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16.11.2022

CHT: From plastic waste to textile finishing: ARRISTAN rAIR

  • made out of recycled PET flakes and recyclable again
  • suited for finishing recycled yarns and fabrics
  • moisture management in sports and active wear

For the sustainable use of resources, the CHT Group has developed the product ARRISTAN rAIR, according to the principles of the circular economy. Here, plastic waste is converted into a valuable textile finishing product to achieve, for example, optimal moisture management in sports and active wear. Other areas of application include socks and tights in the clothing sector, filtration media and nonwovens in the technical textiles sector, and pillows and curtains in home textiles.

Since ARRISTAN rAIR is made out of recycled PET flakes, it is suited for finishing recycled yarns and fabrics which are subsequently recyclable again.

The hydrophilizing agent ARRISTAN rAIR is characterized by its fast-drying properties in combination with excellent soil release and thermoregulation. It therefore offers, especially in the field of functional textiles, optimal functionalities for high-quality and durable sportswear.

  • made out of recycled PET flakes and recyclable again
  • suited for finishing recycled yarns and fabrics
  • moisture management in sports and active wear

For the sustainable use of resources, the CHT Group has developed the product ARRISTAN rAIR, according to the principles of the circular economy. Here, plastic waste is converted into a valuable textile finishing product to achieve, for example, optimal moisture management in sports and active wear. Other areas of application include socks and tights in the clothing sector, filtration media and nonwovens in the technical textiles sector, and pillows and curtains in home textiles.

Since ARRISTAN rAIR is made out of recycled PET flakes, it is suited for finishing recycled yarns and fabrics which are subsequently recyclable again.

The hydrophilizing agent ARRISTAN rAIR is characterized by its fast-drying properties in combination with excellent soil release and thermoregulation. It therefore offers, especially in the field of functional textiles, optimal functionalities for high-quality and durable sportswear.

Source:

CHT Germany GmbH

(c) Carbios
20.10.2022

Carbios publishes results of consumer research study about plastic circularity

  • Carbios’ biorecycling and biodegradation technologies internationally recognized by consumers as promising answers to their top environmental concerns
  • Carbios’ innovations considered one of the best for solving recycling effectively and achieving a real plastic circularity
  • Consumer research including qualitative and quantitative fields was conducted between March and August 2022. The research institute, Strategic Research, conducted 6000 interviews in Europe and USA

Carbios’ biorecycling and biodegradation technologies acclaimed by consumers
During the first research field study, respondents were exposed to Carbios’ biorecycling process; a new enzyme-based biotechnology that enables biological recycling of all types of PET plastic waste (including bottles, packaging and textiles), and pushes the boundaries of recycling in terms of the number of cycles.

  • Carbios’ biorecycling and biodegradation technologies internationally recognized by consumers as promising answers to their top environmental concerns
  • Carbios’ innovations considered one of the best for solving recycling effectively and achieving a real plastic circularity
  • Consumer research including qualitative and quantitative fields was conducted between March and August 2022. The research institute, Strategic Research, conducted 6000 interviews in Europe and USA

Carbios’ biorecycling and biodegradation technologies acclaimed by consumers
During the first research field study, respondents were exposed to Carbios’ biorecycling process; a new enzyme-based biotechnology that enables biological recycling of all types of PET plastic waste (including bottles, packaging and textiles), and pushes the boundaries of recycling in terms of the number of cycles.

The research results demonstrated that European and US respondents find Carbios’ biorecycling technology more unique and innovative than traditional PET recycling (i.e. thermo-mechanical recycling), as well as more relevant in its ability to address their concerns and challenges regarding recycling.

In the second research study, conducted in the US, respondents were also exposed to Carbios’ biodegradation technology: an innovative enzymatic solution by which an enzyme is incorporated into plastics during the production process of bio-sourced PLA plastics (corn, sugar cane). This approach makes the material made from plants 100% compostable at ambient temperatures and degradable like plants with the built-in enzyme biologically breaking the bioplastic down in less than eight weeks without microplastics or toxic residues; creating a fully organic circularity.

Similarly to Carbios’ biorecycling technology, Carbios’ PLA biodegradation innovation caught US respondents’ attention with 64% overall liking it. Additionally, 93% of the respondents sampled described the concept as innovative, unique, easy to understand (49%), and believable (43%). Up to 82% of the most environmentally engaged respondents declared they would definitely buy more products made with Carbios’ fully circular biodegradable bioplastic.

Consumers: No other choice but to make plastic fully circular
The research says 99% of the respondents consider it important to protect the environment, while plastic pollution is now ranked the third most-concerning environmental issues after climate change and ocean pollution.

This awareness brings most of these consumers to be environmentally active when it comes to purchasing goods and sorting. For the US respondents, eco-friendly packaging comes in the fourth place in terms of purchase drivers for packaged goods and 65% of them declare sorting plastic from general waste on a regular basis, which makes plastic the most sorted type of waste.

Nevertheless, for a vast majority of the respondents across geographies, even if they would like to reduce their plastic consumption most of the time there is no suitable alternative that is as convenient, light, and cost-efficient as plastics. Hence in an ideal world, consumers would like all plastic waste in landfills and oceans to be collected, cleaned, reused and recycled.

More information:
Carbios study circularity plastics
Source:

Carbios

(c) adidas
23.09.2022

adidas by Stella McCartney: Industry-First, with Viscose Sportswear

The garment is part of the New Cotton Project, an EU Consortium of key players united to demonstrate the potential of circular garment production
adidas by Stella McCartney presented a first of its kind sportswear garment designed to demonstrate the potential of a circular fashion ecosystem. Joining forces with leading names and innovators in the fashion industry to create, test, and innovate, the tracksuit forms the pinnacle expression of the brand’s pilot circularity program, Made to Be Remade. A take-back scheme where consumers can wear it down and then return it by scanning a QR code via the product so it can be remade. Moving adidas closer to its goal to help end plastic waste.

The garment is part of the New Cotton Project, an EU Consortium of key players united to demonstrate the potential of circular garment production
adidas by Stella McCartney presented a first of its kind sportswear garment designed to demonstrate the potential of a circular fashion ecosystem. Joining forces with leading names and innovators in the fashion industry to create, test, and innovate, the tracksuit forms the pinnacle expression of the brand’s pilot circularity program, Made to Be Remade. A take-back scheme where consumers can wear it down and then return it by scanning a QR code via the product so it can be remade. Moving adidas closer to its goal to help end plastic waste.

It’s currently estimated that just under 1% of all textiles worldwide are recycled into new textiles, so it’s vital the textile industry comes together to learn and knowledge-share. Scheduled across a three-year period, the consortium which includes partners such as Frankenhuis have collected and sorted post-consumer end-of-life textiles, which using pioneering Infinited Fiber technology have been regenerated into a new man-made cellulosic fiber called Infinna™ - which looks and feels just like virgin cotton. This is then turned into a yarn blended with organic cotton, for garment production.

Designing the tracksuit, made using viscose (60% viscose, 40% organic cotton) as a consortium member took the process from a linear to a circular model , as the apparel’s function and style were of equal focus to the garment’s end of life existence.

At the end of the project, consortium partner Aalto University, a Finnish multidisciplinary community specialising in science, art, technology , and design, will distribute learnings with the industry and bring this potential circular design solution to the ever-eco-conscious consumer.

Source:

adidas

(c) Fraunhofer CCPE
19.09.2022

Fraunhofer CCPE on the way to an international circular plastics economy

More than 350 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide every year, and vast amounts of plastic waste simply end up in the environment. The circular economy offers enormous potential for keeping plastics in the loop and thus conserving resources and the environment. Since 2018, six Fraunhofer institutes in the Fraunhofer CCPE cluster have been researching how to make the plastics value chain circular, and Prof. Manfred Renner has been the new head of the cluster since August 2022. Research results, implementation projects and strategies to accelerate the transformation to a circular plastics economy will be presented by Fraunhofer CCPE at the first international Fraunhofer CCPE Summit on February 8 and 9, 2023 in Munich.

More than 350 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide every year, and vast amounts of plastic waste simply end up in the environment. The circular economy offers enormous potential for keeping plastics in the loop and thus conserving resources and the environment. Since 2018, six Fraunhofer institutes in the Fraunhofer CCPE cluster have been researching how to make the plastics value chain circular, and Prof. Manfred Renner has been the new head of the cluster since August 2022. Research results, implementation projects and strategies to accelerate the transformation to a circular plastics economy will be presented by Fraunhofer CCPE at the first international Fraunhofer CCPE Summit on February 8 and 9, 2023 in Munich.

In a circular plastics economy, resources can be saved, products can be intelligently designed for long service life, and end-of-life losses can be reduced. Systemic, technical and social innovations are needed to make the transition from a linear to a circular economy a success. This is what the Fraunhofer Cluster of Excellence Circular Plastics Economy CCPE is researching in the three divisions “Materials”, “Systems” and “Business”. The cooperation of the six Fraunhofer institutes IAP, ICT, IML, IVV, LBF and UMSICHT enables a multi-stakeholder approach in which the appropriate R&D competencies are bundled.

Fraunhofer CCPE would like to present and discuss successful projects and research approaches on an international scale at the Fraunhofer CCPE Summit on February 8 and 9, 2023 in Munich. The summit is to become an international forum for exchanging ideas for solutions and innovations for a circular plastics economy.

Cross-industry collaboration - local, regional and international
Since August 2022, Prof. Manfred Renner, Institute Director of Fraunhofer UMSICHT, is the new head of Fraunhofer CCPE. He succeeds Prof. Eckhard Weidner, who has retired. “Cross-industry cooperation - very local, but also regional and international - is the elementary prerequisite for a functioning circular plastics economy. At the summit, players from all points of the compass will meet and network in order to rethink the plastics value chain together," explains Prof. Manfred Renner, adding, “We want to provide answers to the following questions:  How can we make all Circular Economy principles, i.e. the ten R-strategies, known? How can industry, science and society best cooperate in a transformation to a circular plastics economy for the greatest possible impact?”

Results of the Fraunhofer CCPE cluster so far are innovative approaches for circular business models, intelligent collection, sorting, and recycling technologies, but also new formulations for circular polymers and compounds to enable multiple recycling cycles. With the newly developed assessment tool CRL® , companies can, for example, self-assess the maturity of products or product systems with regard to the circular economy. The tool checks the extent to which a product already takes into account circular economy principles in the areas of product design, product service system, end-of-life management and circular economy, and where there is still potential for improvement.

Source:

Fraunhofer UMSICHT

(c) adidas AG
12.08.2022

adidas Originals introduces the NMD V3 Silhouette

In 2015, adidas Originals launched the NMD silhouette – taking cues from the brand’s inimitable archive in order to create a shoe that disrupted the sneaker world at the time. Six years later and the Trefoil has returned with an updated take on the original innovator, channeling the very same independent mindset to present the  NMD V3.

Built for a life in motion, the NMD V3 reimagines its own iconic heritage with a distinctly forward thinking vision. The silhouette features a re-engineered mesh that wraps around the foot, a transparent heel clip, and BOOST cushioning that’s partially encapsulated in a TPU shell. The NMD V3 also comprises an upper made with a high-performance yarn which contains at least 50% Parley Ocean Plastic – re-imagined plastic waste, intercepted on remote islands, beaches, coastal communities and shorelines – and 50% recycled polyester.

In 2015, adidas Originals launched the NMD silhouette – taking cues from the brand’s inimitable archive in order to create a shoe that disrupted the sneaker world at the time. Six years later and the Trefoil has returned with an updated take on the original innovator, channeling the very same independent mindset to present the  NMD V3.

Built for a life in motion, the NMD V3 reimagines its own iconic heritage with a distinctly forward thinking vision. The silhouette features a re-engineered mesh that wraps around the foot, a transparent heel clip, and BOOST cushioning that’s partially encapsulated in a TPU shell. The NMD V3 also comprises an upper made with a high-performance yarn which contains at least 50% Parley Ocean Plastic – re-imagined plastic waste, intercepted on remote islands, beaches, coastal communities and shorelines – and 50% recycled polyester.

More information:
adidas Originals adidas shoes
Source:

adidas AG

09.08.2022

Carbios joined WhiteCycle to process and recycle plastic textile waste

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 
WhiteCycle envisions that by 2030 the uptake and deployment of its circular solution will lead to the annual recycling of more than 2 million tons of the third most widely used plastic in the world, PET[2]. This project should prevent landfilling or incineration of more than 1.8 million tons of that plastic each year. Also, it should enable reduction of CO2 emissions by around 2 million tons.
 
Complex waste containing textile (PET) from end-of-life tyres, hoses and multilayer clothes are currently difficult to recycle, but could soon become recyclable thanks to the project outcomes. Raw material from PET plastic waste could go back into creation of high-performance products, through a circular and viable value chain.
 
Public and private European organizations are combining their scientific and industrial expertises:

  • industrial partners (Michelin, Mandals, KORDSA);
  • cross-sector partnership (Inditex)
  • waste management companies (Synergies TLC, ESTATO);
  • intelligent monitoring systems for sorting (IRIS);
  • biological recycling SME (Carbios);
  • product life cycle analysis company (IPOINT);
  • university, expert in FAIR data management (HVL);
  • universities, research and technology organizations (PPRIME – Université de Poitiers/CNRS, DITF, IFTH, ERASME);
  • industry cluster (Axelera);
  • project management consulting company (Dynergie).

 
The consortium will develop new processes required throughout the industrial value chain:

  • Innovative sorting technologies, to enable significant increase of the PET plastic content of complex waste streams in order to better process them;
  • A pre-treatment for recuperated PET plastic content, followed by a breakthrough recycling enzyme-based process to decompose it into pure monomers in a sustainable way;
  • Repolymerization of the recycled monomers into like new plastic;
  • Fabrication and quality verification of the new products made of recycled plastic materials

 
WhiteCycle has a global budget of nearly 9.6 million euros and receives European funding in the amount of nearly 7.1 million euros. The consortium’s partners are based in five countries (France, Spain, Germany, Norway and Turkey). Coordinated by Michelin, it has an effective governance system involving a steering committee, an advisory board and a technical support committee.

[1] Complex waste: multi materials waste (Rubber goods composites and multi-layer textile)
[2] PET: Polyethylene terephthalate

Source:

Carbios

(c) adidas AG
01.08.2022

adidas unveils collection that celebrates community, heritage, and identity

adidas unveils the first of two drops with South African luxury designer, Thebe Magugu. The debut collection for women features the celebratory and joyful artwork of a woman dancing, designed in collaboration with artist Phathu Nembilwi, and influenced by Thebe’s mother, aunt and grandmother, and the theme of femininity, interwoven with leading adidas material technology . Each garment features an abstract selection of bright and punchy colors including, impact orange and yellow, accents of shock pink, backgrounded by pulse lilac. The collection spans across sports including running , swimming , training , tennis , football , and cycling alongside a set of casual lifestyle garments.  

United by a shared passion for inclusivity and kinship, the collection includes a three-piece modesty swimwear set made in part with recycled materials and chlorine resistant fabric that is lightweight and chlorine-resistant; swimwear in inclusive sizing (XS-4XL); and gender-neutral pieces with UNITEFIT – a fit system that is created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

adidas unveils the first of two drops with South African luxury designer, Thebe Magugu. The debut collection for women features the celebratory and joyful artwork of a woman dancing, designed in collaboration with artist Phathu Nembilwi, and influenced by Thebe’s mother, aunt and grandmother, and the theme of femininity, interwoven with leading adidas material technology . Each garment features an abstract selection of bright and punchy colors including, impact orange and yellow, accents of shock pink, backgrounded by pulse lilac. The collection spans across sports including running , swimming , training , tennis , football , and cycling alongside a set of casual lifestyle garments.  

United by a shared passion for inclusivity and kinship, the collection includes a three-piece modesty swimwear set made in part with recycled materials and chlorine resistant fabric that is lightweight and chlorine-resistant; swimwear in inclusive sizing (XS-4XL); and gender-neutral pieces with UNITEFIT – a fit system that is created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

The high-performance tennis pieces will be premiered during one of the most prominent hardcourt tournaments by adidas’ inspirational athletes Dana Mathewson, Stefanos Tsitsipas, Felix Auger Aliassime and Daria Kasatkina who are passionate about showing support for what matters and encouraging diversity and inclusivity on and off the court. The tennis collection features the Purple NY UNITEFIT Tennis Dress, delivering style and functionality, made in part with recycled materials.

Alongside the performance pieces, the statement Originals looks include the Originals Crop T-shirt, in white and semi pulse lilac, delivering classic streetwear style, and the Originals 7/8 Leggings, a go-to choice for every occasion. The collaboration also includes remixes of iconic adidas footwear silhouettes including the Stan Smith, Nizza Platform, Astir and Forum footwear, which feature design accents from Thebe Magugu's signature prints. Reflecting adidas's commitment to consciously crafting performance materials, hero styles and pieces have also been made in part with recycled materials, just one of the innovations that represent adidas' commitment to help end plastic waste. 

More information:
adidas Sportswear
Source:

adidas AG

(c) adidas AG
15.07.2022

adidas launches its first product in collaboration with Spinnova

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

The adidas TERREX HS1 is one of the first knitted products to be made in part with Spinnova technology. At least 30% of the fabric in this mid-layer hiking hoodie comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* and 70% from cotton (organic).

Adidas is committed to helping End Plastic Waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be made to be remade and in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1.  

The first product to emerge from this partnership, the adidas TERREX HS1 mid-layer is a piece of multi-functional gear that works on the trails and then rolls up into its hood for easy storage or to create a pillow on longer adventures. It was designed using UNITEFIT – an all-gender fit system created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

Made in part with Spinnova technology , a minimum of 30% of the fabric in the adidas TERREX HS1 comes from wood-based SPINNOVA® fibres (other fibres)* that are made by grinding wood pulp with water into a paste and then spun into a textile fibre.

The product also works with the material’s natural color. Since no dyeing or bleaching is applied, in turn this uses less water compared to the standard dyeing process.

* (Rayon) in US, (New type of cellulose fibre) in China

More information:
adidas Spinnova Fibers fibres Recycling
Source:

adidas AG

(c) Borealis
28.06.2022

Borealis introduces portfolio of circular base chemicals

  • The Borvida™ portfolio introduces sustainable base chemicals to Borealis’ range of product offering
  • The range will initially be based on non-food waste biomass, and chemically-recycled waste; in the future it will also draw from atmospheric carbon capture
  • The traceability of the content will be based on Mass Balance, which is ISCC PLUS certified
  • This is the next step in an ambitious sustainability journey, which will see Borealis move away from traditional fossil-based feed

Borealis is strengthening its EverMinds™ circular product offering with Borvida™, a range of sustainable base chemicals.

The Borvida portfolio will offer base chemicals or cracker products (such as ethylene, propylene, butene and phenol) with ISCC Plus-certified sustainable content from Borealis sites in Finland, Sweden and Belgium. The move is part of Borealis’ broader commitment to a Future-Positive Revolution, in which the unrivalled benefits of base chemicals and polymers can be enjoyed at minimal impact to the planet.   

  • The Borvida™ portfolio introduces sustainable base chemicals to Borealis’ range of product offering
  • The range will initially be based on non-food waste biomass, and chemically-recycled waste; in the future it will also draw from atmospheric carbon capture
  • The traceability of the content will be based on Mass Balance, which is ISCC PLUS certified
  • This is the next step in an ambitious sustainability journey, which will see Borealis move away from traditional fossil-based feed

Borealis is strengthening its EverMinds™ circular product offering with Borvida™, a range of sustainable base chemicals.

The Borvida portfolio will offer base chemicals or cracker products (such as ethylene, propylene, butene and phenol) with ISCC Plus-certified sustainable content from Borealis sites in Finland, Sweden and Belgium. The move is part of Borealis’ broader commitment to a Future-Positive Revolution, in which the unrivalled benefits of base chemicals and polymers can be enjoyed at minimal impact to the planet.   

The portfolio will initially comprise Borvida B, from non-food waste biomass, and Borvida C, from chemically-recycled waste. In the future, the range will evolve to include Borvida A, sourced from atmospheric carbon capture. Borvida is complementary and is the building block to Bornewables™, a portfolio of polyolefins based on renewably-sourced second generation feedstocks, and Borcycle™, which offers circular polyolefins produced from mechanically- and chemically-recycled plastic waste.

Borealis produces a wide range of base chemicals for use in numerous industries based on various feedstock, such as naphtha, butane, propane and ethane. Through its olefin units (steam cracker and propane dehydrogenation), it converts these into the building blocks of the chemical industry: ethylene, propylene and C4 hydrocarbons (butylenes, ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE) and butadiene), and C5-6 hydrocarbons (pygas, phenol) among others.

The basis of the Borvida portfolio is Mass Balance, a Chain of Custody model that enables sustainable content to be tracked, traced, and verified through the entire value chain, offering sustainability-assured products from feedstock to end product. Using this model, circular alternatives can be offered in a cost-effective and environmentally-conscious way, which can be scaled up quickly without compromising on quality or efficiency.

Borvida can be used for a wide range of different polymer and chemical applications, also beyond polyolefins (PO). Non-PO polymers, such as polycarbonates, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), super absorbant polymer (SAP) and other chemicals, are utilised for various end applications including coatings, plasticizers, adhesives, automotive, electronics, lubricants, detergents, appliances and sports equipment.

Together with key strategic partners, including Neste and Covestro, Borealis strives to provide a long-term solution in order to allow value-chain partners to meet their sustainability goals. Borvida will enable our customers to increase the sustainability of their products, keeping them ahead of forthcoming legislative changes, and meeting their customers’ demands for climate-conscious products.

Introduced on a smaller scale in early 2020, early renewable base chemicals customers include Covestro. “The use of alternative sustainable raw materials is one important pillar of our strategic ambition to become fully circular”, comments Frank Dörner, Managing Director Covestro Procurement Services GmbH & Co. KG. “The new product line is a good example for joint solutions, another strategic pillar, in order to establish new and reliable supply chains creating benefits for our customers.”

Source:

Borealis

(c) plasticpreneur
Shredder, injection moulding unit and extruder
22.06.2022

EREMA Group acquires stake in start-up company plasticpreneur®

As of 30 May 2022, EREMA Group GmbH acquired 19.8 percent of plasticpreneur® gmbh. plasticpreneur® is an Austrian start-up company founded two years ago that manufactures at its production site in Klagenfurt recycling solutions for plastic waste that are mobile and can be operated without prior knowledge. The machine portfolio covers the recycling process and the production of new end-products. Due to it´s wide range of applications, it is in demand both in the Global South and in industrialised countries.

In the two years since the company was founded, plasticpreneur® has already sold 330 machines to customers in over 70 countries on all continents. In addition, they have made over 750 application-specific moulds, many of them custom-built to comply with individual customer specifications.

As of 30 May 2022, EREMA Group GmbH acquired 19.8 percent of plasticpreneur® gmbh. plasticpreneur® is an Austrian start-up company founded two years ago that manufactures at its production site in Klagenfurt recycling solutions for plastic waste that are mobile and can be operated without prior knowledge. The machine portfolio covers the recycling process and the production of new end-products. Due to it´s wide range of applications, it is in demand both in the Global South and in industrialised countries.

In the two years since the company was founded, plasticpreneur® has already sold 330 machines to customers in over 70 countries on all continents. In addition, they have made over 750 application-specific moulds, many of them custom-built to comply with individual customer specifications.

While plastics recycling has gained enormous momentum in the industrialised countries, more remote and poorer regions of the world have hardly benefited from high-tech solutions for industrial recycling processes so far. They are held back by a lack of infrastructure and know-how. That is why waste is often incinerated or disposed of in landfills, rivers and the surrounding environment. "Our mission - Another life for plastic, because we care - is also aimed at supporting these regions with solutions for plastic recycling, and with plasticpreneur® we have found the ideal partner for this," says Manfred Hackl, CEO EREMA Group.

The start-up company's machines can process HDPE, PP, PS, LDPE, PLA, AB and TPU separately. Their product range includes a shredder, injection moulding unit, extruder unit for the production of end products, air filters as well as custom-built moulds. "For our machines to be used in regions with little infrastructure, they must be easy to operate without prior knowledge. The fact that we also develop end-product solutions needed locally makes our range of services particularly attractive here," explains Sören Lex, CEO and co-founder of plasticpreneur®. As soon as recycling also becomes a source of income for the operators, they become entrepreneurs. That explains the name of the start-up, a word created from "plastic" and "entrepreneur". plasticpreneur® customers in these countries include e.g. social enterprises and operators of refugee camps, where everyday consumer goods - from clothes pegs and school supplies to toys and fence posts - are produced and sold using plastic waste. This means that the added value stays local.

The demand for plasticpreneur® machines is also increasing in industrialised countries. On the one hand by educational institutions and organisations that use them to raise awareness of the need for a circular economy in workshops and to give pupils as well as adults a better understanding of plastic recycling. On the other hand by customers who are developing new end-products for plastic waste together with plasticpreneur®. Because the machines are so easy to operate they enable a low-theshold use of recycled plastics in product development processes, starting from generating prototypes to launchin small series production. Small companies, product designers and developers therefore are another steadily growing customer segment.

Source:

EREMA Group GmbH

Photo: Texaid
07.06.2022

TEXAID enables Textile-to-Textile Recycling

As a leading company in the collecting, sorting, reselling and recycling of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID has enabled the recycling of post-consumer textile waste into new textiles and clothing. After two years of development, the company has developed a fabric including 50 % of post-consumer textile waste from used clothing, collected and prepared for recycling by TEXAID.

Today’s linear system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced, used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID invested in the textile-to-textile recycling and product development.

As a leading company in the collecting, sorting, reselling and recycling of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID has enabled the recycling of post-consumer textile waste into new textiles and clothing. After two years of development, the company has developed a fabric including 50 % of post-consumer textile waste from used clothing, collected and prepared for recycling by TEXAID.

Today’s linear system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced, used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID invested in the textile-to-textile recycling and product development.

Collaboration enables recycling
After two years of research, product development, and most important, building partnerships in the value chain, TEXAID has been able to develop a fabric made of 100 % recycled fiber in close collaboration with our value chain partners.

The fabric is a blend of 50 % post-consumer textile waste that TEXAID has collected in Germany and Switzerland. White cotton textiles which cannot be worn, have been sorted out in a sorting facility in Apolda, Germany. The other 50% is made from ocean-bound plastic waste which is plastic with a high risk of entering the ocean which has been saved and recycled by Unifi. The fabric and bag have been produced in Italy. The cotton material has been shredded by Marchi & Fildi in Biella, IT, who then spun the recycled cotton and recycled polyester fibers into a yarn. This yarn has been woven into a fabric by Tessitura Casoni.T.F.C.

Through this proof of concept, it has been showcased that making fabrics of 100 % recycled content and with 50 % of post-consumer textiles is possible. TEXAID is looking for strong industry partners to push high-value textile to textile recycling technologies in joint projects like these.

More information:
Texaid Recycling
Source:

Texaid

(c) adidas AG
Felix Auger-Aliassime
30.05.2022

adidas commitment to end plastic waste with SS22 Tennis Collection

adidas launches its SS22 Tennis Collection, a high-performance tennis apparel line featuring graphics inspired by Paris’ botanical gardens and green spaces, garments in the collection were made either in part with Parley Ocean Plastic or in part with recycled content.

Launching ahead of the most prominent clay court tournament of the summer, the SS22 Tennis Collection is being premiered on court by adidas next-gen athletes, Elena Rybakina and Felix Auger-Aliassime, alongside Maria Sakkari, Dominic Thiem and Stefanos Tsitsipas who all share a passion for championing sustainability and working together towards a better future for our planet.

From Insight to Action
The SS22 Tennis Collection is another step adidas is taking on its journey to help end plastic waste, and its athletes are sharing this commitment. For adidas athletes, what they wear on the court is not only performance attire but an expression of their personal style and beliefs.

adidas launches its SS22 Tennis Collection, a high-performance tennis apparel line featuring graphics inspired by Paris’ botanical gardens and green spaces, garments in the collection were made either in part with Parley Ocean Plastic or in part with recycled content.

Launching ahead of the most prominent clay court tournament of the summer, the SS22 Tennis Collection is being premiered on court by adidas next-gen athletes, Elena Rybakina and Felix Auger-Aliassime, alongside Maria Sakkari, Dominic Thiem and Stefanos Tsitsipas who all share a passion for championing sustainability and working together towards a better future for our planet.

From Insight to Action
The SS22 Tennis Collection is another step adidas is taking on its journey to help end plastic waste, and its athletes are sharing this commitment. For adidas athletes, what they wear on the court is not only performance attire but an expression of their personal style and beliefs.

Felix Auger-Aliassime, elite tennis player, commented: "I'm part of a generation of players who care about having an impact on and off the court. When I think about the future, it's not just about my future as a tennis player, but also about the future of the planet. . That's why I wear the new adidas SS22 collection made in part with Parley Ocean Plastic or in part with recycled materials – to send a message that we can all do our part by helping to end plastic waste.“

Fashion-foward Performance
The SS22 Tennis Collection is designed to be bold yet fully functional on court. Each garment features HEAT.RDY technology which is designed to keep players feeling cool, dry and confident as they take on their next challenge.

The Collection features two dresses, tank tops, long sleeve tees and a match skirt for female players. For male players, the collection consists of two tees, a sleeveless tee, a polo tee, a TECHFIT long sleeve top and two different types of shorts.

It is available in a number of different bold graphic prints, all inspired by the Serres d'Auteuil botanical garden. The prominent colors of the collection are black and white.

Source:

adidas AG

(c) adidas AG
09.05.2022

adidas and Parley’s initiative "Run for the Oceans" returns for its fifth year

  • adidas x Parley’s global impact initiative, Run for the Oceans, returns for its fifth year, uniting sporting communities across the planet
  • More activities than ever will be eligible for Run for the Oceans, with the introduction of tennis, wheelchair movement, football and more
  • People across the world can take part by signing-up to the challenge from today and logging activity between May 23 – June 8

As we approach World Oceans Day on June 8, adidas and its longstanding partner Parley for the Oceans are once again encouraging the global sporting community to turn activity into action and Run for the Oceans in 2022.

  • adidas x Parley’s global impact initiative, Run for the Oceans, returns for its fifth year, uniting sporting communities across the planet
  • More activities than ever will be eligible for Run for the Oceans, with the introduction of tennis, wheelchair movement, football and more
  • People across the world can take part by signing-up to the challenge from today and logging activity between May 23 – June 8

As we approach World Oceans Day on June 8, adidas and its longstanding partner Parley for the Oceans are once again encouraging the global sporting community to turn activity into action and Run for the Oceans in 2022.

For the first time, new activities have been introduced to the challenge, making this the most inclusive Run for the Oceans yet. People from all parts of the global sporting community are invited to hit the streets, the tennis court and the football field, and unite to help protect the oceans from plastic waste. For every 10 minutes of running from select activities, such as running, tennis or football*, recorded by participants via the adidas Runtastic app, Joyrun, Codoon, Yeudongquan or Strava, Parley will clean up the equivalent weight of one plastic bottle from beaches, remote islands, and coastlines before it reaches the ocean (up to a maximum of 250,000kg).

Launching between May 23 – June 8, the event returns for its fifth year, with the ambition of mobilising a generation to help end plastic waste. Research shows that the world is at a tipping point, with it predicted that oceans will contain more plastic than fish by 2050.

Since the beginning of the partnership in 2015, adidas has made more than 50 million pairs of shoes with Parley Ocean Plastic and close to 18 million pairs in 2021 alone - this includes plastic waste intercepted from beaches and coastal communities, preventing it from polluting the oceans.

For 2022, adidas x Parley have announced the launch of Adizero X Parley and Ultraboost 22 X Parley . With a carbon footprint of just 3.5kg per pair, the Adizero X Parley is the first time adidas and Parley have combined to launch a lower footprint concept, a milestone for the partnership delivered through innovation and with no compromise on shoe performance.  

From raw material interception, processing, packaging, all the way to the end of product life, adidas calculate and communicate its carbon footprint, conforming to an internationally recognized standard: ISO 14067. The footprint results made available provide full transparency on the complete lifecycle of the product.

Source:

adidas AG

(c) ChemSec, report Not Quite 100%
28.04.2022

ChemSec' Study: Consumer brands demand clarity on recycled plastics

A new interview study from NGO ChemSec shows that there is a gap between supply and demand when it comes to recycled materials, causing confusion and bottlenecks. Among other things, suppliers go out of their way using elaborate trade schemes to reach the coveted ”100% recycled” tag, which – it turns out – is not that important to consumer product brands. Far more crucial aspects, according to several major B2C companies, are:

  • Honest communication towards customers
  • Comprehensive information from suppliers
  • Clear standards for recycled material

These are some of the conclusions from NGO ChemSec’s survey and interview study with 26 highly well-known consumer product brands. All brands responded to a survey concerning their current plastic use, as well as their needs, expectations and challenges regarding using more recycled material, to enable the shift to a circular economy for plastics.

Ten of the brands then participated in in-depth interviews on the same topics:, Essity, H&M, IKEA, Inditex , Lego, Mars,  SC Johnson, Tarkett, Unilever and Walgreens Boots Alliance.

A new interview study from NGO ChemSec shows that there is a gap between supply and demand when it comes to recycled materials, causing confusion and bottlenecks. Among other things, suppliers go out of their way using elaborate trade schemes to reach the coveted ”100% recycled” tag, which – it turns out – is not that important to consumer product brands. Far more crucial aspects, according to several major B2C companies, are:

  • Honest communication towards customers
  • Comprehensive information from suppliers
  • Clear standards for recycled material

These are some of the conclusions from NGO ChemSec’s survey and interview study with 26 highly well-known consumer product brands. All brands responded to a survey concerning their current plastic use, as well as their needs, expectations and challenges regarding using more recycled material, to enable the shift to a circular economy for plastics.

Ten of the brands then participated in in-depth interviews on the same topics:, Essity, H&M, IKEA, Inditex , Lego, Mars,  SC Johnson, Tarkett, Unilever and Walgreens Boots Alliance.

Is non-mechanical recycling the answer?
Only about ten percent of all discarded plastics is recycled today, which is of course not nearly enough to achieve a circular plastics economy. Despite ambitions and initiatives to reduce plastics use – replacing the materials with other, more sustainable ones – the “plastic tap” is not expected to be turned off anytime soon. Quite the opposite, which makes raising the recycling rates more important than ever.

Although commercially viable, traditional (mechanical) recycling is afflicted with severe flaws, such as legacy chemicals, quality and functionality issues, as well as the lack of clean and sorted waste streams. The brands cited quality and functionality issues as the main obstacles for using more recycled material in their products.

This opens up for non-mechanical recycling, sometimes referred to as chemical recycling, where the plastic is either dissolved or broken down into smaller building blocks. Harmful additives and other hazardous chemicals can be removed in the process, and a material comparable to virgin plastic can be achieved – at least in theory.

So far, however, non-mechanical recycling technologies are costly, energy-intensive, and often require the addition of a great deal of virgin plastic to work – the very material that needs to be phased out.

The chain of custody models needs to be detangled
Apart from these production issues, there is a wide range of chain of custody models surrounding non-mechanical recycling, including mass balance and book & claim, which enable trade of credits or certificates for recycled material.

This cuts the physical connection between input and output, making it possible for a supplier to sell a material as “100% recycled”, when the actual recycled content could be zero.

This is a major issue for the brands ChemSec has spoken to, who value honest and correct communication towards customers. It turns out, perhaps somewhat surprisingly, that being able to slap a “made from 100% recycled plastic” label on a product is not all that important to brands.

To the brands, a physical connection between input (the discarded plastic waste headed for recycling) and output (the product at least partially made from recycled plastics) is far more important.

A physical connection, along with correct and adequate information from suppliers, as well as clearer standards and guidelines than what is available today, is what brands require to increase the use of recycled material and move us closer to a circular economy for plastics.

More information:
ChemSec plastics Recycling
Source:

ChemSec

Photo: Erema
07.04.2022

EREMA: New R&D centre for innovative recycling technologies

Construction machinery rolls into action again. The ground-breaking ceremony at the EREMA site in Ansfelden on April, 6 signals the start of work on a new R&D centre. Two halls with a total area of 1,550 square metres and a new office building with 50 workplaces will be built. The R&D centre will offer cross-departmental and cross-company test machines and laboratory for research and development of plastics recycling technologies to further advance the circular economy. Completion is scheduled for February 2023.

Plastics recycling is currently evolving very rapidly from a niche to a trend. This is driven by the legislative targets for plastics recycling that the European Union and many countries around the world have enacted, as well as by the European Green Deal, which aims to make Europe the first climate-neutral continent and in which the circular economy plays a very central role.

Construction machinery rolls into action again. The ground-breaking ceremony at the EREMA site in Ansfelden on April, 6 signals the start of work on a new R&D centre. Two halls with a total area of 1,550 square metres and a new office building with 50 workplaces will be built. The R&D centre will offer cross-departmental and cross-company test machines and laboratory for research and development of plastics recycling technologies to further advance the circular economy. Completion is scheduled for February 2023.

Plastics recycling is currently evolving very rapidly from a niche to a trend. This is driven by the legislative targets for plastics recycling that the European Union and many countries around the world have enacted, as well as by the European Green Deal, which aims to make Europe the first climate-neutral continent and in which the circular economy plays a very central role.

However, there is not just one recycling solution for all types of plastic waste, but rather different solutions depending on the type of plastic, the product and the application intended for the recycled plastic. While some plastics processing loops, such as for PET bottles, have already been closed, many other plastic waste streams still require a great deal of R&D in cooperation with everyone involved in the value chain to produce recycled pellets that meet the very highest standards for the production of new products. More space will be available for this in the new centre.

R&D is decentralised at EREMA. In recent years, approximately 5 percent of turnover was reinvested annually in research and development. Employees from different departments handle process engineering challenges, innovations in mechanical engineering and automation technology, and special technologies with a view to further improving the quality of recycled pellets. They also focus on new recycling technologies for waste plastic materials for which there is currently no satisfactory circular economy solution. The decisive factor here is also to exploit the potential of digitalisation. By collecting and analysing machine data, not only can recycling processes and product quality be further improved, but we can also develop our digital service offering for our customers. Such offerings include customer-specific information tools that feature plant and process data, predictive maintenance and online support as well as commissioning via remote access.

For material tests, which are necessary for research and development work, an expanded machine park will be available following completion of the new R&D centre. Here, the recycling process can be evaluated end-to-end, including upstream and downstream processes such as shredding and further processing of the recycled pellets. The material tests are supported by detailed analysis in the professionally equipped laboratory, which will be relocated to the new premises and upgraded where necessary with the very latest lab equipment.

More information:
EREMA plastics recycling
Source:

EREMA Engineering Recycling Maschinen und Anlagen GmbH

01.04.2022

Carbios presents its 2021 Annual Results

  • 2021 Annual Results: First IFRS consolidated statements integrating the subsidiary Carbiolice
  • Plan to build a first industrial facility with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region: site selected in France in partnership with Indorama Ventures, world leader in the production recycled PET
  • Successful commissioning of a demonstration facility in September 2021 and confirmation of the validity of the scale-up of Carbios’ enzymatic recycling technology
  • Takeover of Carbiolice and full integration in the consolidated IFRS statements since June 4th, 2021
  • Appointment of Philippe Pouletty as Chairman of the Board of Directors on April 1st, 2022
  • Appointment of Emmanuel Ladent as CEO of the Company on December 1st, 2021
  • Strengthening of Carbios’ financial structure: capital increase of €114 million with French and International investors and €30 million loan from the European Investment Bank (EIB)
  • Group’s cash position of €105 million as of December 31, 2021, which does not include the €30 million EIB loan due to be drawn down in the first half of 2022

Carbios, a pi

  • 2021 Annual Results: First IFRS consolidated statements integrating the subsidiary Carbiolice
  • Plan to build a first industrial facility with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region: site selected in France in partnership with Indorama Ventures, world leader in the production recycled PET
  • Successful commissioning of a demonstration facility in September 2021 and confirmation of the validity of the scale-up of Carbios’ enzymatic recycling technology
  • Takeover of Carbiolice and full integration in the consolidated IFRS statements since June 4th, 2021
  • Appointment of Philippe Pouletty as Chairman of the Board of Directors on April 1st, 2022
  • Appointment of Emmanuel Ladent as CEO of the Company on December 1st, 2021
  • Strengthening of Carbios’ financial structure: capital increase of €114 million with French and International investors and €30 million loan from the European Investment Bank (EIB)
  • Group’s cash position of €105 million as of December 31, 2021, which does not include the €30 million EIB loan due to be drawn down in the first half of 2022

Carbios, a pioneer in the development of enzymatic solutions dedicated to the end-of-life of plastic, announced its operating and financial results for the year 2021. The financial statements as of December 31, 2021, were approved by the Company’s Board of Directors at their meeting on March 31, 2022.

“In 2021, Carbios achieved several technical and industrial milestones testifying of the soundness and successful execution of our strategy. The excellent results obtained from our demonstration plant confirms the industrial scale-up potential of our biological technology for the recycling of PET plastics and fibers. Together with our Consortium members, we also produced the world’s first food-grade PET sample bottles produced entirely from enzymatically recycled plastics; a world first. In addition, we have strengthened our financial structure by raising a landmark €114 million in May 2021 and we have taken full control of Carbiolice in June. In line with our objectives and with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region, we will soon enable France to host the world’s first industrial facility dedicated to the biological recycling of plastics. Carbios’ enzymatic process will make it possible to recycle more than 50,000 tons of PET plastic waste per year,” comments Emmanuel Ladent, CEO of Carbios. “Our priority for 2022 is to finalize the terms of our partnership with Indorama Ventures, which will host the world’s first industrial facility operating our biological recycling process at its French production site in Longlaville. This year will also be about optimizing our commercial strategy, while continuing our innovation efforts on the end-of-life of other polymers.”

Click here to for further information.

Source:

Carbios

(c) EREMA Group GmbH
17.03.2022

EREMA: Working together with Recycling Company Anviplas

The Spanish recycling company Anviplas has been involved in plastics recycling for more than 30 years, during which time it has built up extensive know-how that now benefits customers throughout Europe, in Africa and in Asia. Their cooperation with EREMA is almost as long. Since 1991, Anviplas has relied on the technology and service provided by the Austrian recycling machine manufacturer.

The Spanish recycling company Anviplas has been involved in plastics recycling for more than 30 years, during which time it has built up extensive know-how that now benefits customers throughout Europe, in Africa and in Asia. Their cooperation with EREMA is almost as long. Since 1991, Anviplas has relied on the technology and service provided by the Austrian recycling machine manufacturer.

Employing 64 people, Anviplas recycles post-industrial and post-consumer plastic waste, especially HD and LD-PE as well as PP, to make recycled pellets in all colour variations. The production capacity is 1,800 tonnes per month. An EREMA type INTAREMA® 1716 TVEplus® recycling machine with screen changer is in operation at the site in Navarcles (Barcelona) for processing the PP material stream. This patented extruder system was developed for handling difficult-to-process materials, such as heavily printed films as well as very moist waste. This machine is characterised by its optimised 3-stage degassing system; firstly by preheating and predrying the material in the preconditioning unit, secondly because the screw design allows reverse degassing, and thirdly in the degassing zone of the extruder.

Anviplas customers manufacture a huge bandwidth of products made using their recycled pellets. They range from various film products, such as stretch, shrink, mulch and silage films, to irrigation, corrugated and high-pressure pipes, as well as containers such as tubs, bottles, barrels and crates.

In February 2022 the Repeats Group, a pan-European platform for LDPE recycling, and Anviplas announced, that Repeats has made an investment in the Spanish recycling company. For Repeats this investment in Anviplas represents an important step in building a pan-European plastics recycling platform.

More information:
EREMA Recycling plastics Anviplas
Source:

EREMA Group GmbH

(c) adidas
25.02.2022

adidas unveils its first product with Spinnova

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

adidas is committed to helping end plastic waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be remade into entirely new products, and, in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1. Its outdoor brand, adidas TERREX , is leading the innovation of technical materials with the aim of helping drive better product solutions for adventurers in nature while ensuring there is no compromise on style or performance .

By 2025, nine out of 10 adidas articles will carry a more sustainable technology, material, design, or method of manufacturing and adidas’ partnership with Spinnova is a major part of this journey.

Indorama Ventures launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report celebrating a decade of PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones (c) Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited
10th annual Sustainability Report
27.10.2021

Indorama Ventures launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report

  • IVL is celebrating a decade of PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones
  • Over 10 years, IVL has achieved a 100x increase in recycled PET

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a world-class sustainable chemical company, launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report and a video celebrating a decade of ambitious PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones. The company is committed to intensifying its drive towards ending plastic waste and a more circular economy in the decade ahead.

Since its first Sustainability Report in 2011, IVL has grown its sustainability initiatives through the 3Ps – People, Planet and Prosperity. From the baseline in 2013, the company achieved a 10% reduction in GHG intensity, 4% in energy intensity and 7% in water intensity. It also increased total waste diverted from landfill from 48% to 84% in 2020. Moreover, IVL’s global PET recycling capacity has improved almost 100 times from 3,576 tons per year in 2011 – the first entry of IVL to the PET recycling business – to more than 330,000 tons per year in the second quarter of 2021.

  • IVL is celebrating a decade of PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones
  • Over 10 years, IVL has achieved a 100x increase in recycled PET

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a world-class sustainable chemical company, launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report and a video celebrating a decade of ambitious PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones. The company is committed to intensifying its drive towards ending plastic waste and a more circular economy in the decade ahead.

Since its first Sustainability Report in 2011, IVL has grown its sustainability initiatives through the 3Ps – People, Planet and Prosperity. From the baseline in 2013, the company achieved a 10% reduction in GHG intensity, 4% in energy intensity and 7% in water intensity. It also increased total waste diverted from landfill from 48% to 84% in 2020. Moreover, IVL’s global PET recycling capacity has improved almost 100 times from 3,576 tons per year in 2011 – the first entry of IVL to the PET recycling business – to more than 330,000 tons per year in the second quarter of 2021.

Celebrating 10 years of sustainability reporting
Throughout the decade, IVL has voluntarily adopted international standards for its sustainability reports to drive benefits for the environment, society and economy. The effort resulted in recognition by world-class sustainability ratings agencies such as the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI) and the Morgan Stanley Capital International (MSCI).

Recent Sustainability Reports have featured business cases and special situations such as COVID-19. In 2016, IVL was the first Thailand-based company to introduce an additional, shorter version of the report called the Sustainability Report Executive Summary. This year, IVL has made further improvements with an interactive approach, including links to videos and shortcuts to highlighted articles. As a global company operating in 33 countries, the report is available in 15 languages.

On track to recycle 50 billion bottles per year by 2025
In 2020 IVL recycled 10.1 billion PET bottles and is on track to recycle 50 billion bottles per year by 2025. The company’s global reach and leadership position as the world’s largest PET and recycled PET resin producer allow IVL to leverage a closed-loop system. In 2020 IVL invested in three additional recycling facilities and recently acquired CarbonLite’s recycling assets in Texas.

World-renowned marine research institute confirms biodegradability of LENZING™ fibers (c) New York Times/Alexander C. Welsh
Scripps Research Institute
27.10.2021

World-renowned marine research institute confirms biodegradability of LENZING™ fibers

  • Results of experiments conducted by the University of California’s prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego provide further scientific proof that LENZING™ fibers offer an effective substitute to synthetic fibers that are part of the pressing problem of plastic pollution in our oceans.

Lenzing/San Diego – The Lenzing Group, a world-leading provider of wood-based specialty fibers, has received further scientific proof of the biodegradability of its fibers. In a study published in October 2021 , scientists from the prestigious academic research institute Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at the University of California, San Diego confirmed that wood-based cellulosic fibers biodegrade in the ocean within a short period of time at the end of their life cycle, making them a better alternative to fossil-based fibers. The research was the result of an independent project trying to understand the “end-of-life” scenarios for textiles and nonwovens discarded in the environment.

  • Results of experiments conducted by the University of California’s prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego provide further scientific proof that LENZING™ fibers offer an effective substitute to synthetic fibers that are part of the pressing problem of plastic pollution in our oceans.

Lenzing/San Diego – The Lenzing Group, a world-leading provider of wood-based specialty fibers, has received further scientific proof of the biodegradability of its fibers. In a study published in October 2021 , scientists from the prestigious academic research institute Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at the University of California, San Diego confirmed that wood-based cellulosic fibers biodegrade in the ocean within a short period of time at the end of their life cycle, making them a better alternative to fossil-based fibers. The research was the result of an independent project trying to understand the “end-of-life” scenarios for textiles and nonwovens discarded in the environment.

SIO has a global reputation for being one of the oldest, largest and most important marine research centers worldwide. In this study, SIO compared the degradation processes of nonwovens made from fossil-based synthetic materials such as polyester with those of cellulosic materials such as Lenzing’s wood-based lyocell, modal and viscose fibers in specific scenarios – under various real oceanic conditions and controlled aquaria conditions. The results of these experiments are striking: while wood-based cellulosic fibers fully biodegraded within 30 days, the fossil-based fibers tested were practically unchanged after more than 200 days.

The biodegradability of LENZING™ fibers was also tested in the laboratory of Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in Belgium – one of the world's leading companies in biodegradability and compostability testing – which showed data confirmed by those found with the real-life measurements at Scripps. The OWS assessment was conducted in accordance with applicable international standards and reflects relevant natural and artificial conditions in which biodegradation can occur. Certificates from the certification organization TÜV Austria show that LENZING™ fibers rapidly biodegrade in all test environments (soil, industrial composting, home composting, fresh water and marine water) within the time frames set by the applicable standards.

Lenzing also welcomes the EU’s targeted measures to combat plastic waste in general, such as those relating to the single-use plastic directive (EU) 2019/9043. In its recently adopted guidelines for implementing the directive, the EU Commission stipulates the specific products that fall under this category, which is a well-needed effort to provide clarity to the EU member states for their joint campaign against environmental pollution from plastic waste. Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable cellulosic fibers can be part of a sustainable and innovative solution to this man-made problem that will continue to grow. As of July 2021, the single-use plastic directive sets out standardized labelling requirements for certain products, either on packaging or on the products themselves, which include plastic-based feminine hygiene products and wet wipes for body care or household use. This is a start to tackle the problem: educate the consumer and offer alternative materials with better circularity.