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24.11.2022

EURATEX: A price cap at 275€/MWh would be meaningless

The plan of the European Commission to propose a price cap on wholesale gas price at 275€/MWh would be a bitter disappointment for the European textiles and clothing manufacturers, said EURATEX.

November 22nd, EURATEX stated in a letter to EC President, Ursula von der Leyen, that any price cap above the level of 80€euro/MWh would not help the EU industry – the textile sector in particular – to survive the current crisis. Indeed as early as July 2021, the wholesale gas price in the EU was below 30€/MWh. Now, the EU industry is facing gas and energy prices that have exceeded any coping capacity: from the record-high 320€/MWh last August, the price has reached to 127€/MWh today. Still, it is more than 300% than the business as usual prices.

The plan of the European Commission to propose a price cap on wholesale gas price at 275€/MWh would be a bitter disappointment for the European textiles and clothing manufacturers, said EURATEX.

November 22nd, EURATEX stated in a letter to EC President, Ursula von der Leyen, that any price cap above the level of 80€euro/MWh would not help the EU industry – the textile sector in particular – to survive the current crisis. Indeed as early as July 2021, the wholesale gas price in the EU was below 30€/MWh. Now, the EU industry is facing gas and energy prices that have exceeded any coping capacity: from the record-high 320€/MWh last August, the price has reached to 127€/MWh today. Still, it is more than 300% than the business as usual prices.

The very existence of the European industry is at stake and with it the European sustainability agenda – and Europe’s capacity to implement it. Furthermore, Europe will lose its strategic autonomy, which guarantees essential goods and services are made available on the European Internal Market. If we continue on this path, the EU will soon become totally dependent on foreign imports with no leverage to implement its sustainability agenda, let alone lead the transition to a circular economy on the international stage.

At present, the EU industry is facing a dire international competition with the industry in China, India and the US working at energy prices of around 10$/MWh. In addition, these competitors are benefitting of sky-high subsidies from their own governments: the rollout of the US $369bln industrial subsidy scheme is just the latest example.

EURATEX Director General, Dirk Vantyghem, believes that “while the EU Industry is under immense, unprecedented pressure, a price cap at 275€/MWh would be meaningless: the European industry will be permanently pushed out on the market. The industry is at the heart of the European way of life and the fundament of our social market economy. The EU must save its industry to save Europe. The moment to act is now.”

More information:
price gap energy crisis Euratex
Source:

EURATEX

16.11.2022

Next EU-wide REACH enforcement project to focus on imported products

The Enforcement Forum of ECHA agreed that the next REACH enforcement project will investigate how companies fulfil the registration, authorisation and restriction obligations for products and chemicals they import from outside the EU. The project will be done in 2023-2025 and will require close cooperation between REACH enforcement and national customs authorities in the Member States.
In its November meeting, the Enforcement Forum, responsible for harmonising the enforcement of EU chemicals legislation, agreed to focus its next project on the control of imports of substances, mixtures and articles.

This subject was triggered by high levels of non-compliance in imported goods detected in previous Forum projects, including a recent pilot project. The pilot found that 23 % of inspected products were non-compliant with requirements set by EU law and further controls are necessary.

The Enforcement Forum of ECHA agreed that the next REACH enforcement project will investigate how companies fulfil the registration, authorisation and restriction obligations for products and chemicals they import from outside the EU. The project will be done in 2023-2025 and will require close cooperation between REACH enforcement and national customs authorities in the Member States.
In its November meeting, the Enforcement Forum, responsible for harmonising the enforcement of EU chemicals legislation, agreed to focus its next project on the control of imports of substances, mixtures and articles.

This subject was triggered by high levels of non-compliance in imported goods detected in previous Forum projects, including a recent pilot project. The pilot found that 23 % of inspected products were non-compliant with requirements set by EU law and further controls are necessary.

Control of imports at the point of entry is the most effective means of checking that non-compliant substances, mixtures and articles do not enter the European market. The project will also work on further developing and strengthening existing cooperation between REACH inspectors and customs. By strengthening the control of imports, the project will also contribute to the goals of the EU’s Chemicals Strategy for Sustainability.

The Forum also agreed to publish its future advice on enforceability of new restriction proposals under REACH.

Opportunities for expanding the future role of the Forum, strengthening the control of imports and other areas were on the agenda in an open session where 41 representatives from stakeholder organisations and four candidate countries joined. Among other topics, the open session also addressed the enforceability of REACH restrictions, for example, in textiles or on the use of lead gunshot in wetlands as well as analytical methods relevant for the control of REACH duties.

The Forum’s Biocidal Products Regulation Subgroup (BPRS) re-elected Helmut de Vos (BE) for a second term as a Vice-Chair.

More information:
ECHA REACH
Source:

European Chemicals Agency

Dr. Harald Weber and Thomas Waldmann. Photo: VDMA
from left to right: Dr. Harald Weber and Thomas Waldmann.
08.11.2022

VDMA Textile Machinery Association: Dr Harald Weber succeeds Thomas Waldmann

Dr. Harald Weber will become the new managing director of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association on 1 January 2023. The 44-year-old industrial engineer succeeds Thomas Waldmann, who has held the position since 1991 and will retire at the end of the year.

After completing his doctorate at the Technical University of Darmstadt and working as a lecturer at the University of Applied Sciences Mittelhessen (THM), Dr. Weber joined the VDMA in 2011. Since then, he has been responsible for the topics of technology and innovation in the Plastics and Rubber Machinery Association.

Dr. Janpeter Horn, Chairman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Director of August Herzog Maschinenfabrik, commented on the change of personnel: "From his previous work in the plastics industry, Dr. Weber has profound knowledge and experience in topics that are also gaining in importance in textile machinery manufacturing. Examples include recycling and the circular economy, as well as digitalisation and especially the communication standard OPC UA."

Dr. Harald Weber will become the new managing director of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association on 1 January 2023. The 44-year-old industrial engineer succeeds Thomas Waldmann, who has held the position since 1991 and will retire at the end of the year.

After completing his doctorate at the Technical University of Darmstadt and working as a lecturer at the University of Applied Sciences Mittelhessen (THM), Dr. Weber joined the VDMA in 2011. Since then, he has been responsible for the topics of technology and innovation in the Plastics and Rubber Machinery Association.

Dr. Janpeter Horn, Chairman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Director of August Herzog Maschinenfabrik, commented on the change of personnel: "From his previous work in the plastics industry, Dr. Weber has profound knowledge and experience in topics that are also gaining in importance in textile machinery manufacturing. Examples include recycling and the circular economy, as well as digitalisation and especially the communication standard OPC UA."

Dr. Horn added: "We combine our warm welcome to Dr. Weber with a big thank you to Thomas Waldmann. 30 years as managing director at the Textile Machinery Association also stand for constantly changing framework conditions. Mr. Waldmann has always had his finger on the pulse of the industry and, together with his team, has represented the special interests of the member companies: From technology policy to challenges of market access to the leading trade fair ITMA and the European association CEMATEX. ITMA 2007 in Munich was certainly a highlight. The executive board of the association wishes Mr. Waldmann all the best for the new phase of his life that is now beginning."

Source:

VDMA e. V.
Textile Machinery

(c) C.L.A.S.S.
31.10.2022

C.L.A.S.S.: Launch of Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award 2023

The launch of the third edition of the Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award started on October 27, 2022. The Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award (ISFA) is the international competition born out of the collaboration between Connecting Cultures, the foundation that guides the Out of Fashion platform, and C.L.A.S.S., an international eco-hub that since 2007 has been advocating for a new generation of fashion in which the union of design, innovation, communication, and responsibility shapes a conscious and competitive business, capable of playing both an economic and social role.

The Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award invites stylists, photographers, designers, illustrators and artists to create visual imagery, a project that highlights awareness, respect for people and the planet that define the values of sustainable fashion in the fashion system.

Award submissions will be examined by an international jury composed of:

The launch of the third edition of the Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award started on October 27, 2022. The Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award (ISFA) is the international competition born out of the collaboration between Connecting Cultures, the foundation that guides the Out of Fashion platform, and C.L.A.S.S., an international eco-hub that since 2007 has been advocating for a new generation of fashion in which the union of design, innovation, communication, and responsibility shapes a conscious and competitive business, capable of playing both an economic and social role.

The Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award invites stylists, photographers, designers, illustrators and artists to create visual imagery, a project that highlights awareness, respect for people and the planet that define the values of sustainable fashion in the fashion system.

Award submissions will be examined by an international jury composed of:

  • Anna Detheridge, Founder and President, Connecting Cultures
  • Giusy Bettoni, CEO and Founder, C.L.A.S.S.
  • Rita Airaghi, Steering Advisor, Gianfranco Ferré Research Center
  • Paola Arosio, Head of New Brands & Sustainability Projects, Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana
  • Jeanine Ballone Managing Director, Fashion 4 Development
  • Evie Evangelou, Founder and President, Fashion 4 Development
  • Sara Kozlowski, Vice President of Program Strategies, Education, and Sustainability Initiatives, Council of Fashion Designers of America
  • Dio Kurazawa, Founding Partner, The Bear Scouts
  • Renata Molho, journalist, former editor-in-chief of L'Uomo Vogue and former editor-at-large of L'Uomo Vogue, Vogue Italia, Casa Vogue
  • Stefania Ricci, Director, Museo Salvatore Ferragamo
  • Jovana Vukoje, Senior New Brands Specialist, Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

The winning projects of past editions were Take a Walk on the Green Side by Emma Scalcon (2021 - Italy) and Fashion Affair by Vishal Tolambia (2022 - India), two very different works that highlighted how challenging sustainability issues are in the contemporary communication landscape.

The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, January 25, 2023.
The winner will be announced in March 2023 and will receive a cash prize of €3,000.00.

28.10.2022

Current revision of the DOWNPASS standard: Mandatory audit as well for pure parent farms

After the DOWNPASS Standard entered into force as a zero-tolerance standard on 1 January 2017, its first major revision is due in 2022/23. The stakeholder-based approach has again sought feedback from professional and relevant public communities for its first major revision, as it did originally when it was first developed: In addition to animal welfare organisations, veterinarians and agricultural scientists, many trade partners and consumers have also contributed to the discussion with their wishes and requirements.

A central aspect of the DOWNPASS standard is the exclusion of all goods from live animals. Down and feathers may neither come from moulting nor from live plucking. Accredited independent auditing organisations are responsible for monitoring and inspecting the manufacturers' supply chains on site worldwide. Intensified monitoring of high-risk areas is mandatory, but its frequency is left to the discretion of the auditors, who inspect farms both announced and unannounced.

After the DOWNPASS Standard entered into force as a zero-tolerance standard on 1 January 2017, its first major revision is due in 2022/23. The stakeholder-based approach has again sought feedback from professional and relevant public communities for its first major revision, as it did originally when it was first developed: In addition to animal welfare organisations, veterinarians and agricultural scientists, many trade partners and consumers have also contributed to the discussion with their wishes and requirements.

A central aspect of the DOWNPASS standard is the exclusion of all goods from live animals. Down and feathers may neither come from moulting nor from live plucking. Accredited independent auditing organisations are responsible for monitoring and inspecting the manufacturers' supply chains on site worldwide. Intensified monitoring of high-risk areas is mandatory, but its frequency is left to the discretion of the auditors, who inspect farms both announced and unannounced.

Down and feathers, which are used as filling material for DOWNPASS labelled finished products, may only be obtained after slaughter. This must be clearly verifiable. In this respect, all poultry farms that have animals slaughtered for the purpose of food production are covered - regardless of whether these come from parent or rearing farms or from farms that both rear ducklings and goslings besides keeping parent animals.

Parent vs. rearing farms - new mandatory requirement
The vast majority of all poultry farms raise chicks themselves for food or to keep them later as adults for egg laying. So, when the current DOWNPASS speaks of rearing farms or rearing, the term always covers both variants.
Pure parent farms that do not raise chicks themselves but buy in the adult ducks and geese to lay eggs are rare. For this, the standard had an optional additional module that referred to waterfowl, i.e. jointly to ducks and geese.

Since live plucking of ducks is not known and this has been confirmed by veterinarians and agronomists, the DOWNPASS 2019 had enabled the optional auditing of pure goose parent stock farms, being no rearing farms, via an annex. This hitherto voluntary option has been tested in practice over the past three years and met with consistently positive feedback from both producers and trade partners. Therefore, the auditing of goose farms will be a mandatory part of the new version of the DOWNPASS standard in the future. The option for the voluntary goose parent audit will be dropped as well as the one for the simultaneous auditing of duck and goose parent farms.

Source:

Downpass e.V.

Photo: Euratex
26.10.2022

EURATEX & ATP Convention successfully concluded in Porto

  • European textile industry needs to prepare for a paradigm shift, and become global leader in sustainable textiles

Organised by EURATEX in partnership with the Portuguese Textile Association (ATP), the Porto Convention – Sustainability meets Competitiveness: How to Square the Circle? – took place on 13-14 October in Porto, Portugal, with nearly 250 entrepreneurs attending from all over Europe. They discussed the current challenges of the European textile industry and set the grounds for a bright future, based on some strong foundations: innovation, creativity, quality and sustainability.

In his keynote speech, Mr. Pedro Siza Vieira, Former Minister for the Economy and Digital Transition of Portugal, assessed the geopolitical and macroeconomics changes, and how this will impact on the future of the textile industry: nearshoring and friend-shoring, independence from foreign gas through the use of European sustainable energy, as well as circular and automated production lines. While the current turbulence causes uncertainty, he sees a better future for our industry.

  • European textile industry needs to prepare for a paradigm shift, and become global leader in sustainable textiles

Organised by EURATEX in partnership with the Portuguese Textile Association (ATP), the Porto Convention – Sustainability meets Competitiveness: How to Square the Circle? – took place on 13-14 October in Porto, Portugal, with nearly 250 entrepreneurs attending from all over Europe. They discussed the current challenges of the European textile industry and set the grounds for a bright future, based on some strong foundations: innovation, creativity, quality and sustainability.

In his keynote speech, Mr. Pedro Siza Vieira, Former Minister for the Economy and Digital Transition of Portugal, assessed the geopolitical and macroeconomics changes, and how this will impact on the future of the textile industry: nearshoring and friend-shoring, independence from foreign gas through the use of European sustainable energy, as well as circular and automated production lines. While the current turbulence causes uncertainty, he sees a better future for our industry.

The first CEO Panel, addressing the theme of How to Measure and Communicate about Sustainability, focused on the challenges to translate “sustainability” towards the consumers. The panel addressed the issue of greenwashing and the role of brands in communicating about sustainability. It looked at how the new European Commission regulations on eco-label, digital product passport (DPP) and product environmental footprint (PEF) will create a new framework.

The second CEO Panel, discussing Financing Sustainability, looked at the cost of sustainable investments, and how this cost should be managed within the entire supply chain, including the brands and retailers.

Four workshops with industry experts followed in the afternoon, addressing the themes of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) in Textiles, Digital Product Passport (DPP), Recycling Textile Waste and Labelling Textiles (Product Environmental Footprint). As these initiatives will roll out in the coming years – as part of the EU Textile Strategy – participants got a better understanding of the future framework for our industry.

Dirk Vantyghem, Director General of EURATEX, commented on this: “to prepare for a brighter future requires a new regulatory framework, where quality and durability become the norm, where transparency and sustainability is rewarded, where free riders – who do not comply with rules and standards – are kept outside the market. The EU Textile Strategy aims at creating such a framework, which must be fair and balanced, and requires a close and constant dialogue between the regulator and the industry.”

During the 2nd day of the convention, participants had the opportunity to visit state of the art textile companies (Têxteis J.F. Almeida, RIOPELE, and TMG Automotive) and the Portuguese textile  research centre CITEVE. They showcased how the Portuguese textile industry is making this transition, while remaining globally competitive.

Alberto Paccanelli, President of EURATEX, concluded: “We need to attract creative people in our companies, we need to produce top class quality products, and we need to become more sustainable. That is the recipe for our success in a globalised and highly competitive industry.” Paccanelli is positive about the future: “While we face very tough times, I am optimistic about the future of our European textile industry. The rest of the world is watching us, as we move forward with our strategy. We should become their benchmark and Europe should become a global leader in sustainable textiles.”

 

Source:

Euratex

Dr. Isabella Tonaco Photo: SCTI
13.10.2022

Isabella Tonaco Executive Director at SCTI

Sustainable Chemistry for the Textile Industry (SCTI™) has appointed Dr. Isabella Tonaco as Executive Director, effective November 1, 2022. With a mandate to inspire and trigger action at a global level, she will lead SCTI to drive transformational change in the textile and leather industries.
 
Launched two years ago by seven of the world's leading chemical companies, the SCTI Alliance aims to enable brands, retailers and manufacturers to apply cutting-edge sustainable chemistry solutions that enhance the well-being of factory workers, local communities, consumers and the planet.
 
Dr. Tonaco will oversee SCTI activities to implement this mission. Based in Germany, she will work with SCTI member companies and stakeholders across the textile and leather value chain to help the industry achieve the highest levels of sustainability. Dr. Tonaco will report to the SCTI Executive Committee.
 

Sustainable Chemistry for the Textile Industry (SCTI™) has appointed Dr. Isabella Tonaco as Executive Director, effective November 1, 2022. With a mandate to inspire and trigger action at a global level, she will lead SCTI to drive transformational change in the textile and leather industries.
 
Launched two years ago by seven of the world's leading chemical companies, the SCTI Alliance aims to enable brands, retailers and manufacturers to apply cutting-edge sustainable chemistry solutions that enhance the well-being of factory workers, local communities, consumers and the planet.
 
Dr. Tonaco will oversee SCTI activities to implement this mission. Based in Germany, she will work with SCTI member companies and stakeholders across the textile and leather value chain to help the industry achieve the highest levels of sustainability. Dr. Tonaco will report to the SCTI Executive Committee.
 
Dr. Tonaco has more than a decade of experience in sustainability and has held various strategic and commercial roles in the chemical industry. Most recently, she was Vice President of Strategy Execution and Marketing for Renewable Polymers & Chemicals at Neste, a global leader in renewable and circular solutions. Previously, Dr. Tonaco worked for BASF, where she established and executed the company's global leadership position in certified sustainable palm-based ingredients for the Personal Care industry.

(c) INDIA
13.10.2022

Finalists for Hygienix Innovation Award™ announced

  • Absorbent Hygiene Products Featuring Advanced Technology Announced:
    pH monitoring pantyliner (Kimberly-Clark), roll dispensing period product (Egal Pad) and novel potty training pad (Sposie Kids)

Three new absorbent disposable hygiene products that provide users with greater protection, convenience and discretion are the finalists for the Hygienix Innovation Award™ that will be selected at Hygienix™, the premier event for absorbent hygiene and personal care markets, Nov. 14-17, at The Roosevelt New Orleans Hotel.

The annual award recognizes and rewards innovation that uses nonwoven material or technology in a way that provides consumer benefit and expands its usage.  
Each of the companies will present their products during the event on Nov. 15 and INDA’s Director of Education & Technical Affairs Matt O’Sickey will announce the winner on Nov. 17, at 11:30 a.m. to conclude Hygienix™.  

  • Absorbent Hygiene Products Featuring Advanced Technology Announced:
    pH monitoring pantyliner (Kimberly-Clark), roll dispensing period product (Egal Pad) and novel potty training pad (Sposie Kids)

Three new absorbent disposable hygiene products that provide users with greater protection, convenience and discretion are the finalists for the Hygienix Innovation Award™ that will be selected at Hygienix™, the premier event for absorbent hygiene and personal care markets, Nov. 14-17, at The Roosevelt New Orleans Hotel.

The annual award recognizes and rewards innovation that uses nonwoven material or technology in a way that provides consumer benefit and expands its usage.  
Each of the companies will present their products during the event on Nov. 15 and INDA’s Director of Education & Technical Affairs Matt O’Sickey will announce the winner on Nov. 17, at 11:30 a.m. to conclude Hygienix™.  

Egal Pads: Pads on a Roll™ –A wrapped super-thin absorbent period pad that dispenses like toilet paper in public bathroom stalls, preventing the personal embarrassment of not having a menstrual product when needed. This product promotes period product accessibility and destigmatizes menstrual health. It is targeted to schools and universities and the away-from-home market.

Kimberly-Clark: Kotex® Pantyliner with pH Indicator – The new Kotex Pantyliner with pH indicator, shifts color at the moment it needs to be replaced. This technology works by changing the color from yellow to blue when activated by fluids such as urine, sweat, or others. By indicating the moment to change the product, helps to maintain the intimate area clean, fresh, and consequently healthy.

Sposie Kids: Sposie® Dribbles® Potty Training Pads – An absorbent potty training pad that adheres to boy’s and girl’s underwear to protect against leaks and accidents during the transition from diapers to underwear, while still providing physical cues to the wearer to promote potty training.  The pads absorb over half of an average 2-year-old’s bladder capacity and are 100 percent free from any fragrance, latex, and chlorine.

Hygienix™ Conference Highlights
In addition to the award presentation, the Hygienix™ conference will focus on sustainability with presentations by more than 20 industry experts on sustainable inputs, natural fibers, product transparency, reusable menstrual products, recyclable diapers and the latest market forecasts and insights into consumer buying trends.
Hygienix™ will also offer two specialized workshops, a myriad of business connection opportunities, a welcome reception, first-time attendee mentorship program, and two evenings of tabletop receptions.

More information:
Hygienix India
Source:

INDIA

10.10.2022

OETI: 55 years of testing, certifying, accreditation and notification

As an accredited testing and certification body, the “OETI - Institut fuer Oekologie, Technik und Innovation GmbH“ (OETI for short) has been successfully responding to prevailing market requirements for 55 years and, in the process, has made a name for itself worldwide. To mark its anniversary, this international centre of excellence with its origins in Austria is taking a look back at the most important milestones in its history as well as providing interesting insights into future developments.

As renowned flooring manufacturers founded the Austrian Carpet Institute on 25th of September 1967, no one could have imagined how successful the company would become. But even back then, one thing was clear to the experts: the need to establish a carpet research and testing centre in the form of an association. Today, over five decades later, OETI is a testing and certification services provider for OEKO-TEX® certificates and labels, textiles, leather, due diligence along the textile and leather supply chain as well as for personal protective equipment (PPE), flooring technology, furnishings and indoor air quality.

As an accredited testing and certification body, the “OETI - Institut fuer Oekologie, Technik und Innovation GmbH“ (OETI for short) has been successfully responding to prevailing market requirements for 55 years and, in the process, has made a name for itself worldwide. To mark its anniversary, this international centre of excellence with its origins in Austria is taking a look back at the most important milestones in its history as well as providing interesting insights into future developments.

As renowned flooring manufacturers founded the Austrian Carpet Institute on 25th of September 1967, no one could have imagined how successful the company would become. But even back then, one thing was clear to the experts: the need to establish a carpet research and testing centre in the form of an association. Today, over five decades later, OETI is a testing and certification services provider for OEKO-TEX® certificates and labels, textiles, leather, due diligence along the textile and leather supply chain as well as for personal protective equipment (PPE), flooring technology, furnishings and indoor air quality.

In 1992, OETI was a founding member of the ‘International OEKO-TEX® Association for Research and Testing in the Field of Textile and Leather Ecology’ with independent certifications and product labels. Ever since, OEKO-TEX® has enabled companies along the textile and leather supply chain and every consumer to make responsible decisions for safe, environmentally friendly and fairly manufactured products.

In line with its focus on sustainability, OETI and its Swiss parent company, TESTEX AG, wanted to build the new OETI headquarters using low energy construction techniques and ensure its carbon-neutral operation. To achieve these goals, the highest possible thermal insulation and energy optimisation standards were applied, while the carbon-neutral power supply is generated by its in-house photovoltaics system as well as domestic renewable energy.

The new headquarters, which the company moved into in 2021, provides space for 75 employees over 2,500m2 and boasts bright and perfectly equipped office areas. The laboratory areas, the analytical/chemical laboratory and the physical / fire laboratory were also designed based on the latest methods and technologies. This makes OETI, alongside its Swiss parent company TESTEX, the second fully fledged laboratory site in the entire, global TESTEX Group.

More information:
OETI Testex
Source:

OETI

(c) INDA
07.10.2022

INDA: Highlights of the 12th edition of RISE®

  • DiaperRecycle Wins RISE® Innovation Award for Technology that Transforms Used Diapers into Cat Litter

Product development and innovators in nonwovens & engineered materials gained expert insights on material science innovation and sustainability at the 12th edition of RISE® — Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics conference, organized by INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, and The Nonwovens Institute, North Carolina State University, Sept. 27-28 at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC.

More than 20 industry, academic, and government experts from across the globe presented technical developments in sessions focused on circularity and sustainable inputs from such sources as Polylactic Acid Polymers (PLA), natural fibers, biofibers, and waste products.

  • DiaperRecycle Wins RISE® Innovation Award for Technology that Transforms Used Diapers into Cat Litter

Product development and innovators in nonwovens & engineered materials gained expert insights on material science innovation and sustainability at the 12th edition of RISE® — Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics conference, organized by INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, and The Nonwovens Institute, North Carolina State University, Sept. 27-28 at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC.

More than 20 industry, academic, and government experts from across the globe presented technical developments in sessions focused on circularity and sustainable inputs from such sources as Polylactic Acid Polymers (PLA), natural fibers, biofibers, and waste products.

Highlights included presentations on Achieving Supply Chain Circularity, by Kat Knauer, Ph.D., Program Manager – V Research, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL; The Global Plastic Crisis: Winners/Losers in the Marketplace, by Bryan Haynes, Ph.D., Senior Technical Director, Global Nonwovens, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; Sustainable Fibers – Development and the Future by Jason Locklin, Ph.D. Director, University of Georgia – New Materials Institute; PLA & PLA Blends: Practical Aspects of Extrusion by Behnam Pourdeyhimi, Ph.D., William A. Klopman Distinguished Professor, and Executive Director, The Nonwovens Institute, North Carolina State University; and Mitigation of Quat Incompatibility with Cotton and other Cellulosic-based Substrates, by Doug Hinchliffe, Ph.D., Research Molecular Biologist, USDA-ARS.

RISE® Innovation Award Winner
DiaperRecycle was awarded the RISE® Innovation Award for its innovative technology to recycle used diapers into absorbent and flushable cat litter. The annual award recognizes innovation in areas within and on the periphery of the nonwovens industry that use advanced science and engineering principles to develop unique or intricate solutions to problems and advance  nonwovens usage.

By diverting used diapers from households and institutions, and separating the plastic and fiber, DiaperRecycle strives to decrease the climate-changing emissions of diapers from landfills.  “I am thrilled and grateful to win this award — as it proves we are on the right track,” said Cynthia Wallis Barnicoat, CEO of DiaperRecycle.

Other award finalists included Binder BioHook® by Gottlieb Binder GmbH & Co. KG and Sero® hemp fibers from Bast Fibre Technologies, Inc. (BFT).

The 13th edition of RISE® — Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics conference will be held Sept. 12-13, 2023 at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC.

Source:

INDA

04.10.2022

EURATEX response to the latest EU Energy Council decision

  • More ambition and joint European efforts needed

On Friday 30 September, the EU Energy ministers approved a Council Regulation proposal to address high energy prices. The Regulation focusses on the electricity prices and electricity demand reduction, on a solidarity levy from the fossil fuel sector and a retail levy for SMEs. While these initiatives are driven by goodwill, they miss the point of bringing gas prices down – the one measure that would bring the biggest impact on European industry.

EURATEX – as the voice of the European apparel and textiles manufacturers – regrets this lack of ambition: the Regulation does not foresee any meaningful action to directly support the European industry. This can accelerate the de-industrialisation of Europe and loss of industrial capacity to secure the European standard of living and implementing the Green Deal.

“We call on the EU and Member States to pursue our common European interests. The hesitation to adopt a European price cap on natural gas, accompanied by massive national spending programs to subsidise domestic gas consumption, is a dereliction of duty”, said Director General Dirk Vantyghem.

  • More ambition and joint European efforts needed

On Friday 30 September, the EU Energy ministers approved a Council Regulation proposal to address high energy prices. The Regulation focusses on the electricity prices and electricity demand reduction, on a solidarity levy from the fossil fuel sector and a retail levy for SMEs. While these initiatives are driven by goodwill, they miss the point of bringing gas prices down – the one measure that would bring the biggest impact on European industry.

EURATEX – as the voice of the European apparel and textiles manufacturers – regrets this lack of ambition: the Regulation does not foresee any meaningful action to directly support the European industry. This can accelerate the de-industrialisation of Europe and loss of industrial capacity to secure the European standard of living and implementing the Green Deal.

“We call on the EU and Member States to pursue our common European interests. The hesitation to adopt a European price cap on natural gas, accompanied by massive national spending programs to subsidise domestic gas consumption, is a dereliction of duty”, said Director General Dirk Vantyghem.

Triggering competition among Member States rather than promoting cooperation in bringing gas prices down for all European companies will also prove ineffective: indeed, the industrial structure in the European Union is fully integrated. Once a segment of the value chain perishes because of the crisis in one country, all companies based in the EU will suffer its negative effect, driving prices up in the supply chain and adding further strain to our operations. The European industry will be saved as a unified industry, or it will not be saved at all. Fragmenting the internal market will not protect any Member State’s domestic manufacturing.

In addition to a EU-wide price cap on gas, EURATEX calls on the European Commission to swiftly amend the Temporary Crisis Framework, making sure the criteria and thresholds applied do not exclude vulnerable companies from possible support (e.g. in textile finishing and services). Euratex also encourages the European Commission to revise the ETS Indirect Carbon Leakage mechanism and include the man-made fibres, non-wovens, spinning and weaving sectors.

It is high time now for the European Union, said the association – in particular for Member States and the Commission – to step up their ambition and adopt a European vision: a chaotic and fragmented approach will not mitigate the crisis but accelerate it.

Source:

Euratex

Susan Gabler und Johannes Leis vom STFI bei Untersuchungen zum Recycling smarter Textilien. Foto: Sächsisches Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI)
Susan Gabler und Johannes Leis vom STFI bei Untersuchungen zum Recycling smarter Textilien.
20.09.2022

SmartERZ-Projekt zum Recycling von Smart Composites

Im Automobilbau, dem Schiffsbau und der Luftfahrtindustrie sowie bei Windenergieanlagen steigen die Materialanforderungen zusehends. Die verwendeten Werkstoffe sollen leicht, ressourcenschonend und gleichzeitig hochbelastbar sein. Faserverstärkte Kunststoffe (Composites) rücken immer mehr in den Vordergrund, da deren Eigenschaften in Kombination mit Glas- oder Carbonfasern metallischen Materialien oftmals überlegen sind. Mit Fokus auf die klimaneutrale Herstellung und Nutzung von Produkten wächst auch der Bedarf an Recyclinglösungen. Im SmartERZ-Projekt TRICYCLE arbeiten Unternehmen gemeinsam an geeigneten skalierbaren und wirtschaftlich tragfähigen Prozessen zum Recycling von Smart Composites. Momentan gibt es dafür keine Anbieter oder Konzepte am Markt.

Im Automobilbau, dem Schiffsbau und der Luftfahrtindustrie sowie bei Windenergieanlagen steigen die Materialanforderungen zusehends. Die verwendeten Werkstoffe sollen leicht, ressourcenschonend und gleichzeitig hochbelastbar sein. Faserverstärkte Kunststoffe (Composites) rücken immer mehr in den Vordergrund, da deren Eigenschaften in Kombination mit Glas- oder Carbonfasern metallischen Materialien oftmals überlegen sind. Mit Fokus auf die klimaneutrale Herstellung und Nutzung von Produkten wächst auch der Bedarf an Recyclinglösungen. Im SmartERZ-Projekt TRICYCLE arbeiten Unternehmen gemeinsam an geeigneten skalierbaren und wirtschaftlich tragfähigen Prozessen zum Recycling von Smart Composites. Momentan gibt es dafür keine Anbieter oder Konzepte am Markt.

Smart Composites bestehen aus Werkstoffen, deren Funktionalisierung durch die Integration oder Applikation elektrisch leitfähiger Komponenten, z. B. Sensoren oder Mikroprozessoren, erreicht wird. Dazu zählen zum Beispiel smarte Textilien, die elektronisch wärmen, Lichtsignale geben oder zur Datenübertragung genutzt werden können. Das breite Anwendungsspektrum und die vielseitigen Einsatzgebiete dieser intelligenten Verbundwerkstoffe und Multimaterialverbunde werden perspektivisch zu einem wachsenden Bedarf und einer stärkeren Nachfrage führen.

Die funktionale und vielschichtige Verbindung verschiedener Materialien wie Kunststoff, Metall und Textil wirft beim Thema Recycling Nachhaltigkeitsfragen auf. Im Erzgebirge werden dafür bereits heute Lösungen entwickelt. Im Rahmen des WIR!-Projektes SmartERZ ist das Verbundprojekt TRICYCLE entstanden. Mit dem Fokus auf den Strukturwandel im Erzgebirge haben sich acht ortsansässige Partner aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft zusammengetan, um ein Recyclingkonzept aufzustellen und die Grobplanung für ein erzgebirgisches Recycling Center zu entwickeln. Das Ende des Produktlebenszyklus und die Nachnutzung bzw. Wiederaufbereitung stehen dabei im Mittelpunkt des Entwicklungsprozesses. Im Ergebnis sollen effektive und maßgeschneiderte Maßnahmen für eine möglichst hochwertige Wiederverwendung entstehen. Diese sollen dem steigenden Aufkommen an Abfällen aus diesem wachsenden Bereich der deutschen Industrie begegnen und anwendungsbereit sein.

Klassische Herausforderungen für die Projektbeteiligten sind die irreversiblen Verbindungstechniken (z. B. Kleben, Faser-Matrix-Haftung), die Integration vieler verschiedener Materialien in geringen Mengen sowie Form und Größe der Bauteile. Eigene Untersuchungen sowie Feedback von Partnerunternehmen bestätigen die Notwendigkeit sowie den Nutzen eines passgenauen Recyclingprozesses für Smart Composites und intelligente Multimaterialverbünde. Das Projekt soll dazu beitragen, den Wirtschaftsstandort Erzgebirge attraktiver und zukunftsfähiger zu gestalten.

Am 1. September 2021 gestartet, kann TRICYCLE erste Ergebnisse vorweisen. Zunächst wurden die Bedarfe bei mittelständischen Unternehmen in der Region Erzgebirge abgefragt, um die aktuellen Gegebenheiten und den Status quo in Bezug auf technologische Recyclingkonzepte bestmöglich abzubilden. Für ein fundiertes Recyclingkonzept hat das TRICYCLE-Team drei Referenzbauteile für den vorgesehenen Prozess ermittelt, die in der erzgebirgischen Wirtschaft Verwendung finden, und folgenden Bereichen zugeordnet: Automotive, Technische Textilien mit applizierter Zusatzfunktion und Technische Textilien mit integrierter Zusatzfunktion.

Basierend auf dieser Auswahl, analysiert das Projektteam momentan die Herstellungs- und bisherigen Recyclingprozesse der Referenzbauteile. Das beinhaltet auch die Planung praktischer Versuche zum Recycling. Dabei fokussieren sich die Projektpartner auf ihr Know-how in verschiedenen chemischen, thermischen und mechanischen Prozessen zur Separierung, Rückführung und Wiederverwendung der eingesetzten Materialien. Um die Produkte den Recyclingtechnologien zugänglich zu machen, wurde die Herangehensweise innerhalb des Projekts angepasst, da insbesondere Textil aufgrund von Form und Struktur (z. B. endlose Struktur) herausfordernd sein kann.

Obwohl die Materialien selbst recycelbar sind, müssen diese dennoch für den Prozess optimal vorbereitet bzw. fachgerecht aufbereitet werden. Die Expertise und die Technologiekompetenz, die hierfür benötigt werden, ist bei den beteiligten Projektpartnern durch jahrzehntelange Erfahrung und zahlreiche Innovationen vorhanden. Das Zusammenspiel aller Beteiligten im Projekt TRICYCLE stellt bereits jetzt die Weichen für das geplante Recycling Center, um dieses später zum Drehkreuz zwischen regionalen Produktionsunternehmen und dem Recycling weiterzuentwickeln. Dieses soll als „Open Factory“ aufgebaut werden, um den Unternehmen des SmartERZ-Bündnisses bzw. perspektivisch der Region Erzgebirge eine gemeinsame Nutzung zu ermöglichen.

„Die Wiederverwendung der eingesetzten Ressourcen ist sowohl aus ökonomischer als auch aus ökologischer Sicht zwingend geboten. Momentan gibt es weder Anlagenbauer noch Dienstleistungsanbieter mit den entsprechenden Kompetenzen zum Recycling von Smart Composites oder Multimaterialverbünden am Markt,“ stellt Johannes Leis, der Verbundkoordinator vom Sächsischen Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI) in Chemnitz fest.Unter Leitung des STFI als Verbundkoordinator mit seiner über 30-jährigen Erfahrung in der Textilbranche und speziellem Know-how im Recycling von Carbonabfällen haben sich weitere Unternehmen und Forschungseinrichtungen zusammengefunden. Dazu zählen das Textilunternehmen Curt Bauer GmbH, die Professur Fabrikplanung und Fabrikbetrieb der TU Chemnitz, das Ingenieurbüro Matthias Weißflog, der Hersteller für Faserverbundbauteile Cotesa GmbH, der Spezialvlieshersteller Norafin Industries (Germany) GmbH, das Recyclingunternehmen Becker Umweltdienste GmbH und die Hörmann Rawema Engineering & Consulting GmbH. Am Ende der Projektlaufzeit sollen ein einsatzfähiges, technologisches Recyclingkonzept für die zukünftigen entstehenden smarten Produkte sowie die in der Produktion entstehenden Abfälle (bspw. durch fehlerhafte Bauteile und Randbeschnitte) und ein Konzept für den Aufbau eines Recycling Centers vorliegen, das im Erzgebirge entstehen soll.

Photo Pixabay
16.09.2022

Euratex, EuroCoton, Edana, CIRFS and ETSA join forces for the European Textile Industry

The associations published a joint European textiles industry statement on the energy package claiming incisive actions with no further delay.
Here is the statement in full:

Last month, when gas wholesale prices reached the record level of 340€/MWh – triggering also sky-high electricity prices – the European textiles industry called on the European Union to adopt a wholesale price cap for gas, the revision of the merit-order principle in the electricity market, support for SMEs and a single European strategy. On 14 September 2022, on the occasion of the State of the Union address by President Von der Leyen, the Commission announced initiatives aimed at tackling the dramatic energy crisis that the Europe is facing.

We, the European associations representing the whole textiles’ ecosystem,  welcome these proposals by the Commission to change the TTF benchmark parameters and decouple the TTF from the electricity market and the revision of the merit-order principle for the electricity market, which is no longer serving the purpose it was designed for.

The associations published a joint European textiles industry statement on the energy package claiming incisive actions with no further delay.
Here is the statement in full:

Last month, when gas wholesale prices reached the record level of 340€/MWh – triggering also sky-high electricity prices – the European textiles industry called on the European Union to adopt a wholesale price cap for gas, the revision of the merit-order principle in the electricity market, support for SMEs and a single European strategy. On 14 September 2022, on the occasion of the State of the Union address by President Von der Leyen, the Commission announced initiatives aimed at tackling the dramatic energy crisis that the Europe is facing.

We, the European associations representing the whole textiles’ ecosystem,  welcome these proposals by the Commission to change the TTF benchmark parameters and decouple the TTF from the electricity market and the revision of the merit-order principle for the electricity market, which is no longer serving the purpose it was designed for.

We also welcome the proposal to amend the state-aid framework that, in our view, should include the textiles finishing, the textiles services and the nonwoven sectors as well as a simplification of the application requirements. Furthermore, we call for a uniform implementation across the EU.

However, we acknowledge that the Commission proposal lacks in ambition and – if confirmed – it will come at the cost of losing European industrial capacity and European jobs. Ultimately, Europe will remain without its integrated textiles ecosystem, as we know it today, and no mean to translate into reality the EU textiles strategy, for more sustainable and circular textiles products.

An ambitious and meaningful European price cap on the wholesale price of natural gas is absolutely necessary. Europe is running out of time to save its own industry. It is now time to act swiftly, decisively in unity and solidarity at European level. We understand a very high price cap has been so far discussed among Ministries and that is not reassuring for companies across Europe: if any cap is, as expected, above 100/MWh, these businesses will collapse.

Already in March 2022, with EU gas wholesale prices at 200€/MWh, the business case for keeping textiles production was no longer there. To date, natural gas wholesale prices have reached the level of 340€/MWh, more than 15 times higher compared to 2021! Currently, many businesses have suspended their production processes to avoid the loss of tens of thousands of euros every day. We hope this will not become the new normal and – to reduce the likelihood of such a scenario – we call on the Commission, the EU Council and the Parliament to swiftly adopt decisive, impactful and concrete actions to tackle the energy crisis and ensure the survival of the European industry.

Given the dire international competition in which the EU textiles industry operates, it is not possible to just pass on the increased costs to consumers. Yet, with these sky-high prices, our companies cannot afford to absorb those costs. The EU textiles companies are mainly SMEs that do not have the financial structure to absorb such a shock.  In contrast with such reality in Europe, the wholesale price of gas in the US and China is 10€/MWh, whereas in Turkey the price is 25€/MWh. If the EU does not act, our international competitors will easily replace us in the market, resulting in the de-industrialisation of Europe and a worsened reliance on foreign imports of essential products.

Specific segments of the textile industry are particularly vulnerable:

  • The man-made fibres (MMF) industry for instance is an energy intensive sector and a major consumer of natural gas and electricity in the manufacturing of its fibres. Not only is it being affected by higher energy process, it is also experiencing shortages and sharply rising costs of its raw materials.
  • For the nonwovens segment, production processes – which use both fibres and filaments extruded in situ – are also highly dependent on gas and electricity. Polymers melting and extrusion, fibres carding, web-forming, web-bonding and drying are energy-intensive techniques. Nonwoven materials can be found in many applications crucial to citizens like in healthcare (face masks) or automotive (batteries).
  • It also is to be noted that for some segments the use of gas has no technological substitute: for example, the dyeing and finishing production units make very intense use of gas. These production units are mainly composed by boilers and driers, which only work on gas and there is no alternative technology.
  • The textile services sector is also struggling: with the critical nature of the service they provide, they require a considerable amount of energy to keep services, particularly hospitals and care homes stocked with lifesaving material as well as clothing and bed linens for the patients themselves. Losing these businesses would cause a lack of clothing for healthcare professionals, including protective sanitary gowns for surgeons, nurses and doctors, uniforms including other forms of personal protective equipment.
Source:

Euratex

Matt O’Sickey Photo: INDA
Matt O’Sickey
12.09.2022

Matt O’Sickey INDA’s New Director of Education & Technical Affairs

  • Experienced nonwovens professional with extensive hygiene, food, medical, and packaging background will strengthen INDA’s key member service areas

INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, announced the appointment of Matt O’Sickey, Ph.D., as its new Director of Education & Technical Affairs. An accomplished market development, technology and product management executive, O’Sickey has more than 20 years of experience with Tredegar Film Products in the absorbent hygiene, food, and medical sectors.

Most recently, he held Director positions at RKW-North America in the areas of research and development, product design, application engineering, site operations, quality, and technology with a focus on breathable, and lamination films for controlled atmosphere packaging.

At INDA, O’Sickey will direct and expand workforce development programs for all industry members, manage the international harmonized standards activities, and play a leadership role in INDA’s product stewardship working groups and conference content development committees.  

  • Experienced nonwovens professional with extensive hygiene, food, medical, and packaging background will strengthen INDA’s key member service areas

INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, announced the appointment of Matt O’Sickey, Ph.D., as its new Director of Education & Technical Affairs. An accomplished market development, technology and product management executive, O’Sickey has more than 20 years of experience with Tredegar Film Products in the absorbent hygiene, food, and medical sectors.

Most recently, he held Director positions at RKW-North America in the areas of research and development, product design, application engineering, site operations, quality, and technology with a focus on breathable, and lamination films for controlled atmosphere packaging.

At INDA, O’Sickey will direct and expand workforce development programs for all industry members, manage the international harmonized standards activities, and play a leadership role in INDA’s product stewardship working groups and conference content development committees.  

O’Sickey has a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering and a Master’s degree in Engineering Administration, both from Virginia Tech as well as a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from Purdue University. He holds three U.S. patents. He will operate out of INDA’s offices in Cary, NC.

O’Sickey succeeds Chris Plotz who left INDA to pursue other interests. 

More information:
INDA nonwovens Matt O’Sickey
Source:

INDA

(c) Chetna Organic / GoodTextiles Foundation
08.09.2022

GoodTextiles Foundation supports Indian village with cows

The GoodTextiles Foundation, initiated by Dibella, has implemented a new support project in India: Each family of a small village community of organic farmers received a cow from the donations received. The herd of fifty animals helps with farming, gives milk, produces sufficient natural fertilizer and should soon provide higher crop yields and a better income.

In 2016, Dibella established the GoodTextiles Foundation with the aim of making textile value chains more sustainable. It raises funds and implements its own support projects to benefit people at all stages of the textile economy. The most recent project, "One cow for every family," has now taken the first, important intermediate step: Fifty cows arrived in the small village of Aliguda Village (Utnoor Division, Adilabad, Telangana, India) at the beginning of June 2022.

The GoodTextiles Foundation, initiated by Dibella, has implemented a new support project in India: Each family of a small village community of organic farmers received a cow from the donations received. The herd of fifty animals helps with farming, gives milk, produces sufficient natural fertilizer and should soon provide higher crop yields and a better income.

In 2016, Dibella established the GoodTextiles Foundation with the aim of making textile value chains more sustainable. It raises funds and implements its own support projects to benefit people at all stages of the textile economy. The most recent project, "One cow for every family," has now taken the first, important intermediate step: Fifty cows arrived in the small village of Aliguda Village (Utnoor Division, Adilabad, Telangana, India) at the beginning of June 2022.

"Some of our organic cotton is grown on the farms of the village community managed by the smallholder organization Chetna Organic. During the filming of the German documentary "plan b", the farmers told us that they need more natural fertilizer to cultivate their fields ecologically and economically. The biggest wish of each family is therefore a cow. However, they cannot afford this because of the high price of the equivalent of 300 euros. That's how the idea for our next sponsorship project was born," reports Ralf Hellmann, managing director of Dibella and member of the foundation's board of directors.

In addition to the most important reason for purchase - the production of fertilizer - the cows also serve as livestock. They are harnessed in front of the plow and make the strenuous work of tilling the soil easier for the farmers. As draft animals they serve to transport heavier loads, and as milk suppliers they contribute to a family's food supply. Surplus milk that is not needed in the household also provides families with an important additional income through sale.

More information:
GoodTextiles Dibella donations cotton
Source:

GoodTextiles Foundation

Photo: Swissmem
05.09.2022

Swiss Textile Machinery Association: Symposium in Indonesia

  • Free trade deal boosts export potential

The time is right for Swiss textile machinery companies to grow their export business with Indonesia – one of the world’s top 10 textile producers. A free trade agreement between the two countries came into force in 2021, and market analyses show that there is scope for a significant increase in business in textile and textile machinery sectors.

This was the background to a successful symposium in the Indonesian capital Jakarta last month when Swiss Textile Machinery Association members presented their products and innovations to an invited audience of 200 delegates from Indonesian textile companies.

The symposium audience was welcomed by Philippe Strub, of the Swiss Embassy in Indonesia; Ignatius Warsito, from the Indonesia Ministry of Industry’s Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Textile Industry branch; Anne Patricia Sutanto, of the Indonesian Textile Association (API); and Ernesto Maurer, President of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association.

Swiss companies taking part were: Stäubli, Zeta Datatec, Loepfe, Saurer, Benninger, Rieter, Bräcker, Jakob Müller, Maag, Uster and SERV.

  • Free trade deal boosts export potential

The time is right for Swiss textile machinery companies to grow their export business with Indonesia – one of the world’s top 10 textile producers. A free trade agreement between the two countries came into force in 2021, and market analyses show that there is scope for a significant increase in business in textile and textile machinery sectors.

This was the background to a successful symposium in the Indonesian capital Jakarta last month when Swiss Textile Machinery Association members presented their products and innovations to an invited audience of 200 delegates from Indonesian textile companies.

The symposium audience was welcomed by Philippe Strub, of the Swiss Embassy in Indonesia; Ignatius Warsito, from the Indonesia Ministry of Industry’s Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Textile Industry branch; Anne Patricia Sutanto, of the Indonesian Textile Association (API); and Ernesto Maurer, President of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association.

Swiss companies taking part were: Stäubli, Zeta Datatec, Loepfe, Saurer, Benninger, Rieter, Bräcker, Jakob Müller, Maag, Uster and SERV.

The presentations were followed by panel discussions with speakers, and there were also networking opportunities at the companies’ exhibition tables.

Also taking part in a panel at the event was Testex, the independent Swiss organisation which provides testing, certification, OEKO-TEX® and other labels for the textile industry. Discussion focused on the relevance of innovation in textile technology to sustainability and ‘saving the planet.’  

Recent years have seen an acceleration in trade relations between Switzerland and Indonesia, which in 2008 was classed as one of eight priority countries for economic development cooperation by SECO, the Swiss Secretariat for Economic Affairs, with a joint economic and trade commission established the following year.
Collaboration was heightened further in 2018 with a Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) for Indonesia with Switzerland and the other EFTA countries. This more extensive form of free trade agreement was accepted after a popular referendum, and ultimately came into force in November 2021.

Trading between the two countries is supported by SERV, the Swiss export risk insurance organisation. This insures export goods against political and commercial risks and facilitates credit.

Cornelia Buchwalder, Secretary General of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association, said the Indonesia Symposium was ideally-timed, right after the CEPA came into effect: “With the free trade agreement in place, there is even greater potential for the development of trade between our countries,” she said.

“Business in textile and textile machinery is actually below the relative market shares for the sectors, so this stronger cooperation is probably overdue. It was a successful symposium, with enthusiastic participation from Indonesian textile companies, so we are optimistic about future export prospects for Swiss textile machinery.”

Source:

Swissmem

31.08.2022

DNFI Award 2022 – Deadline 9 Sept

As every year, in 2022 the Discover Natural Fibers Initiative (DNFI) called on individuals, universities, textile researchers and companies to submit their products, projects, processes and ideas in the field of Natural Fibres from the following categories:

  • Innovative products, components or applications
  • Innovative processes and procedures
  • Innovative research and science

The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award aims to promote the development of new products/components and applications using natural fibres as well as new processes for manufacturing of environmental friendly products. Universities, institutes, industry and individuals working in the area of scientific research are invited to participate. “Sustainability” should be just one important aspect of each submission considered by the judges.

The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award aims to recognise the innovations as well as the people and institutions responsible for them with the goal of raising public awareness of the achievements of the natural fibre sector as a whole.

As every year, in 2022 the Discover Natural Fibers Initiative (DNFI) called on individuals, universities, textile researchers and companies to submit their products, projects, processes and ideas in the field of Natural Fibres from the following categories:

  • Innovative products, components or applications
  • Innovative processes and procedures
  • Innovative research and science

The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award aims to promote the development of new products/components and applications using natural fibres as well as new processes for manufacturing of environmental friendly products. Universities, institutes, industry and individuals working in the area of scientific research are invited to participate. “Sustainability” should be just one important aspect of each submission considered by the judges.

The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award aims to recognise the innovations as well as the people and institutions responsible for them with the goal of raising public awareness of the achievements of the natural fibre sector as a whole.

Get the details online.

More information:
DNFI DNFI award
Source:

European Industry and Research Exchange on Technical Textiles

26.08.2022

EURATEX: Future of the European textile & clothing industry is at stake

  • European Textile Industry calls for immediate action to tackle the energy crisis;

The European textile & fashion in Europe, represented by EURATEX, calls for a single European strategy to tackle this energy crisis. To safeguard the future of the industry, a revision of the electricity price mechanism is necessary and an EU wide cap on gas prices at 80€/MWh. Special company support needs to be granted to avoid bankruptcy and relocation of textile production outside Europe.

Gas and electricity prices have reached unprecedented levels in Europe. Due to severe global competition in the market that characterizes the European textile & clothing industry, these cost increases are impossible to pass on to customers. This has already led to capacity reductions and production stops. Closures and the shift of production outside Europe are being forecasted should the current situation persist, leading to further de-industrialization of our continent and increased dependency on external suppliers.

  • European Textile Industry calls for immediate action to tackle the energy crisis;

The European textile & fashion in Europe, represented by EURATEX, calls for a single European strategy to tackle this energy crisis. To safeguard the future of the industry, a revision of the electricity price mechanism is necessary and an EU wide cap on gas prices at 80€/MWh. Special company support needs to be granted to avoid bankruptcy and relocation of textile production outside Europe.

Gas and electricity prices have reached unprecedented levels in Europe. Due to severe global competition in the market that characterizes the European textile & clothing industry, these cost increases are impossible to pass on to customers. This has already led to capacity reductions and production stops. Closures and the shift of production outside Europe are being forecasted should the current situation persist, leading to further de-industrialization of our continent and increased dependency on external suppliers.

Specific segments of the textile industry are particularly vulnerable. The man-made fibres (MMF), synthetic and cellulose-based fibres, industry for instance is an energy intensive sector and a major consumer of natural gas in the manufacturing of its fibres. The disappearance of European fibre products would have immediate consequences for the textile industry and for society at large. The activities of textile dyeing and finishing are also relatively intensive in energy. These activities are essential in the textile value chain in order to give the textile products and garments added value through colour and special functionalities (e.g. for medical applications).

The European textile industry calls for an EU-wide cap on gas prices at €80/Mwh, and a revision of the price mechanism for the electricity market, to reduce the huge price gaps with our foreign competitors.

Governments should ensure that critical industries, such textiles and all its segments, are able to ensure gas and electricity contracts towards the end of the year at an affordable price. Stable and predictable energy supply is of the utmost importance. Gas restrictions and rationing must only be used as a last resort. No mandatory consumption cuts should be foreseen.

In addition to these measures under discussion, currently a proliferation of contradictory, uncoordinated national initiatives to tackle the energy crisis is observed. This has led to a de facto fragmentation of the Single Market, resulting in a chaotic policy and regulatory environment that adds a further strain on our supply chain, which is fully integrated at European level. Measures that guarantee a level playing field in the EU are utmost important.

EURATEX President Alberto Paccanelli explained: “Given the current situation, a scenario where entire segments of the textiles industry will disappear can no longer be excluded. This would lead to the loss of thousands of companies and tens of thousands of European jobs and would further aggravate the dependency of Europe to foreign sources of essential goods. This applies specifically to SMEs who need temporary support measures (e.g. state aids, tax relieves, energy price cap) to survive the current crisis and to prepare for the green transition in the longer run.”

More information:
Euratex energy supplies crisis
Source:

Euratex

(c) INDA
23.08.2022

INDA Announces the 2022 RISE® Innovation Award Finalists

  • Innovations in Recycling and Sustainability: Sustainable Diaper Components, Natural Fibers, and Kitty Litter from Recycled Nappies

INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, announced the three finalists that will present their innovative material science solutions as they compete for the prestigious RISE® Innovation Award during the 12th edition of the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics Conference (RISE®) to be held in person September 27-28, 2022 at North Carolina State University.  The award recognizes novel innovations within and on the periphery of the nonwovens industry that creatively use next-level science and engineering principles to solve material challenges and expand the usage of nonwovens and engineered fabrics.

  • Innovations in Recycling and Sustainability: Sustainable Diaper Components, Natural Fibers, and Kitty Litter from Recycled Nappies

INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry, announced the three finalists that will present their innovative material science solutions as they compete for the prestigious RISE® Innovation Award during the 12th edition of the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics Conference (RISE®) to be held in person September 27-28, 2022 at North Carolina State University.  The award recognizes novel innovations within and on the periphery of the nonwovens industry that creatively use next-level science and engineering principles to solve material challenges and expand the usage of nonwovens and engineered fabrics.

Finalists for the 2022 RISE® Innovation Award:
Cat Litter Made from Recycled Nappies – DiaperRecycle
DiaperRecycle has developed technology to recycle used diapers into cat litter. The aim of the company is to make an environmental impact and decrease the climate changing emissions of diaper waste. They’re diverting used diapers (used in households and businesses such as elder care) from landfill, separating the plastic and fiber and making cat litter. The plastic is prepared for recycling by plastics recyclers. The cat litter product is made by DiaperRecycle from the super absorbent fiber of diapers; it’s highly absorbent and flushable.

Biodegradable Diaper Components – Gottlieb Binder GmbH & Co. KG
Together, Avgol and Binder take on the challenge of disposable absorbent articles for the good of future generations and came up with sustainable diaper components. The technologies used are based on biotransformation technology, which makes it possible to achieve more sustainable products by supporting recycling and providing an alternative route for non-recyclable/fugitive waste management.

sero® hemp fibers – Bast Fibre Technologies, Inc.
Bast Fibre Technologies’ sero® hemp fibers offer the nonwoven industry an all-natural substitute for plastic fibers. From dedicated European- and US-based production facilities, BFT transforms raw bast fibers into premium natural fibers for applications ranging from single-use and durable wipes to industrial applications. Suitable for minority or majority blends, sero® hemp combines easily with standard nonwoven fibers to produce fabrics that meet the industry requirements for strength, uniformity, and processing efficiency.

RISE® conference attendees, technology scouts and product developers in the nonwoven/engineered fabrics industry seeking new developments to advance their businesses, will electronically vote for the recipient of the 2022 RISE® Innovation Award. The winner will be announced Wed., Sept. 28th.

Technical experts on INDA’s Technical Advisory Board selected three finalists from among 12 nominations.  The 22-member board of technical professionals is represented by companies such as Absorbent Hygiene Insights LLC, Attindas Hygiene Partners, Berry Global, Cotton Incorporated, Crown Abbey, LLC, The DAK Group, Fi-Tech, Inc. Freudenberg Performance Materials, Glatfelter Sontara Old Hickory, Inc., Lenzing Fibers, Inc., Natureworks LLC, Nice-Pak Products, Inc./PDI, Nonwovens by Design, Norafin (Americas) Inc., The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University, Poccia Consulting, LLC, The Procter & Gamble Company, RKW North America, Inc., Rockline Industries, Smith, Johnson & Associates, Suominen Corporation, and Texas Tech University.

“The RISE Conference recognizes and promotes innovation across the nonwoven and engineered material industry. Technology leaders will share invaluable information on innovative new approaches and concepts to resolve material science challenges. For any technical leader, technology scout or new product innovator, RISE is an event not to be missed,” said Tony Fragnito, INDA’s President.

The conference program will cover relevant and timely topics including: Creating a Circular Industry, Advancements in Sustainable Inputs in PLA, Developments in Natural Fibers I and II, Sustainable Inputs in Fibers and Biofibers, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products, and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

More information:
INDA RISE®
Source:

INDA

09.08.2022

NCTO: North Carolina Textile Executives highlight Importance of Industry

North Carolina textile executives spanning the fiber, yarn, fabric, and finished product textile industries participated in a roundtable discussion with Rep. Kathy Manning (D-NC), at which they discussed the innovative achievements and competitiveness of the domestic industry and outlined priority issues in Washington that impact their daily operations.

The roundtable discussion, hosted by Unifi Inc. and sponsored by the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), was held at Unifi’s headquarters in Greensboro, North Carolina.

North Carolina is the second largest state employer of textile-related jobs, employing more than 30,000 jobs in 2021, according to U.S. government data. The state’s $2.7 billion in textile-related exports leads the nation, according to U.S. government data.

Congresswoman Manning’s visit comes at a pivotal time for the U.S. textile supply chain, which produced $65.2 billion in output in 2021 and employed nearly 535,000 workers. The industry has been at the forefront of domestic manufacturing of over 1 billion personal protective equipment (PPE) items during the COVID-19 pandemic.

North Carolina textile executives spanning the fiber, yarn, fabric, and finished product textile industries participated in a roundtable discussion with Rep. Kathy Manning (D-NC), at which they discussed the innovative achievements and competitiveness of the domestic industry and outlined priority issues in Washington that impact their daily operations.

The roundtable discussion, hosted by Unifi Inc. and sponsored by the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), was held at Unifi’s headquarters in Greensboro, North Carolina.

North Carolina is the second largest state employer of textile-related jobs, employing more than 30,000 jobs in 2021, according to U.S. government data. The state’s $2.7 billion in textile-related exports leads the nation, according to U.S. government data.

Congresswoman Manning’s visit comes at a pivotal time for the U.S. textile supply chain, which produced $65.2 billion in output in 2021 and employed nearly 535,000 workers. The industry has been at the forefront of domestic manufacturing of over 1 billion personal protective equipment (PPE) items during the COVID-19 pandemic.

During the roundtable, North Carolina executives showcased the industry’s important contribution to the state and the U.S. economy as well as its advanced sustainability initiatives, while outlining critical policies, such as the importance of Buy American and Berry Amendment government procurement policies, maintaining strong rules of origins in free trade agreements, supporting a domestic PPE production sector, and the need to address larger systemic trade issues with China.

“In North Carolina, the textile industry is woven into the very fabric of our state and economy, with more than 33,000 workers employed in over 600 textile manufacturing facilities across the state. In Congress, I am committed to supporting our homegrown industry by making PPE in America, protecting the yarn forward rule of origin in our trade agreements, and cracking down on China’s unfair trade practices. I am thrilled to engage with industry leaders in my district, as we discuss ways to grow the U.S. textile industry and the critical role that textile manufacturers play in our local, state, and national economy,” said Congresswoman Kathy Manning.