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KARL MAYER GROUP: Natural fibre composites and knit to shape products at JEC World 2024 (c) FUSE GmbH
26.02.2024

KARL MAYER GROUP: Natural fibre composites and knit to shape products at JEC World 2024

At this year's JEC World 2024 from 5 to 7 March, KARL MAYER GROUP will be exhibiting with KARL MAYER Technical Textiles and its STOLL Business

One focus of the exhibition will be non-crimp fabrics and tapes made from bio-based yarn materials for the reinforcement of composites.

"While our business with multiaxial and spreading technology for processing conventional technical fibres such as carbon or glass continues to do well, we are seeing increasing interest in the processing of natural fibres into composites. That's why we have a new product in our trade fair luggage for the upcoming JEC World: an alpine ski in which, among other things, hemp fibre fabrics have been used," reveals Hagen Lotzmann, Vice President Sales KARL MAYER Technische Textilien.

The winter sports equipment is the result of a subsidised project. The hemp tapes for this were supplied by FUSE GmbH and processed into non-crimp fabrics on the COP MAX 5 multiaxial warp knitting machine in the KARL MAYER Technical Textiles technical centre.

At this year's JEC World 2024 from 5 to 7 March, KARL MAYER GROUP will be exhibiting with KARL MAYER Technical Textiles and its STOLL Business

One focus of the exhibition will be non-crimp fabrics and tapes made from bio-based yarn materials for the reinforcement of composites.

"While our business with multiaxial and spreading technology for processing conventional technical fibres such as carbon or glass continues to do well, we are seeing increasing interest in the processing of natural fibres into composites. That's why we have a new product in our trade fair luggage for the upcoming JEC World: an alpine ski in which, among other things, hemp fibre fabrics have been used," reveals Hagen Lotzmann, Vice President Sales KARL MAYER Technische Textilien.

The winter sports equipment is the result of a subsidised project. The hemp tapes for this were supplied by FUSE GmbH and processed into non-crimp fabrics on the COP MAX 5 multiaxial warp knitting machine in the KARL MAYER Technical Textiles technical centre.

The STOLL Business Unit will be focussing on thermoplastic materials. Several knit to shape parts with a textile outer surface and a hardened inner surface will be on display. The double-face products can be made from different types of yarn and do not need to be back-moulded for use as side door panels or housing shells, for example. In addition, the ready-to-use design saves on waste and yarn material.

Generating its own energy with solar panels Photo Karl Mayer Group
Generating its own energy with solar panels
23.02.2024

Karl Mayer Group: Generating its own energy with solar panels

The Karl Mayer Group is reducing its ecological footprint when it comes to energy utilisation: The Group's largest photovoltaic system to date has just been installed at its headquarters in Obertshausen.

Following the construction of a stable substructure, the first photovoltaic elements were installed on the roof of the assembly hall in Obertshausen on 16 February 2024. This will be followed by the step-by-step conversion of other roofs. If everything goes according to plan, around 6,000 modules will have been installed on an area of approx. 12,000 m² and over 60,000 metres of cable laid by the middle of the year.

"With a total output of 2.4 MWp, we will be able to generate over 35% of the total electricity consumption at the site ourselves," explains Michael Sustelo, Head of Facility Management at the Karl Mayer Group.

The Karl Mayer Group is reducing its ecological footprint when it comes to energy utilisation: The Group's largest photovoltaic system to date has just been installed at its headquarters in Obertshausen.

Following the construction of a stable substructure, the first photovoltaic elements were installed on the roof of the assembly hall in Obertshausen on 16 February 2024. This will be followed by the step-by-step conversion of other roofs. If everything goes according to plan, around 6,000 modules will have been installed on an area of approx. 12,000 m² and over 60,000 metres of cable laid by the middle of the year.

"With a total output of 2.4 MWp, we will be able to generate over 35% of the total electricity consumption at the site ourselves," explains Michael Sustelo, Head of Facility Management at the Karl Mayer Group.

Source:

Karl Mayer Group

STFI: Lightweight construction innovations at JEC World in Paris (c) silbaerg GmbH and STFI (see information on image)
23.02.2024

STFI: Lightweight construction innovations at JEC World in Paris

At this year's JEC World, STFI will be presenting highlights from carbon fibre recycling as well as a new approach to hemp-based bast fibres, which have promising properties as reinforcement in lightweight construction.

Green Snowboard
At JEC World in Paris from 5 to 7 March 2024, STFI will be showcasing a snowboard from silbaerg GmbH with a patented anisotropic coupling effect made from hemp and recycled carbon fibres with bio-based epoxy resin. In addition to silbaerg and STFI, the partners Circular Saxony - the innovation cluster for the circular economy, FUSE Composite and bto-epoxy GmbH were also involved in the development of the board. The green snowboard was honoured with the JEC Innovation Award 2024 in the “Sport, Leisure and Recreation” category.

At this year's JEC World, STFI will be presenting highlights from carbon fibre recycling as well as a new approach to hemp-based bast fibres, which have promising properties as reinforcement in lightweight construction.

Green Snowboard
At JEC World in Paris from 5 to 7 March 2024, STFI will be showcasing a snowboard from silbaerg GmbH with a patented anisotropic coupling effect made from hemp and recycled carbon fibres with bio-based epoxy resin. In addition to silbaerg and STFI, the partners Circular Saxony - the innovation cluster for the circular economy, FUSE Composite and bto-epoxy GmbH were also involved in the development of the board. The green snowboard was honoured with the JEC Innovation Award 2024 in the “Sport, Leisure and Recreation” category.

VliesComp
The aim of the industrial partners Tenowo GmbH (Hof), Siemens AG (Erlangen), Invent GmbH (Braunschweig) and STFI united in the VliesComp project is to bring recycled materials back onto the market in various lightweight construction solutions. The application fields "Innovative e-machine concepts for the energy transition" and "Innovative e-machine concepts for e-mobility" were considered as examples. On display at JEC World in Paris will be a lightweight end shield for electric motors made from hybrid nonwovens - a mixture of thermoplastic fibre components and recycled reinforcing fibres - as well as nonwovens with 100% recycled reinforcing fibres. The end shield was ultimately manufactured with a 100% recycled fibre content. The tests showed that, compared to the variant made from primary carbon fibres using the RTM process, a 14% reduction in CO2 equivalent is possible with the same performance. The calculation for the use of the prepreg process using a bio-resin system shows a potential for reducing the CO2 equivalent by almost 70 %.

Bast fibre reinforcement
To increase stability in the plant stem, bast fibres form in the bark area, which support the stem but, in contrast to the rigid wood, are very flexible and allow slender, tall plants to move in the wind without breaking.A new process extracts the bast bark from hemp by peeling.The resulting characteristic values, such as tensile modulus of elasticity, breaking strength and elongation, are very promising in comparison with the continuous rovings made of flax available on the market.The material could be used as reinforcement in lightweight construction.At JEC World, STFI will be exhibiting reinforcing bars that have been processed into a knitted fabric using a pultrusion process based on bio-based reinforcing fibres made from hemp bast for mineral matrices.

Source:

Sächsische Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI)

19.02.2024

CARBIOS and De Smet Engineers & Contractors: Partnership for construction of PET biorecycling plant

CARBIOS and De Smet Engineers & Contractors (DSEC), a provider of Engineering, Procurement and Construction services in the biotech’s and agro-processing industries, announce their collaboration to spearhead the construction of the world's first PET biorecycling plant. Under the agreement, De Smet has been entrusted with the project management and detailed engineering, including procurement assistance and CARBIOS partners’ management, to ensure the execution of the plant's construction in Longlaville, France, due for commissioning in 2025.  CARBIOS’ first commercial facility will play a key role in the fight against plastic pollution by offering an industrial-scale solution for the enzymatic depolymerization of PET waste to accelerate a circular economy for plastic and textiles.

With over 70 members of De Smet's expert team dedicated to the project and working alongside CARBIOS teams, the collaboration aims to guarantee the project timeline and budget while upholding quality, safety, health, and environmental standards. Construction is currently underway and on schedule.

CARBIOS and De Smet Engineers & Contractors (DSEC), a provider of Engineering, Procurement and Construction services in the biotech’s and agro-processing industries, announce their collaboration to spearhead the construction of the world's first PET biorecycling plant. Under the agreement, De Smet has been entrusted with the project management and detailed engineering, including procurement assistance and CARBIOS partners’ management, to ensure the execution of the plant's construction in Longlaville, France, due for commissioning in 2025.  CARBIOS’ first commercial facility will play a key role in the fight against plastic pollution by offering an industrial-scale solution for the enzymatic depolymerization of PET waste to accelerate a circular economy for plastic and textiles.

With over 70 members of De Smet's expert team dedicated to the project and working alongside CARBIOS teams, the collaboration aims to guarantee the project timeline and budget while upholding quality, safety, health, and environmental standards. Construction is currently underway and on schedule.

Julien Born Photo HeiQ Materials AG
Julien Born
16.02.2024

Julien Born new CEO of HeiQ AeoniQ Holding

HeiQ AeoniQ Holding, a subsidiary of HeiQ Group, is appointing Julien Born as its CEO, leveraging his extensive executive leadership and profound textile industry expertise cultivated in prestigious organizations such as DuPont, KOCH Industries, and The LYCRA Company, where he served as CEO since 2021. Julien Born will champion the growth of the cellulosic filament fiber HeiQ AeoniQ™.

The HeiQ AeoniQ™ technology is poised for commercial production at the inaugural manufacturing facility in Portugal by the close of 2025. The just concluded €5M acquisition of land and buildings, within a 2-year project total investment of €80M, marks a pivotal milestone for the 15,000m2 facility in Maia, Porto. Situated strategically in Portugal's textile hub and a mere 20 minutes from a major commercial port, this facility is poised to catalyze the scale-up phase of the business, going from pilot manufacture to mass production when it wants to compete at full-scale on cost and performance with fossil fuel-based fibers.

HeiQ AeoniQ Holding, a subsidiary of HeiQ Group, is appointing Julien Born as its CEO, leveraging his extensive executive leadership and profound textile industry expertise cultivated in prestigious organizations such as DuPont, KOCH Industries, and The LYCRA Company, where he served as CEO since 2021. Julien Born will champion the growth of the cellulosic filament fiber HeiQ AeoniQ™.

The HeiQ AeoniQ™ technology is poised for commercial production at the inaugural manufacturing facility in Portugal by the close of 2025. The just concluded €5M acquisition of land and buildings, within a 2-year project total investment of €80M, marks a pivotal milestone for the 15,000m2 facility in Maia, Porto. Situated strategically in Portugal's textile hub and a mere 20 minutes from a major commercial port, this facility is poised to catalyze the scale-up phase of the business, going from pilot manufacture to mass production when it wants to compete at full-scale on cost and performance with fossil fuel-based fibers.

HeiQ intends to consolidate the Group’s current and future activities in Portugal at the newly acquired site. This includes Shared Service Center functions as well as the Innovation Hub for the HeiQ Textile & Flooring business unit.

The recent addition of Julien Born to lead the charge follows the nomination of Robert van de Kerkhof to the HeiQ Board, a seasoned executive with extensive textile experience holding positions as CCO, CSO, Board member of Lenzing Plc, and Chairman of CIRFS, the European Man-Made Fibres Association. Robert will also serve as the Chairman of the HeiQ AeoniQ Holding Board.

HeiQ AeoniQ Holding, established as an independent subsidiary to attract new investors, value-chain partners, and brands, embarks on an ambitious multi-year scale-up strategy. This strategy involves integrating diverse sources of bio-derived feedstock and hyper-scaling cellulosic filament fiber production capacity over the next decade, targeting industries such as apparel, footwear, automotive, home textiles, and aeronautics.

Source:

HeiQ Materials AG

(c) Swiss Textile Machinery Swissmem
16.02.2024

Recycled fibres: Swiss manufacturers for circularity

Many end-users now expect recycled materials to be in textile products they purchase – and this is driving innovation throughout the industry. However, there are still many technical and economic issues facing yarn and fabric producers using recycled resources. Members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association offer some effective solutions to these challenges.

Synthetic recycled materials such as PET can usually be treated similarly to new yarn, but there are additional complexities where natural fibres like wool and cotton are involved. Today, there’s a trend towards mechanically recycled wool and cotton fibres.

Many end-users now expect recycled materials to be in textile products they purchase – and this is driving innovation throughout the industry. However, there are still many technical and economic issues facing yarn and fabric producers using recycled resources. Members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association offer some effective solutions to these challenges.

Synthetic recycled materials such as PET can usually be treated similarly to new yarn, but there are additional complexities where natural fibres like wool and cotton are involved. Today, there’s a trend towards mechanically recycled wool and cotton fibres.

Spinning recycled cotton
The use of mechanically recycled fibres in spinning brings specific quality considerations: they have higher levels of short fibres and neps – and may often be colored, particularly if post-consumer material is used. It’s also true that recycled yarns have limitations in terms of fineness. The Uster Statistics 2023 edition features an extended range of fibre data, supporting sustainability goals, including benchmarks for blends of virgin and recycled cotton.
In general, short fibres such as those in recycled material can easily be handled by rotor spinning machines. For ring spinning, the shorter the fibres, the more difficult it is to guide them through the drafting zone to integrate them into the yarn body. Still, for wider yarn counts and higher yarn quality, the focus is now shifting to ring spinning. The presence of short fibres is a challenge, but Rieter offers solutions to address this issue.

Knitting recycled wool
For recycling, wool fibres undergo mechanical procedures such as shredding, cutting, and re-spinning, influencing the quality and characteristics of the resulting yarn. These operations remove the natural scales and variations in fibre length of the wool, causing a decrease in the overall strength and durability of the recycled yarn. This makes the yarn more prone to breakage, especially under the tension exerted during knitting.

Adapting to process recycled materials often requires adjustments to existing machinery. Knitting machines must be equipped with positive yarn suppliers to control fibre tension. Steiger engages in continuous testing of new yarns on the market, to check their suitability for processing on knitting machines. For satisfactory quality, the challenges intensify, with natural yarns requiring careful consideration and adaptation in the knitting processes.

From fibres to nonwovens
Nonwovens technology was born partly from the idea of recycling to reduce manufacturing costs and to process textile waste and previously unusable materials into fabric structures. Nonwovens production lines, where fibre webs are bonded mechanically, thermally or chemically, can easily process almost all mechanically and chemically recycled fibres.

Autefa Solutions offers nonwovens lines from a single source, enabling products such as liners, wipes, wadding and insulation to be produced in a true closed loop. Fibres are often used up to four times for one product.

Recycling: total strategy
Great services, technology and machines from members of Swiss Textile Machinery support the efforts of the circular economy to process recycled fibres. The machines incorporate the know-how of several decades, with the innovative power and quality standards in production and materials.
Stäubli’s global ESG (environmental, social & governance) strategy defines KPIs in the context of energy consumption, machine longevity and the recycling capacity in production units worldwide, as well in terms of machinery recyclability. The machine recyclability of automatic drawing in machines, weaving systems and jacquard machines ranges from 96 to 99%.

Source:

Swiss Textile Machinery Swissmem

silk Bild: LoggaWiggler, Pixabay
15.02.2024

Haelixa and Trudel Silk: New Partnership

Haelixa, the trailblazer of physical traceability solutions, has partnered with Trudel Silk, a market leader for sustainable organic and recycled silk products. This collaboration brings traceability and transparency to silk production.

Silk is one of the finest and smoothest fabrics; the better the quality of the silk, the more luxurious it feels to the touch. To create the best quality silk, the conditions for mulberry cultivation must be up to the highest standards. A healthy micro-ecosystem in the fields translates to top-grade silk cocoon quality. At Trudel, this is the environment they have created for the vertical integration of their business. Trudel aims to succeed at every stage of the process, which can only be accomplished through the active involvement and visible cooperation of all market players. These players include farmers, reeling mills, twisting/spinning mills, weaving mills, dyeing and printing mills, and brands. They are involved in every step, from the cultivation of mulberry trees to the production of silk fabrics.

Haelixa, the trailblazer of physical traceability solutions, has partnered with Trudel Silk, a market leader for sustainable organic and recycled silk products. This collaboration brings traceability and transparency to silk production.

Silk is one of the finest and smoothest fabrics; the better the quality of the silk, the more luxurious it feels to the touch. To create the best quality silk, the conditions for mulberry cultivation must be up to the highest standards. A healthy micro-ecosystem in the fields translates to top-grade silk cocoon quality. At Trudel, this is the environment they have created for the vertical integration of their business. Trudel aims to succeed at every stage of the process, which can only be accomplished through the active involvement and visible cooperation of all market players. These players include farmers, reeling mills, twisting/spinning mills, weaving mills, dyeing and printing mills, and brands. They are involved in every step, from the cultivation of mulberry trees to the production of silk fabrics.

Haelixa and Trudel have collaborated to improve silk’s robust and consistent traceability. As the demand for validation of the silk value chain increases, they have partnered with groups from Italy and Asia to develop a unique solution that uses DNA markers to trace the entire supply chain of silk production. This innovative approach ensures each silk product’s ethical sourcing.

The silk fibers used in their spun silk yarns are marked with a specific DNA per farm set selected by Trudel. Throughout the supply chain, samples of yarn, fabrics, and finished products undergo testing to verify the presence of original silk fibers. Based on the reporting, the brand can trace the finished accessories or garments to Trudel.

 

More information:
Haelixa Silk Road DNA marker
Source:

Haelixa

INDA: Sustainability as Top Priority for 2024 (c) INDA
14.02.2024

INDA: Sustainability as Top Priority for 2024

INDA announces Sustainability as a primary focus for 2024. This strategic initiative, backed by resounding support from INDA’s leadership, is a direct response to feedback from association members affirming that sustainability remains one of the nonwovens industry’s highest priorities.

INDA’s sustainability endeavor will center around three core pillars crucial to the industry’s future: Responsible Sourcing, End-of-Life Solutions, and Innovations in Sustainability. This multifaceted initiative will introduce a spectrum of new and enhanced offerings, including:

  • Webinars addressing sustainability issues impacting members and the industry.
  • Specialized technical and government affairs committees enabling members to collaborate on sustainability opportunities and challenges.
  • The inaugural release of a comprehensive sustainability report from INDA’s Market Intelligence department.
  • A dedicated sustainability special edition of the International Fiber Journal, produced by INDA Media.
  • Sustainability programming at INDA events, including a dedicated focus at the IDEA® 2025 conference.

INDA announces Sustainability as a primary focus for 2024. This strategic initiative, backed by resounding support from INDA’s leadership, is a direct response to feedback from association members affirming that sustainability remains one of the nonwovens industry’s highest priorities.

INDA’s sustainability endeavor will center around three core pillars crucial to the industry’s future: Responsible Sourcing, End-of-Life Solutions, and Innovations in Sustainability. This multifaceted initiative will introduce a spectrum of new and enhanced offerings, including:

  • Webinars addressing sustainability issues impacting members and the industry.
  • Specialized technical and government affairs committees enabling members to collaborate on sustainability opportunities and challenges.
  • The inaugural release of a comprehensive sustainability report from INDA’s Market Intelligence department.
  • A dedicated sustainability special edition of the International Fiber Journal, produced by INDA Media.
  • Sustainability programming at INDA events, including a dedicated focus at the IDEA® 2025 conference.
Source:

INDA - Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry

07.02.2024

RadiciGroup’s roadmap to a sustainable future

“From Earth to Earth”: The new plan defines goals and concrete actions in Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) areas to foster value creation for all stakeholders and put new sustainability regulatory requirements at the centre of attention.

A project, designed to enhance RadiciGroup's transparency and commitment to develop a responsible business along its entire value chain from an economic, social and environmental perspective and focus on the ever more widespread and stringent sustainability regulatory requirements. These are the features and goals of the Sustainability Plan presented by the Group and called "From Earth to Earth", precisely to emphasize the intent to focus on the Earth and future generations.

“From Earth to Earth”: The new plan defines goals and concrete actions in Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) areas to foster value creation for all stakeholders and put new sustainability regulatory requirements at the centre of attention.

A project, designed to enhance RadiciGroup's transparency and commitment to develop a responsible business along its entire value chain from an economic, social and environmental perspective and focus on the ever more widespread and stringent sustainability regulatory requirements. These are the features and goals of the Sustainability Plan presented by the Group and called "From Earth to Earth", precisely to emphasize the intent to focus on the Earth and future generations.

In the context of a complex and constantly changing scenario, the Group has therefore decided to capitalize on the goals achieved and look beyond them with a plan defining the medium-term targets and the actions to be taken to fulfil them and covering all areas considered to be "material”, i.e., relevant from the point of view of ESG and financial risks, opportunities and impacts. Indeed, the ultimate goal of "From Earth to Earth" is to support business continuity and the growth of the company and all its stakeholders.

The project was the result of a multi-year collaboration with Deloitte, which contributed an external and objective viewpoint on the definition of the material targets and themes. However, it was not an armchair exercise, but the result of an extensive listening process involving internal and external stakeholders, all of whom were sustainability experts who helped define a shortlist of strategic themes for both the Group and its main stakeholders. These issues were then analysed in detail using working tables on the different themes to identify the objectives in Environmental, Social and Governance areas and the related concrete actions needed to achieve them, in line with the European decarbonization and energy transition policies and the
United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, a global blueprint for sustainable growth.

In particular, RadiciGroup’s environmental goals include: a 20% increase and differentiation in renewable source electricity consumption, an 80% reduction in total direct greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 compared to 2011, attention to water consumption to limit the impact on local communities and biodiversity, the extension of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology to measure the environmental impact of 70% of the products (in terms of weight) manufactured by the entire Group, collaboration among the various actors in the supply chain from an ecodesign perspective and the search for increasingly more sustainable and circular packaging solutions.

EMPEL Green Theme Technologies
06.02.2024

PFAS-free and water-free textile finishing enters Japanese market

Green Theme Technologies (GTT), creators of the PFAS-free and water-free EMPEL® textile finishing platform, delivers advanced performance and a long term sustainability solution to the Japanese market. Green Theme Technologies, Inc. (GTT) is a US-based textile innovation company with a global vision to increase performance and eliminate pollution.

EMPEL® is a solution for textile mills looking to provide clean, high-performance finishes, and GTT actively promotes this innovative technology to all relevant Japanese companies, including mills, manufacturers, and brands. YKK, the Japanese global leader in zipper manufacturing, has already adopted the EMPEL® technology into their manufacturing process and promotes the technology globally in their new DynaPel™ collection.

Green Theme Technologies (GTT), creators of the PFAS-free and water-free EMPEL® textile finishing platform, delivers advanced performance and a long term sustainability solution to the Japanese market. Green Theme Technologies, Inc. (GTT) is a US-based textile innovation company with a global vision to increase performance and eliminate pollution.

EMPEL® is a solution for textile mills looking to provide clean, high-performance finishes, and GTT actively promotes this innovative technology to all relevant Japanese companies, including mills, manufacturers, and brands. YKK, the Japanese global leader in zipper manufacturing, has already adopted the EMPEL® technology into their manufacturing process and promotes the technology globally in their new DynaPel™ collection.

GTT’s activities in Japan are supported by the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO), a government-related organization that works to promote mutual trade and investment between Japan and the rest of the world. GTT has been approved for JETRO’s Invest Japan Support Program, which allows GTT to leverage its resources to set up an office in Japan in the future and for J-Bridge Program to forge relationships with prospective Japanese partners.

Source:

Green Theme Technologies

AkzoNobel participates in research program with SusInkCoat project (c) The Dutch Research Council (NWO)
05.02.2024

AkzoNobel participates in research program with SusInkCoat project

More than 82 companies, businesses and social organizations – including AkzoNobel – are involved in a major Dutch research program focused on developing new technologies that will help solve some of today’s societal challenges.
 
Seven broad consortia have been established as part of the government-funded “Perspectief” program, with AkzoNobel set to play a leading role in the SusInkCoat project, which will explore how to make inks and coatings more sustainable.

The company will work together with private partners and other societal stakeholders to develop new materials, processes and applications to improve the durability, functionality and recyclability of coatings, thin films and inks. The program, which will run for the next five years, is backed by the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy and the Dutch Research Council (NWO).

More than 82 companies, businesses and social organizations – including AkzoNobel – are involved in a major Dutch research program focused on developing new technologies that will help solve some of today’s societal challenges.
 
Seven broad consortia have been established as part of the government-funded “Perspectief” program, with AkzoNobel set to play a leading role in the SusInkCoat project, which will explore how to make inks and coatings more sustainable.

The company will work together with private partners and other societal stakeholders to develop new materials, processes and applications to improve the durability, functionality and recyclability of coatings, thin films and inks. The program, which will run for the next five years, is backed by the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy and the Dutch Research Council (NWO).

“Our discussions about collaborating with our SusInkCoat partners have been very positive,” says AkzoNobel’s R&D Director of Scientific Academic Programs, André van Linden, who is also the co-lead of SusInkCoat. “We’re all facing the same societal challenges – how to become more circular – and we’re looking for the same solutions in different application areas. But we’ve never done that together for this specific research topic, so we need an ecosystem to help us solve these challenges.
 
Van Linden adds that the program – one of many R&D projects the company is involved with – will also support AkzoNobel’s ambition to achieve 50% less carbon emissions in its own operations – and across the value chain – by 2030.
 
 “We want to make the recyclability of materials - such as furniture, building materials and steel constructions - easier by introducing functionalities like self-healing, higher durability and triggered release,” he continues. “The more you can leave the materials in their original state, the more sustainably you can operate.”

AkzoNobel will be collaborating with Canon, Evonik, GFB, PTG and RUG Ventures, who together possess extensive knowledge of market demands, supply chains and production processes. All the SusInkCoat partners will also work with academic researchers at several Dutch universities in an effort to identify promising developments that can be commercialized, used for education purposes or for outreach to the public.

Research being conducted by the other six consortia includes investigating methods to make tastier plant-based food; flat optics for more sustainable hi-tech equipment; and cheaper and more accessible medical imaging technology.

More information:
AkzoNobel Coatings Sustainability
Source:

AkzoNobel

Indorama Ventures awarded by EcoVadis Sustainability Assessment (c) Indorama Ventures
02.02.2024

Indorama Ventures awarded by EcoVadis Sustainability Assessment

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited has been awarded the 'Platinum Medal' by EcoVadis Sustainability Assessment, underscoring the company's commitment to sustainability.

Indorama Ventures actively participates in the annual EcoVadis assessment to measure its sustainable practices, ensuring alignment with the diverse requirements of key customers across various business segments and operations. In the latest evaluation for 2024, the company achieved a Platinum Medal with a score of 80, surpassing last year’s score of 77. Indorama Ventures is ranked in the top 1% of all companies assessed within the primary industries of basic chemicals. The company demonstrated above industry-average performance in all four assessment areas: environment, labor human rights, ethics, and sustainable procurement.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited has been awarded the 'Platinum Medal' by EcoVadis Sustainability Assessment, underscoring the company's commitment to sustainability.

Indorama Ventures actively participates in the annual EcoVadis assessment to measure its sustainable practices, ensuring alignment with the diverse requirements of key customers across various business segments and operations. In the latest evaluation for 2024, the company achieved a Platinum Medal with a score of 80, surpassing last year’s score of 77. Indorama Ventures is ranked in the top 1% of all companies assessed within the primary industries of basic chemicals. The company demonstrated above industry-average performance in all four assessment areas: environment, labor human rights, ethics, and sustainable procurement.

Source:

Indorama Ventures

29.01.2024

Refashion: Renewal of accreditation for 2023-2028

Refashion, a textile industry’s eco-organisation, has renewed its authority approval until 2028. 6 years during which it will continue to transform the industry in keeping with the objectives set by the French Ministry of Ecological Transition and the French Ministry of the Economy, including the objective to collect 60% of CHF (clothing, household linen and footwear textiles) placed on the market by 2028. This new period is reflected in an ambitious road map and significantly increased investment. Nearly 1.2 billion euros, financed by the marketers, will be spent on transforming the industry during this new period of authority approval.

Refashion, a textile industry’s eco-organisation, has renewed its authority approval until 2028. 6 years during which it will continue to transform the industry in keeping with the objectives set by the French Ministry of Ecological Transition and the French Ministry of the Economy, including the objective to collect 60% of CHF (clothing, household linen and footwear textiles) placed on the market by 2028. This new period is reflected in an ambitious road map and significantly increased investment. Nearly 1.2 billion euros, financed by the marketers, will be spent on transforming the industry during this new period of authority approval.

Determined to achieve the objectives set out in the ambitious specifications set down by the Secretary of State at the Ministry of Ecological Transition, Berangère Couillard, Refashion has worked on a road map with all of its stakeholders involved in the transformation that is underway. Maud Hardy, nominated as the eco-organisation’s CEO in January 2022, started a collaborative working method that will continue throughout this new period to support areas that are key in this transformation. In the next few months, projects will begin and will visibly highlight the progress made in the three phases of a product’s life cycle: production consumption, regeneration.

Production

  • Recognising eco-design initiatives through the eco-modulation of the fees paid by marketers (durability, environmental information labelling, integration of recycled materials). For marketers, these initiatives should represent the scheme’s cornerstone. The aim is to involve all stakeholders in reducing the environmental impact of products.

Consumption

  • As from 2023, Refashion will spend 5 million euros minimum per year in awareness-raising activities and on information to the general public by supporting an array of local authority initiatives.
  • The launch of a repair fund in 2023, in particular to prolong the usage of textiles and footwear products. More than 150 million euros will be invested between 2023 and 2028 to change the habits of the French population to increase repairs by 35% (guideline target by the ADEME 2019).

Regeneration

  • Accelerating clothing, household linen and footwear collection, in particular thanks to an operational mix in the sector. Funding traditional sorting operators will remain central, but Refashion will also develop an additional operational system in order to achieve the collection target of 60% of products placed onto the market (versus 34% in 2021).
  • 5% of fees paid to Refashion will go towards the redeployment/reuse funds to provide support for reuse within the remit of stakeholders in the Social and Solidarity Economy. In addition to this funding, additional funding arrangements open to all stakeholders will be established. The total budget throughout the authority approval period represents 135 million euros.
  • 5% of fees, i.e., 58 million euros in 6 years, will be spent on R&D to help achieve these milestones in order to industrialise the recycling of used CHF: recyclability that is considered during the design stage; automated sorting and recycling.
Source:

Refashion

MACH2®XS Photo SHIMA SEIKI MFG., LTD.
MACH2®XS
28.01.2024

SHIMA SEIKI at Dhaka International Textile & Garment Machinery Exhibition 2024

Operating in Bangladesh since 1996, this is the fourteenth time the Japanese manufacturer is participating in DTG.

As the Bangladeshi textile industry calls for sustainable production through innovation and digitalization, the market is keen to establish effective business models that support such production. In response, for the first time in its DTG exhibition history, SHIMA SEIKI's lineup consists entirely of WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machines. Capable of knitting an entire garment in one piece without the need for linking or sewing while using only the material required to knit one garment at a time, WHOLEGARMENT® knitting is famous for promoting sustainability in the knit factory.

Operating in Bangladesh since 1996, this is the fourteenth time the Japanese manufacturer is participating in DTG.

As the Bangladeshi textile industry calls for sustainable production through innovation and digitalization, the market is keen to establish effective business models that support such production. In response, for the first time in its DTG exhibition history, SHIMA SEIKI's lineup consists entirely of WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machines. Capable of knitting an entire garment in one piece without the need for linking or sewing while using only the material required to knit one garment at a time, WHOLEGARMENT® knitting is famous for promoting sustainability in the knit factory.

The company is showing its MACH2®XS153 WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machine in 15L gauge, as well as its SWG®091N2 "Mini" WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machine in 15 gauge. MACH2®XS features 4 needle beds and SHIMA SEIKI's original SlideNeedle™, capable of producing high-quality fine gauge WHOLEGARMENT® knitwear in all needles. SWG®091N2 provides opportunities in WHOLEGARMENT® knitting across a wide range of items in a compact, economical package. A different approach to WHOLEGARMENT knitting is also shown in the form of the N.SVR®183 machine. SHIMA SEIKI's global standard in shaped knitting, the N.SVR® series now features a model for producing WHOLEGARMENT® knitwear using every other needle in fine gauge. Shown in 18 gauge at DTG, N.SVR®183 is the ideal machine for flexible, entry-level WHOLEGARMENT® production, with the versatility to respond to fluctuating market demand.

Demonstrations are performed on SHIMA SEIKI's SDS®-ONE APEX4 design system. At the core of the company’s "Total Fashion System" concept, it provides comprehensive support throughout the supply chain, integrating production into one smooth and efficient workflow from yarn development, product planning and design, to machine programming, production and even sales promotion.

Source:

SHIMA SEIKI MFG., LTD.

BLUEZONE Foto MUNICHFABRICSTART Exhibitions GmbH
28.01.2024

Schlussbericht MUNICH FABRIC START S/S 2025: Mit vorsichtigem Optimismus in die Zukunft

Nach drei erfolgreichen Messetagen ist am 25. Januar die internationale Fabric Trade Show MUNICH FABRIC START für die Saison Spring.Summer 2025 zu Ende gegangen. Die Denim Trade Show BLUEZONE und der Innovationshub KEYHOUSE schlossen bereits am Mittwochabend ihre Pforten. Das Resümee des Treffens der europäischen Fashionbranche: Wir erleben eine Rückbesinnung auf unsere Wurzeln, um so dem wachsenden Bedürfnis nach Orientierung Rechnung zu tragen – ergänzt um eine Vielfalt spannender nachhaltiger und AI-gestützter Lösungen, die der Branche den Weg in die Zukunft ebnen können.

Unter dem Motto „CLARITY“ konnten Designer, Buyers, Product Manager und Entscheider:innen die Neuheiten und Services von rund 1.000 Anbietern aus aller Welt, verteilt auf die acht Areas ADDITIONALS, FABRICS, ReSOURCE, BLUEZONE, DESIGN STUDIOS, KEYHOUSE, SUSTAINABLE INNOVATIONS sowie THE SOURCE für die neue Saison sichten.

Nach drei erfolgreichen Messetagen ist am 25. Januar die internationale Fabric Trade Show MUNICH FABRIC START für die Saison Spring.Summer 2025 zu Ende gegangen. Die Denim Trade Show BLUEZONE und der Innovationshub KEYHOUSE schlossen bereits am Mittwochabend ihre Pforten. Das Resümee des Treffens der europäischen Fashionbranche: Wir erleben eine Rückbesinnung auf unsere Wurzeln, um so dem wachsenden Bedürfnis nach Orientierung Rechnung zu tragen – ergänzt um eine Vielfalt spannender nachhaltiger und AI-gestützter Lösungen, die der Branche den Weg in die Zukunft ebnen können.

Unter dem Motto „CLARITY“ konnten Designer, Buyers, Product Manager und Entscheider:innen die Neuheiten und Services von rund 1.000 Anbietern aus aller Welt, verteilt auf die acht Areas ADDITIONALS, FABRICS, ReSOURCE, BLUEZONE, DESIGN STUDIOS, KEYHOUSE, SUSTAINABLE INNOVATIONS sowie THE SOURCE für die neue Saison sichten.

Mit Blick auf Trends für Spring.Summer 2025 zeigten sich verschiedene Entwicklungen: Einerseits eine klare Rückbesinnung auf Altbewährtes, bei dem handwerkliches Geschick und klare Formen im Vordergrund stehen. Durchbrochen wird die Nostalgie stellenweise durch ergänzende Statement-Pieces aus dem Athleisure- oder, im Bereich der Damenmode, Lingerie-Bereich. Denim ist in der kommenden Saison allgegenwärtig – nicht zuletzt, da es sich dabei um das wohl demokratischste Fabric handelt, das in jegliche Güte- und Preisklassen übersetzt werden kann. Im Bereich der Damenmode wird es neue Interpretationen des Herrenhemds zu sehen geben, das in seinen klassisch maskulinen Formen dekonstruiert wird. Der Fokus richtet sich auf natürliche Materialien wie Leinen und Hanf. Nicht zuletzt im Bereich einer neuen casual Work Wear, hier vor allem in Kombination mit warmen Neutraltönen und gebrochenen Facetten von Weiß. Pastells werden weiterhin allgegenwärtig bleiben – allerdings in neuen Nuancen und ausbalanciert durch eine erdige Farbpalette.

Das Vortragsprogramm stand diesmal vor allem im Zeichen der Nachhaltigkeit – ob natürliche innovative Fasern und ihr disruptives Potential für eine nachhaltigere Fashionbranche, Recycling-Thematiken und damit verbundene EU-Regulatorik, die die Branche herausfordern werden, sowie hilfreiche Anleitungen dazu, wie sich die verschiedenen Akteure schon heute darauf vorbereiten können. Plattformen wie das KEYHOUSE leisten dazu einen zentralen Beitrag und schlagen die Brücke zwischen jungen, kreativen Denker:innen, der Forschung und Akteuren der Branche.

Die BLUEZONE hat am 23. und 24. Januar die Zenith Area einmal mehr in einen Denim-Hot-Spot verwandelt. Die Blue-Blooded-Community traf sich hier, um die Zukunft der Denimbranche auszuloten. Ein zentrales Thema bleibt die Transformation der Denimindustrie hin zu noch mehr Nachhaltigkeit: Cradle-2-Cradle-Konzepte, innovative Recyclingverfahren und ressourcenschonende Wasch-, Färbe- und Finishingtechnologien waren vielfach das inhaltliche Zentrum der Kollektionspräsentationen, von Stand- und Gangdiskussionen sowie den Trendvorträgen. So wurde der inzwischen von 53 marktführenden Denimunternehmen unterzeichnete Denim Deal auf der BLUEZONE Stage initial in Deutschland vorgestellt. Er verfolgt das Ziel, den Einsatz von Recyclingmaterialien in neuen Textilprodukten verbindlich zu machen. Die Hall of Fame machte das Leitmotiv der BLUEZONE „Signature“ dadurch erlebbar, dass sie live Personal-Pieces von Szeneikonen wie Jason Denham, Adriana Galijasevic, Adriano Goldschmied oder Renzo Rosso zeigte und deren jeweilige Geschichte erzählte. Persönliche Begegnung und Austausch waren auch das Motto der MUNICH FABRIC NIGHT, auf der am Abend des ersten Messetags alle MUNICH FABRIC START Aussteller:innen und Besucher:innen den Dancefloor im Dampfdom der Motorworld zum Kochen brachten.

Während der drei Messetage kamen 11.700 Besucher:innen in das Münchner MOC sowie die Zenith Area. Viele wichtige Brands, wie adidas, Akris, Alberto, Alpha Tauri, Anna van Toor, Armed Angels, Baldessarini, Bestseller, Betty Barclay, BMW, Bogner, Brax, C&A, Carhartt, Closed, Comma, Condé Nast, Digel, Diesel, Drykorn, Escada, Eterna, Ganni, Hessnatur, Holy Fashion Group, HSE, Hugo Boss, Inditex, Joop, Katag, Lagerfeld, Lanius, Lodenfrey, Mac, Maloja, Marc Cain, Marc O’Polo, März, Mey, More&More, Mustang, MyTheresa, Oui, Remei, Riani, Roxy, s.Oliver, Schumacher, Seidensticker, Sportalm, Talbot Runhof, Tchibo, Tom Tailor, Tory Burch, Windsor und Wolford waren vor Ort. Die Besucher:innen kamen aus 58 Ländern, neben Deutschland überwiegend aus dem osteuropäischen Raum, Italien, Skandinavien, UK, den Benelux-Staaten, aber auch aus Südamerika, den USA und den UAE, Saudi Arabien und Ozeanien. Abgerundet durch ein umfassendes Begleitprogramm mit prominenten und internationalen Speaker:innen aus den verschiedensten Bereichen der Branche und zahlreichen Möglichkeiten zum Netzwerken überzeugte die MUNICH FABRIC START auch diese Saison mit ihrem ganzheitlichen Konzept.

Bereits in wenigen Monaten steht mit der VIEW Premium Selection am 18. und 19. Juni in der Motorworld der nächste zentrale Termin für die europäische Fashionbranche an – dann zum Auftakt für die Saison Autumn.Winter 25. Der Junitermin bietet einen ersten inspirierenden Überblick über kommende Trends und Neuerungen in den Bereichen Fabrics, Denim & Sportswear, Additionals und Design Studios für die kommende Saison, und damit bereits vor dem bedeutenden September-Termin, als essenziellem Zeitpunkt für schnelles Ordern, Innovationen und Entwicklungen der Modeindustrie.

 

Source:

MUNICHFABRICSTART Exhibitions GmbH

Presentation of the certificate for 1st place in the business plan competition KEUR.NRW 2023 to the RWTH start-up SA-Dynamics; from left to right: Oliver Krischer (Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Transport of the State of NRW), Sascha Schriever (SA-Dynamics); Maximilian Mohr (SA-Dynamics); Jens Hofer (SA-Dynamics); Christian Schwotzer (SA-Dynamics) © Business Angels Deutschland e. V. (BAND)
Presentation of the certificate for 1st place in the business plan competition KEUR.NRW 2023 to the RWTH start-up SA-Dynamics; from left to right: Oliver Krischer (Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Transport of the State of NRW), Sascha Schriever (SA-Dynamics); Maximilian Mohr (SA-Dynamics); Jens Hofer (SA-Dynamics); Christian Schwotzer (SA-Dynamics)
26.01.2024

Start-up: Bio-based aerogel fibres replace synthetic insulation materials

The Aachen-based start-up SA-Dynamics is developing sustainable, bio-based and biodegradable insulation materials made from aerogel fibres, thereby setting new standards in resource-saving construction. Dr Sascha Schriever (Institut für Textiltechnik ITA), Maximilian Mohr (ITA), Dr Jens Hofer (ITA Postdoc) and Dr Christian Schwotzer (Department for Industrial Furnaces and Heat Engineering IOB), who trained at RWTH Aachen University, were awarded first place in the KUER.NRW Business Plan Competition 2023 and prize money of €6,000.

SA-Dynamics relies on the impressive properties of aerogel fibres: they have excellent insulating properties, are lightweight, durable, robust, versatile and can be processed very well on conventional textile machines thanks to their flexibility. This makes them comparable to polystyrene, but still sustainable, as SA Dynamics uses bio-based and biodegradable raw materials.

The Aachen-based start-up SA-Dynamics is developing sustainable, bio-based and biodegradable insulation materials made from aerogel fibres, thereby setting new standards in resource-saving construction. Dr Sascha Schriever (Institut für Textiltechnik ITA), Maximilian Mohr (ITA), Dr Jens Hofer (ITA Postdoc) and Dr Christian Schwotzer (Department for Industrial Furnaces and Heat Engineering IOB), who trained at RWTH Aachen University, were awarded first place in the KUER.NRW Business Plan Competition 2023 and prize money of €6,000.

SA-Dynamics relies on the impressive properties of aerogel fibres: they have excellent insulating properties, are lightweight, durable, robust, versatile and can be processed very well on conventional textile machines thanks to their flexibility. This makes them comparable to polystyrene, but still sustainable, as SA Dynamics uses bio-based and biodegradable raw materials.

"We can revolutionise the construction world with bio-based aerogel fibres," explains ITA founder Dr Sascha Schriever proudly. "If all insulation materials in construction are converted to bio-based aerogel fibres, all builders can realise their dream of a sustainable house."

SA Dynamics has come a good deal closer to its founding goal by winning the KUER.NRW 2023 business plan competition. The spin-off from Institut für Textiltechnik (ITA) and Department for Industrial Furnaces and Heat Engineering (IOB) at RWTH Aachen University is scheduled for spring 2025.

Source:

ITA – Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University

26.01.2024

Solvay reduces transportation carbon footprint

Solvay is partnering with transportation providers KIITOSIMEON and ADAMS LOGISTICS to reduce the carbon footprint of its facility in Voikkaa, Finland. Known for its hydrogen peroxide technology, the site has a yearly capacity of 85 kilotons, making it the largest hydrogen peroxide unit in the country and one of the largest in Europe. However, the transportation of its products results in more than 850 tons of CO2 emissions annually, attributed to the several thousands deliveries conducted each year.

While the Voikkaa site has been operating on 100% wind-generated electricity since 2023, the journey towards decarbonization takes another step forward as it transitions transportation fuel from diesel to biofuel in the first quarter of 2024. This shift will result in a significant annual reduction of over 700 tons of CO2 emissions, representing more than 8O% reduction in the site's transportation carbon footprint.

Solvay is partnering with transportation providers KIITOSIMEON and ADAMS LOGISTICS to reduce the carbon footprint of its facility in Voikkaa, Finland. Known for its hydrogen peroxide technology, the site has a yearly capacity of 85 kilotons, making it the largest hydrogen peroxide unit in the country and one of the largest in Europe. However, the transportation of its products results in more than 850 tons of CO2 emissions annually, attributed to the several thousands deliveries conducted each year.

While the Voikkaa site has been operating on 100% wind-generated electricity since 2023, the journey towards decarbonization takes another step forward as it transitions transportation fuel from diesel to biofuel in the first quarter of 2024. This shift will result in a significant annual reduction of over 700 tons of CO2 emissions, representing more than 8O% reduction in the site's transportation carbon footprint.

As part of its commitment to carbon neutrality by 2050, Solvay has outlined a sustainability roadmap with around 40 energy transition projects. These projects focus on eliminating coal usage, emphasizing renewable energy sources, prioritizing energy efficiency, and driving process innovation. Solvay has further committed to reduce its emissions* along the value chain by 20% by 2030.

*scope 3 emissions, focus 5 categories, 2021 baseline

DITF: Recyclable event and trade fair furniture made of paper (c) DITF
Structurally wound paper yarn element with green sensor yarn.
26.01.2024

DITF: Recyclable event and trade fair furniture made of paper

A lot of waste is generated in the trade fair and event industry. It makes sense to have furniture that can quickly be dismantled and stored to save space - or simply disposed of and recycled. Paper is the ideal raw material here: locally available and renewable. It also has an established recycling process. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research (DITF) and their project partners have jointly developed a recycling-friendly modular system for trade fair furniture. The "PapierEvents" project was funded by the German Federal Environmental Foundation (DBU).

Once the paper has been brought into yarn form, it can be processed into a wide variety of basic elements using the structure winding process, creating a completely new design language.

A lot of waste is generated in the trade fair and event industry. It makes sense to have furniture that can quickly be dismantled and stored to save space - or simply disposed of and recycled. Paper is the ideal raw material here: locally available and renewable. It also has an established recycling process. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research (DITF) and their project partners have jointly developed a recycling-friendly modular system for trade fair furniture. The "PapierEvents" project was funded by the German Federal Environmental Foundation (DBU).

Once the paper has been brought into yarn form, it can be processed into a wide variety of basic elements using the structure winding process, creating a completely new design language.

The unusual look is created in the structure winding process. In this technology developed at the DITF, the yarn is deposited precisely on a rotating mandrel. This enables high process speeds and a high degree of automation. After the winding process, the individual yarns are fixed, creating a self-supporting component. A starch-based adhesive, which is also made from renewable and degradable raw materials, was used in the project for the fixation.

The recyclability of all the basic elements developed in the project was investigated and confirmed. For this purpose the research colleagues at the project partner from the Department of Paper Production and Mechanical Process Engineering at TU Darmstadt (PMV) used the CEPI method, a new standard test procedure from the Confederation of European Paper Industries.

Sensor and lighting functions were also implemented in a recycling-friendly manner. The paper sensor yarns are integrated into the components and detect contact.

Also, a modular system for trade fair and event furniture was developed. The furniture is lightweight and modular. For example, the total weight of the counter shown is well under ten kilograms and individual parts can easily be shipped in standard packages. All parts can be used several times, making them suitable for campaigns lasting several weeks.

A counter, a customer stopper in DIN A1 format and a pyramid-shaped stand were used as demonstrators. The research work of the DITF (textile technology) and PMV (paper processing) was supplemented by other partners: GarnTec GmbH developed the paper yarns used, the industrial designers from quintessence design provided important suggestions for the visual and functional design of the elements and connectors and the event agency Rödig GmbH evaluated the ideas and concepts in terms of usability in practical use.

Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF)

Selection of looks of the What Goes Around Comes Around exhibition Photographer: Elzo Bonam
Selection of looks of the What Goes Around Comes Around exhibition
25.01.2024

Fashion for Good Museum: Final exhibition “What goes around comes around”

The Fashion for Good museum in Amsterdam marks its 6 year journey with a special fashion exhibition focused on circularity, called What Goes Around Comes Around. Honing in on how circularity plays out in different circles of influence, the exhibition showcases inspirational displays that make tangible what a circular fashion industry will look like.

What Goes Around Comes Around pays homage to the extraordinary work of pioneering artists, innovators and designers working to shift the fashion industry with new solutions. The exhibition opens January 27, 2024 and will be open to the public for 5 months. It is the grand finale, as the Museum is closing its doors. As such it will be the Museum’s final call to collective action, which the fashion industry still so highly needs.

The Fashion for Good museum in Amsterdam marks its 6 year journey with a special fashion exhibition focused on circularity, called What Goes Around Comes Around. Honing in on how circularity plays out in different circles of influence, the exhibition showcases inspirational displays that make tangible what a circular fashion industry will look like.

What Goes Around Comes Around pays homage to the extraordinary work of pioneering artists, innovators and designers working to shift the fashion industry with new solutions. The exhibition opens January 27, 2024 and will be open to the public for 5 months. It is the grand finale, as the Museum is closing its doors. As such it will be the Museum’s final call to collective action, which the fashion industry still so highly needs.

“We are highlighting three areas in What Goes Around Comes Around", explains curator Sophie Jager-van Duren at the Fashion for Good Museum. “First: new work by local artists Atelier Reservé and The Patchwork Family, design collectives working towards circularity, demonstrating what is happening right now. We are also showing looks from established designers BOTTER, Ronald van der Kemp and Marga Weimans, Yuima Nakazato and Nicole McLaughlin. Second, the community, with an installation for visitors to participate in, planting the seed that we need each other to change the fashion system. Lastly, the industry - honing in on examples of innovations and technologies. We invited designers to create new work with circular materials including Living Ink, MIRUM, Altmat and Biophilica.”

Today’s fashion industry is caught in a vicious cycle of ‘take-make-waste’ and this system has a growing negative impact on people and the planet. For instance, in Europe, the average consumer is responsible for 15 kilos of textile waste per year and these numbers are increasing. To address this, we need action from individuals, the industry and society alike to go from a linear take-make-waste model into one that is circular by design.

The Fashion for Good Museum is inviting anybody to come visit its final exhibition and learn from concrete examples, to understand the current state of the fashion industry, gain the tools for taking individual or collective action and be inspired by circular fashion available today.

Designing for circularity means designing without creating waste or pollution, as all materials are continually reused instead of discarded. A circular system is restorative and regenerative and reduces pressure on natural resources. The ultimate goal of the exhibition is to put circularity into practice, help people envision a circular economy based on community practices and empower visitors to take collective action, starting in the museum but extending to their homes and daily lives.

Through the exhibition and its public programme, which consists of interactive workshops and educational events, the museum functions as a community space where visitors are invited to learn, gain new perspectives and are exposed to inspiring examples, building the skills and knowledge to create positive change. The upcoming few months there are multiple events, educational toolkits and other opportunities to join us, all open for the public, keep an eye out on our website and social media channels for the latest updates.

The exhibition is open for the public from Saturday 27th of January until June 5th 2024, marking World Environment Day on June 5th as the final closing day of the museum.

Source:

Fashion for Good 

The research group Water Engineering Innovation Photo: Aarhus University
The research group Water Engineering Innovation, led by Associate Professor Zongsu Wei, works to develop water purification technologies, especially in connection with PFAS. The group collaborates in this project with the research group Robotics from the Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering.
24.01.2024

Artificial intelligence to help remove PFAS

A new research project links some of Denmark's leading researchers in PFAS remediation with artificial intelligence. The goal is to develop and optimise a new form of wastewater and drinking water treatment technology using artificial intelligence for zero-pollution goals.

In a new research and development project, researchers from Aarhus University aim to develop a new technology that can collect and break down perpetual chemicals (PFAS) in one step in a purification process that can be connected directly to drinking water wells and treatment plants.

The project has received funding from the Villum Foundation of DKK 3 million, and it will combine newly developed treatment technology from some of Denmark's leading PFAS remediation researchers with artificial intelligence that can ensure optimal remediation.

A new research project links some of Denmark's leading researchers in PFAS remediation with artificial intelligence. The goal is to develop and optimise a new form of wastewater and drinking water treatment technology using artificial intelligence for zero-pollution goals.

In a new research and development project, researchers from Aarhus University aim to develop a new technology that can collect and break down perpetual chemicals (PFAS) in one step in a purification process that can be connected directly to drinking water wells and treatment plants.

The project has received funding from the Villum Foundation of DKK 3 million, and it will combine newly developed treatment technology from some of Denmark's leading PFAS remediation researchers with artificial intelligence that can ensure optimal remediation.

"In the project, we will design, construct and test a new, automated degradation technology for continuous PFAS degradation. We’re also going to set up an open database to identify significant and limiting factors for degradation reactions with PFAS molecules in the reactor," says Associate Professor Xuping Zhang from the Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering at Aarhus University, who is co-heading the project in collaboration with Associate Professor Zongsu Wei from the Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering.

Ever since the 1940s, PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) have been used in a myriad of products, ranging from raincoats and building materials to furniture, fire extinguishers, solar panels, saucepans, packaging and paints.

However, PFAS have proven to have a number of harmful effects on humans and the environment, and unfortunately the substances are very difficult to break down in nature. As a result, the substances continuously accumulate in humans, animals, and elsewhere in nature.

In Denmark, PFAS have been found in drinking water wells, in surface foam on the sea, in the soil at sites for fire-fighting drills, and in many places elsewhere, for example in organic eggs. It is not possible to remove PFAS from everything, but work is underway to remove PFAS from the groundwater in drinking water wells that have been contaminated with the substances.

Currently, the most common method to filter drinking water for PFAS is via an active carbon filter, an ion-exchange filter, or by using a specially designed membrane. All of these possibilities filter PFAS from the water, but they do not destroy the PFAS. The filters are therefore all temporary, as they have to be sent for incineration to destroy the accumulated PFAS, or they end in landfills.

The project is called 'Machine Learning to Enhance PFAS Degradation in Flow Reactor', and it aims to design and develop an optimal and permanent solution for drinking water wells and treatment plants in Denmark that constantly captures and breaks down PFAS, while also monitoring itself.

"We need to be creative and think outside the box. I see many advantages in linking artificial intelligence with several different water treatment technologies, but integrating intelligence-based optimisation is no easy task. It requires strong synergy between machine learning and chemical engineering, but the perspectives are huge," says Associate Professor Zongsu Wei from the Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering at Aarhus University.

More information:
PFAS Aarhuis University
Source:

Aarhus University
Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering
Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering