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30.01.2024

ECHA: New chemicals database

ECHA CHEM is a new solution for publishing information on chemicals. The first release, available now, includes information from all REACH registrations.

ECHA’s current Information on chemicals platform, launched in 2016, grew rapidly and contains today information on over 360 000 chemicals. In 2022, ECHA announced that it would create a new system for publishing chemicals data. ECHA CHEM allows the Agency to better handle the growing diversity and quantity of data, while taking advantage of technological advancements.

ECHA maintains the largest chemicals database in the European Union (EU), combining industry-submitted data with information generated in the EU’s regulatory processes. ECHA CHEM is the new solution to share with the public the growing amount of information hosted by the Agency.

In the first version of ECHA CHEM, the information from all the over 100 000 REACH registrations are included that companies have submitted to ECHA. Later this year, the database will be expanded with the redesigned Classification and Labelling Inventory, followed by the first set of regulatory lists.

ECHA CHEM is a new solution for publishing information on chemicals. The first release, available now, includes information from all REACH registrations.

ECHA’s current Information on chemicals platform, launched in 2016, grew rapidly and contains today information on over 360 000 chemicals. In 2022, ECHA announced that it would create a new system for publishing chemicals data. ECHA CHEM allows the Agency to better handle the growing diversity and quantity of data, while taking advantage of technological advancements.

ECHA maintains the largest chemicals database in the European Union (EU), combining industry-submitted data with information generated in the EU’s regulatory processes. ECHA CHEM is the new solution to share with the public the growing amount of information hosted by the Agency.

In the first version of ECHA CHEM, the information from all the over 100 000 REACH registrations are included that companies have submitted to ECHA. Later this year, the database will be expanded with the redesigned Classification and Labelling Inventory, followed by the first set of regulatory lists.

More information:
ECHA database REACH chemicals
Source:

European Chemicals Agency

The research group Water Engineering Innovation Photo: Aarhus University
The research group Water Engineering Innovation, led by Associate Professor Zongsu Wei, works to develop water purification technologies, especially in connection with PFAS. The group collaborates in this project with the research group Robotics from the Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering.
24.01.2024

Artificial intelligence to help remove PFAS

A new research project links some of Denmark's leading researchers in PFAS remediation with artificial intelligence. The goal is to develop and optimise a new form of wastewater and drinking water treatment technology using artificial intelligence for zero-pollution goals.

In a new research and development project, researchers from Aarhus University aim to develop a new technology that can collect and break down perpetual chemicals (PFAS) in one step in a purification process that can be connected directly to drinking water wells and treatment plants.

The project has received funding from the Villum Foundation of DKK 3 million, and it will combine newly developed treatment technology from some of Denmark's leading PFAS remediation researchers with artificial intelligence that can ensure optimal remediation.

A new research project links some of Denmark's leading researchers in PFAS remediation with artificial intelligence. The goal is to develop and optimise a new form of wastewater and drinking water treatment technology using artificial intelligence for zero-pollution goals.

In a new research and development project, researchers from Aarhus University aim to develop a new technology that can collect and break down perpetual chemicals (PFAS) in one step in a purification process that can be connected directly to drinking water wells and treatment plants.

The project has received funding from the Villum Foundation of DKK 3 million, and it will combine newly developed treatment technology from some of Denmark's leading PFAS remediation researchers with artificial intelligence that can ensure optimal remediation.

"In the project, we will design, construct and test a new, automated degradation technology for continuous PFAS degradation. We’re also going to set up an open database to identify significant and limiting factors for degradation reactions with PFAS molecules in the reactor," says Associate Professor Xuping Zhang from the Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering at Aarhus University, who is co-heading the project in collaboration with Associate Professor Zongsu Wei from the Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering.

Ever since the 1940s, PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) have been used in a myriad of products, ranging from raincoats and building materials to furniture, fire extinguishers, solar panels, saucepans, packaging and paints.

However, PFAS have proven to have a number of harmful effects on humans and the environment, and unfortunately the substances are very difficult to break down in nature. As a result, the substances continuously accumulate in humans, animals, and elsewhere in nature.

In Denmark, PFAS have been found in drinking water wells, in surface foam on the sea, in the soil at sites for fire-fighting drills, and in many places elsewhere, for example in organic eggs. It is not possible to remove PFAS from everything, but work is underway to remove PFAS from the groundwater in drinking water wells that have been contaminated with the substances.

Currently, the most common method to filter drinking water for PFAS is via an active carbon filter, an ion-exchange filter, or by using a specially designed membrane. All of these possibilities filter PFAS from the water, but they do not destroy the PFAS. The filters are therefore all temporary, as they have to be sent for incineration to destroy the accumulated PFAS, or they end in landfills.

The project is called 'Machine Learning to Enhance PFAS Degradation in Flow Reactor', and it aims to design and develop an optimal and permanent solution for drinking water wells and treatment plants in Denmark that constantly captures and breaks down PFAS, while also monitoring itself.

"We need to be creative and think outside the box. I see many advantages in linking artificial intelligence with several different water treatment technologies, but integrating intelligence-based optimisation is no easy task. It requires strong synergy between machine learning and chemical engineering, but the perspectives are huge," says Associate Professor Zongsu Wei from the Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering at Aarhus University.

More information:
PFAS Aarhuis University
Source:

Aarhus University
Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering
Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering

Carbios and L’Oréal win Pioneer Award for PET recycling solution Photo: Carbios
Emmanuel Ladent (CEO Carbios, on the left) and Jacques Playe (Packaging and Development Director at L’Oréal, on the right)
15.11.2023

Carbios and L’Oréal win Pioneer Award for PET recycling solution

Carbios and L’Oréal have won the “Pioneer Awards” in the Industry category, presented by the Solar Impulse Foundation at the first World Alliance Summit. This prize was awarded to Carbios for its enzymatic PET recycling solution, labeled “Efficient Solution” by the Solar Impulse Foundation since 2019, and to L’Oréal for using this technology for the first time in a cosmetics bottle prototype. Carbios’ solution offers brands an alternative to petro-sourced plastic that helps them meet their sustainability commitments. This advancement paves the way for future applications in other sectors such as packaging, food and beverage, and textiles.

Carbios and L’Oréal have won the “Pioneer Awards” in the Industry category, presented by the Solar Impulse Foundation at the first World Alliance Summit. This prize was awarded to Carbios for its enzymatic PET recycling solution, labeled “Efficient Solution” by the Solar Impulse Foundation since 2019, and to L’Oréal for using this technology for the first time in a cosmetics bottle prototype. Carbios’ solution offers brands an alternative to petro-sourced plastic that helps them meet their sustainability commitments. This advancement paves the way for future applications in other sectors such as packaging, food and beverage, and textiles.

Carbios and L’Oréal: a long-term collaboration
Since 2017, Carbios and L’Oréal have been working together with a shared vision of accelerating the transition to a circular economy for plastic. In 2017, both companies created a Consortium to improve the recyclability and circularity of PET packaging.  Nestlé Waters, PepsiCo and Suntory Beverage & Food Europe joined this Consortium in 2019 to scale up Carbios’ innovation. The world’s first enzymatically recycled PET packaging was made in 2021 using Carbios’ biorecycling process. The world’s first PET biorecycling plant is scheduled to be commissioned in 2025. In parallel, Carbios is rolling out its technology internationally through licensing agreements.

The environmental benefits of biorecycling developed by Carbios
Recent life-cycle analyses[1] show a 57% reduction in CO2 emissions compared with the production of virgin plastic[2], and for every tonne of recycled PET produced, 1.3 tonnes of petrol are avoided. Compared with conventional recycling, enzymatic recycling is 4 times more circular (calculated according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Material Circularity Indicator). Thanks to its highly selective enzyme, optimized for efficient PET degradation, Carbios’ depolymerization process can process all types of PET waste, including colored, multilayer or textile waste that cannot be recycled using current technologies. Furthermore, the two monomers produced (PTA and MEG) make it possible to recreate recycled PET products of identical quality to virgin ones, and suitable for food contact.
 
 
[1] Database ecoinvent 3.8
[2] French scenario, taking into account the detour of 50% of PET waste from conventional end-of-life. Virgin PET: 2.53 kg CO2/kg (cradle to gate)

Source:

Carbios

(c) Hohenstein
15.03.2023

Hohenstein: First 3D measurement study to improve garment sizing for children

Garment fitting pioneer Hohenstein has conducted the first ever measurement series on babies and toddlers. The data will aid the pattern development and fit assessment that is particularly challenging for children's clothing. The new database will help brands and manufacturers design their children's clothing in an accurate, efficient and more sustainable way using fit testing and pattern optimisation.

Hohenstein has been taking body measurements for all target groups since 1957. Based on regular serial measurements taken with 3D body scans over 20 years, data is continuously updated. With the measurement of toddlers and babies, Hohenstein is now closing a large gap in the German market for the first time. 5626 girls and boys in sizes 56 to 182 were measured. This means that 3D scans of infants are available for the first time. The 3D body data form an indispensable basis for customer-specific measurement tables, child-friendly patterns and gradings, optimal fits as well as 3D children's avatars for the simulation of clothing.

Garment fitting pioneer Hohenstein has conducted the first ever measurement series on babies and toddlers. The data will aid the pattern development and fit assessment that is particularly challenging for children's clothing. The new database will help brands and manufacturers design their children's clothing in an accurate, efficient and more sustainable way using fit testing and pattern optimisation.

Hohenstein has been taking body measurements for all target groups since 1957. Based on regular serial measurements taken with 3D body scans over 20 years, data is continuously updated. With the measurement of toddlers and babies, Hohenstein is now closing a large gap in the German market for the first time. 5626 girls and boys in sizes 56 to 182 were measured. This means that 3D scans of infants are available for the first time. The 3D body data form an indispensable basis for customer-specific measurement tables, child-friendly patterns and gradings, optimal fits as well as 3D children's avatars for the simulation of clothing.

Hohenstein offers a wide range of tests for safe children's clothing from a single source. In addition to fit and pattern, Hohenstein carries out risk assessments and safety tests for children's clothing (e.g. cords according to DIN EN 13682), UV protection according to different standards, tests for harmful substances according to OEKO-TEX®, among others. Toy testing is also part of the portfolio.

Source:

Hohenstein

23.02.2023

New online tool maps PFAS hotspots in businesses ahead of EU ban

The EU's plans to ban PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemicals will have an immense impact on companies globally. Perhaps even more than expected, as many manufacturers are unaware that they may have PFAS chemicals in their product line. A new online tool, launched today by NGO ChemSec, will help to solve this problem.

Just a couple of weeks after the big PFAS restriction proposal in the EU was published, ChemSec launches the PFAS Guide, which helps companies investigate the use of persistent chemicals within their businesses. The main feature of the PFAS Guide is the searchable database uncovering different PFAS uses and functions. The online tool also provides guidance on different aspects of the phase-out process from regulation and investigation all the way to testing and supply chain communication.

The EU's plans to ban PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemicals will have an immense impact on companies globally. Perhaps even more than expected, as many manufacturers are unaware that they may have PFAS chemicals in their product line. A new online tool, launched today by NGO ChemSec, will help to solve this problem.

Just a couple of weeks after the big PFAS restriction proposal in the EU was published, ChemSec launches the PFAS Guide, which helps companies investigate the use of persistent chemicals within their businesses. The main feature of the PFAS Guide is the searchable database uncovering different PFAS uses and functions. The online tool also provides guidance on different aspects of the phase-out process from regulation and investigation all the way to testing and supply chain communication.

“We’ve been working to support companies in chemical substitution for a long time, and the last few years we’ve gathered a group of companies working specifically on the PFAS issue. The discussions with them made it clear to us that a main challenge is understanding if and where in your business you may have PFAS”, says Dr. Anna Lennquist, Project Leader for the PFAS Guide.

PFAS are a source of growing concern
It has been estimated that 95 percent of all manufactured goods rely on some form of industrial chemical process. A large share of the chemicals used in these processes have been linked to adverse impacts on human health and the environment. PFAS are a clear example of this problem. PFAS have been manufactured and used in products such as make-up, non-stick pans, water- and greaseproof textiles, food-packaging materials, and firefighting foam since the 1950s and are still used in a wide variety of products around the world today.

But they are also substances of growing concern due to their problematic properties. Per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of several thousand man-made chemicals that accumulate in the environment and cause health impacts for generations. They are, for example, linked to cancer, lung disease, diabetes, reproductive abnormalities and learning difficulties. Since PFAS do not degrade, these “forever chemicals” are now so widespread that is safe to say that every single human being on the planet have detectable levels of these toxic chemicals in their blood.

A couple of weeks ago, a big proposal to restrict PFAS in the EU was published. The five EU Member States behind the proposal submitted a broad restriction proposal that clearly shows the need for the industry to put all resources into phasing out all PFAS substances.

More information:
PFAS ChemSec chemicals
Source:

ChemSec

(c) TMAS
30.12.2022

Climate impact mapping of Swedish textile machinery

Over the past year, TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association, has been working with ClimatePartner on a corporate carbon footprint (CCF) mapping project with its member companies, as a natural step towards supporting a more sustainable textile industry.

Over half of the members of TMAS are participating in the project, which involves calculating each operation’s Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions in order to identify the current climate impact and areas where reductions can be made.

“Integrating climate action into strategies is becoming increasingly important in Europe and we have decided to take a pro-active role,” says TMAS secretary general Therese Premler-Andersson. “There is growing pressure from customers to be more transparant in this area and forthcoming legislation will soon make it necessary for all to take climate actions. TMAS members, however, recognise the benefit of taking action now, not least in terms of taking responsibility and demonstrating credibility.”

The CCF project’s scope examines all aspects of a business split into five areas:

Over the past year, TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association, has been working with ClimatePartner on a corporate carbon footprint (CCF) mapping project with its member companies, as a natural step towards supporting a more sustainable textile industry.

Over half of the members of TMAS are participating in the project, which involves calculating each operation’s Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions in order to identify the current climate impact and areas where reductions can be made.

“Integrating climate action into strategies is becoming increasingly important in Europe and we have decided to take a pro-active role,” says TMAS secretary general Therese Premler-Andersson. “There is growing pressure from customers to be more transparant in this area and forthcoming legislation will soon make it necessary for all to take climate actions. TMAS members, however, recognise the benefit of taking action now, not least in terms of taking responsibility and demonstrating credibility.”

The CCF project’s scope examines all aspects of a business split into five areas:

  • Facility Management (heating, electricity, water, cooling agents and waste disposal).
  • Employee Mobility (commuting and company cars).
  • Business Travel (flights travel by train, rental cars).
  • Procurement (production, packaging and office materials).
  • Logistics (inbound and outbound).

Primary data is being used wherever possible and emission factors originate from internationally recognised databases such as ecoinvent and GEMIS.

The ClimatePartner measurement programme is based on the guidelines of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (GHG Protocol), and factors in all greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto Protocol. These are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorocarbons (PFC), sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) and nitrogen trifluoride (NF3).

Each of these gases affect the atmosphere differently and remain in the atmosphere for different lengths of time. Rather than reporting on each gas separately, they are expressed as a CO2 equivalent (CO2e) for the sake of simplicity. A CO2e is essentially a conversion into a ‘global warming potential’ value that enables the influence of different gases on global warming to be compared.

Photo VDMA
12.12.2022

Young Talent Award for AI supported production control of carbon fibres

  • Formula 1 cars will be cheaper in future

Carbon is the stuff Formula 1 cars are made of, at least the bodywork. But until now, carbon has been expensive. It can be produced more cheaply and efficiently if artificial intelligence monitors the production processes. A camera system combined with artificial intelligence automatically detects defects in the production of carbon fibres. This makes expensive manual inspection of the carbon fibres obsolete and the production price of the carbon fibre can be reduced in the long term.

For this idea, the young engineer Deniz Sinan Yesilyurt received the second prize of the "Digitalisation in Mechanical Engineering" Young Talent Award on 6 December.

  • Formula 1 cars will be cheaper in future

Carbon is the stuff Formula 1 cars are made of, at least the bodywork. But until now, carbon has been expensive. It can be produced more cheaply and efficiently if artificial intelligence monitors the production processes. A camera system combined with artificial intelligence automatically detects defects in the production of carbon fibres. This makes expensive manual inspection of the carbon fibres obsolete and the production price of the carbon fibre can be reduced in the long term.

For this idea, the young engineer Deniz Sinan Yesilyurt received the second prize of the "Digitalisation in Mechanical Engineering" Young Talent Award on 6 December.

Carbon fibres are sought after because of their good properties. They are very light - they weigh up to 50 percent less than aluminium. The combination of low weight and good mechanical properties offers many advantages. Especially in times of the energy transition, lightweight materials like carbon are more relevant than ever before. At the same time, carbon fibres are as resistant to external stresses as metals. However, achieving these good properties of carbon fibres is very complex.


Up to 300 individual fibre strands - bundles of individual fibres - have to be monitored simultaneously during production. If carbon fibres tear, it costs time and money to sort out the damaged fibres. This is just one example of various defects that can occur in the fibres during production.


Therefore, Deniz Sinan Yesilyurt attached a camera to the carbon fibre line that takes pictures of various fibre defects during production and collects them in a database. The artificial intelligence in the camera's information technology system evaluates the fibre defects by assigning the images to predefined reference defects. In doing so, it recognises various fibre defects with a classification accuracy of 99 per cent. The process can also be used in other areas that produce chemical fibres.

Deniz Sinan Yesilyurt received the prize from the German Engineering Federation (VDMA) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. He is a Bachelor's graduate at the Institut für Textiltechnik (ITA) of RWTH Aachen University. The full title of his bachelor's thesis is: "Development of a Kl-supported process monitoring using machine learning to detect fibre damage in the stabilisation process". The VDMA awarded the prize to a total of four theses from different universities. The prize is awarded for outstanding theses and was offered in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

Source:

ITA – Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen Universit

21.11.2022

Hohenstein invests 1.3 million Euro in Sizekick

Aim: Reducing returns and thus increasing sustainability in fashion e-commerce

Hohenstein, a global market leader in apparel sizing and fit development, has invested in AI technology startup, Sizekick. The collaboration will enable accurate decisions on apparel size, improving online shopping experiences, reducing returns and preventing the associated CO2 emissions.

Hohenstein’s 1.3 million Euro investment in the 2022 startup will drive growth in the Sizekick team and enable the 2023 launch of its smartphone app for online shoppers.  The technology will enable online shoppers to find the right clothing size in a few seconds via smartphone.

Aim: Reducing returns and thus increasing sustainability in fashion e-commerce

Hohenstein, a global market leader in apparel sizing and fit development, has invested in AI technology startup, Sizekick. The collaboration will enable accurate decisions on apparel size, improving online shopping experiences, reducing returns and preventing the associated CO2 emissions.

Hohenstein’s 1.3 million Euro investment in the 2022 startup will drive growth in the Sizekick team and enable the 2023 launch of its smartphone app for online shoppers.  The technology will enable online shoppers to find the right clothing size in a few seconds via smartphone.

Sizekick puts an end to unnecessary size-related returns in fashion online retail. The Munich-based company uses artificial intelligence and computer vision technology to recommend the right clothing size to customers in partner web stores. With the help of the integrated Sizekick software and a smartphone, anyone can find the right size in a few seconds. Fashion and sports brands, but also multi-brand stores or marketplaces can integrate the "Sizekick Button" in their online store. Sizekick offers its solution as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS).

"The strategic partnership with Hohenstein enables us, as a new AI solution, to meet the high demands of the market right at the start and to take on the role of technology leader. Our artificial intelligence is already learning thanks to the comprehensive Hohenstein database of 3D body scans. This is an extremely big advantage for our AI," highlights Jake Lydon, CTO at Sizekick.

Source:

Hohenstein

27.06.2022

Ranga Yogeshwar presents third Top 100 award to Mayer & Cie.

Albstadt-based Mayer & Cie. has been named a Top 100 award-winner for the third time as one of Germany’s most innovative small and mid-range businesses. The jury made special mention of the circular knitting and braiding machine manufacturer’s innovative processes. At the centre of the family firm’s further digital development is on the aim to boost its customers’ productivity. Last Friday, 25 June, members of the Mayer & Cie. management received the award from the science journalist Ranga Yogeshwar at the SMB summit in Frankfurt am Main.

For some time now, the focus of development work at Mayer & Cie. has been on lean management in assembly processes, on optimisation of aftersales service, including setting up an online shop for spare parts, and on product lifecycle management, or PLM, which stands for a concept of seamless integration of all the information that arises during a product’s lifecycle. A clean data structure is the basis for these measures, it’s called the “digital backbone”. It means that all product data is processed in the same database and all information is available only once and can be downloaded immediately.

Albstadt-based Mayer & Cie. has been named a Top 100 award-winner for the third time as one of Germany’s most innovative small and mid-range businesses. The jury made special mention of the circular knitting and braiding machine manufacturer’s innovative processes. At the centre of the family firm’s further digital development is on the aim to boost its customers’ productivity. Last Friday, 25 June, members of the Mayer & Cie. management received the award from the science journalist Ranga Yogeshwar at the SMB summit in Frankfurt am Main.

For some time now, the focus of development work at Mayer & Cie. has been on lean management in assembly processes, on optimisation of aftersales service, including setting up an online shop for spare parts, and on product lifecycle management, or PLM, which stands for a concept of seamless integration of all the information that arises during a product’s lifecycle. A clean data structure is the basis for these measures, it’s called the “digital backbone”. It means that all product data is processed in the same database and all information is available only once and can be downloaded immediately.

In all, 436 companies, including about ten per cent from machinery and plant engineering, competed for the Top 100 seal of innovation this year. Nearly 300 were successful and were congratulated in person by Ranga Yogeshwar at the SMB summit. He noted that the award winners set a role model example. “Innovators are thought leaders; they are always pioneers too,” said Yogeshwar, who mentors the competition. “They put their products to the test and ask themselves what an ecological society and a climate-oriented world will require of them. And they check the opportunities and challenges that increasing digitisation will bring for forms of cooperation, social relationships and, with them, for employee retention.”

More information:
Mayer & Cie Top 100 digitisation
Source:

Mayer & Cie.

KARL MAYER: New perspectives through precise lace symmetry (c) KARL MAYER
Examples of Symm-Net designs
08.03.2022

KARL MAYER: New perspectives through precise lace symmetry

  • Symm-Net articles made using the new MJ 92/1 B impress with their perfectly symmetrical appearance

Lace is a delicate seducer. The more finely crafted its ground structure, the more effective its refined designs come across, and as such, the higher the overall quality. The innovative Symm-Net pieces, which can be produced on KARL MAYER’s new MJ 92/1 B, have a look that sets new standards.

  • Symm-Net articles made using the new MJ 92/1 B impress with their perfectly symmetrical appearance

Lace is a delicate seducer. The more finely crafted its ground structure, the more effective its refined designs come across, and as such, the higher the overall quality. The innovative Symm-Net pieces, which can be produced on KARL MAYER’s new MJ 92/1 B, have a look that sets new standards.

Lace offering maximum clarity and balance
Symm-Net lace is characterised by an extremely delicate design, offering absolute symmetry. This is thanks to the particular configuration of the MJ 92/1 B – the new multi-bar jacquard raschel machine features a split-design jacquard bar with separate threading, and can thus work using both equal and counter lapping. In addition, the newcomer has two ground guide bars at the back for counterlapped elastane. For Symm-Net’s ground structure, GB1 works a pillar notation whilst the jacquard bar works a counter-lapped inlay. The result is a net structure with absolutely symmetrical, clearly defined symmetry. To perfect the geometry, the two elastane bars with split threading – i.e. 1 in, 1 out – and counter-lapping patterning mirror the movement of the jacquard bar.

The lapping patterns thus look as follows:
• JB 91: 0 – 0 / 2 – 2 // and JB 92: 2 – 2 / 0 – 0 //
• GB 93: 0 – 0 / 1 – 1 // and GB 94: 1 – 1 / 0 – 0 //

The ground structure is not only more uniform, but also more stable than its counterparts manufactured with equal lapping. The advantages of Symm-Net are particularly visible when working finer mesh constructions. “When it comes to a delicate appearance, Leavers lace traditionally sets the standard; in particular, Endsor- Net is known for its delicate design. There is hardly any discernible difference with Symm-Net, which should open up new design perspectives, especially for the premium brands in Europe,” explains Jamie Heather, lace expert at KARL MAYER. Symm-Net offers a further advantage thanks to its simple pattern development. For example, the patterning process does not require any updates to the commonly used patterning software, SAPO and ProCad – only the machine database needs to be adapted.

High design flexibility
In addition to the Symm-Net variants, all existing patterns of the OJ 91/1 B, MJ 85/1 B and OJ 83/1 B can be implemented on the MJ 92/1 B in E 24 without restrictions; switching from the new counter lapping to the traditional JACQUARDTRONIC® LACE pattern is seamless. Jamie Heather is certain this flexibility will give customers a real competitive advantage.

All the prerequisites for a bestseller
The MJ 92/1 B has been successfully offered on the market since May 2021. The newcomer is available in gauge E 24, with a working width of 134". Despite its high design flexibility, it still offers first-class productivity. It can also reach speeds of up to 800 rpm when producing Symm-Net articles. To allow for diverse product design, 88 pattern guide bars and two elastane bars, arranged in 16 shogging lines, are available. Thanks to these features, the MJ 92/1 B mainly produces elastic galloon lace, but also all-over lace for stylish lingerie items.

Source:

KARL MAYER Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH

Folding / Plating (© 2021, Maag Brothers)
16.12.2021

Swiss Textile Machinery: Changes and opportunities through automation

For most textiles, finishing processes are not actually the last stage. Products often need an extra touch of expertise to make them perfectly ready for the customer. At this point in the value chain, that usually means manual tasks – but now there are technical solutions and intelligent systems which can handle complex operations better, while adding extra value and assured quality.
Automation brings reliability and efficiency, ultimately saving costs to produce the right quality every time. Swiss companies are specialized in many of these disciplines, with machinery for fabric inspection and presentation, labelling and tracking, folding and packaging. They have the technology to inspire a new vision at the post-production segment of the textile manufacturing processes. Optimization of workflows, with bottleneck management, is an obvious potential benefit. And it delivers measurable returns on investment. The wider picture with automation will prepare companies for the IoT and Industry 4.0.

For most textiles, finishing processes are not actually the last stage. Products often need an extra touch of expertise to make them perfectly ready for the customer. At this point in the value chain, that usually means manual tasks – but now there are technical solutions and intelligent systems which can handle complex operations better, while adding extra value and assured quality.
Automation brings reliability and efficiency, ultimately saving costs to produce the right quality every time. Swiss companies are specialized in many of these disciplines, with machinery for fabric inspection and presentation, labelling and tracking, folding and packaging. They have the technology to inspire a new vision at the post-production segment of the textile manufacturing processes. Optimization of workflows, with bottleneck management, is an obvious potential benefit. And it delivers measurable returns on investment. The wider picture with automation will prepare companies for the IoT and Industry 4.0.

New business models
The advantages of automation in mills with high-volume production are obvious: consistent quality, increased efficiency, waste reduction in some cases, as well as significant medium-term cost reductions in every case.
That description focuses on the aims of modern mills in low-cost markets. But producers in Europe and USA could reach out for more. For them, automation could be a game-changer, offering unique new opportunities.
Reshoring is a growing trend now. It shows great potential and is definitely driven by sustainability and changes in consumer mindsets. “We believe that the time is right – the machines and solutions certainly are – to push automation also to the very end of the production line, replacing intensive manual work and take the chance for reshoring. The current situation is kind of a transition time which is expected to last for a couple more years in the textile industry,” says Rueedi. He adds that any investments in these prime markets pay off much faster because of higher labour costs.
Innovation transformed through automation can do much more than simply replacing the nimble fingers of humans. It also enables new business models, guaranteeing prosperous future business, alongside greater job security.

Digital workflow and process control
The Swiss company Maag Brothers is a leading supplier of high-end machines for quality assurance in the final make-up processes, specifically fabric inspection, plating/folding, selvedge printing and packaging. Maag reports on a practical example from a mill in India which recognized the potential of automation.
An analysis at the customer’s mill identified the main goals as modernization of the workflow at quality control and packing processes. Maag’s new system covers tasks from fabric inspection to dispatch, and offers transparent and easily adjustable processes with real-time process control. It’s a digital solution, resulting in a slim organization, paperless, and the basis for further optimization towards Industry 4.0 to exploit its full potential. The customer’s own calculation showed a ROI for the installation at less than three years – along with a reduction in manpower and savings in fabric costs for shade samples.

Perfectly labelled, efficient data...
Smooth processes start with a label. Swiss company Norsel is an expert in grey fabric labelling systems, for piece tracking through all textile processes. High-quality label printing and proper sealing on all kind of fabrics ensure readability and sustainability after dyehouse processes such as mercerizing, high temperature dyeing and even hot calendering. No roll mix-up during dyeing, easy sorting of fabric rolls and rapid delivery make processes in the mill much more efficient. Using RFID codes lifts fabric inventory control to the highest level, with all information readily transferred to a database and integrated through any ERP software.
It’s a foolproof way to avoid the risk of human errors from hand-written notes on grey fabrics and article sheets, by opting for reliable, secure and forward-looking solutions.

Sample collections – the silent salesmen
First impressions count, so fabric producers like to present their collection perfectly – and that’s only possible with automated solutions. Swiss producer Polytex continuously refines its solutions, underlining its leading position in sample making equipment. Fully-automatic high-performance sample production lines are designed to satisfy the highest expectations. Fully-automatic lines or robotic machines set the standards for quality and performance. Even the most demanding clients can achieve their goals with impeccable samples, quickly and efficiently made, for flawless collections that are sure to impress.

Automation drives buying
First impressions are also the trigger for quick purchase decisions. The proof is there on every store shelf. Customers of Espritech are also well aware of it. They trust this Swiss producer of automated folding machinery to provide the final touch of class to home textiles and apparel products before they go on display. The folding systems are generally large mechatronic devices, loaded with latest technologies in mechanics, electronics, sensors and pneumatics. “Textile producers are amazed how folding machines solve the tricky task of reliably handling chaotically behaving materials. They see process optimization potential and the impact. We observe a slow but continuous change of mindset installing sophisticated technology even in the last steps of textile finishing,” says Philipp Rueedi, CFO at Espritech.

17.11.2021

NCTO welcomes Biden Administration’s Buy American Waiver Process

National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) President and CEO Kim Glas issued a statement welcoming the Biden administration’s launch of new database and waiver process for government contract solicitations made under the Buy American Act.

You can read the statement here.

National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) President and CEO Kim Glas issued a statement welcoming the Biden administration’s launch of new database and waiver process for government contract solicitations made under the Buy American Act.

You can read the statement here.

Source:

NCTO

08.07.2021

ECHA: Candidate List updated with eight hazardous chemicals

Some of the newly added substances are used in consumer products such as cosmetics, scented articles, rubber and textiles. Others are used as solvents, flame retardants or to manufacture plastics products. Most have been added to the Candidate List because they are hazardous to human health as they are toxic for reproduction, carcinogenic, respiratory sensitisers or endocrine disruptors.

Companies must follow their legal obligations and ensure the safe use of these chemicals. They also have to notify ECHA under the Waste Framework Directive if their products contain substances of very high concern. This notification is submitted to ECHA’s SCIP database and the information will later be published on the Agency’s website.

Some of the newly added substances are used in consumer products such as cosmetics, scented articles, rubber and textiles. Others are used as solvents, flame retardants or to manufacture plastics products. Most have been added to the Candidate List because they are hazardous to human health as they are toxic for reproduction, carcinogenic, respiratory sensitisers or endocrine disruptors.

Companies must follow their legal obligations and ensure the safe use of these chemicals. They also have to notify ECHA under the Waste Framework Directive if their products contain substances of very high concern. This notification is submitted to ECHA’s SCIP database and the information will later be published on the Agency’s website.

Background
The Candidate List includes substances of very high concern that may have serious effects on our health or the environment. These substances may be placed on the Authorisation List in the future, which means that companies would need to apply for permission to continue using them. The Candidate List has now 219 entries – some of these cover groups of chemicals so the overall number of impacted chemicals is higher.
 
Under the REACH Regulation, companies may have legal obligations when their substance is included – either on its own, in mixtures or in articles – in the Candidate List. Any supplier of articles containing a Candidate List substance above a concentration of 0.1 % weight by weight has to give sufficient information to their customers and consumers to allow safe use.
 
Importers and producers of articles containing a Candidate List substance have six months from the date of its inclusion in the list (8 July 2021) to notify ECHA. Suppliers of substances on the Candidate List (supplied either on their own or in mixtures) have to provide their customers with a safety data sheet.
 
As of 5 January 2021, suppliers of articles on the EU market containing Candidate List substances in a concentration above 0.1% weight by weight must notify these articles to ECHA’s SCIP database. This duty comes from the Waste Framework Directive.
 
More information on these obligations and related tools are available here.

Source:

European Chemicals Agency

Archroma becomes The BHive® partner for chemical compliance and management (c) The BHive®
09.03.2021

Archroma becomes The BHive® partner for Chemical Compliance and Management

Archroma, a global leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, announced that it has become a The BHive® partner to help foster chemical compliance and management across the textile supply chain.

The BHive® is an innovative digital chemical management platform that provides at-a-glance information about chemical products to its users. It was developed by GoBlu International Ltd. to allow manufacturing facilities to easily create digital inventories of the chemical products used onsite using a smartphone. They can identify in a matter of seconds which products meet sustainability requirements of their brand and retail customers, who they can share this information with as well. This enables brands and retailers to achieve full transparency about the chemical use in their global supply chain. Now, over 30 international fashion brands and 500 factories are partnered with The BHive® to drive sustainable chemistry in the textile and fashion industry.

Archroma, a global leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, announced that it has become a The BHive® partner to help foster chemical compliance and management across the textile supply chain.

The BHive® is an innovative digital chemical management platform that provides at-a-glance information about chemical products to its users. It was developed by GoBlu International Ltd. to allow manufacturing facilities to easily create digital inventories of the chemical products used onsite using a smartphone. They can identify in a matter of seconds which products meet sustainability requirements of their brand and retail customers, who they can share this information with as well. This enables brands and retailers to achieve full transparency about the chemical use in their global supply chain. Now, over 30 international fashion brands and 500 factories are partnered with The BHive® to drive sustainable chemistry in the textile and fashion industry.

More than 2000 Archroma chemical products and dyes are now included in The BHive® database.
The company has been very active in the past few years in developing solution systems and innovations in line with the 3 pillars of 'The Archroma Way to a Sustainable World: Safe, efficient, enhanced. It’s our nature'.

Paul Cowell, Head of Archroma’s Competence Centers for Brand & Performance Textile Specialties, explains: "With the pandemic crisis, textile manufacturers are experiencing numerous logistic bottlenecks and challenges. With The BHive®, our partners have now an additional access path to the information about chemical usage and compliance for the Archroma products they keep at their facilities."

SGL Carbon Anlagen: Dichtheitsnachweis DIN EN1591-1 (c) SGL CARBON SE
PTFE Füllkörperkolonne
17.02.2021

SGL Carbon plants: DIN EN1591-1 tightness certification

  • SGL Carbon supplies first plants with DIN EN1591-1 tightness certification to the chemical industry
  • First column already delivered to major European customer

In plant operation in the chemical industry, the tightness of flanged joints is becoming increasingly important when dealing with aggressive and corrosive operating media. In accordance with European Union requirements, the German government has defined new requirements in the first administrative regulation to the Federal Immission Control Act (BImSchG), which will apply from January 2021. SGL Carbon is the first manufacturer of PTFE-lined columns to be able to provide the required proof of tightness according to DIN EN 1591-1 and has already delivered the first column with the new certification to a major European customer.

  • SGL Carbon supplies first plants with DIN EN1591-1 tightness certification to the chemical industry
  • First column already delivered to major European customer

In plant operation in the chemical industry, the tightness of flanged joints is becoming increasingly important when dealing with aggressive and corrosive operating media. In accordance with European Union requirements, the German government has defined new requirements in the first administrative regulation to the Federal Immission Control Act (BImSchG), which will apply from January 2021. SGL Carbon is the first manufacturer of PTFE-lined columns to be able to provide the required proof of tightness according to DIN EN 1591-1 and has already delivered the first column with the new certification to a major European customer.

Specifically, the Technical Instructions on Air Quality Control (TA-Luft) of the Federal Immission Control Act (BImSchG) prescribe new, stricter emission values (leakage class L0.01) for keeping the air clean, which must be complied with when operating plants requiring a permit. In order to be able to guarantee the technical tightness of steel/PTFE flanged joints, SGL Carbon, together with a working group of other companies, first determined the EN 13555 sealing characteristic values, which reflect the material-specific PTFE properties as well as the characteristic manufacture and shaping of the linings. With these characteristic values integrated in a database, SGL experts were able to perform realistic DIN EN 1591-1 calculations for flanged joints of a packed column lined with POLYFLURON PTFE and prove the tightness in accordance with TA-Luft. The design, final acceptance and pressure tests in accordance with Directive 2014/68/EU (PED) were successfully certified by a recognized notified body.

"With the rapid implementation of the new  tightness requirements for columns, our solutions offer customers further significant added value, which is currently also being applied to other products. Our sales team and technical service are available to provide customers with comprehensive advice on the new directives and our products," explains Ralph Spuller, Director Product Management in the Process Technology (PT) Business Unit at SGL Carbon.

Dyeing industry first for 7H with imogo (c) Imogo
The imogo team (left to right): Per Stenflo, textile process specialist Ellinor Niit and CEO Joacim Wellander.
10.02.2021

Dyeing industry first for 7H with imogo

Swedish commission dyeing company 7H Färgeri is looking to propel itself to the forefront of sustainable fabric production with the installation of the first industrial scale imogo Dye-Max spray dyeing line.
Currently under construction, the line will be delivered in the first week of March to the 7H plant close to the Swedish city of Borås. It will have a full working width of 1.8 metres with an operating speed of up to 50 metres for the reactive dyeing of cellulosic fibre-based fabrics. In addition, it will be capable of carrying out the application of a wide range of fabric pre-treatments and finishing processes, providing the company with unbeatable flexibility in production.

A proven Mini-Max laboratory unit for pre-determining application volumes and colour matching will also be delivered as part of the contract.

With the potential to slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems, the DyeMax has gained considerable attention since the concept was outlined and a prototype machine constructed in 2019.

Swedish commission dyeing company 7H Färgeri is looking to propel itself to the forefront of sustainable fabric production with the installation of the first industrial scale imogo Dye-Max spray dyeing line.
Currently under construction, the line will be delivered in the first week of March to the 7H plant close to the Swedish city of Borås. It will have a full working width of 1.8 metres with an operating speed of up to 50 metres for the reactive dyeing of cellulosic fibre-based fabrics. In addition, it will be capable of carrying out the application of a wide range of fabric pre-treatments and finishing processes, providing the company with unbeatable flexibility in production.

A proven Mini-Max laboratory unit for pre-determining application volumes and colour matching will also be delivered as part of the contract.

With the potential to slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems, the DyeMax has gained considerable attention since the concept was outlined and a prototype machine constructed in 2019.

Pilot scale trials have subsequently been carried out with many well-known international textile companies and their brand partners.
The application unit of the Dye-Max consists of a closed chamber containing a series of spray cassettes with precision nozzles for accurate and consistent coverage, in combination with the patented imogo Pro Speed valve that controls the volume to be applied.

Control and precision
“We are achieving an extremely low liquor ratio of around 0.5-1 litres per kilo of fabric and we fully control the pickup, applying precisely what is required to the specific fabric,” says imogo founding partner Per Stenflo. “Compared to traditional padders there is no contamination of the dyebath or dilution of the dye liquor to worry about.
Fast changeovers with virtually no waste together with a high production speed enable a high productivity and unmatched production flexibility. The system is also equipped with an exhaust system and droplet separator to ensure that the environment around the unit is safe and free from particles.

The imogo Mini-Max meanwhile frees up valuable production time by avoiding wasteful pre-runs. The user simply sets the recipe with the Mini-Max and transfers the parameters to the Dye-Max recipe database for the system to be fully production ready.

7H Färgeri was founded in 1935 and has established itself as the Nordic region’s most complete dyeing and processing plant, specialising in technical and functional textiles for the automotive and soft furnishings sectors, as well as functional and protective clothing.

The family-owned business is now run by brothers Johan and Peter Engelmann.
“We are pleased to be pioneering a sustainable first for the dyeing industry,” said Johan Engelmann. “Our goal is to offer the market products and services with the highest quality in the most climate-smart and sustainable way, and imogo’s spray technology will give us the opportunity to offer innovative new services and products to both existing and new customers. It will be a very exciting journey.”

World Congress on Textile Coating
On February 12th Per Stenflo will make a presentation entitled ‘Transforming Textile Dyeing’ during the online World Congress on Textile Coating which is held over four days, between February 11th and 19th.

Sonntag Fins Switch to Sicomin’s GreenPoxy® 33 Bio Resin (c) Sicomin
Ben vd Steen Flying high
30.11.2020

Sonntag Fins Switch to Sicomin’s GreenPoxy® 33 Bio Resin

Sicomin’s latest marine collaboration with Sonntag Fins sees its industry leading GreenPoxy® 33 bio-based epoxy resin used for custom carbon fibre windsurf fins - combining speed, fatigue performance and sustainability for some of the fastest sailors afloat.

Targeted at windsurf slalom sailors, racers and speed sailors, each Sonntag fin is a custom made product, tailored specifically to the user based on a discussion about riding style, physical size and weight, as well as how the rider likes to load the fin whilst sailing.  This attention to detail and bespoke manufacturing places a huge importance on the performance and consistency of the raw materials used, with all new materials having to be validated in production, on the test rig in the lab, and on the water by the team riders.

Sicomin’s latest marine collaboration with Sonntag Fins sees its industry leading GreenPoxy® 33 bio-based epoxy resin used for custom carbon fibre windsurf fins - combining speed, fatigue performance and sustainability for some of the fastest sailors afloat.

Targeted at windsurf slalom sailors, racers and speed sailors, each Sonntag fin is a custom made product, tailored specifically to the user based on a discussion about riding style, physical size and weight, as well as how the rider likes to load the fin whilst sailing.  This attention to detail and bespoke manufacturing places a huge importance on the performance and consistency of the raw materials used, with all new materials having to be validated in production, on the test rig in the lab, and on the water by the team riders.

With this in mind, Sonntag Fins approached Time Out Composite, Sicomin’s German distributor,  looking for a new resin system that could reduce cycle times and improve manufacturing output.  Bio-based systems were discussed, but the first product used by Sonntag was Sicomin’s SR1280 laminating system which delivered immediate results, enabling shorter cure cycles, and exceeding all of the previous mechanical test targets.

In 2020, Sonntag and Time Out Composite revisited the topic of a more sustainable epoxy resin system. It was the perfect time for Sonntag Fins, with their new unique bright green UV resistant outer finish, to go green on the inside too with Sicomin’s GreenPoxy® 33 resin.

Test fins were produced with the new material performing well in production trials. Pure resin samples were also tested and post-cured at 140 ̊C, with the new GreenPoxy® 33 samples showing significantly higher elongation at maximum resistance, meaning the cured epoxy was less brittle and susceptible to damage should a customer’s fin meet a rock. With mechanical properties improved, Sonntag switched production to GreenPoxy® 33 in August 2020.

Sonntag fins are manufactured in CNC machined aluminium moulds using GreenPoxy® 33 and a bespoke lay-up of woven, stitched biaxial and heat-set unidirectional carbon fibre fabrics in four steps:
• The first step in the moulding process is the application of Sonntag’s unique green in-mould coating.
• Next, the individual fabric plies, cut using precisely machined templates, are placed into the mould and then wet-out with the low viscosity epoxy. With the laminate stack complete, the mould is closed and loaded into a heated press for around 2 hours to consolidate and cure the fin.
• After curing, the demoulded fins are tempered in an oven at 140 ̊C, then only a light sanding is required to create the final surface roughness for optimum flow characteristics in the water.
• Finally, the fins are cut to the required length and the base adapter is molded to the epoxy-carbon blade in a specific mould.
With each fin being optimized for its rider, it is critical that each piece produced will bend and twist in exactly the way it has been designed to do so, providing the rider with exactly the feel and feedback they want for their board and fin. Each Sonntag fin is tested on a unique CNC controlled servo and stepper motor driven test bench that Joerg has developed, building a database of test results that not only ensures the products perform as designed but also validating the consistency of the manufacturing process and raw materials.
“We produce high-performance windsurfing fins that need to accommodate significant loads during sailing. Fins need to combine flexibility with extremely high torsion stiffness that places high interlaminar shear forces on the resin, especially in our softer fins.” commented Joerg Sonntag, MD, Sonntag Fins. “A key requirement for us is a resin that maintains its mechanical properties for many years, and this is where the Sicomin systems deliver”

Sherrod Brown (c) NCTO
25.03.2020

Brown pushing plan to address shortage of personal protective equipment

Brown Wrote to President Outlining Critical Steps White House can Take Now to Address Shortage of Personal Protective Equipment

 U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) hosted a news conference call to discuss his plan for addressing the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) needed by healthcare workers on the frontline of keeping Americans healthy and safe during the coronavirus pandemic.

This weekend, Brown wrote to President Trump outlining several steps the Administration should take immediately to address the shortage and ramp up manufacturing of these critical medical supplies.

Brown Wrote to President Outlining Critical Steps White House can Take Now to Address Shortage of Personal Protective Equipment

 U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) hosted a news conference call to discuss his plan for addressing the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) needed by healthcare workers on the frontline of keeping Americans healthy and safe during the coronavirus pandemic.

This weekend, Brown wrote to President Trump outlining several steps the Administration should take immediately to address the shortage and ramp up manufacturing of these critical medical supplies.

In his plan and in his letter to the President, Brown lists nine steps the Administration could take immediately, including:

  1. Designate a government official who can serve as a point person responsible for coordination the acquisition and development of PPE, medical devices, and other supplies necessary to fight the coronavirus pandemic. 
  2. Establish a PPE and medical device assessment and database to monitor the supply and anticipated needs for PPE, ventilators, diagnostic test kits, and other needed medical supplies to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. 
  3. Publish a list of PPE, medical device, and general medical supply needs to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. 
  4. Establish a hotline capable of handling significant call capacity that will provide U.S. producers centralized information about the results of the national assessment and the current need for PPE, devices, and other health care supplies. 
  5. Provide immediate funding to manufacturers to purchase equipment, retool machinery, hire additional workers, and cover any other expenses needed to increase production of PPE and necessary medical devices and supplies.
  6. Streamline contract and certification procedures to ensure production and delivery of materials are not delayed due to paperwork constraints.
  7. Provide critical protections for workers who are making PPE, medical devices, and necessary supplies to receive a waiver from any shelter-in-place requirements to allow workers to volunteer to go to work in these critical industries. 
  8. Provide purchase guarantees and delivery assistance of product to the communities and health care facilities that need the products most. 
  9. Support companies that have the capacity to sterilize reusable equipment to alleviate the existing PPE shortage. 

In his plan, Brown also pointed out important legislative actions that will help ramp up production of these critical supplies, including expanding the strategic national stockpile authority, substantially increasing Defense Production Act funding and strengthening domestic preferences.

More information:
NCTO Coronavirus United States
Source:

NCTO

(c) AZL Aachen GmbH
28.01.2020

AZL and IKV launch common project

In the AZL Workgroup "High-Performance SMC", a project was developed in cooperation with M-Base, the IKV and the AZL partner network for the efficient and standardized provision of engineering data for SMC. Within the scope of the project, companies can participate in the definition of the required characteristic material data, the guidelines for the production of test specimens and the test specifications.
Sheet Moulding Compounds (SMC) are used in various application areas such as vehicles, electronics, construction and infrastructure.

In the AZL Workgroup "High-Performance SMC", a project was developed in cooperation with M-Base, the IKV and the AZL partner network for the efficient and standardized provision of engineering data for SMC. Within the scope of the project, companies can participate in the definition of the required characteristic material data, the guidelines for the production of test specimens and the test specifications.
Sheet Moulding Compounds (SMC) are used in various application areas such as vehicles, electronics, construction and infrastructure.

Driven by the requirements to reduce the production costs of lightweight components, a new generation of SMC components with high mechanical properties is of highest relevance. SMC offers enormous potential to realize structural components with good lightweight characteristics at significantly reduced costs compared to conventional continuous fiber-reinforced components.
In order to further establish SMC in broad industrial applications companies participating within the AZL Workgroup recognized the value of a data bank for data harmonization of SMC to provide the possibility of easily finding the right material with its characteristics for the needed specific requirements.

“The segment of SMC is with 250,000 tons production per year the largest composites market in Europe. I am very pleased that we start now with the project of data harmonization along the complete value chain. The goal is to have a similar data base as already established by Campus® for thermoplastics and thermoplastic composites. Only with a reliable set data we can convince the engineering experts to use SMC in a larger variety of applications,” says Dr. Michael Effing, Chairman of the Board of AVK and Composites Germany.

As of right now a databank for engineered thermoplastic materials (by Campus®) already exists and is offering an immense value.
Under the lead of M-Base, Dr. CEO Erwin Baur who has successfully established the CAMPUS database, the AZL, IKV and companies along the value chain of long fibre reinforced SMC initiated to build a CAMPUS-compatible data structure and material characterization methodology during the High-Performance SMC Workgroup Meetings.