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(c) JEC Group
23.09.2022

JEC Forum DACH 2022 announces program

This year’s JEC forum DACH, taking place from November 29 to 30, 2022, is strategically located in a composites « golden triangle », between Munich, Augsburg and Ingelstadt. This dynamic area, at the heart of the Bavarian region is known to be hosting major companies such as Airbus, Faurecia, Kuka, Siemens, Voith Composites, KraussMaffei Technologies, Cevotec, Munich Composites, or Premium Aerotec, thus promising a two-days opportunity to meet with key decision makers.

The digital platform available to all participants prior to the event enables to schedule one to one business meetings between buyers and suppliers from the whole value chain of composites, as well as informal networking during breaks, lunches and evening event.

In total, 500 attendees, suppliers and buyers, from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, are expected to participate to JEC Forum DACH 2022.

Business meetings event*
DAY 1 – November 29, 2022:

This year’s JEC forum DACH, taking place from November 29 to 30, 2022, is strategically located in a composites « golden triangle », between Munich, Augsburg and Ingelstadt. This dynamic area, at the heart of the Bavarian region is known to be hosting major companies such as Airbus, Faurecia, Kuka, Siemens, Voith Composites, KraussMaffei Technologies, Cevotec, Munich Composites, or Premium Aerotec, thus promising a two-days opportunity to meet with key decision makers.

The digital platform available to all participants prior to the event enables to schedule one to one business meetings between buyers and suppliers from the whole value chain of composites, as well as informal networking during breaks, lunches and evening event.

In total, 500 attendees, suppliers and buyers, from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, are expected to participate to JEC Forum DACH 2022.

Business meetings event*
DAY 1 – November 29, 2022:

  • 10.15 – 11.45 am – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session : Market Developments
  • Moderator: Dr. Michael Effing, AVK
  • 4.0 – 5.30 pm – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session: Recycling of Composites

DAY 2 – November 30, 2022:

  • 9.00– 10.30 am – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session: Sustainability of Composites
  • 3.15 – 4.45 pm – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session: Innovations: Raw Materials, Processes and Applications

Celebrating composites innovation through awards and startup competition

  • The AVK Innovation Awards: Goal is to promote and give prominence to new products/components and applications made from fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) and promote new processes and methods for manufacturing FRP products.
  • Startup Booster competition: The contest is open to entrepreneurs, SMEs, startups and academic spinoffs building innovative composite and advanced materials projects that are based in Germany, Austria or Switzerland (the DACH region).

*You can view the full program here.

Source:

JEC Group

(c) Texaid
21.09.2022

TEXAID installs intelligent sorting stations from circular.fashion

Digital Product Passports can now be processed at TEXAID’s largest sorting facility, thanks to circular.fashion’s intelligent sorting stations, which use RFID and NFC technology to improve the quality and consistency of manual sorting.

Digital Product Passports (DPP) have been recognised by the EU as an enabler for circular fashion and textiles. Technology company circular.fashion has been a leader in this effort, releasing the circularity.ID in 2018 and developing Intelligent Sorting Stations to bring ID based sorting to the textile reuse and recycling industry.

ID based sorting optimises the manual sorting process for reuse and recycling by giving sorters data to make decisions more accurately and consistently. TEXAID has, by adopting this technology, increased Europe’s capacity to process DPPs.

Digital Product Passports can now be processed at TEXAID’s largest sorting facility, thanks to circular.fashion’s intelligent sorting stations, which use RFID and NFC technology to improve the quality and consistency of manual sorting.

Digital Product Passports (DPP) have been recognised by the EU as an enabler for circular fashion and textiles. Technology company circular.fashion has been a leader in this effort, releasing the circularity.ID in 2018 and developing Intelligent Sorting Stations to bring ID based sorting to the textile reuse and recycling industry.

ID based sorting optimises the manual sorting process for reuse and recycling by giving sorters data to make decisions more accurately and consistently. TEXAID has, by adopting this technology, increased Europe’s capacity to process DPPs.

The installation and testing of TEXAID’s new Intelligent Sorting Stations was completed successfully shortly before the holiday period. Initial test results indicate that ID based sorting can make sorting decisions more reliable and more consistent. The team also sees a potential for ID based sorting to reduce training costs for new employees and maximise the value of their sorting decisions. This advancement was made through the CIRTEX project, funded through the KMU Innovativ funding programme from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

The Intelligent Sorting Stations at TEXAID are now operational, and brands and retailers have the ability to adopt the circularity.ID as a Digital Product Passport and have textile products returned to TEXAID for ID based sorting.

Photo: Rieter
20.09.2022

Rieter strengthens its market position in Turkey

Rieter is moving its Kahramanmaraş service station to a larger location covering 2 000 m2 in a bid to broaden its offering and strengthen its market position in Turkey. The station will house one of the region’s largest test-spinning facilities and provide know-how in sustainable yarn manufacturing.

The comprehensive portfolio covers both mechanical and electronic services, including the revision of gear units, servomotor adjustments, and suction drums. The station will also offer preventive maintenance and mill optimization. The service offering spans the entire Rieter product portfolio.

Rieter is moving its Kahramanmaraş service station to a larger location covering 2 000 m2 in a bid to broaden its offering and strengthen its market position in Turkey. The station will house one of the region’s largest test-spinning facilities and provide know-how in sustainable yarn manufacturing.

The comprehensive portfolio covers both mechanical and electronic services, including the revision of gear units, servomotor adjustments, and suction drums. The station will also offer preventive maintenance and mill optimization. The service offering spans the entire Rieter product portfolio.

Highlights of the Kahramanmaraş Service Station include the setup of a fully automatic rotor spinning machine R 70 and the winding machine Autoconer X6. Three-quarters of the 2 000 m2 service space is reserved for functional activities, which will feature one of the region’s largest test-spinning facilities. Customers can run yarn comparison tests and analyze the impact of different technology parts so they can optimize machine setups. In-depth yarn trials and access to Rieter textile technology expertise will allow customers to cater more effectively to the dynamic demands of textile brands regarding performance, quality and sustainability, such as recycling applications.

The Kahramanmaraş service station is strategically located at the heart of the region’s textile industry, with a large proportion of Rieter’s installed base located within a radius of around 200 kilometers. Turkey is a textile powerhouse, currently ranking fifth in global exports and poised for additional growth. The country’s industry is also implementing a green action plan to help it meet the growing demand for sustainable textiles, especially from Europe.

The new service station starts operations in September 2022 and will accelerate the growth of the company’s three stations in Turkey. Rieter has been operating service stations in Turkey since 2005 with a presence in the country dating back to the 1990s.

Source:

Rieter Holding AG

Susan Gabler und Johannes Leis vom STFI bei Untersuchungen zum Recycling smarter Textilien. Foto: Sächsisches Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI)
Susan Gabler und Johannes Leis vom STFI bei Untersuchungen zum Recycling smarter Textilien.
20.09.2022

SmartERZ-Projekt zum Recycling von Smart Composites

Im Automobilbau, dem Schiffsbau und der Luftfahrtindustrie sowie bei Windenergieanlagen steigen die Materialanforderungen zusehends. Die verwendeten Werkstoffe sollen leicht, ressourcenschonend und gleichzeitig hochbelastbar sein. Faserverstärkte Kunststoffe (Composites) rücken immer mehr in den Vordergrund, da deren Eigenschaften in Kombination mit Glas- oder Carbonfasern metallischen Materialien oftmals überlegen sind. Mit Fokus auf die klimaneutrale Herstellung und Nutzung von Produkten wächst auch der Bedarf an Recyclinglösungen. Im SmartERZ-Projekt TRICYCLE arbeiten Unternehmen gemeinsam an geeigneten skalierbaren und wirtschaftlich tragfähigen Prozessen zum Recycling von Smart Composites. Momentan gibt es dafür keine Anbieter oder Konzepte am Markt.

Im Automobilbau, dem Schiffsbau und der Luftfahrtindustrie sowie bei Windenergieanlagen steigen die Materialanforderungen zusehends. Die verwendeten Werkstoffe sollen leicht, ressourcenschonend und gleichzeitig hochbelastbar sein. Faserverstärkte Kunststoffe (Composites) rücken immer mehr in den Vordergrund, da deren Eigenschaften in Kombination mit Glas- oder Carbonfasern metallischen Materialien oftmals überlegen sind. Mit Fokus auf die klimaneutrale Herstellung und Nutzung von Produkten wächst auch der Bedarf an Recyclinglösungen. Im SmartERZ-Projekt TRICYCLE arbeiten Unternehmen gemeinsam an geeigneten skalierbaren und wirtschaftlich tragfähigen Prozessen zum Recycling von Smart Composites. Momentan gibt es dafür keine Anbieter oder Konzepte am Markt.

Smart Composites bestehen aus Werkstoffen, deren Funktionalisierung durch die Integration oder Applikation elektrisch leitfähiger Komponenten, z. B. Sensoren oder Mikroprozessoren, erreicht wird. Dazu zählen zum Beispiel smarte Textilien, die elektronisch wärmen, Lichtsignale geben oder zur Datenübertragung genutzt werden können. Das breite Anwendungsspektrum und die vielseitigen Einsatzgebiete dieser intelligenten Verbundwerkstoffe und Multimaterialverbunde werden perspektivisch zu einem wachsenden Bedarf und einer stärkeren Nachfrage führen.

Die funktionale und vielschichtige Verbindung verschiedener Materialien wie Kunststoff, Metall und Textil wirft beim Thema Recycling Nachhaltigkeitsfragen auf. Im Erzgebirge werden dafür bereits heute Lösungen entwickelt. Im Rahmen des WIR!-Projektes SmartERZ ist das Verbundprojekt TRICYCLE entstanden. Mit dem Fokus auf den Strukturwandel im Erzgebirge haben sich acht ortsansässige Partner aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft zusammengetan, um ein Recyclingkonzept aufzustellen und die Grobplanung für ein erzgebirgisches Recycling Center zu entwickeln. Das Ende des Produktlebenszyklus und die Nachnutzung bzw. Wiederaufbereitung stehen dabei im Mittelpunkt des Entwicklungsprozesses. Im Ergebnis sollen effektive und maßgeschneiderte Maßnahmen für eine möglichst hochwertige Wiederverwendung entstehen. Diese sollen dem steigenden Aufkommen an Abfällen aus diesem wachsenden Bereich der deutschen Industrie begegnen und anwendungsbereit sein.

Klassische Herausforderungen für die Projektbeteiligten sind die irreversiblen Verbindungstechniken (z. B. Kleben, Faser-Matrix-Haftung), die Integration vieler verschiedener Materialien in geringen Mengen sowie Form und Größe der Bauteile. Eigene Untersuchungen sowie Feedback von Partnerunternehmen bestätigen die Notwendigkeit sowie den Nutzen eines passgenauen Recyclingprozesses für Smart Composites und intelligente Multimaterialverbünde. Das Projekt soll dazu beitragen, den Wirtschaftsstandort Erzgebirge attraktiver und zukunftsfähiger zu gestalten.

Am 1. September 2021 gestartet, kann TRICYCLE erste Ergebnisse vorweisen. Zunächst wurden die Bedarfe bei mittelständischen Unternehmen in der Region Erzgebirge abgefragt, um die aktuellen Gegebenheiten und den Status quo in Bezug auf technologische Recyclingkonzepte bestmöglich abzubilden. Für ein fundiertes Recyclingkonzept hat das TRICYCLE-Team drei Referenzbauteile für den vorgesehenen Prozess ermittelt, die in der erzgebirgischen Wirtschaft Verwendung finden, und folgenden Bereichen zugeordnet: Automotive, Technische Textilien mit applizierter Zusatzfunktion und Technische Textilien mit integrierter Zusatzfunktion.

Basierend auf dieser Auswahl, analysiert das Projektteam momentan die Herstellungs- und bisherigen Recyclingprozesse der Referenzbauteile. Das beinhaltet auch die Planung praktischer Versuche zum Recycling. Dabei fokussieren sich die Projektpartner auf ihr Know-how in verschiedenen chemischen, thermischen und mechanischen Prozessen zur Separierung, Rückführung und Wiederverwendung der eingesetzten Materialien. Um die Produkte den Recyclingtechnologien zugänglich zu machen, wurde die Herangehensweise innerhalb des Projekts angepasst, da insbesondere Textil aufgrund von Form und Struktur (z. B. endlose Struktur) herausfordernd sein kann.

Obwohl die Materialien selbst recycelbar sind, müssen diese dennoch für den Prozess optimal vorbereitet bzw. fachgerecht aufbereitet werden. Die Expertise und die Technologiekompetenz, die hierfür benötigt werden, ist bei den beteiligten Projektpartnern durch jahrzehntelange Erfahrung und zahlreiche Innovationen vorhanden. Das Zusammenspiel aller Beteiligten im Projekt TRICYCLE stellt bereits jetzt die Weichen für das geplante Recycling Center, um dieses später zum Drehkreuz zwischen regionalen Produktionsunternehmen und dem Recycling weiterzuentwickeln. Dieses soll als „Open Factory“ aufgebaut werden, um den Unternehmen des SmartERZ-Bündnisses bzw. perspektivisch der Region Erzgebirge eine gemeinsame Nutzung zu ermöglichen.

„Die Wiederverwendung der eingesetzten Ressourcen ist sowohl aus ökonomischer als auch aus ökologischer Sicht zwingend geboten. Momentan gibt es weder Anlagenbauer noch Dienstleistungsanbieter mit den entsprechenden Kompetenzen zum Recycling von Smart Composites oder Multimaterialverbünden am Markt,“ stellt Johannes Leis, der Verbundkoordinator vom Sächsischen Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI) in Chemnitz fest.Unter Leitung des STFI als Verbundkoordinator mit seiner über 30-jährigen Erfahrung in der Textilbranche und speziellem Know-how im Recycling von Carbonabfällen haben sich weitere Unternehmen und Forschungseinrichtungen zusammengefunden. Dazu zählen das Textilunternehmen Curt Bauer GmbH, die Professur Fabrikplanung und Fabrikbetrieb der TU Chemnitz, das Ingenieurbüro Matthias Weißflog, der Hersteller für Faserverbundbauteile Cotesa GmbH, der Spezialvlieshersteller Norafin Industries (Germany) GmbH, das Recyclingunternehmen Becker Umweltdienste GmbH und die Hörmann Rawema Engineering & Consulting GmbH. Am Ende der Projektlaufzeit sollen ein einsatzfähiges, technologisches Recyclingkonzept für die zukünftigen entstehenden smarten Produkte sowie die in der Produktion entstehenden Abfälle (bspw. durch fehlerhafte Bauteile und Randbeschnitte) und ein Konzept für den Aufbau eines Recycling Centers vorliegen, das im Erzgebirge entstehen soll.

19.09.2022

ISKO opens CREATIVE ROOM GERMANY

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

  • First product development centre in Germany

ISKO has opened its second product development centre, based in Stade, Lower Saxony, following the success of the Creative Room London in the UK which had its opening earlier this year.

Creative Room Germany is a innovative space and the first of its kind in Germany. It is the latest initiative of Creative Room Services (CRS), a division of ISKO devoted to offering streamlined and simplified solutions for all denim requirements – from fabric to finished garment.

With a focus on sustainable washing and finishing techniques, customers of Creative Room Germany will be able to work in parallel with ISKO’s experts to achieve their desired denim looks. Together with machine technology partner Jeanologia, they have been able to develop innovative washing and finishing techniques that meet the highest quality and sustainability standards with a significantly lower environmental impact. Creative Room Germany will also be the central point for its customers full product development, ensuring the whole process is agile and more efficient.

By utilising ISKO’s patented recycling technology, they are now able to develop brand new garments by using fibres from post-consumer denim, finally closing the loop and giving a new and cutting-edge circular supply solution for their customers. As well as a hub for its customers, Creative Room Germany will also act as a platform for the wider denim community to share knowledge, create new and innovative ideas and to bring them to life.

“Building on from the success of our London facility, our goal will be to offer tailor made garment supply solutions for customers in the DACH, Benelux and Nordic markets and this facility will be the focal point of that offering. With a collaborative approach, we will fulfil our vision of bringing a new circular supply solution to the market.”
Pau Bruguera, Executive Director @ ISKO

More information:
Isko denim finishing Creative Room
Source:

ISKO

(c) Fraunhofer CCPE
19.09.2022

Fraunhofer CCPE on the way to an international circular plastics economy

More than 350 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide every year, and vast amounts of plastic waste simply end up in the environment. The circular economy offers enormous potential for keeping plastics in the loop and thus conserving resources and the environment. Since 2018, six Fraunhofer institutes in the Fraunhofer CCPE cluster have been researching how to make the plastics value chain circular, and Prof. Manfred Renner has been the new head of the cluster since August 2022. Research results, implementation projects and strategies to accelerate the transformation to a circular plastics economy will be presented by Fraunhofer CCPE at the first international Fraunhofer CCPE Summit on February 8 and 9, 2023 in Munich.

More than 350 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide every year, and vast amounts of plastic waste simply end up in the environment. The circular economy offers enormous potential for keeping plastics in the loop and thus conserving resources and the environment. Since 2018, six Fraunhofer institutes in the Fraunhofer CCPE cluster have been researching how to make the plastics value chain circular, and Prof. Manfred Renner has been the new head of the cluster since August 2022. Research results, implementation projects and strategies to accelerate the transformation to a circular plastics economy will be presented by Fraunhofer CCPE at the first international Fraunhofer CCPE Summit on February 8 and 9, 2023 in Munich.

In a circular plastics economy, resources can be saved, products can be intelligently designed for long service life, and end-of-life losses can be reduced. Systemic, technical and social innovations are needed to make the transition from a linear to a circular economy a success. This is what the Fraunhofer Cluster of Excellence Circular Plastics Economy CCPE is researching in the three divisions “Materials”, “Systems” and “Business”. The cooperation of the six Fraunhofer institutes IAP, ICT, IML, IVV, LBF and UMSICHT enables a multi-stakeholder approach in which the appropriate R&D competencies are bundled.

Fraunhofer CCPE would like to present and discuss successful projects and research approaches on an international scale at the Fraunhofer CCPE Summit on February 8 and 9, 2023 in Munich. The summit is to become an international forum for exchanging ideas for solutions and innovations for a circular plastics economy.

Cross-industry collaboration - local, regional and international
Since August 2022, Prof. Manfred Renner, Institute Director of Fraunhofer UMSICHT, is the new head of Fraunhofer CCPE. He succeeds Prof. Eckhard Weidner, who has retired. “Cross-industry cooperation - very local, but also regional and international - is the elementary prerequisite for a functioning circular plastics economy. At the summit, players from all points of the compass will meet and network in order to rethink the plastics value chain together," explains Prof. Manfred Renner, adding, “We want to provide answers to the following questions:  How can we make all Circular Economy principles, i.e. the ten R-strategies, known? How can industry, science and society best cooperate in a transformation to a circular plastics economy for the greatest possible impact?”

Results of the Fraunhofer CCPE cluster so far are innovative approaches for circular business models, intelligent collection, sorting, and recycling technologies, but also new formulations for circular polymers and compounds to enable multiple recycling cycles. With the newly developed assessment tool CRL® , companies can, for example, self-assess the maturity of products or product systems with regard to the circular economy. The tool checks the extent to which a product already takes into account circular economy principles in the areas of product design, product service system, end-of-life management and circular economy, and where there is still potential for improvement.

Source:

Fraunhofer UMSICHT

(c) Borealis
08.09.2022

Borealis and Trexel develop fully recyclable lightweight bottle

  • Monomaterial solution contains renewably-sourced polypropylene from the Bornewables™ portfolio of circular polyolefins
  • Trexel employs its proprietary MuCell® technology to deliver a range of lightweighting benefits
  • EverMinds™ in action: reuse and design for recycling are focus of value chain collaboration

Borealis and Trexel, an expert in foaming injection and blow moulded parts, announce that they have co-developed a new plastic bottle based on a grade from the Bornewables™ portfolio of polyolefins made using renewable feedstocks derived 100% from waste and residue streams. The lightweight bottle – which will be showcased at the Borealis stand at the K 2022 (from 19 to 26 October 2022 in Düsseldorf) – is reusable and fully recyclable. It boasts a significantly lower overall CO2 footprint because it is composed of renewably-sourced feedstock and produced in the foaming process.

  • Monomaterial solution contains renewably-sourced polypropylene from the Bornewables™ portfolio of circular polyolefins
  • Trexel employs its proprietary MuCell® technology to deliver a range of lightweighting benefits
  • EverMinds™ in action: reuse and design for recycling are focus of value chain collaboration

Borealis and Trexel, an expert in foaming injection and blow moulded parts, announce that they have co-developed a new plastic bottle based on a grade from the Bornewables™ portfolio of polyolefins made using renewable feedstocks derived 100% from waste and residue streams. The lightweight bottle – which will be showcased at the Borealis stand at the K 2022 (from 19 to 26 October 2022 in Düsseldorf) – is reusable and fully recyclable. It boasts a significantly lower overall CO2 footprint because it is composed of renewably-sourced feedstock and produced in the foaming process.

The Bornewables™ portfolio of circular polyolefins helps reduce the carbon footprint while offering material performance equal to virgin polymers. Using Bornewables grades allows for design freedom and colour flexibility, and helps retain a premium look and feel. The grades – which are commercially available in Europe – help conserve natural resources because they are derived solely from waste and residue streams, for example from used cooking oil. Reusing waste already in circulation instead of fossil fuel-based feedstocks enhances the sustainability of applications made using the Bornewables grades.

The reusable new bottle developed by Borealis and Trexel retains its value over many life cycles thanks to the use of Trexel’s proprietary technology in tandem with Bornewables grades; as a material solution, the new bottle minimises the use of valuable raw materials. Moreover, converters consume less energy in the production process when using the MuCell® technology. The bottle thus helps close the loop on plastics circularity by way of design for recycling, the use of renewable feedstocks, and excellent material performance across multiple life cycles.

Source:

Borealis

(c) PURE LOOP
07.09.2022

PURE LOOP: High-strength synthetic nonwoven made with a recycled content of 10 percent

Geosynthetics have become an indispensable part of the construction industry. PP nonwovens, for example - mechanically bonded continuous fibres made from specially UV-stabilised polypropylenes - are often used in blanket form as barriers, screens and filters, and their strength extends the service life of construction projects. Whether for road construction, or as barrier on glaciers or against weeds - there are myriad applications.

TenCate Geosynthetics uses the PURE LOOP ISEC evo technology to recycle this type of PP nonwoven. The European company, with locations in Austria, France and the Netherlands, is specialised in the development and production of geotextiles for modern civil engineering applications. The edge trimmings and production rejects generated during manufacturing used to be recycled at the Linz site, but not fed back into the company's own production process.

Geosynthetics have become an indispensable part of the construction industry. PP nonwovens, for example - mechanically bonded continuous fibres made from specially UV-stabilised polypropylenes - are often used in blanket form as barriers, screens and filters, and their strength extends the service life of construction projects. Whether for road construction, or as barrier on glaciers or against weeds - there are myriad applications.

TenCate Geosynthetics uses the PURE LOOP ISEC evo technology to recycle this type of PP nonwoven. The European company, with locations in Austria, France and the Netherlands, is specialised in the development and production of geotextiles for modern civil engineering applications. The edge trimmings and production rejects generated during manufacturing used to be recycled at the Linz site, but not fed back into the company's own production process.

"The demands on us were high," recalls Patrick Wiesinger, project manager at PURE LOOP. "The PP nonwoven is highly tear resistant, which means its a very challenging recycling process. Our ISEC evo machine conserves the quality of the production waste really well during recycling, so we were able to achieve the specified increase in quality for the recyclates."

Another advantage of PURE LOOP technology is the wide range of shapes in which the production scrap can be delivered for processing. "Our ifeed technology with double feed ram system and singleshaft shredder offers the ideal conditions for direct processing of these large rolls - and without the need for prior preparation of the input material by employees before the material is fed into the recycling process", emphasizes Patrick Wiesinger. With the ISEC evo recycling machine TenCate can now manufacture its high-strength PP nonwoven product with a recyclate content of up to 10 percent.

Source:

PURE LOOP, EREMA Group GmbH

02.09.2022

RGE: Closed-loop urban-fit textile-to-textile recycling solutions in Singapore

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings.

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings. The research centre will develop new technologies to recycle textile waste into fibre and create new, next-generation eco-friendly and sustainable textiles.

This move comes on the back of the tightening of waste import bans in countries such as China, India and Indonesia, which are among the world’s largest waste processors. The stricter import bans have left cities in need of viable local textile recycling solutions to tackle the immense textile waste generated.

RGE Executive Director, Mr Perry Lim, said, “Current textile recycling technologies, which rely primarily on a bleaching and separation process using heavy chemicals, cannot be implemented due to environmental laws. At the same time, there is an urgent need to keep textiles out of the brimming landfills.” He added, “As the world’s largest viscose producer, we aim to catalyse closed-loop, textile-to-textile recycling by developing optimal urban-fit solutions that can bring the world closer to a circular textile economy.”

Globally, an estimated 90 million tonnes of textile waste is generated and disposed of every year, with less than 1% being upcycled into new clothing or other textile materials. By 2030, the amount of global textile waste, which currently accounts for almost 10% of municipal solid waste, is expected to reach more than 134 million tonnes. The textile industry is also responsible for 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than international flights and maritime shipping combined.

At present, most of the available textile recycling technologies are open-loop, where textile waste is typically downcycled to lower-quality products (insulating materials, cleaning cloths, etc.) or be used in waste-to-heat recycling.

“Closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling processes, particularly chemical recycling, are still under development. Scaling up the technologies to industrial scale remains a challenge. A key bottleneck is that refabricating textile waste into fibre needs purity standards for feedstock. However, most of the clothes that we wear are made of a mixture of different synthetic and natural fibres, which makes separating the complex blends of materials challenging for effective recycling.

“Our aim is to address this industry pain point by developing viable solutions that use less energy, fewer chemicals and produces harmless and less effluents, and then potentially scale up across our global operations,” Mr Lim said.

To tackle the key challenges in closed-loop textile recycling, RGE-NTU SusTex is looking into four key research areas, namely cleaner and more energy efficient methods of recycling into new raw materials, automated sorting of textile waste, eco-friendly dye removal, and development of a new class of sustainable textiles that is durable for wear and, at the same time, lends itself to easier recycling.

Technologies developed by RGE-NTU SusTex will be test bedded at RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant in Singapore, which is projected for completion as early as 2024. If successful, RGE has plans to replicate the plant in other urban cities within its footprint.

 

Source:

Royal Golden Eagle

Photo: Andritz/Recypur
02.09.2022

New mattresses made of industrial & post-consumer foam waste

  • Recypur successfully starts up a complete airlay line delivered by ANDRITZ for its mill in L’Alcúdia, Spain

The airlay line is designed for recycling of post-industrial and post-consumer foam and was developed specifically for the bedding and furniture industry, with material heights reaching 20 cm and densities of up to 120 kg/m3. Experimental tests carried out together with experts from ANDRITZ Laroche led to the conclusion that the mechanical method for recycling polyurethane is the most versatile and reliable.

With a capacity of 1.2 t/h, this airlay line enables Recypur to supply new mattresses made of industrial & post-consumer foam waste from old mattresses. This well proven process allows to reduce the environmental impact, increase self-sufficiency and eventually reduce the use of polyurethane. Such a set-up also allows multiple functional materials to be incorporated into the blend, such as flame-retardant, conductive and insulating fibers, among others. Thanks to this tailored approach, Recypur is now able to expand its diversification, innovation and reputation on the Spanish market.

  • Recypur successfully starts up a complete airlay line delivered by ANDRITZ for its mill in L’Alcúdia, Spain

The airlay line is designed for recycling of post-industrial and post-consumer foam and was developed specifically for the bedding and furniture industry, with material heights reaching 20 cm and densities of up to 120 kg/m3. Experimental tests carried out together with experts from ANDRITZ Laroche led to the conclusion that the mechanical method for recycling polyurethane is the most versatile and reliable.

With a capacity of 1.2 t/h, this airlay line enables Recypur to supply new mattresses made of industrial & post-consumer foam waste from old mattresses. This well proven process allows to reduce the environmental impact, increase self-sufficiency and eventually reduce the use of polyurethane. Such a set-up also allows multiple functional materials to be incorporated into the blend, such as flame-retardant, conductive and insulating fibers, among others. Thanks to this tailored approach, Recypur is now able to expand its diversification, innovation and reputation on the Spanish market.

The scope of supply includes a blending line with five feeders, an Exel 1500 for fine opening, an Airlay Flexiloft+ with 2.20 m working width, a recycling machine and an oven.

Airlay lines strongly support the circular economy and are part of ANDRITZ’s comprehensive product portfolio of sustainable solutions that help customers achieve their own sustainability goals in terms of climate and environmental protection.

Recypur, based in the Spanish province of Valencia, is part of DELAX, a Spanish group specialized in manufacturing and commercialization of innovative beds and mattresses. This company is the first Spanish manufacturer of recycled flexible polyurethane foam cores from post-consumer foam waste.

Source:

Andritz AG

25.08.2022

Indorama Ventures committed to Science Based Targets initiative

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a global sustainable chemical company, announced its commitment to science-based targets by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) to help drive its ambitious sustainability programs. The company will also participate in the SBTi Expert Advisory Group for the chemicals industry.

SBTi is a collaboration between CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, the World Resources Institute, and the World Wide Fund for Nature to help businesses set emissions reduction targets based on the most recent climate science. IVL has committed to science-based targets under its purpose of “Reimagining chemistry together to create a better world” which aims to reduce global warming in line with the 1.5°C Paris Climate Agreement.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a global sustainable chemical company, announced its commitment to science-based targets by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) to help drive its ambitious sustainability programs. The company will also participate in the SBTi Expert Advisory Group for the chemicals industry.

SBTi is a collaboration between CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, the World Resources Institute, and the World Wide Fund for Nature to help businesses set emissions reduction targets based on the most recent climate science. IVL has committed to science-based targets under its purpose of “Reimagining chemistry together to create a better world” which aims to reduce global warming in line with the 1.5°C Paris Climate Agreement.

Under its Vision 2030 ambition, Indorama Ventures aims to build on its global industry leadership in sustainability, including by reducing GHG intensity by 30% and increasing renewable electricity consumption to 25%. Green projects are helping the company to achieve its operational efficiency targets, increase its use of renewable energy (especially renewable electricity – both onsite generation and offsite procurement through power purchase agreements), implement new decarbonization technologies including carbon capture, introduce bio-feedstock to its petrochemical value chain, and expand its PET recycling capability.

To meet its targets, IVL recognizes the importance of collaboration between the public and private sectors to decarbonize its operations through a variety of strategies. The established targets help its customers and suppliers to achieve their own sustainability goals, particularly their science-based targets.

Yash Lohia, Chairman of ESG Council at Indorama Ventures, said, "We are pleased to make our sustainability commitment more practical and measurable through science-based targets. We are dedicated to finding new technologies that can transform our operations and products towards net-zero. The efforts are not only for our sustainable business but also to support our customers and suppliers to achieve their own sustainability goals."

Source:

IVL

(c) INDA
23.08.2022

INDA Announces the 2022 RISE® Innovation Award Finalists

  • Innovations in Recycling and Sustainability: Sustainable Diaper Components, Natural Fibers, and Kitty Litter from Recycled Nappies

INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, announced the three finalists that will present their innovative material science solutions as they compete for the prestigious RISE® Innovation Award during the 12th edition of the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics Conference (RISE®) to be held in person September 27-28, 2022 at North Carolina State University.  The award recognizes novel innovations within and on the periphery of the nonwovens industry that creatively use next-level science and engineering principles to solve material challenges and expand the usage of nonwovens and engineered fabrics.

  • Innovations in Recycling and Sustainability: Sustainable Diaper Components, Natural Fibers, and Kitty Litter from Recycled Nappies

INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, announced the three finalists that will present their innovative material science solutions as they compete for the prestigious RISE® Innovation Award during the 12th edition of the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics Conference (RISE®) to be held in person September 27-28, 2022 at North Carolina State University.  The award recognizes novel innovations within and on the periphery of the nonwovens industry that creatively use next-level science and engineering principles to solve material challenges and expand the usage of nonwovens and engineered fabrics.

Finalists for the 2022 RISE® Innovation Award:
Cat Litter Made from Recycled Nappies – DiaperRecycle
DiaperRecycle has developed technology to recycle used diapers into cat litter. The aim of the company is to make an environmental impact and decrease the climate changing emissions of diaper waste. They’re diverting used diapers (used in households and businesses such as elder care) from landfill, separating the plastic and fiber and making cat litter. The plastic is prepared for recycling by plastics recyclers. The cat litter product is made by DiaperRecycle from the super absorbent fiber of diapers; it’s highly absorbent and flushable.

Biodegradable Diaper Components – Gottlieb Binder GmbH & Co. KG
Together, Avgol and Binder take on the challenge of disposable absorbent articles for the good of future generations and came up with sustainable diaper components. The technologies used are based on biotransformation technology, which makes it possible to achieve more sustainable products by supporting recycling and providing an alternative route for non-recyclable/fugitive waste management.

sero® hemp fibers – Bast Fibre Technologies, Inc.
Bast Fibre Technologies’ sero® hemp fibers offer the nonwoven industry an all-natural substitute for plastic fibers. From dedicated European- and US-based production facilities, BFT transforms raw bast fibers into premium natural fibers for applications ranging from single-use and durable wipes to industrial applications. Suitable for minority or majority blends, sero® hemp combines easily with standard nonwoven fibers to produce fabrics that meet the industry requirements for strength, uniformity, and processing efficiency.

RISE® conference attendees, technology scouts and product developers in the nonwoven/engineered fabrics industry seeking new developments to advance their businesses, will electronically vote for the recipient of the 2022 RISE® Innovation Award. The winner will be announced Wed., Sept. 28th.

Technical experts on INDA’s Technical Advisory Board selected three finalists from among 12 nominations.  The 22-member board of technical professionals is represented by companies such as Absorbent Hygiene Insights LLC, Attindas Hygiene Partners, Berry Global, Cotton Incorporated, Crown Abbey, LLC, The DAK Group, Fi-Tech, Inc. Freudenberg Performance Materials, Glatfelter Sontara Old Hickory, Inc., Lenzing Fibers, Inc., Natureworks LLC, Nice-Pak Products, Inc./PDI, Nonwovens by Design, Norafin (Americas) Inc., The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University, Poccia Consulting, LLC, The Procter & Gamble Company, RKW North America, Inc., Rockline Industries, Smith, Johnson & Associates, Suominen Corporation, and Texas Tech University.

“The RISE Conference recognizes and promotes innovation across the nonwoven and engineered material industry. Technology leaders will share invaluable information on innovative new approaches and concepts to resolve material science challenges. For any technical leader, technology scout or new product innovator, RISE is an event not to be missed,” said Tony Fragnito, INDA’s President.

The conference program will cover relevant and timely topics including: Creating a Circular Industry, Advancements in Sustainable Inputs in PLA, Developments in Natural Fibers I and II, Sustainable Inputs in Fibers and Biofibers, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products, and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

More information:
INDA RISE®
Source:

INDA

(C) INDA
17.08.2022

RISE® – Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics Conference in September

  • Focus on Rethinking, Reusing and Recycling Nonwovens this September
  • Industry Experts Present Material Science Innovations & Sustainability

More than 20 industry experts will present their views on how material science innovations can create a more sustainable future for the nonwovens industry at the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics (RISE®) Conference, Sept. 27-28 in Raleigh, at North Carolina State University, co-organized by INDA and The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University.

Starting with responsible sourcing of nonwoven inputs to developing realistic end-of-life options and circularity opportunities, RISE will focus on rethinking, reusing and recycling nonwovens and engineered materials at the Talley Student Union in Raleigh.    

Participants will learn what’s coming next with sessions on the following six themes: Towards a More Circular Industry; Advancement in Sustainable Inputs; Development in Natural Fibers; Sustainable Inputs: Fibers and Biofibers; Waste Not, Want Not, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products; and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

  • Focus on Rethinking, Reusing and Recycling Nonwovens this September
  • Industry Experts Present Material Science Innovations & Sustainability

More than 20 industry experts will present their views on how material science innovations can create a more sustainable future for the nonwovens industry at the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics (RISE®) Conference, Sept. 27-28 in Raleigh, at North Carolina State University, co-organized by INDA and The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University.

Starting with responsible sourcing of nonwoven inputs to developing realistic end-of-life options and circularity opportunities, RISE will focus on rethinking, reusing and recycling nonwovens and engineered materials at the Talley Student Union in Raleigh.    

Participants will learn what’s coming next with sessions on the following six themes: Towards a More Circular Industry; Advancement in Sustainable Inputs; Development in Natural Fibers; Sustainable Inputs: Fibers and Biofibers; Waste Not, Want Not, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products; and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

The 12th edition of RISE® will bring together thought leaders in product development, materials science, and new technologies to connect and convene for the industry’s premier nonwovens science and technology conference.

Expert speakers will address the latest trends and innovations around circularity – an important component of sustainability strategies that aims to return a product into the supply chain, instead of the landfill, after users are done consuming it.

RISE® session highlights include:

  • The Global Plastic Crisis: Who Will Be the Winners/Losers in The Marketplace?
    Bryan Haynes, Ph.D., Senior Technical Director, Global Nonwovens, Kimberly-Clark Corporation
  • Sustainable Fibers – Developments and the Future
    Jason Locklin, Ph.D., Director, University of Georgia, New Materials Institute and David Grewell, Ph.D., Center Director, Center for Bioplastics and Biocomposites
  • Thinking Differently: In a Changing World What’s Next for NatureWorks and Polylactic Acid Polymers (PLA)
    Liz Johnson, Ph.D., Vice President of Technology, NatureWorks LLC
  • PLA and PLA Blends: Practical Aspects of Extrusion
    Behnam Pourdeyhimi, Ph.D., William A. Klopman Distinguished Professor and Executive Director, The Nonwovens Institute, North Carolina State University
  • Hemp is Strong – Are You?
    Olaf Isele, Strategic Product Development Director, Trace Femcare, Inc.
  • Exploring Natural Fibers in Nonwovens
    Paul Latten, Director of Research and Development & New Business, Southeast Nonwovens, Inc.
  • Potential Nonwoven Applications of Tree-Free Fibers Made from Microbial Cellulose –
    Heidi Beatty, Chief Executive Officer, Crown Abbey, LLC
  • Ultra Fine Fibers Made from Recycled Materials
    Takashi Owada, General Manager, Teijin Frontier (U.S.A.), Inc.

The event also will feature the presentation of the RISE® Innovation Award, a special opportunity to tour the Nonwovens Institute’s state-of-the-art facilities with advance registration required, and poster presentations by North Carolina State University graduate students.

Source:

INDA, Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry

11.08.2022

BB Engineering at the K Show 2022

As a sub-exhibitor of Oerlikon, BB Engineering will present its product range in the fields of extrusion, mixing and filtration as well as PET recycling with the VacuFil and VarioFil R+ systems at the K show 2022.

BB Engineering has been focusing its development work increasingly on recycling technologies for several years. In addition to extruders, filters and mixers that are suitable for both recycling processes and the processing of recyclate, BB Engineering offers a complete PET recycling plant called VacuFil.

As a sub-exhibitor of Oerlikon, BB Engineering will present its product range in the fields of extrusion, mixing and filtration as well as PET recycling with the VacuFil and VarioFil R+ systems at the K show 2022.

BB Engineering has been focusing its development work increasingly on recycling technologies for several years. In addition to extruders, filters and mixers that are suitable for both recycling processes and the processing of recyclate, BB Engineering offers a complete PET recycling plant called VacuFil.

With VacuFil, BB Engineering has developed an innovative PET LSP recycling process. The process combines gentle large-scale filtration and targeted IV regulation for consistently outstanding rPET melt quality. Thus, much more than simple "downcycling" is possible with VacuFil. VacuFil processes a wide range of input materials - post-production and post-consumer. The patented key component Visco+ vacuum filter removes volatile impurities quickly and reliably. VacuFil is a modular system that can be designed for different recycling applications. Simple granulation is possible, but also direct feeding into further processing, e.g. in the synthetic fiber spinning mill. BBE offers VacuFil in combination with its own VarioFil compact spinning plant to produce polyester yarn.

At the K show 2022, visitors can experience the VacuFil Visco+ recycling technology in operation with a connected VarioFil spinning plant and see live how recycling yarn is produced from PET waste.

Source:

BB Engineering GmbH

Foto: Unplash
10.08.2022

High-tech center for cotton processing and fiber-to-fiber recycling being built in Africa

IFFAC (Impact Fund for African Creatives) has revealed plans which will revolutionise West African textile and garment production at one stroke. The fund is converting a partially disused textile mill in the region into a hi-tech centre for processing local cotton and recycling waste fabric, to produce both fabric for further processing and new clothes. The mill will be equipped with modern equipment, all sustainably powered by hydroelectricity from the nearby Volta Dam.

West Africa grows about 6% of the world’s cotton but only a tiny fraction of that crop is processed on the continent, the vast majority being shipped thousands of miles to Asia before being shipped back again as finished or part-finished fabrics. The mill project will end the continent’s reliance on such an unsustainable practice with all the obvious financial and environmental benefits.

IFFAC (Impact Fund for African Creatives) has revealed plans which will revolutionise West African textile and garment production at one stroke. The fund is converting a partially disused textile mill in the region into a hi-tech centre for processing local cotton and recycling waste fabric, to produce both fabric for further processing and new clothes. The mill will be equipped with modern equipment, all sustainably powered by hydroelectricity from the nearby Volta Dam.

West Africa grows about 6% of the world’s cotton but only a tiny fraction of that crop is processed on the continent, the vast majority being shipped thousands of miles to Asia before being shipped back again as finished or part-finished fabrics. The mill project will end the continent’s reliance on such an unsustainable practice with all the obvious financial and environmental benefits.

As well as producing fabric from sustainably grown virgin cotton, a joint venture with Shandong-based WOL Textiles Ltd., a privately owned plant that has long supplied the African market, the mill will be home to a state-of-the-art shredding and recycling facility, a joint venture between IFFAC and the Dutch Circularity B.V. CEO Han Hamers of Circularity B.V. in The Netherlands, has been involved in the production of 100% circular knit and woven articles.

The mill project is expected to create over a thousand jobs. The surrounding area already boasts a significant number of experienced textile workers ready to be retrained on the new equipment. While the majority of the products created will be sold within the region, all processes will confirm to new EU Supply Chain Law to allow for the possibility of export.  

Output is forecast at six million pieces of finished clothing and twenty-five million metres of spun and woven cloth per year. In total, thirty million US$ of investment will be made in the site with operations ready to begin next year (2023).

More information:
IFFAC Africa Recycling
Source:

Circularity Germany GmbH i.G.

09.08.2022

Carbios joined WhiteCycle to process and recycle plastic textile waste

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 
WhiteCycle envisions that by 2030 the uptake and deployment of its circular solution will lead to the annual recycling of more than 2 million tons of the third most widely used plastic in the world, PET[2]. This project should prevent landfilling or incineration of more than 1.8 million tons of that plastic each year. Also, it should enable reduction of CO2 emissions by around 2 million tons.
 
Complex waste containing textile (PET) from end-of-life tyres, hoses and multilayer clothes are currently difficult to recycle, but could soon become recyclable thanks to the project outcomes. Raw material from PET plastic waste could go back into creation of high-performance products, through a circular and viable value chain.
 
Public and private European organizations are combining their scientific and industrial expertises:

  • industrial partners (Michelin, Mandals, KORDSA);
  • cross-sector partnership (Inditex)
  • waste management companies (Synergies TLC, ESTATO);
  • intelligent monitoring systems for sorting (IRIS);
  • biological recycling SME (Carbios);
  • product life cycle analysis company (IPOINT);
  • university, expert in FAIR data management (HVL);
  • universities, research and technology organizations (PPRIME – Université de Poitiers/CNRS, DITF, IFTH, ERASME);
  • industry cluster (Axelera);
  • project management consulting company (Dynergie).

 
The consortium will develop new processes required throughout the industrial value chain:

  • Innovative sorting technologies, to enable significant increase of the PET plastic content of complex waste streams in order to better process them;
  • A pre-treatment for recuperated PET plastic content, followed by a breakthrough recycling enzyme-based process to decompose it into pure monomers in a sustainable way;
  • Repolymerization of the recycled monomers into like new plastic;
  • Fabrication and quality verification of the new products made of recycled plastic materials

 
WhiteCycle has a global budget of nearly 9.6 million euros and receives European funding in the amount of nearly 7.1 million euros. The consortium’s partners are based in five countries (France, Spain, Germany, Norway and Turkey). Coordinated by Michelin, it has an effective governance system involving a steering committee, an advisory board and a technical support committee.

[1] Complex waste: multi materials waste (Rubber goods composites and multi-layer textile)
[2] PET: Polyethylene terephthalate

Source:

Carbios

08.08.2022

I:CO: Rücknahmeprogramm mit Jack & Jones für getragene Kleidung und Schuhe

Zusammen mit der dänischen Modemarke für Herrenbekleidung sammelt I:CO künftig im Rahmen des Take-Back-Systems getragene Kleidung und Schuhe. Kunden können seit Anfang August markenunabhängig ihre aussortierte Kleidung und Schuhe in deutschen Jack & Jones Filialen abgeben. Der Vertrag über die Zusammenarbeit wurde Ende März unterzeichnet. Für I:CO ist diese Partnerschaft nach Selected Homme/Femme die zweite mit einer Marke der Bestseller-Gruppe.
 
In den Sortierwerken von SOEX wird jedes Kleidungsstück oder Paar Schuhe zunächst von Hand sortiert sowie nach Qualität und Zustand überprüft und später im voll automatisierten Sorting-for-Recycling für die jeweilige Weiterverarbeitung vorbereitet. Das oberste Ziel ist dabei die Langlebigkeit der Kleidung und Schuhe zur Vermeidung von CO2-Emissionen und Müll.

Zusammen mit der dänischen Modemarke für Herrenbekleidung sammelt I:CO künftig im Rahmen des Take-Back-Systems getragene Kleidung und Schuhe. Kunden können seit Anfang August markenunabhängig ihre aussortierte Kleidung und Schuhe in deutschen Jack & Jones Filialen abgeben. Der Vertrag über die Zusammenarbeit wurde Ende März unterzeichnet. Für I:CO ist diese Partnerschaft nach Selected Homme/Femme die zweite mit einer Marke der Bestseller-Gruppe.
 
In den Sortierwerken von SOEX wird jedes Kleidungsstück oder Paar Schuhe zunächst von Hand sortiert sowie nach Qualität und Zustand überprüft und später im voll automatisierten Sorting-for-Recycling für die jeweilige Weiterverarbeitung vorbereitet. Das oberste Ziel ist dabei die Langlebigkeit der Kleidung und Schuhe zur Vermeidung von CO2-Emissionen und Müll.

Source:

SOEX

03.08.2022

Sustainable Developments in Absorbent Hygiene & Personal Care at Hygienix™

  • INDA Announces Full Program and Opens Registration for Premier Event in New Orleans

With reusable and recyclable products and new inputs offering growth opportunities in absorbent hygiene and personal care products, Hygienix™ will provide an insightful view into the market’s future this November in New Orleans.

Industry participants from around the world and throughout the supply chain will convene and connect for the eighth edition of the premier event for the fast-growing segment on November 14-17, at The Roosevelt New Orleans Hotel.

The in-person conference will highlight the segment’s continued growth and new opportunities with presentations by more than 20 industry experts on sustainable inputs, natural fibers, product transparency, reusable menstrual products, recyclable diapers and more as well as the latest market forecasts and insights into consumer buying trends.

  • INDA Announces Full Program and Opens Registration for Premier Event in New Orleans

With reusable and recyclable products and new inputs offering growth opportunities in absorbent hygiene and personal care products, Hygienix™ will provide an insightful view into the market’s future this November in New Orleans.

Industry participants from around the world and throughout the supply chain will convene and connect for the eighth edition of the premier event for the fast-growing segment on November 14-17, at The Roosevelt New Orleans Hotel.

The in-person conference will highlight the segment’s continued growth and new opportunities with presentations by more than 20 industry experts on sustainable inputs, natural fibers, product transparency, reusable menstrual products, recyclable diapers and more as well as the latest market forecasts and insights into consumer buying trends.

Hygienix also will offer two specialized workshops, and a myriad of business connection opportunities including a welcome reception on Nov. 14 and a first-time attendee mentorship program.
Participants will discover innovative products in absorbent hygiene and personal care at tabletop exhibits with evening receptions on Nov. 15-16, providing opportunities for 60 companies to showcase their unique offerings.

Three finalists will each present their innovative and technically sophisticated disposable absorbent hygiene products as they vie for the prestigious Hygienix Innovation Award™. Nominations are open until August 29. Demonstrating the interest in sustainability, last year’s award recipient was Kudos Diaper Subscription featuring its 100% cotton disposable diaper.

Hygienix Highlights
Absorbent hygiene – the single largest nonwoven end‐use category (by square meters) – is expected to continue its strong growth over the next four years, creating market opportunities in this thriving area driven by growing consumer interest for environmentally-friendly options in material inputs and end-of-life options.

Participants will hear the latest data and forecasts from analysts during presentations by Robert Fry, Jr., Ph.D., Principal of Robert Fry Economics LLC on the Global Economy – What we Can Expect in 2023; Pricie Hanna, Managing Partner, and Colin Hanna, Director of Market Research, Price Hanna Consultants on Disposables versus Reusables; and Simon Preisler, Vice President of Logistics, Central National Gottesman delivering a Logistic Market Update.

A panel of entrepreneurs will discuss the challenges, biases and taboos to bringing innovations into the marketplace. Experts sharing their insights will be Mia Abbruzzese and Alexandra Fennell, co-founders of Grace; Amrita Saigal, founder and CEO, Kudos; and Cindy Santa Cruz, President of ParaPatch.

A session on Next-Generation Menstrual Products and their Users will feature Liying Qian, Research Analyst, Euromonitor International providing market data on disposable and reusable period products; Frantisek Riha-Scott, Founder, Confitex discussing reusable products; and Greta Meyer, Co-Founder and CEO, Sequel on Reengineering the Tampon.
Also focusing on period products will be a presentation by Danielle Keiser, Managing Director, Impact, Madami on Changing the Conversation with Consumersmoderated by Heidi Beatty, Chief Executive Officer, Crown Abbey, LLC.

Other intriguing not-to-be-missed presentations centered on sustainability trends include:

  • Assessing Sustainable Fiber Options in the Context of Disposable Hygienic Products – Richard Knowlson, Principal, RPK Consulting LLC
  • Five Generations of Hygiene + Sustainability – Matt Schiering, Professor of Marketing, Dominican University
  • Recycling Approaches for Disposable Diaper Waste – Jeannine Cardin, Quality and R&D, RecycPHP Inc.

Hygienix will provide additional focused learning opportunities with two essential short courses (with separation registration fees) on Nov. 14 focused on Absorption Systems for Absorbent Hygiene Products, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. and Global Diaper Trends from 3:45 to 6 p.m.

More information:
Hygienix INDA
Source:

INDA

IVL
03.08.2022

Winners of the RECO Sustainable Young Designer Competition

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) named the winners of ‘RECO Young Designer Competition’, Thailand's largest upcycling fashion design event, parading haute couture garments containing at least 60% recycled materials.

Eleven finalists showcased 33 handmade sustainable outfits at the 9th edition of the fashion show at IVL’s headquarters in Bangkok, using recycled PET and polyester items to craft creative fashions. Under the concept of ‘REVIVE: Start from the Street,’ RECO supports young Thai designers while raising awareness of recycling. The designs use a range of recycled materials including recycled PET yarns, discarded fabric from factories, and even repurposed safety belts.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) named the winners of ‘RECO Young Designer Competition’, Thailand's largest upcycling fashion design event, parading haute couture garments containing at least 60% recycled materials.

Eleven finalists showcased 33 handmade sustainable outfits at the 9th edition of the fashion show at IVL’s headquarters in Bangkok, using recycled PET and polyester items to craft creative fashions. Under the concept of ‘REVIVE: Start from the Street,’ RECO supports young Thai designers while raising awareness of recycling. The designs use a range of recycled materials including recycled PET yarns, discarded fabric from factories, and even repurposed safety belts.

RECO awarded finalists and winners with 500,000 baht in prizes to support their careers. First prize of 125,000 baht was awarded to 23-year-old emerging furniture designer Prem Buachum for his ‘The Origin of Rebirth’ collection, using fabric recycled from post-consumer PET bottles. The first runner-up, Sathitkhun Boonmee, was awarded 75,000 baht for his ‘Remembering Your Favorite Teddy Bear’ collection, using old dolls made of polyester fibers. Second runners-up, Worameth Monthanom and Tanakorn Sritong, received 50,000 baht for their ‘Regeneration of Nature (into Spring)’ collection, using unused fabrics and discarded PET film. Napat Tansuwan, a finalist with his’ Don’t Judge’ collection, will go on to create designer merchandise for sponsor Buriram United Football Club using local weaving techniques from communities in Buriram province.

Mrs. Aradhana Lohia Sharma, Vice President at Indorama Ventures and RECO Young Designer Competition Chairperson, said, “Since 2011, RECO's ambition has been to uplift recycling and inspire people to realize the value of recyclable materials to produce great new products for daily life. We have witnessed many thoughtful initiatives on upcycling through the collections created by our talented young Thai designers. The designs this year showcase stunning wearability and innovation while using a large percentage of recycle materials. Public interest in recycling has been growing immensely, and we are grateful to strengthen the relationship with partners like Buriram United Football Club.”

“Indorama Ventures hopes this competition will be a driving force in nurturing sustainable fashion concepts and increasing the acceptance of recycled materials, especially post-consumer PET. We are proud to be a stepping-stone for our youth's design journey and our community’s sustainable future.”

Source:

IVL

25.07.2022

Carbios: Strengthening its leadership in the biorecycling of plastics and textiles

  • Exceptional achievement of research work on the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for understanding PET depolymerization enzymes

Carbios (Euronext Growth Paris: ALCRB), a pioneer in the development of enzymatic solutions dedicated to the end-of-life of plastic and textile polymers, announces the publication of an article entitled “An NMR look at an engineered PET depolymerase” in the scientific journal Biophysical Journal.

The article describes the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the thermal stability of PET depolymerization enzymes and the mechanism of adsorption of the enzyme on the polymer. This innovative approach, which required months of development, is a world first and opens up new ways of improving these enzymes. This publication confirms Carbios' international lead in the development of the most efficient enzymes for the depolymerization and recycling of plastics.

  • Exceptional achievement of research work on the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for understanding PET depolymerization enzymes

Carbios (Euronext Growth Paris: ALCRB), a pioneer in the development of enzymatic solutions dedicated to the end-of-life of plastic and textile polymers, announces the publication of an article entitled “An NMR look at an engineered PET depolymerase” in the scientific journal Biophysical Journal.

The article describes the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the thermal stability of PET depolymerization enzymes and the mechanism of adsorption of the enzyme on the polymer. This innovative approach, which required months of development, is a world first and opens up new ways of improving these enzymes. This publication confirms Carbios' international lead in the development of the most efficient enzymes for the depolymerization and recycling of plastics.

Prof. Alain Marty, Chief Scientific Officer of Carbios and co-author of the article, explains: “ Nearly 25 researchers are currently working on our unique enzymatic technology. It is based on academic collaborations with the world's leading experts in their fields..”

Dr. Guy Lippens, CNRS Research Director and co-author of the artcle, adds: “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an extraordinary biophysical technique for visualizing an enzyme directly in solution. Our study is the first to use NMR as a complementary technique to crystallography and molecular modeling to observe a PETase. This gives new perspectives to better understand the functioning of these enzymes and it makes it possible to imagine new ways of improving these enzymes. ”

More information:
Carbios de-polymerization
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Carbios