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06.01.2022

Monforts presents Econtrol® at VDMA Webtalk in February

Monforts textile technologist Jonas Beisel will outline the benefits of the company’s Econtrol® continuous dyeing process during the next free-to-attend VDMA Textile Machinery Webtalk which takes place on February 3rd 2022 at 13.00 (CET).

“Our customers are increasingly looking at shorter production runs and the more economical use of dyestuffs, as well as reducing water and energy consumption,” says Beisel. “We have gained many years of experience in the optimisation of dyeing processes through working with our customers, both at their own plants and in our Advanced Technology Centre (ATC) in Mönchengladbach, Germany.

“Our Thermex universal hotflue for continuous dyeing, curing and thermosoling achieves unrivalled reliability even at high fabric speeds, for exceptional cost-effectiveness when dyeing both large and small batches of woven fabrics. The Econtrol® process for reactive dyestuffs now has an impressive number of references on the market, as a quick and economical one-pass pad-dry and wash off process. This is the ideal process for fast change technology and operational savings.”

Monforts textile technologist Jonas Beisel will outline the benefits of the company’s Econtrol® continuous dyeing process during the next free-to-attend VDMA Textile Machinery Webtalk which takes place on February 3rd 2022 at 13.00 (CET).

“Our customers are increasingly looking at shorter production runs and the more economical use of dyestuffs, as well as reducing water and energy consumption,” says Beisel. “We have gained many years of experience in the optimisation of dyeing processes through working with our customers, both at their own plants and in our Advanced Technology Centre (ATC) in Mönchengladbach, Germany.

“Our Thermex universal hotflue for continuous dyeing, curing and thermosoling achieves unrivalled reliability even at high fabric speeds, for exceptional cost-effectiveness when dyeing both large and small batches of woven fabrics. The Econtrol® process for reactive dyestuffs now has an impressive number of references on the market, as a quick and economical one-pass pad-dry and wash off process. This is the ideal process for fast change technology and operational savings.”

Among key benefits are the saving of resources compared to conventional continuous dyeing methods, excellent reproducibility of pale to dark shades, from lab to bulk, and greater flexibility in production planning due to a resulting dry fabric that does not need an immediate wash off.

Econtrol® is a registered trademark of DyStar® Colours Distribution GmbH, Germany, and Bertram Seuthe of DyStar® will be providing recommendations for dyes and auxiliaries for the process during the VDMA event.

A third speaker, Guido Seiler of Fong’s Europe, will explain how Goller washing ranges help to significantly reduce the water that is conventionally wasted in the washing off process, through a combination of process and chemistry know-how and advanced technologies.

More information:
Monforts VDMA Textilmaschinen
Source:

Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG by AWOL Media

Trützschler introduces new Comber Machine (c) Trützschler
TCO 21
16.12.2021

Trützschler introduces new Comber Machine

Comber machines from Trützschler are already trusted by customers across the textiles industry and around the globe. The TCO 21 is the latest addition to their portfolio and was built to boost productivity,  ensure quality and support increased automation.

High productivity and raw material savings
One of the key benefits of the TCO 21 is its advanced processing speed. This next-generation combing machine is able to produce at a rate of up to 600 nips per minute. the TCO 21 can also be coordinated with Trützschler’s JUMBO CANS (Ø 1.200 mm). They not only reduce yarn defects due to fewer piecings which leads to quality improvements, but also offer a higher efficiency because of their larger dimensions. This, for example, has positive effects on the number of necessary cans and can transports – and results in lower personnel costs.

Comber machines from Trützschler are already trusted by customers across the textiles industry and around the globe. The TCO 21 is the latest addition to their portfolio and was built to boost productivity,  ensure quality and support increased automation.

High productivity and raw material savings
One of the key benefits of the TCO 21 is its advanced processing speed. This next-generation combing machine is able to produce at a rate of up to 600 nips per minute. the TCO 21 can also be coordinated with Trützschler’s JUMBO CANS (Ø 1.200 mm). They not only reduce yarn defects due to fewer piecings which leads to quality improvements, but also offer a higher efficiency because of their larger dimensions. This, for example, has positive effects on the number of necessary cans and can transports – and results in lower personnel costs.

Excellent yarn quality
The TCO 21 comes with COUNT MONITORING as standard. This feature makes it possible for the machine operator to define limits for count variations via an easy-to-use display. Trützschler’s DISC MONITOR system of sensors measures the count continuously, and the machine alerts the operator and switches off if the limit is exceeded. In addition, the COUNT MONITORING function also includes spectrogram analysis.

Customers can further strengthen their focus on quality by choosing to add the COUNT CONTROL function to the TCO 21. It is managed via the same easy-to-use display, and offers automatic sliver count measurement, as well as spectrogram analysis. It also automatically regulates the main draft during production to balance count variations and ensure the desired sliver count. This feature is particularly attractive for customers who manufacture blends of cotton and synthetic, as it can also be used to avoid variations in the overall yarn composition.

Automatic optimization
The TCO 21 joins the TCO 12 from Trützschler as an combing machine that offers automatic PIECING OPTIMIZER technology, and that finds the right piecing setting without a single laboratory test, because of two functions: First by adjusting the piecing time in the combing cycle (timing function). Whereas the resetting of the detaching point (piecing time) is usually a very time-consuming task, it now takes only a few minutes and is performed automatically at a push on a button. Second the customer is helped to select specific detaching curve types (curve function) for their unique requirements.

Easy operation
The TCO 21 is simple to operate and maintain. The SMART TOUCH display is fast and intuitive, and a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) sensor quickly identifies each user and adapts the information on the display to their individual needs. The multi-colored T-LED display provides visual indications of the machine’s status or quality parameters over large distances which enables the operator recognizing them at a glance in the entire spinning mill. The TCO 21 is built with original Trützschler electronics that ensure high performance and durability: Their intelligent cooling system, that has already proven itself in the draw frame TD 10, contributes to a longer service life by reducing the operating temperature of electronic power components. Even if components have to be replaced at some point, the customer can keep their spare parts inventory small, because they can switch also electronics spare parts flexibly between different machine types, e.g. cards and draw frames. The option to add an automatic greasing function completes the easy operation of the TCO 21.

 

Source:

Trützschler

13.12.2021

TMAS: Digitalisation demands streamlined solutions

Fully integrated production lines from single source suppliers have increasingly become the norm in the textile industry and make complete sense in meeting today’s complex supply chain needs, according to TMAS – the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

“Over the past few decades, textile mills have transitioned from consisting of collections of individual machines serviced and maintained largely by in-house mechanics as well as separate supplier companies for each part of the production line,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Those in-house engineering service teams have diminished over the years, while the introduction of electronic drive systems in the 1980s and 90s also put an increased emphasis on the need for third party electrical engineers, operating separately to the machine builders.

“Subsequently, mechanical machines and electronic drive systems became much more integrated, and more recently, with the advent of digitalisation, entire production lines are becoming centrally controlled with remote, instantaneous connections to their suppliers for service and maintenance.

Fully integrated production lines from single source suppliers have increasingly become the norm in the textile industry and make complete sense in meeting today’s complex supply chain needs, according to TMAS – the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

“Over the past few decades, textile mills have transitioned from consisting of collections of individual machines serviced and maintained largely by in-house mechanics as well as separate supplier companies for each part of the production line,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Those in-house engineering service teams have diminished over the years, while the introduction of electronic drive systems in the 1980s and 90s also put an increased emphasis on the need for third party electrical engineers, operating separately to the machine builders.

“Subsequently, mechanical machines and electronic drive systems became much more integrated, and more recently, with the advent of digitalisation, entire production lines are becoming centrally controlled with remote, instantaneous connections to their suppliers for service and maintenance.

“In this context, the integration of machinery and automation specialists as single-source suppliers makes perfect sense, while partnerships between machine builders and their customers have never been more important.”

The recent acquisition of Nowo textile machinery from its previous owner, Brandstones Ab Oy, by TMAS member ACG Kinna, she adds, is a good example of this general trend.

Nowo, headquartered in Turku, Finland, designs, manufactures and exports high-end textile production machinery mainly for the fibre processing industry. At the end of the 1980s it introduced the highly successful Nowo Vac pillow filling system, which has been its best-selling system, alongside the Noworoll ball fibre machine, introduced in the 1990s.

Nowo’s machine range covers the entire production process from bale opening to weighing and filling, and complete production lines are tailored to the specific needs of customers. The company can also deliver individual machines such as bale openers, cards, cross-lappers, pickers, mixing devices, material silos, sucking devices, anti-static units etc. Seven patents cover the company’s technologies.

Founded in 1977, ACG Kinna Automatic, based in Skene in Sweden, specialises in customised and cost-efficient solutions for the production of pillows and quilts. All of its design, manufacturing and final line testing is carried out in Sweden and the reliability and longevity of its machines has earned it the trust of the world’s largest furniture and home decoration retailers and Europe’s largest manufacturer of pillows and duvets, among many customers.

Source:

TMAS / AWOL Media

VDMA: Top young talent with cutting-edge topics  (c) VDMA
The 2021 winners (from top left to right): Dr Martin Hengstermann, Irina Kuznik, Kai-Chieh Kuo.
10.11.2021

VDMA: Top young talent with cutting-edge topics

The Chairman of the Walter Reiners-Stiftung foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association, Peter D. Dornier has awarded prizes to three successful young engineers. The award-winning works provide practical solutions on the topic of circular economy. For example, the recycling of carbon fibres, which are used to produce lightweight components for the automotive industry. Or the environmentally friendly production of yarns from crab shells. Another topic was medical applications: The processing of ultra-fine yarns into stents for aortic repair. The award ceremony took place online on 9 November as part of the Aachen-Dresden-Denkendorf International Textile Conference.  

With a creativity prize, endowed with 3,000 euros, the foundation honoured the diploma thesis of Irina Kuznik, TU Dresden. She used a creative approach to realise solutions for processing chitosan into fibre yarn.

The Chairman of the Walter Reiners-Stiftung foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association, Peter D. Dornier has awarded prizes to three successful young engineers. The award-winning works provide practical solutions on the topic of circular economy. For example, the recycling of carbon fibres, which are used to produce lightweight components for the automotive industry. Or the environmentally friendly production of yarns from crab shells. Another topic was medical applications: The processing of ultra-fine yarns into stents for aortic repair. The award ceremony took place online on 9 November as part of the Aachen-Dresden-Denkendorf International Textile Conference.  

With a creativity prize, endowed with 3,000 euros, the foundation honoured the diploma thesis of Irina Kuznik, TU Dresden. She used a creative approach to realise solutions for processing chitosan into fibre yarn.

Mr Kai-Chieh Kuo was awarded the diploma/master's thesis promotion prize of 3,500 euros. With his master's thesis, which was written at RWTH Aachen University, Mr Kuo contributes to the production of vital components used in medicine. The stents made of ultra-fine yarns are made possible by an innovative modification of the classic tube weaving process.

The Walter Reiners Foundation rewarded the doctoral thesis of Dr. Martin Hengstermann with the promotional prize in the dissertation category, endowed with 5,000 euros. The thesis deals with the production of recycled carbon fibres. These can be used to produce lightweight components for motor vehicle and aircraft construction or the wind energy sector.

New Prize Sustainability / Circular Economy
The environmental conditions of the textile industry and machine construction are changing. Topics such as climate protection and the circular economy are becoming central. From this perspective, the board of the Walter Reiners Foundation has decided to further develop the foundation's prize system.

In 2022, the foundation will for the first time offer a prize with a focus on design / sustainability. Peter D. Dornier, Chairman of the Foundation, explained: "Already in the design phase, one can set the parameters so that a textile product can be reintroduced after use into the economic cycle for a high-quality application. For example, through the appropriate use of materials and finishing. We are looking for solutions for resource-saving design, technology and manufacturing processes."   

(c) TMAS
The new TMAS board members (left to right) Sven Öquist, Jerker Krabbe and Semir Pavlica.
08.11.2021

TMAS has appointed three new members to its board

Jerker Krabbe of Eton Systems, Semir Paclica of Baldwin Technology and Sven Öquist of Coloreel will contribute a wealth of experience from a wide range of industries to the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

Jerker Krabbe joined Eton Systems, one of the leaders in intelligent overhead conveyor systems, as CEO six months ago, and has more than 25 years of commercial, operational and international experience within several well-known companies such as Electrolux, Husqvarna, Gunnebo and Assa Abloy, and most recently as CEO of Sector Alarm AB.

Semir Pavlica has a master’s in finance and started his career at the SEB banking group before joining Baldwin Technology five ago. He is now managing the company’s process improvement and performance.

Sven Öquist joined Coloreel as Vice President of Sales in April this year. He has an international background with previous positions as Managing Director/CEO for a number of Swedish companies. He has also led the global sales team at Polestar, the electrified brand of Volvo Cars.

 

Jerker Krabbe of Eton Systems, Semir Paclica of Baldwin Technology and Sven Öquist of Coloreel will contribute a wealth of experience from a wide range of industries to the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

Jerker Krabbe joined Eton Systems, one of the leaders in intelligent overhead conveyor systems, as CEO six months ago, and has more than 25 years of commercial, operational and international experience within several well-known companies such as Electrolux, Husqvarna, Gunnebo and Assa Abloy, and most recently as CEO of Sector Alarm AB.

Semir Pavlica has a master’s in finance and started his career at the SEB banking group before joining Baldwin Technology five ago. He is now managing the company’s process improvement and performance.

Sven Öquist joined Coloreel as Vice President of Sales in April this year. He has an international background with previous positions as Managing Director/CEO for a number of Swedish companies. He has also led the global sales team at Polestar, the electrified brand of Volvo Cars.

 

25.10.2021

TMAS members showcase sustainable finishing technologies

Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – are proving instrumental in pioneering new sustainable processes for the dyeing, finishing and decoration of textiles.

The wasteful processes involved in these manufacturing stages are only one component in the development of viable circular supply chains for textiles that are now being established in Sweden.

At the recent Conference on Sustainable Finishing of Textiles, held across three separate afternoons on September 30th, October 1st and October 7th, delegates heard that Sweden will introduce extended producer responsibility (EPR) for waste textiles and clothing at the beginning of 2022, ahead of the adoption of a similar European Union-wide EPR system in 2025.

New fibers
Swedish companies are also active in the development of new fibers derived from waste clothing, building on the country’s legacy leadership in pulp and paper production.

Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – are proving instrumental in pioneering new sustainable processes for the dyeing, finishing and decoration of textiles.

The wasteful processes involved in these manufacturing stages are only one component in the development of viable circular supply chains for textiles that are now being established in Sweden.

At the recent Conference on Sustainable Finishing of Textiles, held across three separate afternoons on September 30th, October 1st and October 7th, delegates heard that Sweden will introduce extended producer responsibility (EPR) for waste textiles and clothing at the beginning of 2022, ahead of the adoption of a similar European Union-wide EPR system in 2025.

New fibers
Swedish companies are also active in the development of new fibers derived from waste clothing, building on the country’s legacy leadership in pulp and paper production.

At the Sustainable Finishing of Textiles Conference, however, it was said that all of the environmental gains made by such sustainable new fibers can potentially be cancelled out in the further processing they are subjected to – and especially in resource-intensive conventional dyeing, finishing and decoration.

TMAS members Baldwin Technology and Coloreel have both developed solutions to address this issue.

TexCoat G4
During the conference, Baldwin’s VP of Global Business Development Rick Stanford explained that his company’s TexCoat G4 non-contact spray technology significantly reduces water, chemistry and energy consumption in the finishing process. It consistently and uniformly sprays chemistry across a fabric surface and applies it only where needed, on one or both sides.

Instant coloring
Coloreel’s CEO Mattias Nordin outlined the benefits of his company’s technology which enables the high-quality and instant coloring of a textile thread on-demand and can be paired with any existing embroidery machine without modification. This enables unique effects like shades and gradient to be achieved in an embroidery for the first time.

22.10.2021

VDMA Textile Machinery publishes position paper

In a position paper published on 22 October 2021, the companies organised in the VDMA Textile Machinery Association welcome the ambitions of the EU to promote climate protection, in particular the approach of combining the goals for the EU textile and clothing industry into a sector-specific strategy.

Up to now, the increasing textile consumption around the world, due to growing population and purchasing power has been accompanied by a rising use of resources. “The textile machinery companies organised in the VDMA are geared towards a functioning circular economy. With our highly efficient technologies we are an indispensable partner in this transition process”, explained Regina Brückner, Chairwoman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Associate of Brückner Trockentechnik.  

In a position paper published on 22 October 2021, the companies organised in the VDMA Textile Machinery Association welcome the ambitions of the EU to promote climate protection, in particular the approach of combining the goals for the EU textile and clothing industry into a sector-specific strategy.

Up to now, the increasing textile consumption around the world, due to growing population and purchasing power has been accompanied by a rising use of resources. “The textile machinery companies organised in the VDMA are geared towards a functioning circular economy. With our highly efficient technologies we are an indispensable partner in this transition process”, explained Regina Brückner, Chairwoman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Associate of Brückner Trockentechnik.  

In the new position paper, the executive board of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association emphasises that the new framework must be practicable. Ms Brückner said: “The EU must strike the right balance between necessary, yet also minimal, legislative regulation. A successful transition requires a level playing field which sets out fair rules for sustainability, thereby enabling European companies to nonetheless increase their international competitiveness.”

You can find the complete position paper in the attachment.

Source:

VDMA e. V

14.10.2021

Monforts: Automated finishing at Knopf’s Sohn

Knopf’s Sohn, a contract finisher of technical textiles, has installed a fully automated Montex stenter at its plant in Helmbrechts, Germany.
Knopf’s Sohn is processing technical textiles for the automotive, aerospace, home furnishings and workwear markets, based on wool, cellulose, polyamide and polyester fabrics, along with elastane blends, in weights of 80-800gsm.

The Montex machinery range is constantly being upgraded to meet evolving customer needs for greater automation, ease of operation and energy optimisation. The latest ten chamber line at Knopf’s Sohn, with a working width of up to 2.0 metres, was engineered to specific requirements in order to accelerate the company’s move to fully automatic control of its production, and high scaffolding was required for its installation.

The line benefits from two integrated ECO Booster modules to provide high energy savings. These compact, air-to-air heat exchangers, installed within the roof structure of the line, exploit energy from the exhaust gas to preheat up to 60% of the incoming fresh air entering the stenter.

Knopf’s Sohn, a contract finisher of technical textiles, has installed a fully automated Montex stenter at its plant in Helmbrechts, Germany.
Knopf’s Sohn is processing technical textiles for the automotive, aerospace, home furnishings and workwear markets, based on wool, cellulose, polyamide and polyester fabrics, along with elastane blends, in weights of 80-800gsm.

The Montex machinery range is constantly being upgraded to meet evolving customer needs for greater automation, ease of operation and energy optimisation. The latest ten chamber line at Knopf’s Sohn, with a working width of up to 2.0 metres, was engineered to specific requirements in order to accelerate the company’s move to fully automatic control of its production, and high scaffolding was required for its installation.

The line benefits from two integrated ECO Booster modules to provide high energy savings. These compact, air-to-air heat exchangers, installed within the roof structure of the line, exploit energy from the exhaust gas to preheat up to 60% of the incoming fresh air entering the stenter.

The use of a single ECO Booster unit has been calculated to save up to 35% in energy costs, based on fixation processes. Fully automatic operation, set at the Monforts Qualitex control unit, ensures there is no additional burden on the machine operator.

The line is powered by Exxotherm indirect heating, which practically eliminates the yellowing which can be experienced during the treatment of certain polyamide and elastane-based fabrics, and is also equipped with a Conticlean circulating air filter system for constant high drying capacity.

Software
The latest Qualitex visualisation software offers operators reliability and easy control with its full HD multi-touch monitor and slider function, dashboard function with individual adaptation to operating states and faster access to comprehensive recipe data management.

With the Monformatic control system, the exact maintenance of the dwell time in combined treatment processes (drying and heat-setting) can be monitored. When the heat-setting point is reached, the fan speed is automatically adjusted, keeping energy consumption fully under control.

Source:

A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG / AWOL Media

(c) Brückner Trockentechnik GmbH & Co. KG
23.09.2021

WEIDMANN and BRÜCKNER: New standards in stenter technology

WEIDMANN GmbH in Süßen is known worldwide as a specialist for the finishing of fiber and down-proof articles and woven industrial fabrics. Customers particularly appreciate the company's reliability and flexibility with regard to their individu-al requirements, and consistently high quality of its products. The Swabian textile manufacturer finishes premium fabrics, mainly for the bedding industry, using the latest technology and in an environmentally conscious manner.

WEIDMANN GmbH in Süßen is known worldwide as a specialist for the finishing of fiber and down-proof articles and woven industrial fabrics. Customers particularly appreciate the company's reliability and flexibility with regard to their individu-al requirements, and consistently high quality of its products. The Swabian textile manufacturer finishes premium fabrics, mainly for the bedding industry, using the latest technology and in an environmentally conscious manner.

The complex production and finishing processes for high-quality fabrics require a reliable and efficient machine technology. With this in mind, WEIDMANN has always relied on the proven stenter technolo-gy from BRÜCKNER. For many decades, the German textile machinery manufacturer has been a world leader in the con-struction of production lines for the finishing of classical textiles, woven industrial  fabrics, nonwovens, glass fabrics and floor coverings. In addition to stenters, the company's production program also in-cludes coating lines, relaxation dryers, sanfor lines, continuous dyeing lines as well as ovens for the bonding of nonwovens and other special lines. All machines are produced 100% in-house in Germany.

Both companies continuously invest in new and innovative technology in order to be successful and competitive today and in the future. Only Recently, a completely newly developed BRÜCKNER stenter was installed in the ultra-modern plant at WEIDMANN. During the intensive project engineering phase it soon became clear which features are of special importance for their daily production requirements:

  • uniform moisture distribution in the machine entry and during pick-up of the specialized   chemicals in the finishing padder before the thermoprocess
  • weft-straight fabric flow with minimized residual distortion
  • very good accessibility for maintenance and daily cleaning
  • sensor technology and automation of setting parameters for energy optimization
  • heat-recovery with hot water generation for the dye house
  • the line must be fully Industry 4.0 capable
Source:

Brückner Trockentechnik GmbH & Co. KG

30.08.2021

Changes in the Rieter Board of Directors

  • Luc Tack und Stefaan Haspeslagh resign with immediate effect

The two members of the Board of Directors Luc Tack und Stefaan Haspeslagh announced on August 30, 2021, that they are resigning from the Board of Directors with immediate effect.

Rieter will inform the law enforcement authorities that there is no interest in continuing the criminal proceedings any further.

The Board of Directors welcomes the fact that a joint solution was found that is in the best interests of Rieter and Picanol, both of which are among the world’s leading textile machinery manufacturers.

According to Luc Tack, the Picanol Group (Belgium) will remain a shareholder of Rieter.

 

  • Luc Tack und Stefaan Haspeslagh resign with immediate effect

The two members of the Board of Directors Luc Tack und Stefaan Haspeslagh announced on August 30, 2021, that they are resigning from the Board of Directors with immediate effect.

Rieter will inform the law enforcement authorities that there is no interest in continuing the criminal proceedings any further.

The Board of Directors welcomes the fact that a joint solution was found that is in the best interests of Rieter and Picanol, both of which are among the world’s leading textile machinery manufacturers.

According to Luc Tack, the Picanol Group (Belgium) will remain a shareholder of Rieter.

 

Source:

Rieter Management AG

Jason Kent, BTMA
26.08.2021

New CEO at British Textile Machinery Association (BTMA)

Jason Kent has been appointed as Chief Executive Officer of the BTMA Group, which also includes subsidiaries nw texnet and The Textile Recorder (Machinery & Accessories) Exhibitions Ltd (TREX), effective from Monday 23rd August 2021.

Jason has been a non-executive member of the BTMA board for over eight years and brings a wealth of experience with him, having spent 35 years working in the carpet tufting machinery industry.

As a time-served mechanical technician engineer, he ascended through a series of positions of greater responsibility with Cobble Blackburn until its acquisition in 2013 by the Vandewiele Group, where he undertook the role of Managing Director for the tufting machinery business.

He also studied part-time for his MBA back in 2011 and is also a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute.

“I am very privileged to be joining the BTMA,” said Jason Kent. “I believe there are many generational changes ahead that our members must face and the BTMA needs to be ready and capable of supporting such challenges.”

Jason Kent has been appointed as Chief Executive Officer of the BTMA Group, which also includes subsidiaries nw texnet and The Textile Recorder (Machinery & Accessories) Exhibitions Ltd (TREX), effective from Monday 23rd August 2021.

Jason has been a non-executive member of the BTMA board for over eight years and brings a wealth of experience with him, having spent 35 years working in the carpet tufting machinery industry.

As a time-served mechanical technician engineer, he ascended through a series of positions of greater responsibility with Cobble Blackburn until its acquisition in 2013 by the Vandewiele Group, where he undertook the role of Managing Director for the tufting machinery business.

He also studied part-time for his MBA back in 2011 and is also a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute.

“I am very privileged to be joining the BTMA,” said Jason Kent. “I believe there are many generational changes ahead that our members must face and the BTMA needs to be ready and capable of supporting such challenges.”

 “As I see it, we have three initial goals in providing better business outcomes for our members through active engagement in addressing industry skills deficits, ensuring we are at the forefront of the industrial digitalisation revolution, and leveraging opportunities brought about through innovation and the associated global focus on sustainability.”
Founded in 1940, the British Textile Machinery Association actively promotes British textile machinery manufacturers and their products to the world. The non-profit organisation acts as a bridge between its members and the increasingly diverse industries within the textile manufacturing sector.

More information:
BTMA
Source:

AWOL Media for BTMA

(c) Autefa
25.08.2021

Swiss Textile Machinery: Top Technology for Nonwovens

Originally conceived as a low-cost, high-volume alternative to knitting and weaving, nonwovens was already expanding its market boundaries by the 1970s with new applications in ‘disposables’ such as diapers, hygiene and teabags.

In the past five decades, the nonwovens business has exploded in all directions, reaching a global market worth USD 40.5 billion in 2020, projected to grow to USD 53.5 billion by 2025. This annual growth rate of 5.7% (MarketsandMarkets, Nonwoven Fabric Market Report) is based on countless new applications and expansion into durable, as well as additional disposable, products.

Major growth drivers include the hygiene sector, and filtration media for power plants and air conditioning systems. Especially during the peak of the COVID pandemic in 2020 and 2021, demand in the hygiene sector multiplied. Worldwide capacities for both meltblown and spunlace production rocketed compared to a normal business year. Swiss Autefa Solutions, for example, significantly benefited from this trend, notably with the launch of a fully-automatic machine for producing face masks.

Originally conceived as a low-cost, high-volume alternative to knitting and weaving, nonwovens was already expanding its market boundaries by the 1970s with new applications in ‘disposables’ such as diapers, hygiene and teabags.

In the past five decades, the nonwovens business has exploded in all directions, reaching a global market worth USD 40.5 billion in 2020, projected to grow to USD 53.5 billion by 2025. This annual growth rate of 5.7% (MarketsandMarkets, Nonwoven Fabric Market Report) is based on countless new applications and expansion into durable, as well as additional disposable, products.

Major growth drivers include the hygiene sector, and filtration media for power plants and air conditioning systems. Especially during the peak of the COVID pandemic in 2020 and 2021, demand in the hygiene sector multiplied. Worldwide capacities for both meltblown and spunlace production rocketed compared to a normal business year. Swiss Autefa Solutions, for example, significantly benefited from this trend, notably with the launch of a fully-automatic machine for producing face masks.

The automotive industry is the second big growth area, with many new applications being pioneered. The trend to electric and hybrid vehicles has helped this, as nonwovens reinforced with carbon fibres are widely used as battery housings.

Swiss nonwovens competence
Innovative applications across all sectors have driven the rapid evolution of sophisticated nonwovens machinery. Today’s trends demand higher productivity, sustainability and Industry 4.0 compatibility – demonstrated by the full equipment portfolio of Swiss Textile Machinery member Autefa Solutions. With V-Jet Futura, the company recently sealed the link in its product range between web forming and drying technology. This latest Hydroentanglement Machine, together with the SQ-V Square Drum Dryer, embodies advanced technology combined with significant reductions in energy consumption compared to other process solutions.

A vital contribution to nonwovens production is offered by Rieter subsidiary Graf, a leading supplier of clothing and combs for carding and combing processes in spinning and nonwovens. Graf's Hipro card clothings – suitable for any man-made fibres in the nonwovens sector – are focussing on higher productivity. Their superior performance delivers up to 10% higher throughput and greater carding efficiency compared to conventional clothings. These reliable card clothing elements also ensure a consistently reproducible high web quality, as well as 20% fewer failures in the web, thanks to the precise fibre transfer to and from the cylinder.

Another constant trend in nonwovens today is the drive for better quality. Manufacturers want to take charge of contamination levels in their processes, as well as eradicating defects which may arise during production. Uster Technologies, a leading provider of quality management solutions from fibre to fabric, offers a combined solution to achieve both these required quality standards. At the fibre preparation stage, Uster Jossi Vision Shield N ensures the best possible initial inspection and removal of contamination. Then, at the end of the production sequence, Uster EVS Fabriq Vision N handles automated detection and marking of all the main defects caused during production. This combined solution avoids material waste and takes full advantage of the potential for process optimization.

Source:

Swiss Textile Machinery Association

(c) Brückner Trockentechnik GmbH & Co. KG
BRÜCKNER ECO-HEAT and ECO-AIR system on the stenter at FEINJERSEY
19.08.2021

Sustainable production technology from BRÜCKNER

  • Long-term partnership between the Austrian textile producer FEINJERSEY and the German textile machinery manufacturer BRÜCKNER

The Feinjersey Group is an internationally operating textile company and supplies the "global players" of the textile industry worldwide. The value chain of the company, which is based in Götzis, Austria, ranges from yarn processing to the finished product.

As a fully integrated production company, the internationally active textile company Feinjersey attaches great importance to a high quality standard and guarantees care at every step in the process chain. With approx. 250 employees and annual sales of around 45 million euros, the company knits, dyes and finishes top-quality knitted fabrics as well as elastic woven fabrics for a wide range of applications.

Products are made for the fashion, sports, workwear and technical textiles sectors. Among other things, fabrics for the automotive industry, laminating backings and coating substrate for artificial leather or foils, construction textiles or fabrics for medical technology are all produced.

  • Long-term partnership between the Austrian textile producer FEINJERSEY and the German textile machinery manufacturer BRÜCKNER

The Feinjersey Group is an internationally operating textile company and supplies the "global players" of the textile industry worldwide. The value chain of the company, which is based in Götzis, Austria, ranges from yarn processing to the finished product.

As a fully integrated production company, the internationally active textile company Feinjersey attaches great importance to a high quality standard and guarantees care at every step in the process chain. With approx. 250 employees and annual sales of around 45 million euros, the company knits, dyes and finishes top-quality knitted fabrics as well as elastic woven fabrics for a wide range of applications.

Products are made for the fashion, sports, workwear and technical textiles sectors. Among other things, fabrics for the automotive industry, laminating backings and coating substrate for artificial leather or foils, construction textiles or fabrics for medical technology are all produced.

The Austrian textile manufacturer has been certified with the Bluesign textile seal and ensures efficient use of resources with modern machinery. Water and energy consumption as well as pollutant emissions are to be reduced to a minimum.

In textile finishing in particular, the focus is on minimising energy consumption as this process is the most energy-intensive in the entire process chain. Feinjersey uses its own photovoltaic system for this purpose, as well as the heat recovery and exhaust air purification systems on the stenter frames. By using the waste heat from production, the company's buildings are heated. All six stenter frames at Feinjersey are made by BRÜCKNER and produce with three-stage heat recovery and exhaust air purification systems.

The latest BRÜCKNER line has a working width of 4.20 m and is mainly used for the finishing of high-ly elastic and extremely sensitive knitted fabric. In order to avoid yellowing on the fabric, the stenter is equipped with an indirect gas heating system. The knitting oil vapours coming from the fabric during the heat-setting process are extracted from the dryer and cleaned in a BRÜCK-NER ECO-AIR exhaust air cleaning system before being extracted to atmosphere. The complete exhaust air treat-ment on the newest stenter is carried out by a multistage BRÜCKNER ECO-HEAT and ECO-AIR system.

Source:

Brückner Trockentechnik GmbH & Co. KG

Oerlikon Webinar with a Focus on Customer Service (c) Oerlikon
19.08.2021

Oerlikon Webinar with a Focus on Customer Service

The new series of webinars of the Swiss Oerlikon Group’s Manmade Fibers Solutions business unit will be focusing on services for manmade fiber systems.

Short Overview of the webinars:

  • How ceramics within the yarn path improve the quality of your yarn on September 01
  • myOerlikon – tailored digital services provide a comprehensive overview on September 13
  • Always by your side – with Oerlikon Remote Services on September 22
  • Better safe than sorry – maximize productivity and minimize downtimes with regular machine check-ups on September 29

For more information click here, where we keep you informed about upcoming events.

The new series of webinars of the Swiss Oerlikon Group’s Manmade Fibers Solutions business unit will be focusing on services for manmade fiber systems.

Short Overview of the webinars:

  • How ceramics within the yarn path improve the quality of your yarn on September 01
  • myOerlikon – tailored digital services provide a comprehensive overview on September 13
  • Always by your side – with Oerlikon Remote Services on September 22
  • Better safe than sorry – maximize productivity and minimize downtimes with regular machine check-ups on September 29

For more information click here, where we keep you informed about upcoming events.

Source:

Oerlikon

TMAS: Swedish Group ACG turns 100 (c) Ismail Abdelkareem, ACG Goup
ACG’s Reimar Westerlind and Thomas Arvidsson at the company’s head office in Borås, Sweden
16.08.2021

TMAS: Swedish Group ACG turns 100

It is exactly 100 years ago on August 17th this year that Carl Axel Gustafsson returned from the USA to Sweden with a significant agency agreement from the Boston-based sewing machine leader Reece.

Back in 1921, Reece, along with its competitor Singer, entirely dominated the buttonhole machine market and were the world’s only manufacturers of these machines for jackets, trousers and coats.

Gustafsson’s license enabled his new company A C Gustafsson to become one of Europe’s first leasing organisations, hiring out Reece buttonhole machines and receiving payment per sewn buttonhole stitch.

This business thrived for many decades and formed the basis for the entire ACG Group as it exists today.

Forty years later, on September 2nd 1961 to be precise, Reimar Westerlind walked out of a restaurant after a long and enjoyable lunch with someone he’d never met before, having signed his intention to buy a company he knew nothing about on an improvised contract written on the back of a menu.

It is exactly 100 years ago on August 17th this year that Carl Axel Gustafsson returned from the USA to Sweden with a significant agency agreement from the Boston-based sewing machine leader Reece.

Back in 1921, Reece, along with its competitor Singer, entirely dominated the buttonhole machine market and were the world’s only manufacturers of these machines for jackets, trousers and coats.

Gustafsson’s license enabled his new company A C Gustafsson to become one of Europe’s first leasing organisations, hiring out Reece buttonhole machines and receiving payment per sewn buttonhole stitch.

This business thrived for many decades and formed the basis for the entire ACG Group as it exists today.

Forty years later, on September 2nd 1961 to be precise, Reimar Westerlind walked out of a restaurant after a long and enjoyable lunch with someone he’d never met before, having signed his intention to buy a company he knew nothing about on an improvised contract written on the back of a menu.

“What I didn’t know then was that my dining partner was the family lawyer of Carl Axel Gustafsson,” Reimar explains. “I had no money and knew nothing about the textile industry and I also quickly discovered the business was not doing so well at that time and tried to get out of the agreement, but he insisted I honour it. He told me he had money and would back me, but I’d have to work hard and pay him back in full.”

Reimar certainly took that advice, and at the age of 92 still travels to his office every day to oversee the operations of the diverse companies now operating under the ACG umbrella.

Although textiles remain the bedrock of the business, under Reimar Westerlind’s management, ACG Group has branched out into many other fields of activity over the past 60 years, and its diversity has also led to some highly unexpected developments.

Like many other European manufacturers, ACG also began to expand beyond its traditional borders from the 1970s onwards – initially into the former Soviet Union and subsequently establishing subsidiaries in Estonia, Lithuania, Finland, the Ukraine and Denmark.

23.07.2021

FET installs new Spunbond system at University of Leeds

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd, UK has completed the installation and commissioning of a new FET Laboratory Spunbond system for the University of Leeds.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd, UK has completed the installation and commissioning of a new FET Laboratory Spunbond system for the University of Leeds.

This FET spunbond system is now an integral part of the research facilities of the CCTMIH (Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare), led by Prof. Stephen Russell based in the School of Design, University of Leeds, who commented “The new spunbond system is perfectly suited to our academic research work, and is already proving itself to be extremely versatile and intuitive to use”.
 
This spunbond system complements existing research lab facilities at the university, which covers all areas of fibre and fabric processing, physical testing and characterisation. It forms part of a wider investment in facilities to support fundamental, academic research on ‘future manufacturing’ for medical devices, where the focus is on studying small-scale processing of unconventional polymers and additive mixes to form spunbond fabrics with multifunctional properties.
 
Key to this research is developing the underlying process-structure-performance relationships, based on the measured data, to provide detailed understanding of how final fabric performance can be controlled during processing.

As a rule, many exciting materials developed in academic research struggle to progress beyond the bench, because of compatibility issues with key manufacturing processes such as spunbond. By leveraging mono, core-sheath and island-in-the-sea bicomponent technology, the Leeds University team is working with polymer and biomaterial research scientists, engineers and clinicians to explore the incorporation of unusual materials in spunbond fabrics, potentially widening applications.
 
FET has built on its melt spinning expertise to develop a true laboratory scale spunbond system and is currently working on a number of other such projects globally with research institutions and manufacturers.

Source:

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd / Project Marketing Ltd

Trützschler: New Pre-Cleaner CL-X for Cotton (c) Trützschler GmbH & Co. KG
09.07.2021

Trützschler: New Pre-Cleaner CL-X for Cotton

Double the production rate, with lower energy consumption per kilogram of fiber material – that might sound like a contradiction, but the new Trützschler pre-cleaner CL-X makes it possible. It gently and reliably removes coarse contaminants like leaf debris, stalks or seeds from cotton with minimum loss of good fibers. The pre-cleaner CL-X provides more efficiency and lays the foundation for a high-quality end-product before the cotton is further processed in mixers and fine cleaners.

CL-X features at one glance

Double the production rate, with lower energy consumption per kilogram of fiber material – that might sound like a contradiction, but the new Trützschler pre-cleaner CL-X makes it possible. It gently and reliably removes coarse contaminants like leaf debris, stalks or seeds from cotton with minimum loss of good fibers. The pre-cleaner CL-X provides more efficiency and lays the foundation for a high-quality end-product before the cotton is further processed in mixers and fine cleaners.

CL-X features at one glance

  • Continuous production of 1,600 kilograms per hour for present blow room configuration.
  • 30% energy saving compared to the current benchmark.
  • Integrated WASTECONTROL for automatic adjustment recommendation of waste excretion to avoid unnecessary fiber loss.
  • 2.60 m long cleaning section.
  • New and improved grid geometry for better separation and gentle tuft treatment.
  • Material draft due to 10 % higher speed of second opening roller for reliable and consistent fiber transport.
  • Optimal cleaning level and minimal fiber loss due to individual and stepless grid adjustment for each opening roller by motor.
  • Gentle tuft treatment with adjustable opening roller speed.
  • Synchronized lot management (automatic lot change for up to three lots).
  • Connection possibility for a waste box (for waste analysis).
  • Lower cost of ownership.
Swiss Textile Machinery companies at ITMA Asia + CITME (c) 2021, Swissmem
Impression from ITMA Asia + CITME 2020
18.06.2021

Swiss Textile Machinery companies at ITMA Asia + CITME

The recent ITMA Asia + CITME exhibition was marked by a strong showing from Swiss Textile Machinery members, in what was the sector’s first major face-to-face showcase since the pandemic restrictions.

With an attendance comprised of 99% visitors, the show still proved a satisfactory venture, the Swiss companies reported. There was real product innovation, and meaningful customer interest, prompting a genuine mood of optimism among exhibitors. The event was held from June 12-16 in Shanghai, with 18 Swiss exhibitors, of whom 13 were Swiss Textile Machinery member companies.

The Swiss Textile Machinery member firms exhibiting at ITMA Asia + CITME 2020 were:

  • Bräcker
  • Graf
  • Hunziker
  • Loepfe
  • Luwa
  • Polytex
  • Rieter
  • Santex Rimar
  • Sedo Engineering
  • SSM
  • Stäubli
  • Uster
  • Willy Grob

The recent ITMA Asia + CITME exhibition was marked by a strong showing from Swiss Textile Machinery members, in what was the sector’s first major face-to-face showcase since the pandemic restrictions.

With an attendance comprised of 99% visitors, the show still proved a satisfactory venture, the Swiss companies reported. There was real product innovation, and meaningful customer interest, prompting a genuine mood of optimism among exhibitors. The event was held from June 12-16 in Shanghai, with 18 Swiss exhibitors, of whom 13 were Swiss Textile Machinery member companies.

The Swiss Textile Machinery member firms exhibiting at ITMA Asia + CITME 2020 were:

  • Bräcker
  • Graf
  • Hunziker
  • Loepfe
  • Luwa
  • Polytex
  • Rieter
  • Santex Rimar
  • Sedo Engineering
  • SSM
  • Stäubli
  • Uster
  • Willy Grob
14.06.2021

Swedish automation boosts Tritex sewing operations

Founded in 1952, Svegea of Sweden – a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association – has over 60 years of experience in exclusively designing, manufacturing and installing high quality collarette band cutting machines worldwide.

These are used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as waistbands, cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements, such as Triteks Trejd.

Founded in 1994, this family-owned business employs over 280 people at its plant in Prilep, North Macedonia, where high quality cotton fabrics are expertly converted into the products of the Tritex Underwear brand.

The Prilep operation encompasses the processing of fabrics, design, cutting, sewing, quality control and packing in a fully integrated workflow.

With around 200 sewing machinists, the Tritex product range encompasses briefs, boxers, slips, t-shirts, pyjamas and body slips which are primarily sold to countries within the European Union, as well as the domestic market.

Founded in 1952, Svegea of Sweden – a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association – has over 60 years of experience in exclusively designing, manufacturing and installing high quality collarette band cutting machines worldwide.

These are used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as waistbands, cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements, such as Triteks Trejd.

Founded in 1994, this family-owned business employs over 280 people at its plant in Prilep, North Macedonia, where high quality cotton fabrics are expertly converted into the products of the Tritex Underwear brand.

The Prilep operation encompasses the processing of fabrics, design, cutting, sewing, quality control and packing in a fully integrated workflow.

With around 200 sewing machinists, the Tritex product range encompasses briefs, boxers, slips, t-shirts, pyjamas and body slips which are primarily sold to countries within the European Union, as well as the domestic market.

The company has also just completed the digitalisation of its full production via the in-house DPC-SYS system, installing around 200 industrial PCs linking each of its workstations and departments.

Triteks Trejd currently operates three of the latest Svegea collarette cutting machines and is highly satisfied with their performance, as well as the service provided by the Swedish company.

VDMA member companies at ITMA ASIA + CITME (c) ITMA
07.06.2021

VDMA member companies at ITMA ASIA + CITME

Although affected by the Covid-19 pandemic, ITMA ASIA + CITME, which takes place mid-June in Shanghai, will see a convincing participation of VDMA member companies. 56 exhibitors from Germany will exhibit at this year’s edition of Asia’s major fair for textile machinery. Due to the pandemic and travel restrictions, this is much less than in 2018, when 99 exhibitors from Germany were present. The booked space of German companies has almost halved compared to 2018. Nevertheless, Germany is still the second largest exhibitor nation after China.

At a virtual VDMA press conference early June, these renowned VDMA member companies* presented their highlights for the Asian market:

Although affected by the Covid-19 pandemic, ITMA ASIA + CITME, which takes place mid-June in Shanghai, will see a convincing participation of VDMA member companies. 56 exhibitors from Germany will exhibit at this year’s edition of Asia’s major fair for textile machinery. Due to the pandemic and travel restrictions, this is much less than in 2018, when 99 exhibitors from Germany were present. The booked space of German companies has almost halved compared to 2018. Nevertheless, Germany is still the second largest exhibitor nation after China.

At a virtual VDMA press conference early June, these renowned VDMA member companies* presented their highlights for the Asian market:

  • Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions Division
  • Truetzschler Group
  • Neuenhauser
  • Saurer
  • Karl Mayer
  • Groz-Beckert
  • Herzog
  • Lenze
  • Mahlo
  • Sedo Treepoint
  • Thies

Instead of visiting the show personally, the VDMA offers a virtual trip to Asia. The established "Textile Machinery Webtalk" series via the newsroom IndustryArena will focus on ITMA ASIA in the run-up to the fair: VDMA Webtalks meet ITMA ASIA.

*See attached document for more information.