ITA GmbH) for the business development in composites 

As of April 19th, 2021, AMAC is pleased to announce its cooperation with the Institute for Textile Technology, ITA, of RWTH Aachen University and their ITA GmbH. The aim of the cooperation is to strengthen and develop their business activities in composites.

AMAC cooperates with ITA (Institute for Textile Technology of RWTH Aachen University and their ITA GmbH) for the business development in composites 

As of April 19th, 2021, AMAC is pleased to announce its cooperation with the Institute for Textile Technology, ITA, of RWTH Aachen University and their ITA GmbH. The aim of the cooperation is to strengthen and develop their business activities in composites.

ITA, as one of the largest institutes on the campus of the excellence University RWTH Aachen, Germany, develops complete solutions from the manufacturing of the fiber itself over the processing of textile intermediates with thermoplastic and thermoset resins, textile-based part manufacturing, capabilities such as braiding, pultrusion and in-situ impregnation of textile preforms. Top 3 focused industries are transportation and particularly the e-mobility sector, building and construction as well as the wind energy sector. Additionally, ITA GmbH is the partner of the industry in R&D, focusing on 8 business segments, providing technology and knowledge transfer, as well as offering comprehensive solutions along the entire textile value chain.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Gries, Director of ITA, explains the background of the strategic cooperation with focus on composites: „Our long-term experience and unmatched know-how with all aspects of continuous fibers, non-wovens and web-based reinforcements allows us to deliver to the composite manufacturers a complete technology and service offer around the development of technical textiles, from the development of glass and carbon fibers to the textile-based processing of composite parts. In all process steps of our research and developments, we focus on sustainable and recyclable solutions, an efficient cost-performance ratio, the possible use of bio-based materials and the reduction of the CO2 footprint. We are glad to cooperate with Dr. Michael Effing and AMAC in order to benefit from his door-opening network in the composites industry. “

Dr. Michael Effing, Managing Director of AMAC GmbH: „I am very happy to support the ITA to generate innovation thanks to further industrial networking and pre-competitive joint projects. ITA is indeed a one-stop source for composite solutions from the fiber to the cost-efficient manufacturing of final parts. In the context of the Covid-19 impact to the entire industry, it makes sense to bundle forces. Furthermore, ITA, with its long tradition and satisfied customers offers further valuable networking opportunities to the composites industry as well as access to relevant complementary fiber-based excellence and 250 different technologies in their machine-park with an outstanding infrastructure in Aachen.”

Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development ©Stäubli
Multilayer Aramid
17.03.2021

Swiss weaving: Fabrics of the future

  • Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development

Shoes and electronic calculators are probably not the first products people would associate with the textile weaving process. But they certainly signpost the future for woven fabrics, as two examples of the ever-wider possibilities of latest technology in the field. Fashion and function already combine in the increasing popularity of woven fabrics for shoes, and this is a present and future trend. Calculators in fabrics? That’s another story of ingenious development, using so-called ‘meander fields’ on the back and keys printed on the front of the material.

  • Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development

Shoes and electronic calculators are probably not the first products people would associate with the textile weaving process. But they certainly signpost the future for woven fabrics, as two examples of the ever-wider possibilities of latest technology in the field. Fashion and function already combine in the increasing popularity of woven fabrics for shoes, and this is a present and future trend. Calculators in fabrics? That’s another story of ingenious development, using so-called ‘meander fields’ on the back and keys printed on the front of the material.

These glimpses of the outlook for modern weavers are among the highlights of developments now being pioneered by Swiss textile machinery companies. All weaving markets require innovation, as well as speed, efficiency, quality and sustainability. Member firms of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association respond to these needs at every point in the process – from tightening the first thread in the warp to winding the last inch for fabric delivery. They also share a common advantage, with a leading position in the traditional weaving industry as well as the expertise to foster new and exciting applications.

Technology and research cooperation
The concept of a ‘textile calculator’ was developed by Jakob Müller Group, in cooperation with the textile research institute Thuringen-Vogtland. Müller’s patented MDW® multi-directional weaving technology is able to create the meander fields which allow calculator functions to be accessed at a touch. A novel and useful facility, which suggests limitless expansion.

Today, the latest woven shoes are appreciated for their precise and comfortable fit. They score through their durability, strength and stability, meeting the requirements of individual athletes across many sports, as well as leisurewear. Stäubli is well known as a leading global specialist in weaving preparation, shedding systems and high-speed textile machinery. Its jacquard machines offer great flexibility across a wide range of formats, weaving all types of technical textiles, lightweight reinforcement fabrics – and shoes.

It’s possible to weave new materials such as ceramics, mix fibers such as aramid, carbon and other, and produce innovative multi-layers with variable thicknesses. Such applications put special demands on weaving machines which are fulfilled by Stäubli high-performance TF weaving systems.

Great weaving results are impossible without perfect warp tension, now available thanks to the world-leading electronic warp feeding systems of Crealet. Some market segments in weaving industry today demand warp let-off systems which meet individual customer requirements. For example, the company has recognized expertise to understand that geotextile products often need special treatment, as provided by its intelligent warp tension control system. Individual and connective solutions are designed to allow external support via remote link. Crealet’s warp let-off systems are widely used in both ribbon and broadloom weaving, for technical textiles applied on single or multiple warp beams and creels.

Functional, sustainable, automated
Trends in the field of woven narrow fabrics are clearly focused on functionality and sustainability. The Jakob Müller Group has already embraced these principles – for example using natural fibers for 100% recyclable labels with a soft-feel selvedge. It also focuses as much as possible on the processing of recycled, synthetic materials. Both PET bottles and polyester waste from production are recycled and processed into elastic and rigid tapes for the apparel industry.

For efficient fabric production environments, it is now recognized that automated quality solutions are essential. Quality standards are increasing everywhere and zero-defect levels are mandatory for sensitive applications such as airbags and protective apparel.

Uster’s latest generation of on-loom monitoring and inspection systems offers real operational improvements for weavers. The fabric quality monitoring prevents waste, while the quality assurance system significantly improves first-quality yield for all applications. Protecting fabric makers from costly claims and damaged reputations, automated fabric inspection also removes the need for slow, costly and unreliable manual inspection, freeing operators to focus on higher-skilled jobs.

Smart and collaborative robotics (cobots) offer many automation possibilities in weaving rooms. Stäubli’s future oriented robotics division is a driver in this segment with first effective installations in warp and creel preparation.

Control and productivity
Willy Grob’s specialized solutions for woven fabric winding focus on reliable control of tension, keeping it constant from the start of the process right through to the full cloth roll. Continuous digital control is especially important for sensitive fabrics, while performance and productivity are also critical advantages. In this regard, the company’s large-scale batching units can provide ten times the winding capacity of a regular winder integrated in the weaving machine.

The customized concept by Grob as well as design and implementation result in great flexibility and functionality of the fabric winding equipment – yet another example of Swiss ingenuity in textile machinery.  
There is even more innovation to come in weaving – and in other segments – from members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association in future! This confident assertion is founded on an impressive statistic: the 4077 years of experience behind the creative power of the association’s member firms. It’s proof positive that their developments grow out of profound knowledge and continuous research.

HIGHTEX Trade Fair postponed to 14-18 June 2022 (c) ITM
15.03.2021

HIGHTEX Trade Fair postponed to 14-18 June 2022

HIGHTEX International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Trade Fair, which is planned to be held on June 22-26, 2021 was decided to postpone to June 14-18, 2022, considering the effects of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic in the world. This postponement decision was taken as a result of intense discussions and evaluations with our participants and sector representatives.

The HIGHTEX Organization Team made the following statements: “We as HIGHTEX Organization Team, our priority is to protect your valuable exhibitors and visitors’ investments and all rights, not our commercial earnings. In this regard, we believe that all of our participants will find this compulsory postponement decision taken for the HIGTEX Exhibition justified and will understand.”

HIGHTEX 2022, which will be held in Istanbul Tuyap Fair and Congress Center between 14- 18 June 2022, simultaneously with the ITM 2022 Exhibition.

HIGHTEX International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Trade Fair, which is planned to be held on June 22-26, 2021 was decided to postpone to June 14-18, 2022, considering the effects of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic in the world. This postponement decision was taken as a result of intense discussions and evaluations with our participants and sector representatives.

The HIGHTEX Organization Team made the following statements: “We as HIGHTEX Organization Team, our priority is to protect your valuable exhibitors and visitors’ investments and all rights, not our commercial earnings. In this regard, we believe that all of our participants will find this compulsory postponement decision taken for the HIGTEX Exhibition justified and will understand.”

HIGHTEX 2022, which will be held in Istanbul Tuyap Fair and Congress Center between 14- 18 June 2022, simultaneously with the ITM 2022 Exhibition.

HIGHTEX 2022 being the first and only exhibition in its field in Turkey will host the world's leading technical textile and nonwoven manufacturers in Istanbul for 5 days.
HIGHTEX 2022, where many companies from Turkey and abroad will exhibit their latest technologies and products; will be visited by many industry professionals from medical to ready-to-wear, from decoration to cosmetics, from automotive to defense.

Source:

HIGHTEX

The Montex®Coat ticks all the right boxes for coating success in 2021 (c) Monforts
A recent Montex®Coat installation at a European mill.
24.02.2021

The Montex®Coat ticks all the right boxes for coating success in 2021

Flexibility, product uniformity and automation are the keys to success for coating businesses in today’s rapidly-changing technical textiles industry, explained Jürgen Hanel, Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, at the recent 1st World Congress on Textile Coating.

Introducing the latest Montex®Coat magnetic roller coating option to virtual delegates from around the world at the conference organised by International Newsletters, Hanel explained why this technology makes perfect sense now

“The magnetic roller system allows a wide range of coatings and finishes to be carried out, while being easy to handle for operators and much easier to clean at the end of the process,” he said. “It provides textile finishers with an expanded range of options due to the fully-adjustable positioning of the magnet within the roller and with four different magnet positions possible, can be set to operate both as a direct coating system and as an indirect coater.”

Flexibility, product uniformity and automation are the keys to success for coating businesses in today’s rapidly-changing technical textiles industry, explained Jürgen Hanel, Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, at the recent 1st World Congress on Textile Coating.

Introducing the latest Montex®Coat magnetic roller coating option to virtual delegates from around the world at the conference organised by International Newsletters, Hanel explained why this technology makes perfect sense now

“The magnetic roller system allows a wide range of coatings and finishes to be carried out, while being easy to handle for operators and much easier to clean at the end of the process,” he said. “It provides textile finishers with an expanded range of options due to the fully-adjustable positioning of the magnet within the roller and with four different magnet positions possible, can be set to operate both as a direct coating system and as an indirect coater.”

With traditional dip coating systems, he added, as well as with many standard knife coating technologies, there is always a difference in the tension between the centre and the edges of the wide width fabrics being treated – and hence the amount of pressure with which the coating is applied. With the use of a magnetic roller, equal pressure is applied across the full width of the fabric, with consistent results even at wide widths of over 2.4 metres. In addition, adjusting the roller surface, rather than changing the coating formulation to match the required add-on and viscosity for each coating effect required, leads to much higher output from the line.

Cleaner and less wasteful
The contribution of such flexible and resource-saving new technologies to a cleaner and less wasteful textile industry was a key theme at the congress – held virtually across the four afternoons of February 11th, 12th, 18th and 19th – as was digitalization and the many advantages it is providing.

“A typical integrated Monforts coating line is automated from the inlet feed to the winder,” Hanel told delegates. “Adjustments can also be made simply and easily from the touchscreen and with the new hand-held remote controller which has recently been introduced for the Montex®Coat unit.”

Manual adjustment, he added, is time consuming and needs the attention of an experienced operator or the reproducibility will not be accurate between coating operations. The adjustment by motors allows each coating to be stored and downloaded again for 100% reproducibility.

The motors can be fully controlled from the touchscreen and all necessary adjustments carried out remotely, making switching from one process to another extremely quick and easy.
The accuracy that is now being demanded by today’s most exacting customers is met with an optional carbon fibre roller – especially in dealing with the winding tension required in the processing of materials such as prepregs for composites and other heavyweight fabrics. Typical applications for the Montex®Coat include the finishing of tents and awnings, black-out roller blinds and sail cloth, automotive interior fabrics and medical disposables. Full PVC coatings, pigment dyeing or minimal application surface and low penetration treatments can all be accommodated.

“The World Congress on Textile Coating was characterised by some very stimulating presentations and forums between the speakers and a global audience of textile specialists,” Jürgen Hanel concluded. “It truly reflected the high level of positive changes now taking place in not just textile coating, but the entire textile industry. I look forward to the next edition, which hopefully will be a face-to-face event for even deeper level discussions and debate.”

vombaur: Filtration textiles (c) vombaur
22.01.2021

vombaur: Filtration textiles

From the drinking water and food industries through water management and mining to the automotive and aviation sectors, mechanical filtration processes are used in almost every industry. As different as the methods, dimensions and special requirements of the filtration process are in each case – technical textiles and often tubular filters are almost always used. This means that tubular filters and narrow textiles by vombaur contribute to the safe and reliable separation or treatment of substances in the widest variety of filtration processes.

Individual solutions
The requirements placed on the textile, the material, the flow rate and the loading capacity of the filters depend on the respective use: a tubular for dewatering soil needs to withstand different forces than a tubular filter for the beverages industry. On the other hand, the latter needs to meet the highest hygiene standards. Because the requirements are so individual, vombaur develops customised filtration textiles for its customers all over the world.

From the drinking water and food industries through water management and mining to the automotive and aviation sectors, mechanical filtration processes are used in almost every industry. As different as the methods, dimensions and special requirements of the filtration process are in each case – technical textiles and often tubular filters are almost always used. This means that tubular filters and narrow textiles by vombaur contribute to the safe and reliable separation or treatment of substances in the widest variety of filtration processes.

Individual solutions
The requirements placed on the textile, the material, the flow rate and the loading capacity of the filters depend on the respective use: a tubular for dewatering soil needs to withstand different forces than a tubular filter for the beverages industry. On the other hand, the latter needs to meet the highest hygiene standards. Because the requirements are so individual, vombaur develops customised filtration textiles for its customers all over the world.

Seamless tubular filters
At vombaur, filter media are round woven seamlessly on unique looms. As a result, they have identical surface properties all around and over the entire length, such as flow rate, loading capacity, shrinkage behaviour or material thickness

Narrow textiles for fabricating filter media
"We manufacture our narrow textiles from a wide variety of high-tech yarns. Sometimes monofilament yarn is used, sometimes multifilament, sometimes spun yarn. Like the type of weave, we select the raw materials depending on the function they need to fulfil," emphasises Gert Laarakker, Sales Manager at vombaur. "So that our filtration textiles reliably perform the job they are supposed to perform. Clean. Safe. Sturdy."

Source:

stotz-design.com GmbH & Co. KG

Global Success of Technical Textiles will be Reflected in HIGHTEX 2021 (c) HIGHTEX 2021
International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Fair
28.12.2020

Global Success of Technical Textiles will be Reflected in HIGHTEX 2021

  • The nonwoven and technical textiles industry has become the focus of the whole world during the pandemic process.
  • Most countries carried out works for these sectors with their investments, production and innovations.

During the pandemic process, a new one is added every day to the works for the nonwoven and technical textiles sector, whose importance is increasing in line with the needs. Turkey has become a center of  technical textiles by showing that its accumulation in these field and power.

In the Turkish technical textiles sector, which has an export market of 107 billion dollars worldwide and continues to break its own export record every month, R&D and innovation investments continue without slowing down. Technical textile exports, which increased by 77 percent in last November compared to the same month of the previous year, increased by 55 percent in January - November period and reached 2.5 billion dollars. Thus, technical and smart textiles and production technologies both attracted more attention and gained more importance in line with the needs of the pandemic process.

  • The nonwoven and technical textiles industry has become the focus of the whole world during the pandemic process.
  • Most countries carried out works for these sectors with their investments, production and innovations.

During the pandemic process, a new one is added every day to the works for the nonwoven and technical textiles sector, whose importance is increasing in line with the needs. Turkey has become a center of  technical textiles by showing that its accumulation in these field and power.

In the Turkish technical textiles sector, which has an export market of 107 billion dollars worldwide and continues to break its own export record every month, R&D and innovation investments continue without slowing down. Technical textile exports, which increased by 77 percent in last November compared to the same month of the previous year, increased by 55 percent in January - November period and reached 2.5 billion dollars. Thus, technical and smart textiles and production technologies both attracted more attention and gained more importance in line with the needs of the pandemic process.

HIGHTEX 2021 International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Fair, which will be held at Tüyap Fair and Congress Center on 22-26 June 2021, will be the exhibition where the latest technologies and products for nonwoven, technical and smart textiles which have become more important during the pandemic period and have become the focus of the whole world. Especially the products and technologies produced for the pandemic will attract more attention at the exhibition. HIGHTEX 2021 Exhibition, which will gather its exhibitors and visitors under one roof, will also allow new collaborations. At the same time, the exhibition, where developing technologies and products are exhibited, will provide a great advantage in terms of the formation of new business ideas.
HIGHTEX 2021, the first and only exhibition in Turkey in its field are expected to sign a new record in terms of number of exhibitors and visitors. You can visit www.hightexfairs.com website for more information about HIGHTEX 2021, which is preparing to attract more attention and host people than ever before.

Turkish textile manufacturers wait for ITM 2021 Exhibition (c) ITM
10.12.2020

Turkish textile manufacturers wait for ITM 2021 Exhibition to expand their investments

The Turkish textile industry, which continues its exports and investments without slowing down despite the devastating pandemic, once again proved its strength, especially in this period. ITM 2021 Exhibition, which will be held in Istanbul between 22 and 26 June 2021, will provide a great advantage to companies that desire to expand their investments and introduce their brand new technologies.

The Turkish textile industry, which continues its exports and investments without slowing down despite the devastating pandemic, once again proved its strength, especially in this period. ITM 2021 Exhibition, which will be held in Istanbul between 22 and 26 June 2021, will provide a great advantage to companies that desire to expand their investments and introduce their brand new technologies.

Although there were slowdowns in the textile industry in April and May this year due to the troublesome coronavirus pandemic , the Turkish textile industry succeeded a big breakthrough with the removal of restrictions in June, thanks to both its textile production infrastructure and international exports capacity. The exports of the textile and raw materials sector increased and the companies turned to new investments. While many local companies enlarged their facilities, some of them made new investment decisions. For example, while a giant hygienic and medical fabric production facility was invested in Çorlu, another Turkish company, a global brand in textile machinery production, decided to invest 40 million Turkish Lira. Gaziantep-based spunbond and meltblown nonwoven manufacturer company added two new meltblown lines to its operations. Another company also began to invest in the production of raw materials that they import. This investment activity in Turkey, where is a manufacturing base of European customers whet the appetite of international investors. One of South Korea's largest conglomerates has rolled up its sleeves for an investment of 430 million US Dollars in Çerkezköy. Due to the investments, the purchase of textile machinery increased by 37.1 percent in the first nine months of 2020 amounting to over 1 billion US Dollars.

The Accurate Address for Investment Decisions: ITM 2021 Exhibition
Although the companies took advantage of the pandemic period as an opportunity and continued their investments, many of them are waiting for the ITM 2021 Exhibition for large machinery purchases. ITM 2021 Exhibition, which will be held between 22 and 26 June 2021 at Istanbul Tüyap Fair and Congress Center, will gather thousands of participating companies and visitors under one roof. The company officials, who will have the opportunity to observe the latest technological products to be exhibited by the international and domestic exhibitors, will direct their investments by meeting with the experts of the sector. The machines produced for technical textiles, which became even more important during the devastating pandemic period, will attract the attention of visitors. Thanks to the machinery purchases and business partnerships of both domestic and international companies, there will be great dynamism in the textile industry and the national economy.

Source:

ITM

Logo Archroma (c) Archroma
06.11.2020

Archroma announces 20% price increase for its fluorochemical range

Archroma, a global leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, today announced an increase of up to 20% in the selling prices of its Nuva® N and Fluowet® fluorocarbon polymers.

Fluorocarbon polymers are typically used in essential applications where a water and/or oil barrier is needed, such as personal protective equipment (PPE) for health professionals, or other technical textiles.

As a global leader in the area of repellency treatments, we have the responsibility to develop and produce products with the highest level of sustainability – economically and ecologically.

The price increase has become necessary to support the increasing regulatory and other costs, as well as ongoing investments that Archroma continuously makes in its own manufacturing technology and process, to produce fluorochemicals in the safest possible way for the consumer and the environment.

The price increase will be effective from November 16, 2020, in all regions and markets, for all new orders and as contracts allow.

 

® Trademarks of Archroma registered in many countries

Archroma, a global leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, today announced an increase of up to 20% in the selling prices of its Nuva® N and Fluowet® fluorocarbon polymers.

Fluorocarbon polymers are typically used in essential applications where a water and/or oil barrier is needed, such as personal protective equipment (PPE) for health professionals, or other technical textiles.

As a global leader in the area of repellency treatments, we have the responsibility to develop and produce products with the highest level of sustainability – economically and ecologically.

The price increase has become necessary to support the increasing regulatory and other costs, as well as ongoing investments that Archroma continuously makes in its own manufacturing technology and process, to produce fluorochemicals in the safest possible way for the consumer and the environment.

The price increase will be effective from November 16, 2020, in all regions and markets, for all new orders and as contracts allow.

 

® Trademarks of Archroma registered in many countries

Source:

Archroma / EMG

Bandagenband (c) JUMBO Textil
20.10.2020

JUMBO-Textil: Narrow textiles with a function

Technical textiles fulfil many functions: they hold, they lift, they fixate, they stretch – and they tension. In this function narrow textiles fulfil an important task in product development. And they offer significant advantages over metal or plastic tensioning devices such as springs, clamps or cable ties.

Properties
Textiles are light: a property that plays a central role in modern mobility. Textiles are flexible: from extremely high to extremely low elasticity: the force-elongation behaviour of elasticated narrow textiles can be precisely defined. Depending on the tensioning task to be performed. Textiles tension in tight packaging spaces: elastics can also be used where space is too tight for springs and clasps. Textiles are energy efficient: lightweight, with high tensioning force. Textiles are easy to handle: replace a connector spontaneously and without tools, quickly change the length or roll up and store a supply. And textiles are sustainable: natural fibres and rubber are natural and ecologically degradable raw materials; synthetic fibres can be completely produced from recycled materials.

Technical textiles fulfil many functions: they hold, they lift, they fixate, they stretch – and they tension. In this function narrow textiles fulfil an important task in product development. And they offer significant advantages over metal or plastic tensioning devices such as springs, clamps or cable ties.

Properties
Textiles are light: a property that plays a central role in modern mobility. Textiles are flexible: from extremely high to extremely low elasticity: the force-elongation behaviour of elasticated narrow textiles can be precisely defined. Depending on the tensioning task to be performed. Textiles tension in tight packaging spaces: elastics can also be used where space is too tight for springs and clasps. Textiles are energy efficient: lightweight, with high tensioning force. Textiles are easy to handle: replace a connector spontaneously and without tools, quickly change the length or roll up and store a supply. And textiles are sustainable: natural fibres and rubber are natural and ecologically degradable raw materials; synthetic fibres can be completely produced from recycled materials.

Applications
Development teams in numerous industries leverage these properties for their products. For example, for flexible machine parts in mechanical engineering, for switch contacts in electrical engineering, for oscillation-capable locking systems in the construction industry, for noise- and vibration-free seating systems in the automotive sector or for grip rings in the toys industry.

Tasks
Particularly en vogue today, when we are spending more time than usual in our own homes: applications for narrow textiles in the furniture industry. They go far beyond the area of legacy home textiles: as tensioning elements in armchairs, sofas and chairs, as hinge solutions in cupboards, as fixation elements in extendable or folding tables. Narrow textiles are used for gripping tasks almost everywhere in the living room.

"JUMBO-Textil specialises in precisely implementing the individual requirements for defined force-elongation values of elasticated narrow textiles: we adapt the technical properties of our products precisely to the specific task and the respective raw materials," explains Werner Thiex, Sales Director Automotive. "Precise technical specification plus sustainable raw materials – this is a crucial combination in the 21st century".

Source:

stotz-design.com

World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy (c) pixabay
Cotton
07.10.2020

October, 7th: World Cotton Day

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

According to the WTO, the aim of World Cotton Day is to highlight the global economic importance of cotton and to raise awareness of the raw material by recognising the work of everyone involved in its cultivation, processing and trade. At the same time, within the framework of international cooperation, it is hoped that supporters and investors can be found to aid with technological and economic progress within the cotton value chain.

This time, the entire world cotton community will be involved in World Cotton Day on Wednesday, 7 October 2020. A wide variety of campaigns and events are taking place everywhere to draw attention to the importance of cotton and its possible uses.

Cotton is one of the most relevant agricultural raw materials in the world. Around 26 million tonnes of it are harvested annually. Approximately 150 million people in almost 80 countries around the world live from the cultivation of the natural fibre. A large number of these live in developing countries, where cotton cultivation is of particular importance as a cash crop.

Cotton is known as an agricultural product that is turned into a textile. The raw material is indispensable in fashion and clothing – and has been for thousands of years. But the use of cotton now goes far beyond textiles. For example, cosmetic products such as hand creams and hair shampoo are made from the oil of cotton seeds. The raw material is also used in the manufacture of banknotes, furniture and technical textiles, as well as in medical technology.

Against the background of the current discussion on sustainability and sustainable consumption, the role of natural fibres is becoming even more important. Cotton is biodegradable and a renewable resource. It can be grown again and again in agriculture through cultivation in crop rotation. This secures incomes and enables efficient value creation within the global production and processing chain.

The Bremen Cotton Exchange will actively support World Cotton Day with cross-media coverage. In addition, in time for World Cotton Day, three thematically different, emotionally appealing short films about cotton will be launched. They are aimed at consumers as customers of the textile and clothing trade and provide information about the benefits and properties of cotton and answer questions about its sustainability. In keeping with the times, they will be published via virtual media.

Monforts texCoat coating system (c) Monforts / AWOL Media
06.10.2020

Monforts at Innovate Textile & Apparel (ITA) 2020

During the Innovate Textile & Apparel (ITA) virtual textile machinery show which will run from October 15th-30th 2020, Monforts will be emphasising its leadership position in three key fields – advanced coating, denim finishing and fabric sanforizing.

With its multi-head capability, the latest Monforts texCoat coating system provides flexibility with an unprecedented range of options and a wide range of modules available.

Refinements
“Since we acquired the coating technology that our systems are based on we have made a lot of refinements and all of them are reflected in higher coating accuracy and the resulting quality of the treated fabrics,” says Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, Jürgen Hanel.
“Our systems have the shortest fabric path from the coating unit into the stenter and we have all variations of coating application systems too – and all of these options are available in wider widths, with the engineering and manufacturing from a single source here in Europe.”

During the Innovate Textile & Apparel (ITA) virtual textile machinery show which will run from October 15th-30th 2020, Monforts will be emphasising its leadership position in three key fields – advanced coating, denim finishing and fabric sanforizing.

With its multi-head capability, the latest Monforts texCoat coating system provides flexibility with an unprecedented range of options and a wide range of modules available.

Refinements
“Since we acquired the coating technology that our systems are based on we have made a lot of refinements and all of them are reflected in higher coating accuracy and the resulting quality of the treated fabrics,” says Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, Jürgen Hanel.
“Our systems have the shortest fabric path from the coating unit into the stenter and we have all variations of coating application systems too – and all of these options are available in wider widths, with the engineering and manufacturing from a single source here in Europe.”

CYD
Denim finishing is meanwhile a field in which Monforts has an undisputed lead and it has been working closely with its many partners in the key denim manufacturing countries of Bangladesh, Brazil, China, India, Mexico Pakistan and Turkey to develop advanced solutions. The latest of these is the CYD yarn dyeing system.
“CYD is based on the proven Econtrol® dyeing system for fabrics*,” explains Monforts Head of Denim Hans Wroblowski. “It integrates new functions and processes into the weaving preparatory processes – spinning, direct beaming, warping and assembly beaming, followed by sizing and dyeing – in order to increase quality, flexibility, economic viability and productivity. The CYD system has been developed in response to a very strong market demand.”

Pre-shrinking
Monforts has also recently delivered a significant number of its latest Monfortex sanforizing lines to customers around the world.
Sanforizing is vital to final fabric quality, pre-shrinking it by compressing prior to washing, to limit any residual or further shrinkage in a made-up finished garment to less than 1%, for perfect comfort and fit over an extended lifetime.

As with industry-leading Montex stenters, Monfortex lines benefit from the latest Qualitex 800 control system which allows all parameters to be easily automated via the 24-inch colour touchscreen, including production speed, control of all fabric feed devices, rotation spray or steaming cylinder options, the width of the stretching field and the rubber belt pressure. Up to 10,000 separate process parameter records can be generated and stored by the data manager.

 

*Econtrol® is a registered mark of DyStar Colours Distribution GmbH, Germany.

Baldwin installs six precision spray systems in 60 days for textile manufacturers (c) Baldwin Technology Company Inc.
Baldwin’s TexCoat G4 precision spray system produces ideal results in fabric finishing, because the exact required amount of water and chemistry is always applied.
22.09.2020

Baldwin: six precision spray systems in 60 days for textile manufacturers

  • Fabric finishing and sanforization systems installed in the US and Turkey to enhance productivity

ST. LOUIS - Baldwin Technology Company Inc. has successfully installed six new fabric finishing and sanforizing precision spray systems in the US and Turkey. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the installations were completed in just 60 days, thanks to close collaboration between onsite Baldwin textile team members, local agents and remote support from the company’s product and technology center in Sweden.
For textiles, non-wovens and technical textiles, Baldwin’s precision spray technology processes a wide range of low-viscosity water-based chemicals, such as softeners, anti-microbial agents, water repellents, oil  repellents, flame retardants and more.

  • Fabric finishing and sanforization systems installed in the US and Turkey to enhance productivity

ST. LOUIS - Baldwin Technology Company Inc. has successfully installed six new fabric finishing and sanforizing precision spray systems in the US and Turkey. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the installations were completed in just 60 days, thanks to close collaboration between onsite Baldwin textile team members, local agents and remote support from the company’s product and technology center in Sweden.
For textiles, non-wovens and technical textiles, Baldwin’s precision spray technology processes a wide range of low-viscosity water-based chemicals, such as softeners, anti-microbial agents, water repellents, oil  repellents, flame retardants and more.

These systems enable fabric producers to significantly reduce chemical and water consumption, while speeding up production times and eliminating production steps, including drying and bath changeovers when switching fabric colors. “Our customers are major manufacturers in fabric dying, finishing and remoistening, and we want to provide outstanding service and support—even in times like this,” said Rick Stanford, Business Development Leader at Baldwin and the commercial leader of the US installations. “Not only does our precision spray technology enhance productivity in their process, but there is also zero waste, which goes hand-in-hand with the increased sustainability focus in the textile industry.”

In North Carolina, two new TexCoat G4 precision spray systems are now in production with major international vertical manufacturers of outdoor living, performance fabrics and automotive fabrics. In Georgia, a major vertical manufacturer of workwear and protective fabrics installed a sanfor precision spray system, which has helped the customer obtain deeper penetration of moisture into fabrics treated with durable water repellents. In Turkey, three new TexCoat G4 systems were installed in Çorlu, northwest of Istanbul, for a large producer of knit fabrics, such as T-shirts. “In Turkey, the manufacturer purchased and installed one TexCoat G4 system before COVID-19, and the customer was so pleased with the results that, during the pandemic, three more were purchased,” said Simone Morellini, Sales Manager- EMEAR at Baldwin and the commercial leader of the Turkish installations. “The systems were manufactured and installed during the lockdown, and now, all four systems are up and running, and being used heavily on a daily basis.” “With the success we have seen, we plan to apply the same strategies for upcoming installations, including the next one in Honduras: strong local management and customer coordination, combined with  effective remote support during the installation,” said Stanford.

Source:

Baldwin Technology Company Inc.

Acafintex looks to a bright future with new Monforts technology (c) AWOL Media
Acafintex father and son ownership team Don Francisco and Lic Francisco Moyano at the new Monforts installation.
14.09.2020

Acafintex looks to a bright future with new Monforts technology

At a total length of over 71 metres, the Montex finishing line that has just been installed by Monforts for Acafintex at its plant in Puebla, Mexico, is one of the highest capacity stenters the German technology leader has delivered to date.

Puebla is known as the epicentre of Mexico’s textile and clothing industry and is ideally placed for supplying both the USA and Europe, being three hours from the Gulf of Mexico for shipping via the Atlantic, and five hours from the Pacific coast as well.

Mexico's textile and clothing industry spans the entire production chain – from cotton growing and man-made fibre production to the manufacture of yarn, fabric, finished clothing and accessories. The industry is estimated to directly employ around 640,000 workers and to provide livelihoods for many more people indirectly. The country is a key supplier of textiles and clothing to the USA, but has faced fierce competition from China, which has until recently been the largest supplier of textiles and clothing to the US market.

At a total length of over 71 metres, the Montex finishing line that has just been installed by Monforts for Acafintex at its plant in Puebla, Mexico, is one of the highest capacity stenters the German technology leader has delivered to date.

Puebla is known as the epicentre of Mexico’s textile and clothing industry and is ideally placed for supplying both the USA and Europe, being three hours from the Gulf of Mexico for shipping via the Atlantic, and five hours from the Pacific coast as well.

Mexico's textile and clothing industry spans the entire production chain – from cotton growing and man-made fibre production to the manufacture of yarn, fabric, finished clothing and accessories. The industry is estimated to directly employ around 640,000 workers and to provide livelihoods for many more people indirectly. The country is a key supplier of textiles and clothing to the USA, but has faced fierce competition from China, which has until recently been the largest supplier of textiles and clothing to the US market.

However, the position of Mexico in the US import market has become more stable following the signing of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which came into force in July this year. The country has also been a key beneficiary of the current trade war that is raging between China and the USA.

In addition, there is scope for higher sales in Mexico’s domestic market. The country has a population of 129 million people who are becoming increasingly prosperous, with a large proportion of younger people who are spending more on clothing.

Flexible operation

Founded in 1986, family-owned Acafintex operates as a commission dyehouse, finishing both knitted and woven fabrics for local companies in Mexico, in widths of between 100cm to 3.6 metres. The company is run by father and son team Don Francisco and Lic Francisco Moyano.

“We have very flexible operations for fabric finishing and also produce and sell our own fabrics for both the fashion industry and for the uniforms market,” says Don Francisco. “These days, we are increasingly finishing materials for technical textiles and for the automotive industry too. We have both local and international suppliers of both yarns and base fabrics and make sure we choose the best and most reliable sources. Exports now account for over 40% of our sales.”

European contract

With a  width of 3.8 metres, the new Monforts Montex line at Acafintex is equipped with no less than 12 double TwinAir drying chambers to meet the requirements of specific technical textiles to a European customer, in a contract secured following the company’s ISO 9001 certification in 2019. The line is equipped with an integrated heat recovery system and also benefits from an exhaust air cleaning system to ensure the most resource-efficient processing available on the market.

On the Monforts TwinAir system, the airflows above and below the fabric being dried can be regulated completely independently of each other, with Optiscan Auto-Balance fully controlling the distance between the fabric and the dryer nozzles via variable-frequency fan motors and CCD chip evaluation. As a result, the evaporation rate of the stenter and its energy utilisation are always fully optimised. Contact-free drying eliminates the possibility of fabric marking or stitch draft.

Highly-intuitive Monforts Qualitex visualisation software allows all machine functions and process parameters to be assessed and controlled easily, and thousands of article specific settings and formulations to be called up at any time – with 100% reproducible results.

In combination with an existing Montex stenter, the new line has expanded finishing capacity at Acafintex to an annual 20 million linear metres.

Modifications

“From the installation to the start-up, we were supported by a team of Monforts technicians and local representative Arnulf Thaler at Sattex here in Mexico,” says Lic Francisco. “Of course, every installation has its challenges and with such big machines we needed to modify several things inside the factory and also required certain modifications from Monforts which were all carried out successfully.”  

Forced, like much of the textile industry globally, to temporarily suspend operations at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, Acafintex is now back to full production, having installed the necessary safety measures for its employees, and is anticipating a bright future.

“We are passionate about developing new materials in search of mutual benefit for both our clients and suppliers, as well as our own workforce and the environment,” Don Francisco Moyano concludes. “Investment in the latest technology like this new Monforts line plays a key role in helping us achieve our long-term goals.”

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. (c)Paimion
Rester Paimio end-of-life textile refinement
18.08.2020

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy and LSJH will drive the textile sector towards a circular economy and begin processing textile waste as an industrial raw material. The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. The 3,000-square-metre plant is being developed by Rester Oy, which recycles companies' end-of-life textiles and industrial waste materials. LSJH, which processes households’ end-of-life textiles on its production line, will hire part of the plant.

Outi Luukko, Rester Oy’s board chair, says, “The processing plant will begin a new era of textile circular economy in Finland. As industry pioneers, we are launching a system change in Scandinavia. The transition of the textile industry from a linear model to a circular economy is essential, as virgin materials cannot sustain the current structure of the textile industry. And why should it, when there is so much recyclable material available?”

From the perspective of Rester Oy’s main owner, work clothing supplier Touchpoint, the circular economy plant not only represents resource efficiency, but is also necessary from the perspective of the entire life cycle of a responsible work clothing collection.

Luukko adds, “Finding a local solution to a global problem is a huge leap in the right direction and raises Finland's profile as a pioneer of circular economy."

The future plant will be able to process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles annually, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste. Both production lines produce recycled fibre, which can be used for various industrial applications, including yarn and fabric, insulating materials for construction and shipping industries, acoustic panels, composites, non-woven and filter materials, and other technical textiles, such as geo-textiles.

LSJH is piloting a full-scale refinement plant

LSJH has launched a pilot production line for processing households' end-of-life textiles. Unfortunately, consumers' end-of-life textiles are heterogeneous, making them a challenging raw material for further processing. Before processing, the textiles are sorted by material into various fibre classes using optical identification technology developed by LSJH and its partners. This ensures the quality of the raw material and the resulting fibre products.

Jukka Heikkilä, managing director for Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto, explains: “On the basis of the experiences gathered from the pilot project, Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto is preparing a full-scale refinement plant in the Turku region. As soon as 2023, the plant will process Finnish households' end-of-life textiles. The project involves all waste treatment plants owned by Finnish municipalities.”

Paimio has ambitious goals for circular economy companies

Rester’s initiative aims to create a circular economy cluster in Paimio that combines the processing and reuse of end-of-life textile fibres. Paimion Kehitys Oy, which is owned by the City of Paimio and the local association of enterprises, supports the development of circular economy companies in Paimio.

Mika Ingi, managing director for Paimion Kehitys Oy, says, “We want to step out of our traditional municipal role and create significant added value for everyone taking part. That is why we are involved in the development of a new modern service model based on ecosystem thinking. We are piloting the textile cluster, followed in the coming years by clusters focusing on plastic, construction, and energy. The aim of our service is to support and help develop new profitable business by bringing circular economy companies and their potential customers to innovate together."

The foundation stone of the processing plant was laid today (18 August 2020). The processing plant will begin operations in February 2021.

Sustainable leadership for GtA with new Monforts Montex wide width lines (c) AWOL Media
GtA Managing Director Andreas Niess
27.07.2020

Sustainable leadership for GtA with new Monforts Montex wide width lines

Following the successful commissioning of two new Monforts Montex wide-width stenter lines and additional environmental management equipment at its plant in Germany, GtA – Society for Textile Equipment GmbH – is aiming to be the first textile finishing company to become entirely CO2-neutral in the manufacture of all of its products by 2025.

GtA is a partner company to Germany’s large-format digital printing fabric leader, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH, which has has this year been able to considerably expand its portfolio due to the new Monforts lines.

Headquartered in Gross-Zimmern, close to Frankfurt, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH and its partners in Germany have an annual production of 37 million square metres of warp knits for a range of end-use applications, including garments, automotive interiors and technical textiles, but increasingly with a concentration on digital printing substrates.

Fault-free textiles

Following the successful commissioning of two new Monforts Montex wide-width stenter lines and additional environmental management equipment at its plant in Germany, GtA – Society for Textile Equipment GmbH – is aiming to be the first textile finishing company to become entirely CO2-neutral in the manufacture of all of its products by 2025.

GtA is a partner company to Germany’s large-format digital printing fabric leader, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH, which has has this year been able to considerably expand its portfolio due to the new Monforts lines.

Headquartered in Gross-Zimmern, close to Frankfurt, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH and its partners in Germany have an annual production of 37 million square metres of warp knits for a range of end-use applications, including garments, automotive interiors and technical textiles, but increasingly with a concentration on digital printing substrates.

Fault-free textiles

A new standard in pure white, 100% clean and fault-free textile substrates has been demanded by this market in recent years due to the rapid growth in digitally-printed banners and billboards – often referred to as ‘soft signage’.

The substrates of choice for digital printing are 100% polyester warp knits which are resilient and allow excellent take-up of inks, and vibrant colours and clear and precise images to be achieved with digital printing techniques. The knitted construction also has the advantage of elasticity, which is a plus in terms of flexibility for installers.

Critically, the warp knitted fabrics have extremely smooth surfaces which is becoming increasingly important due to the general move away from PVC coatings which were the standard in the past.

It was to finish these fabrics for Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH as well as providing such services for many other customers, that the GtA plant in Neresheim, Baden-Württemberg, was established in 2015.

The purpose-built plant on a greenfield site was initially equipped with a fully-automated, 72 metre long Monforts installation comprising a washing machine integrated with a 3.6 metre wide, seven-chamber Montex stenter. The line quickly went from single to double shift production and then to 24/7 operation  to meet demand.

Expanded widths

Building on the success of this installation, GtA has now installed two more Montex stenter lines – both in expanded working widths of 5.6 metres and purpose-built at Montex GmbH in Austria.

A six-chamber Montex unit is combined with a washing machine to guarantee the purity of the substrates, while a five-chamber line is integrated with a wide-width coating machine. This new coating capability at GtA has led to a number of new additions to the Georg and Otto Friedrich DecoTex range for digital printing, including wide width fabrics with flame retardant, antimicrobial and non-slip finishes.

The new Montex stenter lines benefit from all of the latest innovations from Monforts, including the Smart Sensor system for the optimised maintenance planning of key mechanical wear components on the stenters. A comprehensive overview of the condition of all parts at any time is now available for operators within the highly intuitive Qualitex visualization software.

With Qualitex, all article-specific settings can be stored and the formulations for thousands of treatment processes called up again at any time. Individual operators can also personalise their dashboards with the most important machine functions and process parameters.

Environmental commitment

GtA is run by a seasoned team of textile professionals led by Managing Director Andreas Niess.

“We have received excellent service from Monforts from the outset and we were happy to place the order for these two new lines as part of our ongoing cooperation,” he says. “With all of the latest Monforts advances in technology we are fully in control of all production and quality parameters with these lines, as part of our significant commitment to innovative environmental technology.”

The GtA plant, which operates in near-cleanroom conditions, has also been equipped with proprietary technology to fully exploit the Monforts air-to-air heat recovery systems that are now standard with Montex stenters.

“Around 30 per cent of our investment volume at the site goes to energy-saving measures and we are sure that this commitment is worthwhile,” Mr Niess says. “As an example, our integrated heat recovery system fully exploits the waste heat from the process exhaust air and the burner exhaust gases of the Monforts stenters, allowing us to achieve an exhaust air temperature of  between 30 to 34°C, compared to what would conventionally be between 140 to 160°C. Another focus has been on exhaust air purification technology and here too, the latest technology has been installed with integrated heat recovery elements.”

This, he adds, saves 52% of the energy that would normally be used – equating to 5,800,000 KwH per year. The necessary audits for energy-efficient companies are also carried out annually.

In addition, GtA has purpose-designed the automatic chemical mixing and dosing systems that feed the padders for the key treatments that are carried out on the fabrics through the stenters.

The company is going further, however, in its pursuit of clean production and raw materials.

"We want to be an asset and not a burden on our immediate environment and therefore do not use any additives containing solvents," Mr Niess says. “We were the first to use fully halogen-free flame retardant chemistry, and we use bio-based, finely ground alumina products for the washing process instead of surfactants. PES polyester yarns made from recycled material are also increasingly used and the latest additions to our raw materials portfolio, the RC-Ocean products, are made from recycled sea plastic.

“We are now planning a combined heat and power plant for the production of electrical energy and heat and we will also build a photovoltaic system that converts solar radiation into electrical energy. GtA wants to be the first textile finishing company to be CO2-neutral in the manufacture of all of its products by 2025. The complete heat supply and heating for the 13,000 square metre production hall, as well as the office building and the hot water supply for the domestic water, is already energy-neutral. We are convinced that this commitment will pay off in the long term and our positive business development proves that sustainability and business profitability are perfectly compatible.”

In addition to the products for Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH, GtA  offers its manufacturing capacities for other customers as a contract service.

All products are manufactured in accordance with Öko-Tex Standard 100, product class 1 and the company is also involved in the research and development of new sustainable manufacturing processes, in cooperation with many regional universities and funding project partners.

Source:

AWOL Media for A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG

ITM 2021
The ITM and Hightex Exhibitions are postponed
22.05.2020

ITM and HIGHTEX Exhibitions Postponed to 22-26 June 2021

ITM International Textile Machinery Exhibition and HIGHTEX International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Exhibition, held every two years in partnership with Tüyap Tüm Fuarcılık Inc. and Teknik Fuarcılık Inc., and in cooperation with TEMSAD, were planned to be held between June 2-6 this year. However, as effects of Corona virus (Covid-19) continue to increasingly impact all the world, ITM and HIGHTEX exhibitions had been postponed to 14-18 July 2020, but it has been announced that the events have been rescheduled to 22-26 June 2021. 

ITM International Textile Machinery Exhibition and HIGHTEX International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Exhibition, held every two years in partnership with Tüyap Tüm Fuarcılık Inc. and Teknik Fuarcılık Inc., and in cooperation with TEMSAD, were planned to be held between June 2-6 this year. However, as effects of Corona virus (Covid-19) continue to increasingly impact all the world, ITM and HIGHTEX exhibitions had been postponed to 14-18 July 2020, but it has been announced that the events have been rescheduled to 22-26 June 2021. 

Exhibitions Preparation Continue
Preparations for ITM and HIGHTEX 2021 Exhibitions continue at full steam to bring together hundreds of manufacturers and global investors who develop leading technologies in their fields. The latest technologies and new products to be displayed at ITM and HIGHTEX Exhibitions, which will open their doors in Istanbul Tuyap Fair Convention and Congress Center next year, will meet with textile investors from all over the world.
 
ITM 2018, where textile machinery leaders exhibited their latest technological products, turned into a trade show with global launches and hosted one of the largest meetings in the world, with 1150 exhibitors from 64 countries and 58.942 visitors (14.248 of them foreigners) from 94 countries.

Source:

Teknik Fuarcılık INC

Logo monforts
Logo monforts
09.03.2020

Monforts ATC adventures in aquaculture

Monforts has recently been involved in a number of R&D trials aimed at improving the performance of the fishing cage nets employed in fish farming operations at its Advanced Technology Centre (ATC) in Mönchengladbach, Germany.

The cultivation of both freshwater and saltwater fish populations under controlled conditions is a global industry valued at around $200 billion annually and only made possible with the use of huge aquaculture nets.

Monforts has recently been involved in a number of R&D trials aimed at improving the performance of the fishing cage nets employed in fish farming operations at its Advanced Technology Centre (ATC) in Mönchengladbach, Germany.

The cultivation of both freshwater and saltwater fish populations under controlled conditions is a global industry valued at around $200 billion annually and only made possible with the use of huge aquaculture nets.

Biofouling
“These nets are very prone to biofouling and to avoid its negative impacts, high-pressure robotic jets are now used to clean them,” explains Monforts Head of Technical Textiles Jürgen Hanel. “Net cleaning is expensive and can also damage current antifouling coatings on the nets, causing contamination as well as fish health and welfare risks.
The development of more effective antifouling coatings for fishing cage nets has been one aspect of R&D work at the Monforts ATC, while the use of how alternative fibres could potentially be coated or finished to replace the polyamide which is currently most widely used has also been explored.
The issue of plastics and synthetic fibres in the oceans has generated global media attention recently, and the aquaculture industry is exploring all avenues that will lead to more sustainable practices.

Expansions
Since its opening in 2013, over €3 million has been invested in equipment at the Monforts ATC, which over an area of 1,200 square metres houses two full finishing lines, engineered to accommodate an extremely diverse range of processes, in addition to a Thermex range for the continuous dyeing of denim.

Source:

AWOL Media

The SFL-2000 is the result of a four-year development project (c) AWOL
10.02.2020

ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström teamed up with Juki Corporation


In the latest technology innovation from members of TMAS (the Swedish textile machinery association), ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström have teamed up with Juki Corporation – the world’s leading sewing machine manufacturer – in the development of a new automated line concept that can considerably speed up the production of finished filter bags.

Woven or nonwoven filter bags employed in a wide range of industrial processes may be under the radar as products, but they represent a pretty significant percentage of technical textiles production.

According to a recent report from BCC research, a leading US analyst covering this sector, industrial filtration represented a $555 million market in 2019 and some of the key areas where such filter bags are employed include:


In the latest technology innovation from members of TMAS (the Swedish textile machinery association), ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström have teamed up with Juki Corporation – the world’s leading sewing machine manufacturer – in the development of a new automated line concept that can considerably speed up the production of finished filter bags.

Woven or nonwoven filter bags employed in a wide range of industrial processes may be under the radar as products, but they represent a pretty significant percentage of technical textiles production.

According to a recent report from BCC research, a leading US analyst covering this sector, industrial filtration represented a $555 million market in 2019 and some of the key areas where such filter bags are employed include:

  • Metal fabrication, with effective filtration required for manual and automated welding, thermal cutting, blasting and machining, especially for coolant filtration.
  • The process and energy industries, including foundries, smelters, incinerators, asphalt works and energy production plants.
  • Other key manufacturing fields – often where dust is generated – including the production of timber, textiles, composites, waste handling and minerals, in addition to chemicals, food production, pharmaceuticals, electronics and agriculture.

Line integration
The new SFL-2000 line is the result of a four-year development project between Juki Central Europe, headquartered in Poland, and the two ACG companies.

It is capable of handling a wide range of different filter media, and as an all-in-one solution, can produce high quality and accurate seams to pre-defined parameters, with optional modules allowing for customised constructions.

 

More information:
ACG Kinna ACG Nyström TMAS
Source:

AWOL

(c) Edward C. Gregor Associates
03.02.2020

Dynamic Modifiers: Highest flame retardancy with new coating

A new non-halogenated FR compound called PAL...VersaCHARTM can achieve a new level of flame retardant performance as a coating for nonwovens and technical textiles.

PAL...VersaCHARTM has been tested to 1,950°C – the highest to date – and shown to prevent all flaming drips of polymer. Char bodies form on the compound surface, protecting against flame creation and delaying heat transfer. Rapid self- extinguishing burn behaviour protects any underlying substrate to which it is adhered.

The compound has passed ASTM E84 (Class A) with a 15/10 rating, which includes ‘clean’ smoke generation of only 2.3% of the allowable ASTM smoke limits. In addition, the compound is light weight, at a specific gravity of 1.0, and 100% non-toxic in every respect, being free from heavy metals, halogens and VOCs. 

Other properties include excellent cold crack performance, hydrophobicity, printability, extreme chemical resistance and the ability to be custom tailored for specific needs such as UV or antimicrobial performance, as volume warrants. The compound is also very competitively priced.

A new non-halogenated FR compound called PAL...VersaCHARTM can achieve a new level of flame retardant performance as a coating for nonwovens and technical textiles.

PAL...VersaCHARTM has been tested to 1,950°C – the highest to date – and shown to prevent all flaming drips of polymer. Char bodies form on the compound surface, protecting against flame creation and delaying heat transfer. Rapid self- extinguishing burn behaviour protects any underlying substrate to which it is adhered.

The compound has passed ASTM E84 (Class A) with a 15/10 rating, which includes ‘clean’ smoke generation of only 2.3% of the allowable ASTM smoke limits. In addition, the compound is light weight, at a specific gravity of 1.0, and 100% non-toxic in every respect, being free from heavy metals, halogens and VOCs. 

Other properties include excellent cold crack performance, hydrophobicity, printability, extreme chemical resistance and the ability to be custom tailored for specific needs such as UV or antimicrobial performance, as volume warrants. The compound is also very competitively priced.

In addition to its use as a coating, PAL...VersaCHARTM compound can be produced as a flexible film or sheet and moulded to shape or over-moulded to most materials, including metal for corrosion resistance. As a polymeric compound it can be cast or calendered and typical durometers from 80-99A for flexible-to-high rigid formats are practical. 

Separately, an adhesive has been created which bonds to many surfaces. In internal evaluations of two laminated plies of woven carbon fibre and two plies of glass fabrics, both passed a 60 second vertical burn with no ply separation, distortion or flaming drips from the adhesive.

Dynamic Modifiers envisages many uses for PAL...VersaCHARTM, from aerospace to the protection of rigid structural materials in building interiors etc.   
 

Monforts at Techtextil India (c) Monforts
A recent Monforts texCoat installation.
20.11.2019

Monforts at Techtextil India

Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG will be providing information on its extensive range of coating and finishing technologies for the production of nonwovens and technical textiles at the forthcoming Techtextil India exhibition.

“India is already a very important market for Monforts and there are exciting prospects ahead for Indian manufacturers of technical textiles, who are well positioned to capitalise on growth opportunities,” says Monforts Head of Denim Hans Wroblowski, who will be at the Monforts stand in Hall 4, booth C52 at the show. “India has one of the largest working-age populations in the world and a complete textile value chain for both natural and synthetic fibres.”

In addition, he adds, India’s government, through its Ministry of Textiles, has been actively promoting the growth of technical textiles through various programmes based on investment promotion, subsidies, the creation of infrastructure and the stimulation of consumption.

Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG will be providing information on its extensive range of coating and finishing technologies for the production of nonwovens and technical textiles at the forthcoming Techtextil India exhibition.

“India is already a very important market for Monforts and there are exciting prospects ahead for Indian manufacturers of technical textiles, who are well positioned to capitalise on growth opportunities,” says Monforts Head of Denim Hans Wroblowski, who will be at the Monforts stand in Hall 4, booth C52 at the show. “India has one of the largest working-age populations in the world and a complete textile value chain for both natural and synthetic fibres.”

In addition, he adds, India’s government, through its Ministry of Textiles, has been actively promoting the growth of technical textiles through various programmes based on investment promotion, subsidies, the creation of infrastructure and the stimulation of consumption.

As a result, India’s Ministry of Textiles is forecasting that the growth of technical textiles in the country will be over 18% annually in the next few years, from a value of US$16.6 billion in 2018 to US$28.7 billion in 2021.

Value addition

High value-added technical products such as wide-width digital printing substrates, carbon fabrics for high-performance composites, filter media, flame retardant barrier fabrics and heavy-duty membranes are now being coated on Monforts texCoat ranges and finished with the company’s industry-leading Montex stenters.

“Since we acquired the technology that our coating units are based on in 2015, we have made a lot of refinements,” says Hans. “All of these developments are reflected in higher coating accuracy and the resulting quality of the treated fabrics. At the same time, our latest multi-functional coating heads offer an unprecedented range of options, with a wide range of modules available.”

The texCoat user interface is now equipped with the unique Monforts visualisation system and the magnetic doctor blade has greater power reserves. Options include a carbon fibre-reinforced composite coating drum with a more scratch-resistant surface and maximum rigidity and remote control which simplifies exact adjustment for the operator.

Montex stenters in special executions are meanwhile ideal for the drying and finishing of both technical woven fabrics and nonwovens and characterised by high stretching devices in both length and width.

“The European-built Montex range of stenters has earned its leading position in the technical textiles market due to the overall robustness, reliability and economy of these machines,” Hans concludes. “Whatever the intended end-product – and we continue to discover potentially new areas in which technical textiles can be utilised all the time – we have the machine specification and know-how to turn ideas into reality. In India we also benefit from the strong sales and service support of A.T.E. Enterprises.”

Texchtextil India takes place alongside World of Composites at the Bombay Exhibition Centre in Mumbai from November 20-22.

Source:

A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG by AWOL Media.