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05.07.2021

Infinited Fiber Company raises EUR 30 million from new Investors

Circular fashion and textile technology group Infinited Fiber Company has secured investments totaling 30 million euros in its latest financing round completed on June 30. The round also brought Infinited Fiber Company new investors, including sportswear company adidas, Invest FWD A/S, which is BESTSELLER’s investment arm for sustainable fashion, and investment company Security Trading Oy. Among the existing investors contributing to this round of financing were fashion retailer H&M Group, who was the lead investor, investment company Nidoco AB, and Sateri, the world’s largest viscose producer and a member of the RGE group of companies.

Circular fashion and textile technology group Infinited Fiber Company has secured investments totaling 30 million euros in its latest financing round completed on June 30. The round also brought Infinited Fiber Company new investors, including sportswear company adidas, Invest FWD A/S, which is BESTSELLER’s investment arm for sustainable fashion, and investment company Security Trading Oy. Among the existing investors contributing to this round of financing were fashion retailer H&M Group, who was the lead investor, investment company Nidoco AB, and Sateri, the world’s largest viscose producer and a member of the RGE group of companies.

This securement of new funding follows Infinited Fiber Company’s April announcement of plans to build a flagship factory in Finland in response to the strong growth in demand from global fashion and textile brands for its regenerated textile fiber Infinna™. The factory, which will use household textile waste as raw material, is expected to be operational in 2024 and to have an annual production capacity of 30,000 metric tons. The new funding enables Infinited Fiber Company to carry out the work needed to prepare for the flagship factory investment and to increase production at its pilot facilities in the years leading to 2024.

“We are really happy to welcome our new investors and grateful for the continued support from our older investors,” said Infinited Fiber Company co-founder and CEO Petri Alava. “These new investments enable us to proceed at full speed with the pre-engineering, environmental permits, and the recruitment of the skilled professionals needed to take our flagship project forward. We can now also boost production at our pilot facilities so that we can better serve our existing customers and grow our customer-base in preparation for both our flagship factory and for the future licensees of our technology.”

H&M Group is one of Infinited Fiber Company’s earliest investors. They first invested in Infinited Fiber Company in 2019.

H&M Group has also signed a multiyear sales deal with Infinited Fiber Company to secure its access to agreed amounts of Infinna from the planned flagship factory.

New investor BESTSELLER has struck a similar sales deal with Infinited Fiber Company.

In addition to strong interest by global fashion leaders, the technology has significant promise for major textile fiber producers. Allen Zhang, President of Sateri, said: “Sateri is excited to continue to invest in and collaborate with Infinited Fiber Company as part of our long-term commitment towards closed-loop, circular and climate-positive cellulosic fibers. This financing round marks a major milestone for our collaboration in scaling up next-generation fiber solutions.”

Infinited Fiber Company’s flagship plant preparations are also proceeding on other fronts. Several Nordic and international investment banks have given Infinited Fiber Company proposals on the financing options for the investment.

Infinited Fiber Company’s technology turns cellulose-based raw materials, like cotton-rich textile waste, into Infinna, a unique, premium-quality regenerated textile fiber with the natural, soft look and feel of cotton. Infinna is biodegradable and contains no microplastics, and at the end of their life, garments made with it can be recycled in the same process together with other textile waste.

Source:

Infinited Fiber Company

Infinited Fiber and Patagonia seal Multiyear Sales Deal (c) Infinited Fiber Company
28.06.2021

Infinited Fiber Company and Patagonia seal Multiyear Sales Deal

Outdoor apparel company Patagonia and circular fashion and textile technology group Infinited Fiber Company have signed a multiyear sales agreement for Infinited Fiber Company’s unique, premium-quality regenerated textile fiber Infinna™, which is created out of textile waste. The move marks a major milestone for both companies towards making textile circularity an everyday reality: The deal guarantees Patagonia access to the limited-supply fiber over the coming years and secures future sales income for Infinited Fiber Company as it ramps up production.

Infinna is a unique, virgin-quality regenerated textile fiber with the soft and natural look and feel of cotton. It is created from cotton-rich textile waste that is broken down at the molecular level and reborn as new fibers. Because it’s made of cellulose – a building block of all plants – Infinna is biodegradable and contains no microplastics to clog our seas. Clothes made with it can be recycled again in the same process together with other textile waste.

Outdoor apparel company Patagonia and circular fashion and textile technology group Infinited Fiber Company have signed a multiyear sales agreement for Infinited Fiber Company’s unique, premium-quality regenerated textile fiber Infinna™, which is created out of textile waste. The move marks a major milestone for both companies towards making textile circularity an everyday reality: The deal guarantees Patagonia access to the limited-supply fiber over the coming years and secures future sales income for Infinited Fiber Company as it ramps up production.

Infinna is a unique, virgin-quality regenerated textile fiber with the soft and natural look and feel of cotton. It is created from cotton-rich textile waste that is broken down at the molecular level and reborn as new fibers. Because it’s made of cellulose – a building block of all plants – Infinna is biodegradable and contains no microplastics to clog our seas. Clothes made with it can be recycled again in the same process together with other textile waste.

In April, Infinited Fiber Company announced plans to build a flagship factory in Finland to meet the growing demand for Infinna from global fashion brands. It is currently supplying customers from its R&D and pilot facilities in Espoo and Valkeakoski, Finland. The planned flagship factory will have an annual production capacity of 30,000 metric tons, which is enough fiber for roughly 100 million T-shirts made with 100% Infinna. Infinited Fiber Company expects to have sold the new factory’s entire output for several years during 2021.

More than 92 million metric tons of textile waste is produced globally every year and most of this ends up in landfills or incinerators. At the same time, textile fiber demand is increasing, with Textile Exchange estimating the global textile fiber market to grow 30% to 146 million metric tons by 2030 from 111 million metric tons in 2019. Infinited Fiber Company’s fiber regeneration technology, which uses cellulose-rich waste streams as its raw material, offers a solution both to stop waste from being wasted and to reduce the burden of the textile industry on the planet’s limited natural resources.

02.06.2021

Lenzing und Södra join forces in post-consumer textile recycling

  • Closing the loop from fiber to fiber in fashion

Lenzing, a leading global supplier of wood-based specialty fibers, and Södra, a producer of pulp, signed a cooperation agreement today, June 02, 2021. The cooperation involves the transfer of knowledge between the two companies, which have been proactively driving the circular economy issue for many years, and a joint process development followed by a capacity expansion for pulp from post-consumer waste. The jointly developed pulp OnceMore® will subsequently also be used as a raw material for the production of Lenzing’s TENCEL™ x REFIBRA™ branded specialty fibers.
The goal is to process 25,000 tons of textile waste per year by 2025.

  • Closing the loop from fiber to fiber in fashion

Lenzing, a leading global supplier of wood-based specialty fibers, and Södra, a producer of pulp, signed a cooperation agreement today, June 02, 2021. The cooperation involves the transfer of knowledge between the two companies, which have been proactively driving the circular economy issue for many years, and a joint process development followed by a capacity expansion for pulp from post-consumer waste. The jointly developed pulp OnceMore® will subsequently also be used as a raw material for the production of Lenzing’s TENCEL™ x REFIBRA™ branded specialty fibers.
The goal is to process 25,000 tons of textile waste per year by 2025.

OnceMore® by Södra is the world’s first process for industrial-scale recycling of textile waste of blended fibers, and it’s the forest who makes that possible. The process combines wood cellulose with textile waste to create a pure, high-quality dissolving pulp which can be used to produce new clothing and other textile products. During 2022, a new investment will ten-fold the production capacity of OnceMore® pulp and reach a higher level of recycled textile content. The goal for 2025 is to process 25,000 tons of textile and offer a OnceMore® pulp based on our wood material and 50 percent recycled textile material.

 

Source:

Lenzing AG

Key role for Kipaş in the EU’s multi-million New Cotton Project (c) Monforts
The New Cotton Project logo
30.11.2020

Key role for Kipaş in the EU’s multi-million New Cotton Project

  • Monforts customer Kipaş has been selected as the sole denim manufacturing partner in the €6.7 million European Union-funded New Cotton Project, involving the brands adidas and H&M, working in a consortium with suppliers, innovators and research institutes.

Kipaş, based in Kahramanmaraş, Turkey, is currently installing its third Monforts Montex stenter along with a third Monfortex compressive shrinkage system in a combined configuration dedicated to denim production.

This follows the successful installation and commissioning of the second Montex and Monfortex lines at the Kahramanmaraş plant in 2018, which Kipaş Vice Chairman of the Board Ahmet Öksüz said had immediately exceeded expectations.

  • Monforts customer Kipaş has been selected as the sole denim manufacturing partner in the €6.7 million European Union-funded New Cotton Project, involving the brands adidas and H&M, working in a consortium with suppliers, innovators and research institutes.

Kipaş, based in Kahramanmaraş, Turkey, is currently installing its third Monforts Montex stenter along with a third Monfortex compressive shrinkage system in a combined configuration dedicated to denim production.

This follows the successful installation and commissioning of the second Montex and Monfortex lines at the Kahramanmaraş plant in 2018, which Kipaş Vice Chairman of the Board Ahmet Öksüz said had immediately exceeded expectations.

“We performed a very thorough technical investigation based on the latest Industry 4.0 analysis before the purchase, to determine what we needed, and the Monforts technology met all our requirements,” he said, in an interview with Textilegence magazine. “The Monfortex is equipped with a variety of features not found on classical shrinkage machines and the production can be monitored from beginning to end. It also exceeded our expectations in energy cost savings.”

Kipaş subsequently received a special certificate from Monforts in recognition of its exceptional utilisation of the technology to its full potential.

The latest Montex stenter now being installed at Kipaş is a 12-chamber unit with a working width of 2 metres featuring all of the latest automation features. The Monfortex unit, also with a working width of 2 metres, is in a ‘double rubber’ configuration, comprising two compressive shrinkage units and two felt calenders in line. This allows the heat setting of elastane fibres and the residual shrinkage of the denim to be carried out simultaneously, for a significant increase in production speeds.

“Around 90-95% of denim fabric production now contains elastane fibres and the Monforts system has allowed us to simultaneously increase our production and quality in this respect,” Mr Öksüz said.

Regenerated cotton
For the next three years within the New Cotton Project, Kipaş will manufacture denim fabrics based on the cellulose-based fibres of Infinited Fiber Company of Finland, made from post-consumer textile waste that has been collected, sorted and regenerated.

The patented technology of Infinited, which is leading the consortium of 12 companies, turns cellulose-rich textile waste into fibres that look and feel like cotton.

“We are very excited and proud to lead this project which is breaking new ground when it comes to making circularity in the textile industry a reality,” said Infinited co-founder and CEO Petri Alava. “The enthusiasm and commitment with which the entire consortium has come together to work towards a cleaner, more sustainable future for fashion is truly inspiring.”

Take-back programmes
Adidas and H&M will establish take-back programmes to collect the clothing that is produced, to determine the next phase in their lifecycle. Clothing that can no longer be worn will be returned to Infinited, for regeneration into new fibres, further contributing to a circular economy in which textiles never go to waste, but instead are reused, recycled or turned into new garments.

The aim is to prove that circular, sustainable fashion can be achieved today, and to act as an inspiration and stepping stone to further, even bigger circular initiatives by the industry going forward.

The EU has identified the high potential for circularity within the textile industry, while simultaneously highlighting the urgent need for the development of technologies to produce and design sustainable and circular bio-based materials. Making sustainable products commonplace, reducing waste and leading global efforts on circularity are outlined in the European Commission’s Circular Economy Action Plan.

Fashion brands produce nearly twice as many clothes today as they did 20 years ago and demand is expected to continue growing. At the same time, the equivalent of one garbage truck of textiles is landfilled or burned every second. Most of the textile industry’s environmental problems relate to the raw materials used by the industry – cotton, fossil-based fibres such as polyester, and viscose as the most common man-made cellulosic fibre, are all associated with serious environmental concerns.

Sateri Sustainability Vision for 2030 (c) Sateri
02.11.2020

Sateri Launches Sustainability Vision for 2030

  • Sateri pledges to Be World’s Leading Net-Positive Fibre Producer

Sateri, one of the world’s largest viscose producer, has launched its sustainability vision for 2030 to guide the company’s strategic growth in the coming decade. The Vision is anchored around four key pillars in response to environmental and social challenges faced by the cellulosic fibre industry: Climate and Ecosystem Protection, Closed Loop Production, Innovation and Circularity, and Inclusive Growth.

The Vision comes with a time-bound roadmap and measurable targets. It encompasses notable targets including net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, achieving 98% Sulphur recovery rate at all its mills by 2025, utilising textile waste and produce viscose products with 50% recycled content by 2025 and 100% by 2030, and supporting more than 300,000 local families and smallholder farmers to develop sustainable livelihoods.

  • Sateri pledges to Be World’s Leading Net-Positive Fibre Producer

Sateri, one of the world’s largest viscose producer, has launched its sustainability vision for 2030 to guide the company’s strategic growth in the coming decade. The Vision is anchored around four key pillars in response to environmental and social challenges faced by the cellulosic fibre industry: Climate and Ecosystem Protection, Closed Loop Production, Innovation and Circularity, and Inclusive Growth.

The Vision comes with a time-bound roadmap and measurable targets. It encompasses notable targets including net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, achieving 98% Sulphur recovery rate at all its mills by 2025, utilising textile waste and produce viscose products with 50% recycled content by 2025 and 100% by 2030, and supporting more than 300,000 local families and smallholder farmers to develop sustainable livelihoods.

Highlighting the significance of the Vision to the company, Sateri’s President Allen Zhang said, “As a raw material supplier, Sateri will do our part and respond to the urgent need to decouple growth from further resource impact. This is something that will underpin our growth, in addition to QPC (Quality, Productivity, Cost) and continuous improvement which are well-embedded in the company.”*

Sateri’s 2030 Vision was conceived after months of discussions with management members and external stakeholders including customers, brands and NGOs. The process was facilitated by BSR, a sustainability consultancy, led by its Asia Pacific Vice President, Jeremy Prepscius.

“The challenges facing the garment industry require all value chain participants to invest, innovate and integrate sustainability into their business models. This requires leadership and alignment and will need determination to succeed, which is what Sateri is striving to do,” said Prepscius.*

In the coming months, Sateri will form workgroups to develop action plans to deliver on the identified targets. Progress towards realising Sateri 2030 Vision will be reported in the company’s annual sustainability report and online sustainability dashboard.

Read more about Sateri 2030 Vision: www.sateri.com/sustainability/vision2030/

 

*Please see attached document for more information

Source:

Omnicom Public Relations Group

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. (c)Paimion
Rester Paimio end-of-life textile refinement
18.08.2020

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy and LSJH will drive the textile sector towards a circular economy and begin processing textile waste as an industrial raw material. The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. The 3,000-square-metre plant is being developed by Rester Oy, which recycles companies' end-of-life textiles and industrial waste materials. LSJH, which processes households’ end-of-life textiles on its production line, will hire part of the plant.

Outi Luukko, Rester Oy’s board chair, says, “The processing plant will begin a new era of textile circular economy in Finland. As industry pioneers, we are launching a system change in Scandinavia. The transition of the textile industry from a linear model to a circular economy is essential, as virgin materials cannot sustain the current structure of the textile industry. And why should it, when there is so much recyclable material available?”

From the perspective of Rester Oy’s main owner, work clothing supplier Touchpoint, the circular economy plant not only represents resource efficiency, but is also necessary from the perspective of the entire life cycle of a responsible work clothing collection.

Luukko adds, “Finding a local solution to a global problem is a huge leap in the right direction and raises Finland's profile as a pioneer of circular economy."

The future plant will be able to process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles annually, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste. Both production lines produce recycled fibre, which can be used for various industrial applications, including yarn and fabric, insulating materials for construction and shipping industries, acoustic panels, composites, non-woven and filter materials, and other technical textiles, such as geo-textiles.

LSJH is piloting a full-scale refinement plant

LSJH has launched a pilot production line for processing households' end-of-life textiles. Unfortunately, consumers' end-of-life textiles are heterogeneous, making them a challenging raw material for further processing. Before processing, the textiles are sorted by material into various fibre classes using optical identification technology developed by LSJH and its partners. This ensures the quality of the raw material and the resulting fibre products.

Jukka Heikkilä, managing director for Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto, explains: “On the basis of the experiences gathered from the pilot project, Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto is preparing a full-scale refinement plant in the Turku region. As soon as 2023, the plant will process Finnish households' end-of-life textiles. The project involves all waste treatment plants owned by Finnish municipalities.”

Paimio has ambitious goals for circular economy companies

Rester’s initiative aims to create a circular economy cluster in Paimio that combines the processing and reuse of end-of-life textile fibres. Paimion Kehitys Oy, which is owned by the City of Paimio and the local association of enterprises, supports the development of circular economy companies in Paimio.

Mika Ingi, managing director for Paimion Kehitys Oy, says, “We want to step out of our traditional municipal role and create significant added value for everyone taking part. That is why we are involved in the development of a new modern service model based on ecosystem thinking. We are piloting the textile cluster, followed in the coming years by clusters focusing on plastic, construction, and energy. The aim of our service is to support and help develop new profitable business by bringing circular economy companies and their potential customers to innovate together."

The foundation stone of the processing plant was laid today (18 August 2020). The processing plant will begin operations in February 2021.

(c) Infinited Fiber Company
25.11.2019

Maisie Williams dresses up with Infinited Fiber

Global fashion brand Weekday decided to show initiative in circular fashion on White Monday and is now the world’s first global fashion brand who has published a garment from IFC fabric.

Weekday wanted to raise awareness of IFC by contacting Maisie Williams who’s known to speak about causes she cares about. Maisie co-designed a two-piece outfit which is made entirely from IFC fabric.

IFC’s technology enables the millions of kilos of textile waste that is currently burned or landfilled, to be turned into a cost efficient, high quality cotton-like fiber.

”Infinited Fiber Company has a really interesting new recycling technique that has potential to help Weekday in our goal towards 100% recycled or sustainably sourced materials. For us, this material is extra interesting because of its cotton-like appearance and durability,” says Ulrika Jakobsson, Sustainability and Material Responsible at Weekday.

IFC provided Weekday with a few meters of newly processed denim fiber to test and they are now the first in the world to use this fabric.

Global fashion brand Weekday decided to show initiative in circular fashion on White Monday and is now the world’s first global fashion brand who has published a garment from IFC fabric.

Weekday wanted to raise awareness of IFC by contacting Maisie Williams who’s known to speak about causes she cares about. Maisie co-designed a two-piece outfit which is made entirely from IFC fabric.

IFC’s technology enables the millions of kilos of textile waste that is currently burned or landfilled, to be turned into a cost efficient, high quality cotton-like fiber.

”Infinited Fiber Company has a really interesting new recycling technique that has potential to help Weekday in our goal towards 100% recycled or sustainably sourced materials. For us, this material is extra interesting because of its cotton-like appearance and durability,” says Ulrika Jakobsson, Sustainability and Material Responsible at Weekday.

IFC provided Weekday with a few meters of newly processed denim fiber to test and they are now the first in the world to use this fabric.

At the moment this garment is not a collection that can be purchased. Weekday is testing the material and they are hoping to create a full collection soon.
IFC‘s technology is operating in Finland and is patented, proven and ready for global up-scaling and licensing. Its investors include global fashion corporation H&M Group and Singapore based global biomaterials company RGE Pte Ltd.

More information:
Weekday Infinited Fiber Co.
Source:

Infinited Fiber Company

16.09.2019

Schoeller Introduces PROEARTH™ Biodegradable Textiles

Schoeller, the global textile solutions manufacturer dedicated to sustainability and innovation for more than 150 years, introduces its new PROEARTH™ collection of biodegradable textiles. The new collection, comprised of bluesign® approved fabrics with biodegradable polyester, will debut as part of its Schoeller FTC (SFTC) line, a joint venture between Schoeller Textil AG and the Taiwanese Formosa Taffeta Co. Ltd., at Premiere Vision Paris, September 17-19, Hall 6, Stand 6J18.

As the founding developer of the bluesign® system, the first activewear and leisurewear manufacturer to receive Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certification, and one of the first companies to sign the UN’s Paris Agreement for climate change, Schoeller continues to be on the cutting edge of sustainable practices, bringing one of the first collections of biodegradable synthetic fabrics to the market. Its most recent development, PROEARTH was created to help offset the more than 16 million tons of textile waste produced in the US alone each year.

Schoeller, the global textile solutions manufacturer dedicated to sustainability and innovation for more than 150 years, introduces its new PROEARTH™ collection of biodegradable textiles. The new collection, comprised of bluesign® approved fabrics with biodegradable polyester, will debut as part of its Schoeller FTC (SFTC) line, a joint venture between Schoeller Textil AG and the Taiwanese Formosa Taffeta Co. Ltd., at Premiere Vision Paris, September 17-19, Hall 6, Stand 6J18.

As the founding developer of the bluesign® system, the first activewear and leisurewear manufacturer to receive Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certification, and one of the first companies to sign the UN’s Paris Agreement for climate change, Schoeller continues to be on the cutting edge of sustainable practices, bringing one of the first collections of biodegradable synthetic fabrics to the market. Its most recent development, PROEARTH was created to help offset the more than 16 million tons of textile waste produced in the US alone each year.

Jacket, pant and lining fabrics
The SFTC PROEARTH collection will launch with five, bluesign®-approved fabrics designed for lifestyle, fashion and outdoor categories. Made with virgin polyester that has been optimized for biodegradation and has tested to biodegrade at faster and better rates than competitive offerings, the initial PROEARTH articles available this fall include jacket, pant and lining material qualities with various colour options.

More information:
Schoeller Textil AG Schoeller
Source:

Schoeller Textil AG

(c) GB Network Marketing & Communication
08.11.2018

Zerobarracento brings the Made in Italy zero-waste to Budapest Fashion Week

The brand has been invited to present the SS2019 @ Budapest Fashion Week on November 14th, 2018

For the third consecutive year, the Italian brand Zerobarracento was selected to embody the excellence of our country at the Budapest Fashion Week. On November 14th, Zerobarracento will show on runway S/S 2019. The concept of connection to a fashion garment, and the idea of creating pieces to last is fundamental to this brand. 0 means: zero waste, reduced pollution, and reduced emissions. 100 means: 100% quality, Made in Italy, sustainability and transparency of the production. Patterns are developed with zero-waste techniques, that eliminates textile waste at the design stage, adopting a zero-waste design approach reduces textile waste and the demand on natural resources. The pieces are 100% made in Italy, created with premium sustainable and traceable materials.

The brand has been invited to present the SS2019 @ Budapest Fashion Week on November 14th, 2018

For the third consecutive year, the Italian brand Zerobarracento was selected to embody the excellence of our country at the Budapest Fashion Week. On November 14th, Zerobarracento will show on runway S/S 2019. The concept of connection to a fashion garment, and the idea of creating pieces to last is fundamental to this brand. 0 means: zero waste, reduced pollution, and reduced emissions. 100 means: 100% quality, Made in Italy, sustainability and transparency of the production. Patterns are developed with zero-waste techniques, that eliminates textile waste at the design stage, adopting a zero-waste design approach reduces textile waste and the demand on natural resources. The pieces are 100% made in Italy, created with premium sustainable and traceable materials.

Camilla Carrara, CEO and designer di Zerobarracento, describes the collection as follows: "garments are created with the GOTS certified Bacx™ by Centro Seta organic silks sourced from C.L.A.S.S. e.commerce and the Newlife™ transformed polyester. Shapes and colours were inspired by a Malaysian trip: simplicity and nature are blended giving life to saturated colours".

Source:

GB Network Marketing & Communication