From the Sector

Reset
6 results
03.02.2022

Lenzing’s new prize for research projects on ethical and sustainable fashion

The Lenzing Group will present the Young Scientist Award for outstanding research in the field of fibers and textiles for the first time in 2022. The Dornbirn Global Fiber Congress (GFC Dornbirn) is an ideal platform for the recently launched research competition. Bachelor’s and master’s degree students will have the opportunity to submit their scientific work in the categories of fashion and the circular economy, textile recycling and the innovative use of biobased fibers to a jury of well-known industry experts.

The jury consists of Karla Magruder (Founder of Acceleration Circularity), Friedericke von Wedel-Parlow (Beneficial Design Institute Berlin) and Dieter Eichinger (Head of Standardization and Innovation, Secretary-General of BISFA). The winning project will receive a prize of EUR 5,000. The aim is to promote the students’ work and create a platform for networking with the textile and fiber industry.

The Lenzing Group will present the Young Scientist Award for outstanding research in the field of fibers and textiles for the first time in 2022. The Dornbirn Global Fiber Congress (GFC Dornbirn) is an ideal platform for the recently launched research competition. Bachelor’s and master’s degree students will have the opportunity to submit their scientific work in the categories of fashion and the circular economy, textile recycling and the innovative use of biobased fibers to a jury of well-known industry experts.

The jury consists of Karla Magruder (Founder of Acceleration Circularity), Friedericke von Wedel-Parlow (Beneficial Design Institute Berlin) and Dieter Eichinger (Head of Standardization and Innovation, Secretary-General of BISFA). The winning project will receive a prize of EUR 5,000. The aim is to promote the students’ work and create a platform for networking with the textile and fiber industry.

The Austrian Fibers Institute is the organizer of the 61st Dornbirn Global Fiber Congress on a not-for-profit basis. The event, due to take place from September 14 to 16, 2022, will offer an ideal setting for the presentation of the Young Scientist Award prize.

You can read more about the Young Scientist Award and the submission in the attached document.

Political Tailwind for Alternative Carbon Sources (c) Renewable Carbon Initiative
European Policy under the new green deal
22.12.2021

Political Tailwind for Alternative Carbon Sources

  • More than 30 leading pioneers of the chemical and material sector welcome the latest political papers from Brussels, Berlin and Düsseldorf

The political situation for renewable carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling for the defossilisation of the chemical and materials industry has begun to shift fundamentally in Europe. For the first time, important policy papers from Brussels and Germany take into consideration that the term decarbonisation alone is not sufficient, and that there are important industrial sectors with a permanent and even growing carbon demand. Finally, the need for a sustainable coverage of this carbon demand and the realisation of sustainable carbon cycles have been identified on the political stage. They are elemental to the realisation of a sustainable chemical and derived materials industry.

  • More than 30 leading pioneers of the chemical and material sector welcome the latest political papers from Brussels, Berlin and Düsseldorf

The political situation for renewable carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling for the defossilisation of the chemical and materials industry has begun to shift fundamentally in Europe. For the first time, important policy papers from Brussels and Germany take into consideration that the term decarbonisation alone is not sufficient, and that there are important industrial sectors with a permanent and even growing carbon demand. Finally, the need for a sustainable coverage of this carbon demand and the realisation of sustainable carbon cycles have been identified on the political stage. They are elemental to the realisation of a sustainable chemical and derived materials industry.

The goal is to create sustainable carbon cycles. This requires comprehensive carbon management of renewable sources, which includes carbon from biomass, carbon from Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU) – the industrial use of CO2 as an integral part – as well as mechanical and chemical recycling. And only the use of all alternative carbon streams enables a true decoupling of the chemical and materials sector from additional fossil carbon from the ground. Only in this way can the chemical industry stay the backbone of modern society and transform into a sustainable sector that enables the achievement of global climate goals. The Renewable Carbon Initiative’s (RCI) major aim is to support the smart transition from fossil to renewable carbon: utilising carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling instead of additional fossil carbon from the ground. This is crucial because 72% of the human-made greenhouse gas emissions are directly linked to additional fossil carbon. The RCI supports all renewable carbon sources available, but the political support is fragmented and differs between carbon from biomass, recycling or carbon capture and utilisation (CCU). Especially CCU has so far not been a strategic objective in the Green Deal and Fit-for-55.

This will change fundamentally with the European Commission's communication paper on “Sustainable Carbon Cycles” published on 15 December. The position in the paper represents an essential step forward that shows embedded carbon has reached the political mainstream – supported by recent opinions from members of the European parliament and also, apparently, by the upcoming IPCC assessment report 6. Now, CCU becomes a recognised and credible solution for sustainable carbon cycles and a potentially sustainable option for the chemical and  material industries. Also, in the political discussions in Brussels, the term “defossilation” is appearing more and more often, complementing or replacing the term decarbonisation in those areas where carbon is indispensable. MEP Maria da Graça Carvahlo is among a number of politicians in Brussels who perceive CCU as an important future industry, putting it on the political map and creating momentum for CCU. This includes the integration of CCU into the new Carbon Removal Regime and the Emission Trading System (ETS).

As the new policy documents are fully in line with the strategy of the RCI, the more than 30 member companies of the initiative are highly supportive of this new development and are ready to support policy-maker with data and detailed suggestions for active support and the realisation of sustainable carbon cycles and a sound carbon management. The recent political papers of relevance are highlighted in the following.

Brussels: Communication paper on “Sustainable Carbon Cycles”
On 15 December, the European Commission has published the communication paper “Sustainable Carbon Cycles” . For the first time, the importance of carbon in different industrial sectors is clearly stated. One of the key statements in the paper is the full recognition of CCU for the first time as a solution for the circular economy, which includes CCU-based fuels as well. The communication paper distinguishes between bio-based CO2, fossil CO2 and CO2 from direct air capture when addressing carbon removal and it also announces detailed monitoring of the different CO2 streams. Not only CCU, but also carbon from the bioeconomy is registered as an important pillar for the future. Here, the term carbon farming has been newly introduced, which refers to improved land management practices that result in an increase of carbon sequestration in living biomass, dead organic matter or soils by enhancing carbon capture or reducing the release of carbon. Even though the list of nature-based carbon storage technologies is non-exhaustive in our view, we strongly support the paper’s idea to deem sustainable land and forest management as a basis for the bioeconomy more important than solely considering land use as a carbon sink. Surprisingly, chemical recycling, which is also an alternative carbon source that substitutes additional fossil carbon from the ground (i.e. carbon from crude oil, natural gas or from coal), is completely absent from the communication paper.

Berlin: Coalition paper of the new German Government: “Dare more progress – alliance for freedom, justice and sustainability”
The whole of Europe is waiting to see how the new German government of Social Democrats, Greens and Liberals will shape the German climate policy. The new reform agenda focuses in particular on solar and wind energy as well as especially hydrogen. Solar energy is to be expanded to 200 GW by 2030 and two percent of the country's land is to be designated for onshore wind energy. A hydrogen grid infrastructure is to be created for green hydrogen, which will form the backbone of the energy system of the future – and is also needed for e-fuels and sustainable chemical industry, a clear commitment to CCU. There is a further focus on the topic of circular economy and recycling. A higher recycling quota and a product-specific minimum quota for the use of recyclates and secondary raw materials should be established at European level. In the coalition paper, there is also a clear commitment to chemical recycling to be found. A significant change for the industry is planned to occur in regards to the so-called “plastic tax” of 80 cents per kilogram of non-recycled plastic packaging. This tax has been implemented by the EU, but most countries are not passing on this tax to the manufacturers and distributors, or only to a limited extent. The new German government now plans to fully transfer this tax over to the industry.

Düsseldorf: Carbon can protect the climate – Carbon Management Strategy North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW)
Lastly, the RCI highly welcomes North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW, Germany) as the first region worldwide to adopt a comprehensive carbon management strategy, a foundation for the transformation from using additional fossil carbon from the ground to the utilisation of renewable carbon from biomass, CO2 and recycling. For all three alternative carbon streams, separate detailed strategies are being developed to achieve the defossilisation of the industry. This is all the more remarkable as North Rhine-Westphalia is the federal state with the strongest industry in Germany, in particular the chemical industry. And it is here, of all places, that a first master plan for the conversion of industry from fossil carbon to biomass, CO2 and recycling is implemented. If successful, NRW could become a global leader in sustainable carbon
management and the region could become a blueprint for many industrial regions.

During the first physical Frankfurt Fashion Week in January 2022, PREMIUM GROUP will show more novelties than ever. (c) PREMIUM GROUP
SEEK
06.10.2021

SAVE THE DATE: Frankfurt, January 2022

  • HIGHER, FASTER, FURTHER ! During the first physical Frankfurt Fashion Week in January 2022, PREMIUM GROUP will show more novelties than ever.

The anticipation is rising! With the actual move to Frankfurt in January 2022, Anita Tillmann, Jörg Arntz and the teams will not only present further developed versions of the PREMIUM and SEEK fashion fairs, but will also celebrate a major B2C festival for the first time with THE GROUND.

More than ever, the Berliners‘ passion for people and fashion, but also for business and trading, is at the heart of all their events. And where better to combine all this than in the power metropolis of Frankfurt am Main.

  • HIGHER, FASTER, FURTHER ! During the first physical Frankfurt Fashion Week in January 2022, PREMIUM GROUP will show more novelties than ever.

The anticipation is rising! With the actual move to Frankfurt in January 2022, Anita Tillmann, Jörg Arntz and the teams will not only present further developed versions of the PREMIUM and SEEK fashion fairs, but will also celebrate a major B2C festival for the first time with THE GROUND.

More than ever, the Berliners‘ passion for people and fashion, but also for business and trading, is at the heart of all their events. And where better to combine all this than in the power metropolis of Frankfurt am Main.

„No city in Germany - no city in Europe - stands for business relevance and trading power as much as Frankfurt am Main,“ explains Tillmann. „We now have a unique opportunity to actively shape the future together. PREMIUM GROUP provides the industry with the platform, the brands with the creative content. In addition, we do what we do best, introduce the right players to each other and connect them. We bring together the movers and shakers who have the same drive as we do. With this new mix of location, entertainment, creative industry and trading focus, we are creating a unique momentum after the pandemic - January is when the big deals are made and the c ourse is set for the future.“

To achieve this goal, the PREMIUM GROUP teams have also given the proven successful formats PREMIUM and SEEK a new coat of paint. More space, new areas and shorter distances provide visitors with a completely new trade event experience. Trends, brands and events can be discovered together with new and well-known partners - for the first time all in one place!

And PREMIUM, which is already entering its 19th year in January, is also showing a new side in Frankfurt. Instead of being spread out like in Station-Berlin, in Frankfurt all brands show their collections in one big hall. „We are so excited to finally unite all exhibitors in one hall. This way we create a universe with many different worlds - colorful and exciting,“ says Wiebus. „We are in close exchange with all the protagonists throughout the year and continue to develop the concepts together. The entire industry is positive about coming together in Frankfurt. Everyone is keen to experience and create something completely new! We offer the framework for this - that is our strength.“

And the Berliners have another surprise in store for the Frankfurt debut: With THE GROUND, they are organizing a large fashion festival for young end consumers for the first time. Responsible for the event concept, in addition to Tillmann, Arntz and the PREMIUM GROUP- team, is B2C expert Kai Zollhöfer, who already made the Bread & Butter by Zalando a crowd puller. “THE GROUND is a B2C festival aimed at a young, purpose-driven generation. This new generation has a strong stance on current social and environmental challenges and expects brands to reflect them. The overriding themes at THE GROUND are therefore sustainability, diversity and equality”, said Zollhöfer.

The 3-day event offers brands the opportunity to interactively exhibit purpose-driven stories and products. In addition to the thematic focus on fashion, brands from the fields of wellbeing, beauty, mobility and technology will also present innovative products and solutions.

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project ©Tchibo
The demand for Fairtrade organic cotton is growing rapidly and is supported by a project initiated by Dibella in India.
29.06.2021

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

"In India, it is mainly micro-farms and village cooperatives that are active in organic cotton cultivation. Conversion of additional land and sustainable management could increase yields and fibre quality of organic cotton. The Chetna Organic initiative, with which we have been working successfully for many years, advises the farmers in these processes. It supports the farmers and village communities with targeted education, training and practical assistance in organic farming, thus preparing the ground for better income and living conditions for the families," says Ralf Hellmann, Managing Director of Dibella.

Several alliance partners - Dibella, Fairtrade Germany, GIZ, Organic Cotton Accelerator (OCA) and Tchibo - have taken the exemplary initiative as an opportunity to promote the cultivation and expansion of organic cotton in India. In cooperation with Chetna Organic, they focus on supporting Indian women's cooperatives, women farmers and families in the production of organic cotton as part of the "Organic Cotton Pilot Project". Tchibo and Fairtrade subsidise micro-farms during the conversion phase of the fields (the fibres are only recognised as organic cotton four years after conversion) and contribute to the provision of GMO-free seeds, which have become a scarce commodity in India. Together with Dibella, they finance training courses that teach the optimal use of natural rainfall as well as efficient, ecological cultivation methods, which subsequently lead to improved fibre quality. In addition, they commit to purchasing Fairtrade organic cotton for many years.

Ralf Hellmann: "The pilot project enables us to expand our Dibella Good Textiles collection because it guarantees us long-term access to fair-trade organic cotton. At the same time, it improves the living conditions of the small-scale farmers and their families. We therefore hope that "Organic Cotton" will also set a precedent in other cotton growing regions and bring organic farming forward in India."

Bremer Baumwollbörse, Bremer Rathaus (c) Bremen Cotton Exchange
Bremer Baumwollbörse, Bremer Rathaus
10.02.2020

International Cotton Conference Bremen 2020: keynotes

Focus on Sustainability and Climate Change

Passion for Cotton: The 35th International Cotton Conference Bremen starts on 25 March in the Hanseatic city’s historic Town Hall. But before subject-specific questions are discussed in depth in the individual sessions, the concise and inspiring keynotes by leading business experts from science and industry will draw attention to the current trends and challenges in the industry at the start of the conference. A large part of the presentations is shaped by the current discussion on environmental and sustainability issues and the resulting consequences for the global economy.

Climate Change and Sustainability

“Climate change - a storm in a teacup?” asks Kai Hughes, Executive Director of the International Cotton Advisory Committee, Washington D.C., USA, in a provocative speech. The aim of his presentation is to work out the challenges of climate change especially for agriculture and cotton production. This should form the basis for later discussion on concrete approaches and solutions within the cotton community.

Focus on Sustainability and Climate Change

Passion for Cotton: The 35th International Cotton Conference Bremen starts on 25 March in the Hanseatic city’s historic Town Hall. But before subject-specific questions are discussed in depth in the individual sessions, the concise and inspiring keynotes by leading business experts from science and industry will draw attention to the current trends and challenges in the industry at the start of the conference. A large part of the presentations is shaped by the current discussion on environmental and sustainability issues and the resulting consequences for the global economy.

Climate Change and Sustainability

“Climate change - a storm in a teacup?” asks Kai Hughes, Executive Director of the International Cotton Advisory Committee, Washington D.C., USA, in a provocative speech. The aim of his presentation is to work out the challenges of climate change especially for agriculture and cotton production. This should form the basis for later discussion on concrete approaches and solutions within the cotton community.

With his lecture “The HUGO BOSS sustainability programme ... and what our customer has to do with it” Andreas Streubig, Director of Global Sustainability at Hugo Boss AG, Metzingen, Germany, rolls up the textile value chain from a different angle, starting at the consumer level. As a representative of a premium brand for women's and men's clothing, Streubig discusses sustainability as a strategic element of the corporate strategy and provides information on how elements of the strategy are being implemented at Hugo Boss.

Rüdiger Senft, Head of Sustainability at Commerzbank, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, looks at the changing role of banks in financing the cotton market. In addition to a general introduction to the topic of sustainability and banking regulation, Senft's presentation deals with the financing of the cotton trade from a social and ecological point of view.
The opening session on 25 March is hosted by Bill Ballenden, founder and owner of Dragontree, Swindon, UK, an online auction platform for the cotton trade. As a former cotton manager for Louis Dreyfus in Europe and Asia, Bill Ballenden has many years of experience in the industry.

Cross-Cutting Issues: Digitalisation, Gender, Value Chains

The subsequent session in the conference programme with the headline “A Wider View” is devoted to currently defining trends and important cross-cutting issues in the industry. This goes far beyond classic cotton themes.

A lecture by Mark Messura, Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain Marketing for Cotton Incorporated, Cary, North Carolina, deals with the role of cotton in an increasingly digitally controlled supply chain. Significant keywords here are faster delivery times, vertical integration, transparency and traceability.

The presentation by Roger Gilmartin, Managing Director of Tri-Blend Consulting, Charlotte, USA, entitled “The secret recipe for timely, cost-optimised and high-quality cotton clothing” promises exciting and enlightening insights. Tri-Blend Consulting conducts studies on the performance of different cotton varieties during the entire consumption process to the finished yarn and evaluates them from an economic point of view.

Amy Jackson, from the Better Cotton Initiative, London, UK, presents ICA Liverpool's “Women in Cotton” initiative. With this commitment, the initiative aims to increase the influence of women in the cotton industry and give them a stronger voice, for example by building networks in cooperation.

Navdeep Singh Sodhi, International Strategic Management Consultant at the Gherzi Textile Organisation, Switzerland, gives an insight into the current development of the value chain for cotton, textiles and clothing in Africa. Looking ahead to the coming decades, also in view of population growth, Africa is seen as having a high potential for building economic structures to improve income and prosperity.

Thomas Schneider, Professor at the University of Applied Sciences in Berlin and active in the field of production planning and control, textile materials and materials testing will host the session. A leading light in his field, Thomas Schneider has more than 30 years of experience in scientific and application-oriented research in the textile and fibre sector, including at the Fibre Institute Bremen e.V.

Source:

Bremer Baumwollbörse

Suite 13 (c) Greenshowroom und Ethical Fashion Show Berlin
Suite 13
12.06.2018

Greenshowroom und Ethical Fashion Show Berlin: Trends Frühjahr / Sommer 2019

Sehnsucht nach Weite. Der Sommer ruft und weckt die Sehnsucht nach der Endlosigkeit des Meeres. Nach dem authentischen Kennenlernen ferner Kulturen. Nach ruhigen Sommerhäusern umgeben von trockenen Feldern und grenzenloser Weite. Mal erinnern natürliche Materialien und harmonische Farbpaletten an mediterrane Landschaften unter wolkenlosem Himmel, mal wecken folkloristische Details Assoziationen mit exotischen Lebensstilen. Die Kollektionen oszillieren zwischen laut und leise, zwischen kräftig und zart, zwischen subtil und markant. Sie alle verbindet jedoch eines: Die Hommage an den weiten Raum, der dort draußen außerhalb der Städte wartet, und an seine belebende Kraft. Ob beeinflusst von der engen Zusammenarbeit mit Kunsthandwerkern weltweit und dem Wunsch, ihre traditionellen Handwerkstechniken zu erhalten, oder inspiriert von der Einzigartigkeit der Natur — die SS19-Kollektionen der Aussteller des Messe-Duos Greenshowroom und Ethical Fashion Show Berlin vermitteln eines ganz bestimmt: Lust auf Sommer, auf Ferne und Freiheit.

Sehnsucht nach Weite. Der Sommer ruft und weckt die Sehnsucht nach der Endlosigkeit des Meeres. Nach dem authentischen Kennenlernen ferner Kulturen. Nach ruhigen Sommerhäusern umgeben von trockenen Feldern und grenzenloser Weite. Mal erinnern natürliche Materialien und harmonische Farbpaletten an mediterrane Landschaften unter wolkenlosem Himmel, mal wecken folkloristische Details Assoziationen mit exotischen Lebensstilen. Die Kollektionen oszillieren zwischen laut und leise, zwischen kräftig und zart, zwischen subtil und markant. Sie alle verbindet jedoch eines: Die Hommage an den weiten Raum, der dort draußen außerhalb der Städte wartet, und an seine belebende Kraft. Ob beeinflusst von der engen Zusammenarbeit mit Kunsthandwerkern weltweit und dem Wunsch, ihre traditionellen Handwerkstechniken zu erhalten, oder inspiriert von der Einzigartigkeit der Natur — die SS19-Kollektionen der Aussteller des Messe-Duos Greenshowroom und Ethical Fashion Show Berlin vermitteln eines ganz bestimmt: Lust auf Sommer, auf Ferne und Freiheit.

Ombre Claire
Delikate Details, exquisite Formen, sorgfältig ausgewählte Rohstoffe – kurzum Eleganz. Dafür steht der zeitgenössische Schmuck des Pariser Labels Ombre Claire. Für die  Designerin Aude Durou beinhaltet der Begriff Eleganz allerdings noch mehr als das: einen kooperativen Geist und den Respekt aller Beteiligten. Ihre Entwürfe setzen Tuareg-Kunsthandwerker in Niger und Mali in die Tat um. Die Designs entstehen aus der Begegnung der Sahara-Kultur und der Fantasie der Designerin. Die aktuelle Kollektion steht unter dem Motto „Eclipse“. Silbermünzen füllen sich mit dunklem Ebenholz, Ringe von Planeten und Sonnensystemen drehen sich um sich selbst und wecken Assoziationen mit den 70er Jahren.

Komana
Verspielt. Individuell. Mutig. Die beiden Designerinnen des Labels Komana, Livia und Nina Henne, verbinden in ihren Entwürfen ihre Faszination für Folklore, die visionäre Welt von Künstlern und die Wunder der Natur. Grafische Prints sind stets das Herzstück der Kollektionen. Für die kommende warme Jahreszeit interpretieren die Schweizer Schwestern unter anderem Punkte neu. Digitale Prints treffen auf Blockprints, die indische Kunsthandwerker umsetzen und so die Tradition am Leben halten. Sorgfältig ausgewählte ökologisch und fair produzierte Materialien dienen als Leinwand für die Ideen. So werden delikate, locker geschnittene Seiden-Tops und Hosen durch Utility-Westen aus handgewobener Baumwolle kontrastiert.


Jungle Folk
Trockene Heufelder, Sommerhäuser und schlichtes Landleben – hinter der SS19-Kollektion des Schweizer Labels Jungle Folk steht der Gedanke eines entschleunigten Sommers. Klassisches Beige und Schwarz wird ergänzt durch Akzente in Blau, Cassis und Eigelb. Feminin wehende Leinen-Kleider und Jumpsuits treffen auf hochgeschnittene Hosen und Oversize-Jacken aus handgewobenen Seiden-Denim-Stoffen. Auch in der kommenden Saison ist es wieder eine Mischung aus Moderne und Zeitlosigkeit gepaart mit qualitativ hochwertigen Stoffen und Fertigung in kleinen Kooperativen und Manufakturen, die die Kollektion so außergewöhnlich macht.

Suite 13
Zeitlos und originell. Clean und natürlich. Das ist die Handschrift, die das spanische Label Suite 13 ausmacht. Auch im kommenden Frühjahr und Sommer bleibt die Marke diesen Prinzipien treu. Leuchtende Farben treffen auf neutrale Töne, die an mediterrane Landschaften erinnern. Im Mittelpunkt der SS19-Kollektion steht ein Druck, der die Schönheit der Frau als künstlerische Skizzen von verschiedenen Frauenkörpern aufgreift. Die natürlichen, meist in Spanien hergestellten Materialien wie Leinen werden in kleinen Werkstätten in Barcelona zu eleganten, puristischen Styles verarbeitet.  

Mymarini
Einen perfekten Badeanzug zu kreieren, der Stil, Nachhaltigkeit und Funktionalität spielend vereint – mit diesem Anspruch startete Mareen Burk das Hamburger Label Mymarini. Entstanden ist eine ethische Badekollektion für Surfer und für alle, die sich für Wasser, Sport, Style und Umweltschutz interessieren. Garne und Etiketten stammen aus Deutschland, die Stoffe aus Italien und die Produktion findet in Kroatien statt. Der Clou: Die Styles sind zum Wenden und bieten dadurch zwei Designs in einem. In der SS19-Kollektion setzen goldene Kanten und starke Farbkombinationen wie Pink und Rot auffällige Highlights. Edel wird es mit Naturtönen wie Sand, Creme und Oliv.

Ecoalf
„Because there is no Planet B“ – so lautet das Motto des spanischen Labels Ecoalf. Im kommenden Frühjahr und Sommer verbindet die für innovatives Recycling bekannte Marke die drei Themen Ocean, Habana und Studio. Inspiriert von dem kubanischen Flair, kombiniert Ecoalf für die Linie Habana heimische Stoffe wie Hanf mit strukturierten, fließenden Textilien sowie natürliche Farbtöne mit neuen Prints. Als Teil ihres „Upcycling the Oceans“-Projektes lanciert das Label zudem eine neue Swimwear-Linie aus recycelten PET-Flaschen, die in Thailand aus dem Meer gesammelt werden.