Aus der Branche

Zurücksetzen
4 Ergebnisse
Graphic DNFI
19.06.2022

DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award Ceremony During Heimtextil

Natural fibers are among the most important raw materials in the textile and fashion industry worldwide. For centuries, they have fed millions of people through their cultivation or breeding, and it is impossible to imagine daily life without them. Especially at the moment, natural fibers are gaining special importance due to the intense discussions about sustainable living. Even though natural fibers have accompanied mankind for a long time, they are changeable, technical, and adaptable to the challenges of the textile industry.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) is celebrating natural fibres in a program to be conducted during Heimtextil in Frankfurt on 23 June. Anyone with an interest in the role of natural fibres in the world economy, economic indicators of textile activity, innovations in natural fibre research, and updates on proposed EU legislation affecting textiles is welcome to attend.

The program will include various presentations by the previous and current award winners, presentations, and discussions:

Overview of world natural fibre production, employment, and value,

Natural fibers are among the most important raw materials in the textile and fashion industry worldwide. For centuries, they have fed millions of people through their cultivation or breeding, and it is impossible to imagine daily life without them. Especially at the moment, natural fibers are gaining special importance due to the intense discussions about sustainable living. Even though natural fibers have accompanied mankind for a long time, they are changeable, technical, and adaptable to the challenges of the textile industry.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) is celebrating natural fibres in a program to be conducted during Heimtextil in Frankfurt on 23 June. Anyone with an interest in the role of natural fibres in the world economy, economic indicators of textile activity, innovations in natural fibre research, and updates on proposed EU legislation affecting textiles is welcome to attend.

The program will include various presentations by the previous and current award winners, presentations, and discussions:

Overview of world natural fibre production, employment, and value,

  • Economic indicators and impacts of coronavirus on textile industries,
  • Updates on innovative uses of natural fibres:
  • Use of wool in automobile insulation applications for enhanced sustainability,
  • Using cellulose from cotton to produce a biodegradable plastic substitute,
  • Manufacturing waterproof fabric from a blend of cotton and jute as sustainable
  • Substitute for polypropylene tarps
  • Proposed EU textile legislation and potential impacts on natural fibres
Weitere Informationen:
DNFI DNFI award Heimtextil
Quelle:

DNFI

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge Photo: pixabay
10.12.2021

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

  • more reliant on non-renewable resources,
  • less biodegradable, and
  • increasingly prone to releasing microplastics.

The increased consumption is also discretionary, driven by consumer desire and remains unchecked. Thus, the long-term trend in the textile industry parallels the intentional addition of microplastics to products such as cosmetics. The contrast is that the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has recommended such intentional additions be restricted, whereas the over-consumption of synthetic fibres continues unchecked. One way for the EU to account for and mitigate microplastic pollution is through an EU-backed methodology measuring and reporting microplastic emissions, so that consumers and procurement officers have the information needed to minimise microplastic pollution resulting from their purchasing decisions.

There is a critical opportunity to address microplastic pollution in the fashion textile industry through the EU Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) methodology. To meet the environmental objectives of the Circular Economy Action Plan, the EU is proposing that companies substantiate their products’ environmental credentials using this harmonised methodology. However, microplastic pollution is not accounted for in the PEF methodology. This omission has the effect of assigning a zero score to microplastic pollution and would undermine the efforts of the European Green Deal, which aim “to address the unintentional release of microplastics in the environment.”

The incorporation of microplastic pollution as an indicator would increase the legitimacy of the PEF method as well as better inform consumer purchasing decisions, especially as the European Green Deal seeks to “further develop and harmonise methods for measuring unintentionally released microplastics, especially from tyres and textiles, and delivering harmonised data on microplastics concentrations in seawater.”

Whilst we continue to learn about the damage of microplastics and there is new knowledge emerging on the toxic impacts along the food chain, there is sufficient information on the rate of microplastic leakage into the environment to implement a basic, inventory level indicator in the PEF now. This is consistent with the recommendations of a review of microplastic pollution originating from the life cycle of apparel and home textiles. There are precedents in PEF for basic level (e.g., ‘resource use, fossils’) and largely untested (e.g. land occupation and toxicity indicators) indicators, and therefore an opportunity for the EU to promote research and development in the measurement and modelling of microplastic pollution by including such emissions in the PEF methodology. For such an indicator, the long and complex supply chains of the apparel and footwear industry would be a test case with high-impact and a global reach.

Quelle:

DNFI / IWTO – 2021

15.09.2021

DNFI Award Jury 2021 started its work

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) will announce the winner of the Innovation in Natural Fibre Research Award soon. The aim of the award is to raise awareness of the achievements of the natural fibers sector by recognizing innovative and progressive work by people and institutions at the level of production and use of natural fibers. The closing date for applications was September 10.

Interest in the award was high again in 2021, indicating that research in fields involving natural fibres is robust. The applications that were received reveal a fascinating array of projects, new topics, and both private and public sector funding for natural fibre research.

There are seven finalists, and final judging is underway. The winner of the 2021 Award will be announced in early October.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) will announce the winner of the Innovation in Natural Fibre Research Award soon. The aim of the award is to raise awareness of the achievements of the natural fibers sector by recognizing innovative and progressive work by people and institutions at the level of production and use of natural fibers. The closing date for applications was September 10.

Interest in the award was high again in 2021, indicating that research in fields involving natural fibres is robust. The applications that were received reveal a fascinating array of projects, new topics, and both private and public sector funding for natural fibre research.

There are seven finalists, and final judging is underway. The winner of the 2021 Award will be announced in early October.

The seven finalists for the 2021 Award fall into several broad categories, including traceability and the measurement of environmental impacts of natural fibres, the use of natural fibres in manufacturing biodegradable composites, and new or expanded uses for natural fibre materials. Researchers and institutions located in Australia, India, Republic of Korea, and Switzerland are among the finalists for the 2021 award.

Weitere Informationen:
DNFI DNFI award
Quelle:

DNFI

35. Internationale Baumwolltagung – The Hybrid Edition © Bremer Baumwollbörse
Baumwollernte in Indien
19.03.2021

35. Internationale Baumwolltagung – The Hybrid Edition

  • Passion for Cotton!
  • Bremen ist Baumwolle

Einmal mehr bestätigte die Internationale Baumwolltagung, wie eng Bremen mit dem Rohstoff Baumwolle und seiner international vernetzten Lieferkette verwoben ist. Schließlich gelang es der Bremer Baumwollbörse und dem Faserinstitut Bremen als Organisatoren der angesehenen Konferenz zum 35. Mal, die Baumwollwelt in Bremen zu versammeln. ‚Bremen‘ ist, so der Eindruck, vor allem international ein Inbegriff für Baumwolle, Baumwollforschung und Baumwollqualität. Mehr als 450 Teilnehmer aus 32 Ländern besuchten die Tagung.

Ein Treffen der Baumwollcommunity im World Wide Web
Die ursprünglich für 2020 geplante Konferenz musste aus bekannten Gründen um ein Jahr verschoben werden. Da aber auch zum aktuellen Zeitpunkt keine Präsenzveranstaltung möglich ist, traf sich die Baumwollcommunity erstmals in der fast 150jährigen Geschichte der Bremer Baumwollbörse in virtuellen Tagungsräumen im Internet.

  • Passion for Cotton!
  • Bremen ist Baumwolle

Einmal mehr bestätigte die Internationale Baumwolltagung, wie eng Bremen mit dem Rohstoff Baumwolle und seiner international vernetzten Lieferkette verwoben ist. Schließlich gelang es der Bremer Baumwollbörse und dem Faserinstitut Bremen als Organisatoren der angesehenen Konferenz zum 35. Mal, die Baumwollwelt in Bremen zu versammeln. ‚Bremen‘ ist, so der Eindruck, vor allem international ein Inbegriff für Baumwolle, Baumwollforschung und Baumwollqualität. Mehr als 450 Teilnehmer aus 32 Ländern besuchten die Tagung.

Ein Treffen der Baumwollcommunity im World Wide Web
Die ursprünglich für 2020 geplante Konferenz musste aus bekannten Gründen um ein Jahr verschoben werden. Da aber auch zum aktuellen Zeitpunkt keine Präsenzveranstaltung möglich ist, traf sich die Baumwollcommunity erstmals in der fast 150jährigen Geschichte der Bremer Baumwollbörse in virtuellen Tagungsräumen im Internet.

Fast 90 Sprecher in 14 Sessions
Am 17. und 18. März trugen an die 90 Sprecher und Panelisten mit hochaktuellen Vorträgen oder ihrer Teilnahme an Diskussionsrunden und den Keynotes zum Gelingen der Tagung bei. Bremens Bürgermeister Dr. Andreas Bovenschulte, Stephanie Silber, Präsidentin der Bremer Baumwollbörse sowie Prof. Dr. Axel Herrmann, Direktor des Faserinstitut Bremen hatten die Konferenz mit ihren Reden zuvor feierlich eröffnet. Das anschließende Programm mit seinen 14 Sessions überzeugte durch Vielfalt und sein umfassendes Informationsangebot.

Die Tagungssessions waren in zwei parallel laufende Vortragsstränge aufgeteilt, gedacht für Besucher mit unterschiedlichen Informationsinteressen. Im ‚Conceptual Track‘ ging es um Informationsvermittlung zu einem eher politisch, strategischen Themenspektrum. Dies waren etwa nachhaltiger Baumwollanbau, Transparenz in der Lieferkette und unternehmerische Verantwortung. Im eher fachspezifischen ‚Technical Track‘ spielten technologische Fortschritte im Baumwollanbau durch Einsatz von Digitalisierung, Steigerung von Erträgen, Verbesserung von Faserqualität, Qualitätsprüfung und Standardisierung die entscheidende Rolle.

Parallel zu den Sessions fanden Posterpräsentationen bzw. Postertalks und Austauschgespräche mit Experten statt. Sie schlossen zum Teil an Inhalte der Vorträge an oder erweiterten den Erfahrungshorizont mit informativen Impulsen zu weiteren Themen. Hierfür waren auf der Tagungsplattform besondere virtuelle Räume eingerichtet worden, die während der Tagung für Kommunikationszwecke jeglicher Form für Teilnehmer offenstanden.

Expertenwissen State of the Art
Jeder Tagungstag begann mit jeweils zwei beeindruckenden Keynotes aus der Wirtschaft bzw. von Wirtschaftsverbänden, die sich den Herausforderungen der Baumwollindustrie aus unterschiedlichen Blickwinkeln näherten. Zu ihnen zählten Nanda Bergstein, Tchibo, Kai Hughes, ICAC, Heinz Zeller, Hugo Boss AG sowie Michael Alt und Eugen Weinberg, Commerzbank AG.

Deutliche Akzente setzten Paneldiskussionen zu Themen wie verantwortungsvolle Rohstoffproduktion, Lieferkettentransparenz und Kreislaufwirtschaft. Das galt ebenso für Vorträge zu Fortschritten bei der Baumwollsaatzucht und -produktion, zur Digitalisierung in der Landwirtschaft, Verarbeitungsprozessen von Baumwolle, Baumwollqualität und -prüfung sowie zur Vorstellung innovativer textiler Produkte aus Baumwolle.

Überzeugend war auch die Präsentation des Faserinstituts Bremen zu den Ergebnissen einer in Kooperation mit der Bremer Baumwollbörse weltweit durchgeführten Umfrage unter Spinnereien über störende Qualitätsmängel bei angelieferter Baumwolle, die Verwendung von Fasermischungen sowie den Einsatz von Baumwolle alternativer Produktionsmethoden. Große Aufmerksamkeit fanden auch die Resultate einer weiterführenden Befragung der Bremer Baumwollbörse unter Bekleidungsproduzenten und Einzelhandelsunternehmen. Sie lieferte Aussagen über die Bewertung von Baumwollqualität und sonstiger Baumwolleigenschaften, zur Verwendung von Textilien aus anderen Natur-, Misch- und oder Chemiefasern, zur Bedeutung von Nachhaltigkeit auf Handelsebene und zur Bereitschaft, Beschaffungsprozesse transparent zu machen.

Last but not least fanden an zwei Tagen vor Beginn der Konferenz internationale Netzwerkmeetings sowohl des Steuerungskreises der Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) als auch des International Committee on Cotton Testing Methods (ICCTM) der International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF) statt.

„Wir sind sehr stolz, dass die Premiere der Hybridversion der International Cotton Conference Bremen erfolgreich zu Ende gegangen ist. Mein Dank geht deshalb an alle, die das möglich gemacht haben“, betont Stephanie Silber, Präsidentin der Bremer Baumwollbörse und Geschäftsführerin des traditionsreichen Baumwollhandelsunternehmens Otto Stadtlander GmbH.

„Mit der aufmerksamkeitsstarken Zusammenstellung des Tagungsprogramms zeigt sich erneut, wie wertvoll die intensive Zusammenarbeit zwischen Faserinstitut Bremen und Bremer Baumwollbörse ist, bei der sich Wissenschaft und Praxis optimal ergänzen“, so Prof. Dr. Axel Herrmann für das Faserinstitut Bremen (FIBRE).

„Wieder einmal haben die Bremer führende Vertreter der Branche und aus der ganzen Welt zusammengebracht, um sich mit kritischen Fragen und Herausforderungen unserer Industrie zu befassen. Diese Konferenz hat die Nachhaltigkeitsbestrebungen weiter vorangebracht. Dies ist besonders wichtig für uns alle, die die technischen und wirtschaftlichen Möglichkeiten von Baumwolle verfolgen.“, bekräftigt Mark Messura, Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain Marketing Cotton Incorporated.

Prof. Dr. Ing. Thomas Schneider, Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft (HTW), Berlin, ergänzt: „Wir haben gesehen, dass Baumwolle wegen ihrer Eigenschaften als natürlicher, innovativer, nachwachsender und biologisch abbaubarer und auch noch recyclebarer Rohstoff mit Blick auf die Zukunft unverzichtbar ist. Die Möglichkeiten seiner Verwendung gehen weit über die Verarbeitung zu Bekleidung hinaus und sind aus der Sicht der Forschung noch lange nicht ausgeschöpft.“

Die nächste Internationale Baumwolltagung findet vom 30.- 31. März 2022 statt, in dem Jahr des 150. Geburtstages der Bremer Baumwollbörse.