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Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles provided vital business platform (c) Messe Frankfurt (HK) Co Ltd
25.10.2021

Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles provided vital business platform

Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles concluded its 27th autumn edition in early October. Held alongside four other concurrent textile shows, the fair was the only major event for this sector able to take place in China during this season, providing a much-needed business platform for 735 exhibitors and 20,106 trade buyers. The fair was held at the National Exhibition and Convention Center (Shanghai).

Ms Wendy Wen, Senior General Manager of Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd expressed: “Due to the valuable cooperation of many parties and the continued support of our exhibitors and other partners, we were able to hold the fair as scheduled despite a number of challenges. Since the pandemic situation was brought under control in China last year, we have expended considerable resources to ensure our textile fairs still take place to provide trading platforms that connect the global industry. This edition was especially important as it was the only major fair to take place in the country at this time.”

Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles concluded its 27th autumn edition in early October. Held alongside four other concurrent textile shows, the fair was the only major event for this sector able to take place in China during this season, providing a much-needed business platform for 735 exhibitors and 20,106 trade buyers. The fair was held at the National Exhibition and Convention Center (Shanghai).

Ms Wendy Wen, Senior General Manager of Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd expressed: “Due to the valuable cooperation of many parties and the continued support of our exhibitors and other partners, we were able to hold the fair as scheduled despite a number of challenges. Since the pandemic situation was brought under control in China last year, we have expended considerable resources to ensure our textile fairs still take place to provide trading platforms that connect the global industry. This edition was especially important as it was the only major fair to take place in the country at this time.”

While a number of international exhibitors participated this year with individual booths, the Belgium Pavilion presented home and contract products and five Chinese regional pavilions from Hangzhou, Shaoxing, Huzhou, Haining, and Tongxiang also featured. Two trend forums also provided inspiration for 2022, while the IKASAS Japanese Home Design Gallery, New Voices of Top Youth Upholstery Designers City Roving Exhibition and China International Fiber Art Exhibition gave further insights into various aspects of the industry.

Fair’s fringe programme highlights sustainability, design and more
As with all of Messe Frankfurt’s textile fairs around the world, sustainability is a big focus. A number of events under this focus took place in the fair’s fringe programme, including a half day forum titled How Sustainable Fashion is Reshaping Lifestyles, with a range of innovative companies and prestigious universities participating as speakers.

The Design Talk session featured a series of presentations from leading international designers, including from China, Japan and Europe, to share their design insights. And a new concept this year, titled New Voices of Top Youth Upholstery Designers – Intertextile Upholstery Design and City Roving Exhibition, showcased the work of six groups of young local designers from across China who presented the interior design ideas of their generation through displays and a forum. And reflecting the changes that continue to accelerate in the industry, a number of e-commerce and cross-border trade events took place, including sessions from the likes of JD Home, AliExpress and Tmall.

The 2022 Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles – Spring Edition will take place from 9 – 11 March, while the Autumn Edition is scheduled for 23 – 25 August 2022.

CHIC Shanghai starts on October 9, 2021 with around 500 brands (c) Chic Shanghai / JANDALI MODE.MEDIEN.MESSEN
28.09.2021

CHIC Shanghai starts on October 9, 2021 with around 500 brands

From the 09-11th of October, CHIC will take place with around 500 fashion and lifestyle brands on 53,000 sqm in the National Exhibition & Convention Center in Shanghai and offers a perfect overview of the fashion innovations in all fashion areas of the next season.

Chinese consumers place increasing value on sustainable products, the topic of "sustainability" is present in all areas of CHIC, in cooperation with WGSN the latest trends in sustainable fashion S / S 22 are shown. Together with China Fashion and WWD, companies that produce particularly sustainably are honored as part of the "Pursuer of excellence in sustainability" event.

The organizers put a special focus on the expansion of digital tools for the trade fair participants, which were used in the run-up to the trade fair for intensive visitor marketing and at the trade fair to optimally network supply and demand, WeChat plays a central role here. The CHIC WeChat mini program has been expanded and integrates the CHIC e-catalog, tailored to the needs of exhibitors and visitors.

From the 09-11th of October, CHIC will take place with around 500 fashion and lifestyle brands on 53,000 sqm in the National Exhibition & Convention Center in Shanghai and offers a perfect overview of the fashion innovations in all fashion areas of the next season.

Chinese consumers place increasing value on sustainable products, the topic of "sustainability" is present in all areas of CHIC, in cooperation with WGSN the latest trends in sustainable fashion S / S 22 are shown. Together with China Fashion and WWD, companies that produce particularly sustainably are honored as part of the "Pursuer of excellence in sustainability" event.

The organizers put a special focus on the expansion of digital tools for the trade fair participants, which were used in the run-up to the trade fair for intensive visitor marketing and at the trade fair to optimally network supply and demand, WeChat plays a central role here. The CHIC WeChat mini program has been expanded and integrates the CHIC e-catalog, tailored to the needs of exhibitors and visitors.

The next editions of CHIC will take place from 3-5th of November 2021 in Shenzhen and from 9-11th of March 2022 in Shanghai.

Source:

JANDALI MODE.MEDIEN.MESSEN

LOVE HERO uses Kornit Digital for sustainable Fashion (c) Kornit Digital Europe GmbH / LOVE HERO
17.09.2021

LOVE HERO uses Kornit Digital for sustainable Fashion

Kornit Digital announced that the London-based LOVE HERO fashion label uses Kornit’s sustainable, digitized, on-demand production capabilities to deliver its complete line of nature-themed apparel.

All fabrics are traceable and certified via their blockchain platform, Retraced, to minimize their eco footprint. Cut-and-sew operations take place in Portugal.

LOVE HERO is currently engaged with Kornit on the mechanics of imprinting silk, biodegradable nylon, and other diverse materials. One such application involves two-sided fabrics—nylon on top, with cotton on the reverse.

“Kornit is committed to becoming the operating system for sustainable fashion fulfillment, on demand,” says Chris Govier, KDEU Managing Director. “With visionary creators like Joshua and LOVE HERO ready to test the bounds of our design and color capabilities, and our growing network of digitized producers ready to make those visions tangible with speed, economy, and quality from all corners of the globe, we’re changing the public percetion of what digital can do—meeting the global sustainability imperative, without demanding compromise from any actor in that value chain.”

Kornit Digital announced that the London-based LOVE HERO fashion label uses Kornit’s sustainable, digitized, on-demand production capabilities to deliver its complete line of nature-themed apparel.

All fabrics are traceable and certified via their blockchain platform, Retraced, to minimize their eco footprint. Cut-and-sew operations take place in Portugal.

LOVE HERO is currently engaged with Kornit on the mechanics of imprinting silk, biodegradable nylon, and other diverse materials. One such application involves two-sided fabrics—nylon on top, with cotton on the reverse.

“Kornit is committed to becoming the operating system for sustainable fashion fulfillment, on demand,” says Chris Govier, KDEU Managing Director. “With visionary creators like Joshua and LOVE HERO ready to test the bounds of our design and color capabilities, and our growing network of digitized producers ready to make those visions tangible with speed, economy, and quality from all corners of the globe, we’re changing the public percetion of what digital can do—meeting the global sustainability imperative, without demanding compromise from any actor in that value chain.”

Source:

Kornit Digital Europe GmbH / pr4u

26.08.2021

Rialto Designs: Flexible, Sustainable Fashion Production on Demand with Kornit Presto S

Kornit Digital (Nasdaq: KRNT), a worldwide market leader in digital textile printing technology, announced UK textile printing company Rialto Designs has invested in a Kornit Presto S with Softener Solution to drive printed textile fashion innovation.

Founded 25 years ago by textile technologist brothers Riyaz and Mohsin Omarji, Rialto Designs has established a client base that includes many of the UK’s leading fashion brands.
In recent years, the company has downsized its analog screen production and adopted digital direct-to-garment capabilities. Two Kornit Avalanche HD6 systems for on-demand DTG production have streamlined operations and increased output to gain new market opportunities.

The latest single-step, eco-friendly Kornit Presto S helps align Rialto’s roll-to-roll workflow with commercial growth and delivers high-quality natural and synthetic pieces, in any quantity and in short order.

Kornit Digital (Nasdaq: KRNT), a worldwide market leader in digital textile printing technology, announced UK textile printing company Rialto Designs has invested in a Kornit Presto S with Softener Solution to drive printed textile fashion innovation.

Founded 25 years ago by textile technologist brothers Riyaz and Mohsin Omarji, Rialto Designs has established a client base that includes many of the UK’s leading fashion brands.
In recent years, the company has downsized its analog screen production and adopted digital direct-to-garment capabilities. Two Kornit Avalanche HD6 systems for on-demand DTG production have streamlined operations and increased output to gain new market opportunities.

The latest single-step, eco-friendly Kornit Presto S helps align Rialto’s roll-to-roll workflow with commercial growth and delivers high-quality natural and synthetic pieces, in any quantity and in short order.

Kornit’s DTG technology supports Rialto to deliver a service that sets it apart on speed, sustainability, and high quality. Clients can now order printed samples across hundreds of fabric bases—polyester and natural—and receive their orders within 24 hours.

Source:

Kornit

04.05.2021

C.L.A.S.S.: THE TEXTILE LIBRARY CIRCULAR SYMPOSIUM

How to recognize truly sustainable fashion? How can responsible recycling of garments and fabrics - as well as new formulas for circular economy - make a difference in fighting the climate emergency? These are just some of the topics addressed during THE TEXTILE LIBRARY CIRCULAR SYMPOSIUM, the open-ended program of virtual meetings with some of the most influential fashion and sustainability experts organized by the Museo del Tessuto di Prato in collaboration with C.L.A.S.S. ecohub.

The museum and the international platform that creates awareness and supports professionals who believe in fashion and sustainable textiles have joined forces to talk not only to fashion enthusiasts but to everyone, and explore a hot and often underestimated topic that involves everyday life. The series of meetings deepens and complements the new section entirely dedicated to circular textiles in the museum's Textile Library.

How to recognize truly sustainable fashion? How can responsible recycling of garments and fabrics - as well as new formulas for circular economy - make a difference in fighting the climate emergency? These are just some of the topics addressed during THE TEXTILE LIBRARY CIRCULAR SYMPOSIUM, the open-ended program of virtual meetings with some of the most influential fashion and sustainability experts organized by the Museo del Tessuto di Prato in collaboration with C.L.A.S.S. ecohub.

The museum and the international platform that creates awareness and supports professionals who believe in fashion and sustainable textiles have joined forces to talk not only to fashion enthusiasts but to everyone, and explore a hot and often underestimated topic that involves everyday life. The series of meetings deepens and complements the new section entirely dedicated to circular textiles in the museum's Textile Library.

Like a real symposium, THE TEXTILE LIBRARY CIRCULAR SYMPOSIUM is a conversation arena involving 10 game changers who have been able to innovate not only with high-tech and responsible products and materials but also with new formulas, business models and production systems that respect the planet and people. Among the speakers of the cycle, visionary innovators who generate change at all levels: from the entire production system and beyond to retailers, leading international brands, research companies and communication experts, all the way to the final consumer.

The first appointment is Wednesday, May 13 at 5 pm CEST with the talk THE SUSTAINABLE PERSPECTIVE. True sustainable fashion is a choral and capillary system in which every actor plays a fundamental role. During the meeting, professionals from different fields, from cultural institutions to industrial production, from marketing to retail, will share their perspective on sustainability.

Recycling is the key word in THE SECOND CHANCE, the second meeting scheduled for June 10 h. 5 p.m CEST.

On September 29, also at 5 p.m. CEST, appointment for the talk A TICKET TO FASHION... AND BACK entirely dedicated to the new models of circular economy.

You can register here.

Source:

C.L.A.S.S. / GB Network Marketing & Communication

Emma Scalcon wins Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award (c)Emma Scalcon
Emma Scalcon project TAKE A WALK ON THE GREEN SIDE
21.04.2021

Emma Scalcon wins Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award

  • EMMA SCALCON is the winner of the first edition of the IMAGINING SUSTAINABLE FASHION AWARD, an international competition for communication in sustainable fashion.

The award was established in October 2020 by Connecting Cultures and C.L.A.S.S. with the aim of creating new visual imagery and innovative communication models in sustainable fashion. Stylists, photographers, designers, illustrators, artists and other creatives, invited to rethink how to communicate the new generation of values of an ethical and sustainable fashion system, joined the open and international call.

The name of the winner of the IMAGINING SUSTAINABLE FASHION competition was announced during a webinar on March 30th at 4pm led by Giusy Bettoni, CEO of C.L.A.S.S. Eco Hub; Anna Detheridge, President of Connecting  Cultures; Lucy Orta, Chair, Art & the Environment, University of the Arts London; and Dio Kurazawa, Founding Partner of The Bear Scouts.

  • EMMA SCALCON is the winner of the first edition of the IMAGINING SUSTAINABLE FASHION AWARD, an international competition for communication in sustainable fashion.

The award was established in October 2020 by Connecting Cultures and C.L.A.S.S. with the aim of creating new visual imagery and innovative communication models in sustainable fashion. Stylists, photographers, designers, illustrators, artists and other creatives, invited to rethink how to communicate the new generation of values of an ethical and sustainable fashion system, joined the open and international call.

The name of the winner of the IMAGINING SUSTAINABLE FASHION competition was announced during a webinar on March 30th at 4pm led by Giusy Bettoni, CEO of C.L.A.S.S. Eco Hub; Anna Detheridge, President of Connecting  Cultures; Lucy Orta, Chair, Art & the Environment, University of the Arts London; and Dio Kurazawa, Founding Partner of The Bear Scouts.

Born in Padua, Italy, 22 years old, and a student in her second year in Textile & Fashion Design at IAAD - Istituto d'Arte Applicata e Design, Emma Scalcon won the IMAGINING SUSTAINABLE FASHION competition with her project TAKE A WALK ON THE GREEN SIDE, designing communications crafted with strong and impactful images and simple but detailed wording intended for younger consumers to inform them about sustainable fashion issues.

Scalcon ranked first among the finalists selected by a high profile jury composed of:
·   Anna Detheridge, Founder and President, Connecting Cultures
·   Giusy Bettoni, CEO and Founder, C.L.A.S.S.
·   Rita Airaghi, Director, Gianfranco Ferré Foundation
·   Paola Arosio, Head of New Brands & Sustainability Projects, Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (The National Chamber for Italian Fashion)
·   Jeanine Ballone, Managing Director, Fashion 4 Development
·   Evie Evangelou, Founder and President, Fashion 4 Development
·   Chiara Luisi, Sustainability Projects Coordinator, Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (The National Chamber for Italian Fashion)
·   Sara Kozlowski, Director of Education and Sustainable Strategies, Council of Fashion Designers of America  
·   Dio Kurazawa, Socio fondatore, The Bear Scouts
·   Renata Molho, Founding Partner, The Bear Scouts
·   Lucy Orta, Chair, Art & the Environment, University of the Arts London
·   Stefania Ricci, Director, Museo Salvatore Ferragamo

Emma Scalcon was awarded the €3,000 prize, made possible by the Main Sponsor ROICA™ by Asahi Kasei and by the other sponsors of the project: ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei - a latest generation fabric collection that promotes responsible innovation with advanced high-tech performance, C.L.A.S.S., and the Greek smart cotton SUPREME GREEN COTTON® by Varvaressos.
 
“It is time to be pioneers in communication and for this we have supported the Imagining Sustainable Fashion Award,” commented Takaaki Kondo, global marketing department manager for ROICA™ by Asahi Kasei, the Main Sponsor of the award. ROICA™ by Asahi Kasei is a high quality stretch fibre with an innovative range of intelligent functions to satisfy every modern wardrobe need for sports, underwear, and fashion. “We believe that together with responsible innovation, communication is the key to bring sustainability to the next level: to inspire, educate, inform and allow both professionals and consumers to make the right choices.”

“The competition is an opportunity to rethink how to communicate the new and different values of an ethical and sustainable fashion system,” explained Anna Detheridge. “I am quite impressed with the results of the competition — the diversity of forms that we received show both an interesting change in sensibility and a practical approach to communicating these values. There is less visual rhetoric and reliance on compelling images and more investment in basic information and a greater variety of narratives.

It is a great pleasure to see the energies from a wealth of young creatives, small businesses, and designers from all over the world with cross-disciplinary interests and a diversity of talents who are ushering in a new culture of design. My heartiest congratulations go to Emma Scalcon".

“I completely agree with Anna's comments on the quality of the work submitted by participants in the competition and together we have renewed our intention to continue IMAGINING SUSTAINABLE FASHION into 2021 with a new edition of the award,” stated Giusy Bettoni. “After this initial experience, we find ourselves even more motivated to explore some of the themes that emerged during the selection process, in particular those regarding the ethics of intellectual and cultural property, a topical issue in an industry like fashion. For this reason, we are already working together on organizing a webinar on this topic with outside specialists, including legal experts.”

 21 Grams, the group comprised of Veronica De Nigris, Serena Paone e Immacolata Esposito, won a special contest open to the public among the finalists selected by the jury, receiving the most votes from Instagram followers on C.L.A.S.S.’s corporate Instagram profile. The media partner for the initiative is Renoon, the leading search tool and data hub for sustainable fashion, a rising start-up of the year, aggregating +190 brands offering sustainable options to consumers. 

Mostafiz Uddin Wins Coveted Drapers Sustainable Fashion Champion Award (c) Denim Expert Limited
Mostafiz Uddin
10.03.2021

Mostafiz Uddin Wins Coveted Drapers Sustainable Fashion Champion Award

  • Mostafiz Uddin, Managing Director of Denim Expert Limited and Founder of Bangladesh Apparel Exchange (BAE) has won Sustainable Fashion Champion at the Drapers Sustainable Fashion Awards 2021, which took place virtually on 10 March.

On receiving the award, Mostafiz said he wants to be a game-changer in the apparel industry, leading by example to inspire others to behave responsibly and ethically.

He also dedicated the award to H&M which, he explained, supported his business, Denim Expert, through the pandemic by continuing to place orders He said the loyal support of the Swedish fashion giant almost certainly helped save the livelihoods of 2000 workers at his factory and their 10000 family members. “That’s true sustainability leadership,” he said.

The Drapers Sustainable Fashion Awards recognise steps being made in reducing the fashion industry’s environmental impact and creating fairer working conditions across the supply chain.
Judged by an independent panel of sustainability and fashion retail experts, the awards shine a spotlight on best practice within the global fashion industry.

  • Mostafiz Uddin, Managing Director of Denim Expert Limited and Founder of Bangladesh Apparel Exchange (BAE) has won Sustainable Fashion Champion at the Drapers Sustainable Fashion Awards 2021, which took place virtually on 10 March.

On receiving the award, Mostafiz said he wants to be a game-changer in the apparel industry, leading by example to inspire others to behave responsibly and ethically.

He also dedicated the award to H&M which, he explained, supported his business, Denim Expert, through the pandemic by continuing to place orders He said the loyal support of the Swedish fashion giant almost certainly helped save the livelihoods of 2000 workers at his factory and their 10000 family members. “That’s true sustainability leadership,” he said.

The Drapers Sustainable Fashion Awards recognise steps being made in reducing the fashion industry’s environmental impact and creating fairer working conditions across the supply chain.
Judged by an independent panel of sustainability and fashion retail experts, the awards shine a spotlight on best practice within the global fashion industry.

Covid-19 has presented unforeseen challenges for fashion retailers and brands, but it has also given us all an opportunity to build back better. Forward-thinking fashion businesses know change is not optional, and are embracing their responsibilities and ability to make a difference.

Mostafiz Uddin has been recognised as the Sustainable Fashion Champion 2021 for setting examples in promoting sustainability during the Covid-19 pandemic which broke out worldwide in March last year.
Jill Geoghegan, Acting Editor of Drapers, said: “Despite the challenges thrown up by the Coronavirus pandemic, fashion brands and retailers increasingly recognise that sustainability is a business imperative.”  
“Many businesses continued to invest in cleaning up their supply chains and introducing new models of working, despite the unprecedented trading conditions.

“The Drapers Sustainable Fashion Awards highlight and celebrate these advancements, paving the way for a more responsible future for the industry.” Managing Director of Denim Expert Limited Mostafiz Uddin said: “In the pandemic, my factory Denim Expert Limited kept true to its commitment towards sustainability, despite an extremely difficult trading landscape.

“During the pandemic, I was vocal about the issue of buyer-supplier relationships and, in speaking out, I wanted to champion the cause of suppliers all over the world. Too often suppliers in garment supply chains do not have a voice because they fear that by speaking out, they will be treated unfavourably by brands.

“This was, of course, a risk on my own part but I like to think I stood up for what I think is right and ultimately, I believe progressive brands understood I was coming from a good place. Like them, all I want to see is a fair, ethical and sustainable industry where brands and retailers work in an environment of collaboration, not conflict.”

Mostafiz also had some special praise for H&M. He said: “It would have not been possible for me to support my workers during the pandemic, had my factory not received help from H&M during the unprecedented time. While Denim Expert suffered from huge orders cancellation and orders hold, H&M supported us by placing orders in the pandemic that saved thousands of lives and livelihoods. Therefore, I would like to dedicate this Award to H&M and its CEO Helena Helmersson.”

The judges of Drapers Sustainable Fashion Champion Award 2021 have been Kerry Bannigan, Founder, Conscious Fashion Campaign; Sarah Ditty, Global Policy Director, Fashion Revolution; Miriam Lahage, Founder, Aequip; Samata Pattinson, CEO, Red Carpet Green Dress; Caroline Rush, Chief Executive Officer, British Fashion Council; Lucy Shea, Group CEO, Futerra; Jane Shepherdson, Chairman, My Wardrobe HQ; and Dilys Williams, Director, Centre for Sustainable Fashion.

CALL TO ACTION of C.L.A.S.S. ICON 2021 (c) C.L.A.S.S.
C.L.A.S.S. Manifesto
12.02.2021

CALL TO ACTION of C.L.A.S.S. ICON 2021

  • C.L.A.S.S. launches the Manifesto for Responsible Fashion and kicks off the CALL TO ACTION of C.L.A.S.S. ICON 2021
  • What does it mean to be a “game changer” in green fashion?
  • What are the false myths of eco-fashion and what are the guidelines for innovating while safeguarding the planet? And how do you tell the story behind a sustainable fashion collection?

An annual competition to reward a visionary creative who combines design, responsible innovation and communication, capable of raising contemporary consumer awareness of the new values of sustainable fashion. This is the Call to Action launched to find the C.L.A.S.S. ICON 2021 by Giusy Bettoni of C.L.A.S.S. in the Smart Voices panel "C.L.A.S.S. ICON: Award and Manifesto for Responsible Fashion", moderated by the green journalist Diana de Marsanich, and starring, on the 10th February, the fashion designer Gilberto Calzolari, recipient of the international award for creative visionaries in the world of fashion C.L.A.S.S. ICON Award 2020, and Federico Poletti, Marketing and Communication Director of WHITE SHOW.

  • C.L.A.S.S. launches the Manifesto for Responsible Fashion and kicks off the CALL TO ACTION of C.L.A.S.S. ICON 2021
  • What does it mean to be a “game changer” in green fashion?
  • What are the false myths of eco-fashion and what are the guidelines for innovating while safeguarding the planet? And how do you tell the story behind a sustainable fashion collection?

An annual competition to reward a visionary creative who combines design, responsible innovation and communication, capable of raising contemporary consumer awareness of the new values of sustainable fashion. This is the Call to Action launched to find the C.L.A.S.S. ICON 2021 by Giusy Bettoni of C.L.A.S.S. in the Smart Voices panel "C.L.A.S.S. ICON: Award and Manifesto for Responsible Fashion", moderated by the green journalist Diana de Marsanich, and starring, on the 10th February, the fashion designer Gilberto Calzolari, recipient of the international award for creative visionaries in the world of fashion C.L.A.S.S. ICON Award 2020, and Federico Poletti, Marketing and Communication Director of WHITE SHOW.

C.L.A.S.S. Manifesto  

During the Smart Voice, the C.L.A.S.S. Manifesto for Responsible Fashion, the 2021 edition of the C.L.A.S.S. ICON competition and the Sustainability Formula were presented.

C.L.A.S.S. ICON Award is an international award for visionary creatives in the fashion world who are able to convey the values of sustainability not only to fashion professionals, but also to the wider public: consumers. "We created C.L.A.S.S. ICON to reward visionary designers who create their collections by combining design, innovation and responsibility and who are able to communicate the values behind their garments authentically and effectively to consumers. It's time for storymaking and storytelling to align, otherwise it's just greenwashing" says Giusy Bettoni.

From 15th of February to 15th of April it will be possible to apply by sending an email to classicon@classecohub.org, with a description and objectives of the brand, the sustainability values adopted and the strategy, the designer's profile, a photo-video story of the latest collection, and any previous awards won (all info on http://www.classecohub.org).

During the panel, designer Gilberto Calzolari, the first winner of the first C.L.A.S.S. ICON Award, shared his vision for responsible fashion and his current projects. "My brand is a laboratory of experimentation. I create fashion to open conversations and change the way people behave and think. My creativity, from the choice of fabrics and processes to the image I decide to communicate, are the weapons at my disposal. Since the beginning, I have been really excited to team up with C.L.A.S.S. in order to share a common and challenging journey, with the perspective to be part of a constantly growing network activating mutual support. I have always thought at my collections as a call to action for a better future and now more than ever my mission as C.L.A.S.S. ICON is to make people understand that commitment and sustainability can and must go hand in hand with beauty and elegance. The adage 'kalòs kai agathòs' is one of the classical teachings that should never be forgotten: aesthetics, in my opinion, is inseparable from ethics. That's why I don't just target professionals, but also the end consumer, fashionistas and beyond" says Gilberto.

"For the first edition of C.L.A.S.S. ICON in 2020 Gilberto was decreed as our chosen one, and the path together was sanctioned at that moment: the sharing of values and visions is an indissoluble bond that keeps us united over time. Like Gilberto, each ICON will be part of a community where together with C.L.A.S.S. will try to make a real smart fashion and above all create an important voice," says Giusy Bettoni.

In support of the C.L.A.S.S. ICON award, C.L.A.S.S. presented its Manifesto for Responsible Fashion, which summarises the values that C.L.A.S.S. has been researching, communicating and developing since 2007: the role of the ethical company and its transparent production, the importance of traceable and healthy products, with total respect for people and the environment. A commitment to a circular economy with a positive impact that also means safeguarding the seas, the ocean, the use of water, energy and resources.

"A Manifesto for fashion with the lowest possible impact on the planet and on people and animals’ health thanks to responsible innovation, perfectly up to the challenges of contemporary lifestyle. This is why I created the Sustainability Formula, which only exists when there is design, responsible innovation and we are able to track and measure the impact of products and processes and communicate the new values in an appropriate way. In a word, when there is knowledge" concludes Giusy Bettoni.
 
F = D x I x S x C
F= Fashion
D=Design
S=Sustainability
C=Communication

Frankfurt Fashion Week: hosting the future of fashion © Lottermann and Fuentes
Anita Tillmann and Detlef Braun
02.12.2020

Frankfurt Fashion Week: hosting the future of fashion

  • Looking to the future – Frankfurt Fashion Week is positioning itself with a consistently sustainable agenda and propelling the transformation of a modern, resource-efficient fashion industry.

The Conscious Fashion Campaign (CFC), working in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships (UNOP), will be the presenting partner and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be a prerequisite for all exhibitors by 2023. And the Frankfurt Fashion SDG Summit by CFC is set to become the leading international conference for sustainability in the fashion world. The future of fashion has begun – and its key players will be coming together in Frankfurt am Main from 5-9 July 2021.
 

  • Looking to the future – Frankfurt Fashion Week is positioning itself with a consistently sustainable agenda and propelling the transformation of a modern, resource-efficient fashion industry.

The Conscious Fashion Campaign (CFC), working in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships (UNOP), will be the presenting partner and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be a prerequisite for all exhibitors by 2023. And the Frankfurt Fashion SDG Summit by CFC is set to become the leading international conference for sustainability in the fashion world. The future of fashion has begun – and its key players will be coming together in Frankfurt am Main from 5-9 July 2021.
 
Frankfurt am Main, 2 December 2020. Joining forces to improve the fashion industry: Frankfurt Fashion Week is positioning itself as the host of the future of fashion and actively driving forward the transformation towards a future-oriented, more sustainable fashion and textile industry. All decision-makers looking to instigate this change will be coming together in Frankfurt am Main from 5-9 July 2021. The initiators of Frankfurt Fashion Week – Messe Frankfurt and the Premium Group – have achieved a real coup: Conscious Fashion Campaign, working in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships, will be the presenting partner. Messe Frankfurt will build on its collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships and establish Frankfurt Fashion week as the platform on which to advance the Sustainable Development Goals and help guide the fashion industry into the 'Decade of Action'.
 
“Frankfurt will play host to the whole world. We are seeing a very positive response indeed,” confirmed Peter Feldmann, Senior Mayor of the City of Frankfurt am Main, at today’s digital press conference, before going on to say: “The fact that the initiators are able to rethink the concept of a Fashion Week in such a way is extremely impressive and proves that the fashion industry is correctly interpreting the signs of the present and future. The time has come for value creation and values to be reconciled. Consistent alignment with the Sustainable Development Goals is an important step in this direction.”
 
“Frankfurt Fashion Week aims to play a crucial role in finding solutions for macrosocial challenges and supporting the goals of international politics such as the European Green Deal. The fashion and textile industries are also expected to be climate-neutral by 2050. If we want to achieve this, we all need to pull together. Frankfurt Fashion Week is inviting all initiators and supporters of sustainable concepts and congresses or shows dedicated to sustainability to meet in Frankfurt, partake in discussions and make tangible decisions for the greater good. We will connect the most relevant players and pave the way for a future-proof fashion and textile industry,” says Detlef Braun, CEO of Messe Frankfurt.
 
“Given its global reach, the fashion industry is uniquely positioned to collaborate and engage on the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular on climate action and responsible production and consumption,” said Annemarie Hou, Acting Executive Director of the United Nations Office for Partnerships. “Frankfurt Fashion Week and the Summit will serve as an important platform for education and engagement of the fashion and textile industry in the Decade of Action,” emphasised Ms Hou.
 
The aim of Frankfurt Fashion Week is for all exhibitors, participants and partners to align with the Sustainable Development Goals by 2023. The SDGs will also be incorporated into all formats of Frankfurt Fashion Week. This will help to make the UN’s sustainability goals visible and tangible for the Fashion Week audience, therefore bringing its claim, goals and specific proposals for implementation to an international opinion-forming fashion and lifestyle community. During a one-day Frankfurt Fashion SDG Summit presented by Conscious Fashion Campaign, topics like gender equality, clean water, climate protection, social justice and their significance for a forward-looking fashion industry will be examined in greater depth. Another point on the sustainability agenda: Frankfurt Fashion Week is launching a Sustainability Award for outstanding, innovative, sustainable design, alongside other categories with a global appeal for the fashion and textile industry.
 
"We are committed to setting the wheels of transformation in motion. Not only does the overall mindset have to fundamentally change; the entire industry also needs to have the courage to be transparent and honest. It’s important to see values and value creation as opportunities rather than contentious. We are doing what we do best: connecting the relevant players at all levels. With its ecosystem, Frankfurt Fashion Week will become the enabler. We are creating a platform that will orchestrate industry-wide change. With this as our inspiration, we are also developing our tradeshow formats from a ‘marketplace of products’ to a ‘marketplace of purpose and ideas’,” explains Anita Tillmann, Managing Partner of the Premium Group.
 
A new start in Frankfurt: In summer 2021 the entire fashion industry will be coming to the metropolis on the Main river to inform themselves, be inspired, discuss, negotiate and celebrate. “There’s a huge need to finally meet in person again, to exchange ideas and be inspired. At the same time, digital tools and formats have become an integral part of the fashion industry,” says Markus Frank, Head of the City of Frankfurt’s Department of Economic Affairs and therefore also responsible for its creative industry. “To implement such a future-oriented, all-encompassing overall concept, Frankfurt’s business and creative scenes offer an almost unique concentration of different expertise with its internationally networked agencies, universities and museums. The city’s multifaceted, high-end club, bar and restaurant scene, diverse hotel industry and internationally renowned retail landscape will become the stage for this. This network will be a key factor in the successful implementation of Frankfurt Fashion Week and the way in which it will expand into the public space as a cultural and social happening.”
 
A number of major publishing houses are also showing their commitment to the new Fashion Week in Frankfurt with conferences, events and awards: Textilwirtschaft, the leading professional fashion journal by the Deutscher Fachverlag publishing house, is moving its traditional meeting of the industry’s top decision-makers – the TW Forum, the presentation of the renowned Forum Award, as well as its subsequent conference – from Heidelberg to Frankfurt’s Palmengarten botanical gardens, and will therefore be kicking off Frankfurt Fashion Week on Sunday evening and Monday morning. The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung will be hosting its traditional fashion party for the first time in Frankfurt and publishing a special edition of its FAZ Magazin on Frankfurt Fashion Week. And the ZEIT publishing group is holding its ‘UNLOCK Style by ZEITmagazin’ conference, which was established in 2014, and the ZEITmagazin Fashion Week party in Frankfurt for the first time and will dedicate the whole new issue of ZEITmagazin Frankfurt to Frankfurt Fashion Week. Condé Nast will also be involved in next summer’s Frankfurt Fashion Week with an exclusive event by GQ. And the Burda publishing house will also be represented with various event formats from its lifestyle and fashion brands.There will also be talks with SHINE  Conventions, the organiser of GLOW, about what a mutual collaboration could look like.
 
Frankfurt Fashion Week is also delighted to have the Fashion Council Germany (FCG) on board.  The FCG is theinstitution when it comes to German fashion design. It promotes designers, is committed to gaining more political relevance and strengthens the international visibility and awareness of German fashion. At Frankfurt Fashion Week, the FCG will contribute selected formats, such as its already established Fireside Chat, and a future-oriented accelerator format to support German designers.
 
“What really impresses me about Fashion Week is the whole networking aspect: the creative industries will meet the financial world and sustainability is the common denominator. The Green Finance Cluster is another project that we could link with Frankfurt Fashion Week in the future. This will provide new inspiration in the fashion industry, which will certainly extend way beyond its own horizon of Frankfurt and Hesse. After a very difficult year for the trade fair industry, the concept is an encouraging breath of fresh air,” sums up Tarek Al-Wazir, Hesse’s Minister of Economics, Energy, Transport and Regional Development and Deputy Minister-President of the state of Hessen.

Key role for Kipaş in the EU’s multi-million New Cotton Project (c) Monforts
The New Cotton Project logo
30.11.2020

Key role for Kipaş in the EU’s multi-million New Cotton Project

  • Monforts customer Kipaş has been selected as the sole denim manufacturing partner in the €6.7 million European Union-funded New Cotton Project, involving the brands adidas and H&M, working in a consortium with suppliers, innovators and research institutes.

Kipaş, based in Kahramanmaraş, Turkey, is currently installing its third Monforts Montex stenter along with a third Monfortex compressive shrinkage system in a combined configuration dedicated to denim production.

This follows the successful installation and commissioning of the second Montex and Monfortex lines at the Kahramanmaraş plant in 2018, which Kipaş Vice Chairman of the Board Ahmet Öksüz said had immediately exceeded expectations.

  • Monforts customer Kipaş has been selected as the sole denim manufacturing partner in the €6.7 million European Union-funded New Cotton Project, involving the brands adidas and H&M, working in a consortium with suppliers, innovators and research institutes.

Kipaş, based in Kahramanmaraş, Turkey, is currently installing its third Monforts Montex stenter along with a third Monfortex compressive shrinkage system in a combined configuration dedicated to denim production.

This follows the successful installation and commissioning of the second Montex and Monfortex lines at the Kahramanmaraş plant in 2018, which Kipaş Vice Chairman of the Board Ahmet Öksüz said had immediately exceeded expectations.

“We performed a very thorough technical investigation based on the latest Industry 4.0 analysis before the purchase, to determine what we needed, and the Monforts technology met all our requirements,” he said, in an interview with Textilegence magazine. “The Monfortex is equipped with a variety of features not found on classical shrinkage machines and the production can be monitored from beginning to end. It also exceeded our expectations in energy cost savings.”

Kipaş subsequently received a special certificate from Monforts in recognition of its exceptional utilisation of the technology to its full potential.

The latest Montex stenter now being installed at Kipaş is a 12-chamber unit with a working width of 2 metres featuring all of the latest automation features. The Monfortex unit, also with a working width of 2 metres, is in a ‘double rubber’ configuration, comprising two compressive shrinkage units and two felt calenders in line. This allows the heat setting of elastane fibres and the residual shrinkage of the denim to be carried out simultaneously, for a significant increase in production speeds.

“Around 90-95% of denim fabric production now contains elastane fibres and the Monforts system has allowed us to simultaneously increase our production and quality in this respect,” Mr Öksüz said.

Regenerated cotton
For the next three years within the New Cotton Project, Kipaş will manufacture denim fabrics based on the cellulose-based fibres of Infinited Fiber Company of Finland, made from post-consumer textile waste that has been collected, sorted and regenerated.

The patented technology of Infinited, which is leading the consortium of 12 companies, turns cellulose-rich textile waste into fibres that look and feel like cotton.

“We are very excited and proud to lead this project which is breaking new ground when it comes to making circularity in the textile industry a reality,” said Infinited co-founder and CEO Petri Alava. “The enthusiasm and commitment with which the entire consortium has come together to work towards a cleaner, more sustainable future for fashion is truly inspiring.”

Take-back programmes
Adidas and H&M will establish take-back programmes to collect the clothing that is produced, to determine the next phase in their lifecycle. Clothing that can no longer be worn will be returned to Infinited, for regeneration into new fibres, further contributing to a circular economy in which textiles never go to waste, but instead are reused, recycled or turned into new garments.

The aim is to prove that circular, sustainable fashion can be achieved today, and to act as an inspiration and stepping stone to further, even bigger circular initiatives by the industry going forward.

The EU has identified the high potential for circularity within the textile industry, while simultaneously highlighting the urgent need for the development of technologies to produce and design sustainable and circular bio-based materials. Making sustainable products commonplace, reducing waste and leading global efforts on circularity are outlined in the European Commission’s Circular Economy Action Plan.

Fashion brands produce nearly twice as many clothes today as they did 20 years ago and demand is expected to continue growing. At the same time, the equivalent of one garbage truck of textiles is landfilled or burned every second. Most of the textile industry’s environmental problems relate to the raw materials used by the industry – cotton, fossil-based fibres such as polyester, and viscose as the most common man-made cellulosic fibre, are all associated with serious environmental concerns.

(c) Sateri
23.09.2020

FINEXTM Reaches New Milestones; Launches Officially at Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics

FINEXTM, Sateri’s marquee brand for recycled fibre, is now certified to the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) which provides verification of recycled raw materials through the supply chain.

RCS is intended for use with any product that contains at least 5% recycled material. Sateri has successfully produced FINEXTM viscose fibres with up to 20% recycled content. Under the RCS certification process, each stage of production is required to be certified, beginning at the recycling stage and ending at the last seller in the final business-to-business transaction.

These new developments were announced at the official launch of FINEXTM on September 23, 2020. About 160 guests, mostly senior representatives of major fashion brands and fabric and garment makers, gathered to celebrate the milestones that cement the status of FINEXTM as a game changer for sustainable fashion.

Themed ‘Sustainable Fashion for the Future’, the launch was jointly hosted by Sateri and China International Fashion Fair (CHIC) on the sidelines of the three-day Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, a major industry expo.

FINEXTM, Sateri’s marquee brand for recycled fibre, is now certified to the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) which provides verification of recycled raw materials through the supply chain.

RCS is intended for use with any product that contains at least 5% recycled material. Sateri has successfully produced FINEXTM viscose fibres with up to 20% recycled content. Under the RCS certification process, each stage of production is required to be certified, beginning at the recycling stage and ending at the last seller in the final business-to-business transaction.

These new developments were announced at the official launch of FINEXTM on September 23, 2020. About 160 guests, mostly senior representatives of major fashion brands and fabric and garment makers, gathered to celebrate the milestones that cement the status of FINEXTM as a game changer for sustainable fashion.

Themed ‘Sustainable Fashion for the Future’, the launch was jointly hosted by Sateri and China International Fashion Fair (CHIC) on the sidelines of the three-day Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, a major industry expo.

In his address, Allen Zhang, President of Sateri, said, “The development of FINEXTM has been an intensive effort for Sateri from initial commercialisation, to partnering brands like Lafuma and Rico Lee, and finally to today’s launch. This is all made possible with collaboration across the value chain – working alongside yarn spinners, garment makers and brand partners – to bring a high quality and more planetfriendly product to consumers. The fashion industry is changing fast and, beyond functionality, circularity is now of the greatest importance in apparel manufacturing.”

In the ‘2020 Sustainable Fashion Report’ released by China’s leading business news publication CBNweekly earlier this week, results of a survey with stakeholders in the fashion value chain reinforced the potential of textile recycling as a solution to the problem of textile waste arising from over-consumption and production. The report identified technology and capital as the biggest barriers to textile recycling and highlighted the critical role brands play in mobilising manufacturers and consumers to advance sustainable fashion.

As part of its efforts to promote textile fibre recycling in China, Sateri is in dialogue with the China Association of Circular Economy (CACE) to undertake a comprehensive study on the industrial-scale textile waste recycling landscape in the country. The study is expected to commence next year.

More information:
FinexTM Sateri recycling fibers
Source:

Omnicom Public Relations Group / Sateri

ISKO logo
ISKOs shared its R-TWO Platform
11.03.2020

ISKO shared R-TWO™ at Drapers Sustainable Fashion Forum

ISKO presented its 100% responsible platform, R-TWO™.

The denim ingredient brand hosted a special panel to discuss some of the advancements in technology that are making the fashion industry more responsible: from R-TWO™ to automated laser technology.

With the fashion industry being considered one of the world’s most polluting businesses-sectors, collaborating and knowledge sharing are key in finding solutions for a better future. Fully aware of this scenario, ISKO was the headline sponsor at The Drapers Sustainable Fashion Forum brings together responsible players to discuss what can be done to tackle the industry’s environmental and social issues through innovation and creativity.

ISKO presented its 100% responsible platform, R-TWO™.

The denim ingredient brand hosted a special panel to discuss some of the advancements in technology that are making the fashion industry more responsible: from R-TWO™ to automated laser technology.

With the fashion industry being considered one of the world’s most polluting businesses-sectors, collaborating and knowledge sharing are key in finding solutions for a better future. Fully aware of this scenario, ISKO was the headline sponsor at The Drapers Sustainable Fashion Forum brings together responsible players to discuss what can be done to tackle the industry’s environmental and social issues through innovation and creativity.

Sharing knowledge, collaborating for change.
As evidence of its Responsible Innovation™ approach, ISKO presented the R-TWO™ program, its latest
responsible achievement. Stemming from the mill’s holistic vision, R-TWO™ represents a great example of how reducing, reusing, and recycling strategies can be implemented in a textile business to improve its  environmental performance.
The R-TWO™ reduces the amount of raw material sourced by using a blend of reused cotton and recycled polyester – both certified –, improving sourcing efficiency throughout the entire field-to-fabric production.
Reused cotton is certified with the Content Claim Standard – or CCS – from the Textile Exchange. As for recycled polyester, it can be either Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) or Global Recycled Standard (GRS) certified, depending on the content percentages. Together with this cutting-edge and fully responsible program, ISKO also uses automated laser
technology developed in partnership with Jeanologia.

“How technology can help make the fashion industry more sustainable”:
On March 11th, ISKO hosted a discussion about ways, to make the fashion industry more responsible
The panel was moderated by David Shah, consultant on design and marketing development, Publisher and CEO at Metropolitan Publishing BV and Associate Professor at ARTez (Arnhem, the Netherlands) and Associate Professor at Renmin University, (Beijing, China). The talk involved Keith O’Brien, ISKO Marketing & Business Development Manager, Victoria Soto, Jeanologia Custom Technology Consultant and Filippo Ricci, Fashion Open Studio Program & Partnership Manager.

 

Source:

Menabò Group, Global Press and PR Support

MANTECO Logo NEW GENERATION RECYCLED WOOL by MANTECO
MANTECO Logo
29.01.2020

Manteco presents The Manteco System

The integrated sustainable network making fashion circular, Made in Italy and 100% traceable

World leading textile manufacturer Manteco presents its sustainable path for a better future: The Manteco System. A strategy and a vision shaping the company’s sustainable imprint since 1943. The system consists in the development and engineering of a production network involving 100 partner-companies from the whole supply chain “We all team up responsibly to create premium collection based on transparent , traceable  circular economy practices,” comments Matteo Mantellassi, co-CEO of Manteco.
 
To achieve meeting the demand for fair and sustainable fashion that consumers believe in, and is expected  from our clients, the company and its partners have created and accomplished to a Protocol of Sustainable Values and Commitments in line with the highest standards of the global market.

The integrated sustainable network making fashion circular, Made in Italy and 100% traceable

World leading textile manufacturer Manteco presents its sustainable path for a better future: The Manteco System. A strategy and a vision shaping the company’s sustainable imprint since 1943. The system consists in the development and engineering of a production network involving 100 partner-companies from the whole supply chain “We all team up responsibly to create premium collection based on transparent , traceable  circular economy practices,” comments Matteo Mantellassi, co-CEO of Manteco.
 
To achieve meeting the demand for fair and sustainable fashion that consumers believe in, and is expected  from our clients, the company and its partners have created and accomplished to a Protocol of Sustainable Values and Commitments in line with the highest standards of the global market.

“On a hand, the protocol preserves the unique ‘genius loci’ of our territory – it respects the heritage of all our partners, from the smaller businesses to the more structured ones - on the other hand, it works like a shared compass of sustainable values, allowing the whole supply chain behind Manteco products to stand out and be competitive on the global stage” adds Mantellassi.
 
The protocol and its monitored and traceable system cover virtuous management of resources – e.g. Water, energy and chemical products - waste management and low production impact on the environment but also responsible standards in terms of employment, quality of the working environment, equal rights and anti-discrimination policies.

One of the key  results of such commitment and sustainable development is the creation of an upgraded version of the recycled wool  MWool™: a top ingredient made from premium recycled wool process guaranteed by the Manteco System.The System works like a symphony where management, measurement and controls  are not there just to test  the quality of each single phase of processes or  products , but to make sure and offer the complete traceability of Manteco production.  From raw material, to yarn, spinning, finishing, testing and final fabric.

Some productions tips about Manteco:

  •  5.3 million kg of raw materials processed annually.
  •  6.860 tests on raw material per year.
  •  34.400 tests on finished products.
  •  100% made in Italy system completely based in the Prato district since 1943.
  •  Total transparency and traceability thanks to a highly skilled management system.

With a turnover of over 91m Euro in 2019 and an annual growth of 17,80% since 2012, Manteco SpA is the 4th textile company in Italy, listed in the TOP30 companies of the Italian fashion system. “The unique Manteco system adds value to our products while highlighting the sustainable path we share with all our partners both upstream and downstream”.

More information:
Manteco
Source:

(c) GB Network

Italian Converter celebrates 25 years with the  E.C.O. KOSMOS cross-collection (c) GB Network
Toupe and brick red E.C.O. Graffiti (100% linen) on E.C.O. Aurora (cotton and AMNI SOUL ECO®)
09.09.2019

Italian Converter celebrates 25 years with the E.C.O. KOSMOS cross-collection

  • Empowering fashion with responsible R&D, cutting edge finishing and a Made in Italy design imprint

Paris - “The soul of sustainable fashion is an alchemy, a combined commitment and an act of responsibility”. This is the motto ‘embossed’ in the collections and the values of Italian Converter. At Première Vision, the leading manufacturer celebrates its 25th anniversary and presents E.C.O. KOSMOS, a cross-collection, a brand-new ‘green line’ range’ and a winning formula shining a light on the company’s responsible path and unique ‘blend’ for the fashion of tomorrow.

  • Empowering fashion with responsible R&D, cutting edge finishing and a Made in Italy design imprint

Paris - “The soul of sustainable fashion is an alchemy, a combined commitment and an act of responsibility”. This is the motto ‘embossed’ in the collections and the values of Italian Converter. At Première Vision, the leading manufacturer celebrates its 25th anniversary and presents E.C.O. KOSMOS, a cross-collection, a brand-new ‘green line’ range’ and a winning formula shining a light on the company’s responsible path and unique ‘blend’ for the fashion of tomorrow.

The acronym E.C.O. stands for Ecologic, Conversion, Optimisation; three unique concepts and values that truly embody Italian Converter DNA: sustainability, transformative process and quality improvement.
For over 25 years, Italian Converter creates high-quality materials for some of the leading fashion and accessories brands. “Made in Italy and sustainability are part of our DNA.” Says Costantino Karazissis, founder of Italian Converter. “We believe that responsible sourcing and processes as well as a deep research into new technology pathways and a market-savvy taste for material design must be the starting point.”

At the core of the company’s responsible alchemy is also the constant research for the perfect balance of 100% Made in Italy materials. “We proudly collaborate with 120 skilled employees producing new hybrid material innovations daily, attracting partnerships from the best high-end brands both in Italy and abroad”.

Toupe and brick red E.C.O. Graffiti (100% linen) on E.C.O. Aurora (cotton and AMNI SOUL ECO®)

E.C.O. KOSMOS is entirely traceable, transparent, 100%made in Italy. The collection walks through a very complete and balanced range sustainable materials - from natural to eco high tech ones- that are transformed, enriched and valued in 9 high-tech cutting-edge innovations thanks to the Italian Converter expertise.
•    The natural line starts from bases of cotton bonded with AMNI SOUL ECO®, an enhanced polyamide 6.6 that degrades within 5 years instead of decades, as other conventional ones do.
•    The stretch innovations start from bases in GRS-certified Newlife™, a cutting-edge premium recycled polyester created using a High-Tech Conversion Model. Thanks to a mechanical process, used plastic bottles are turned into a top-quality polymer and yarn which is 100% traceable and 100% Made in Italy. The whole process takes place within a 100 square km area in Piedmont in Northern Italy.
 
All the references make use only of water-based resins and Standard 100 by OEKO-TEX® certified dying. The result, is resistant and transpiring solutions which come with bold and high-performing features, with a soft touch or even with a silky, yet strong, and enveloping feel. The designs range from rustic to contemporary and nod to jacquard, ‘authentic look’ and ‘drill’ hints. An ideal solution for footwear, apparel and leather goods.

Long story short? No compromises. E.C.O. Kosmos reflects design, innovation and responsible values, as well as 100% Italian Converter know-how.
 
“But this is just the beginning,” adds Karazissis. “The next step we are going to implement in the E.C.O. Kosmos cross-collection is a progressive integration of our triple-expertise, processes and R&D.” A sustainable step forward, a leap woven into a deep expertise a story to-be-continued. For a better future, this is for sure.

 

Fast Concept - Paper leather jacket, by Prof Kay Politowicz and Dr Kate Goldsworthy UAL (c) RISE AB
Fast Concept - Paper leather jacket, by Prof Kay Politowicz and Dr Kate Goldsworthy UAL
23.11.2018

New research pushing the limits for ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ fashion towards a sustainable, circular future

  • conceptual and commercial garments presented at exhibition in London

After two years of research Mistra Future Fashion is honoured to present, in collaboration with Centre for Circular Design at University of the Arts London and Filippa K, an exhibition pushing the limits of ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ fashion. Started in 2017, the industry-embedded project Circular Design Speeds takes a unique systemic approach, showcasing what could be accomplished using existing value chains as well as what the future of sustainable fashion holds. Ground-breaking textile research from University of the Arts London is questioning normative use and design of garments in creating prototypes to be worn across a spectrum of 24 hours to 50 years. By implementing research into existing value chains, Filippa K have produced a coat that is 100% recycled and recyclable, as well as a concept dress that is 100% bio-based and biodegradable. The research results and garments will be presented at the launch event at the University of the Arts London, on November 23rd and open to public on the 24th and 25th of November.

  • conceptual and commercial garments presented at exhibition in London

After two years of research Mistra Future Fashion is honoured to present, in collaboration with Centre for Circular Design at University of the Arts London and Filippa K, an exhibition pushing the limits of ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ fashion. Started in 2017, the industry-embedded project Circular Design Speeds takes a unique systemic approach, showcasing what could be accomplished using existing value chains as well as what the future of sustainable fashion holds. Ground-breaking textile research from University of the Arts London is questioning normative use and design of garments in creating prototypes to be worn across a spectrum of 24 hours to 50 years. By implementing research into existing value chains, Filippa K have produced a coat that is 100% recycled and recyclable, as well as a concept dress that is 100% bio-based and biodegradable. The research results and garments will be presented at the launch event at the University of the Arts London, on November 23rd and open to public on the 24th and 25th of November.

On Friday November 23rd the exhibition Disrupting Patterns: Designing for Circular Speeds opens up at University of the Arts London. The exhibition is the results of a two-year research project called Circular Design Speeds aiming at pushing the limits of ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ fashion by testing new concepts for sustainable design in an industry setting. On display are exploratory prototypes, as well as commercial garments produced by industry partner Filippa K using existing value chains. In addition, research results on innovative materials, consumer acceptance, composting studies and Life Cycle Assessments are presented. The aim of this project is to implement research results in a real fashion industry context, focusing on speed of use and maximising fabric value retention in products.

The Service Shirt developed by Professor Rebecca Earley is designed to last for over 50 years. The concept garment explores the multiple complexities, challenges and opportunities associated with design for circular business models in extended use contexts. The Service Shirt was designed as a ‘deliberate extreme’ to have a total lifecycle of 50 years. This lifecycle includes in-house and external remanufacturing processes, as well as various use cycles – often moving between single ownership and rental and sharing contexts. It becomes the lining for a jacket and then crafted in to fashion accessories, before finally being chemically regenerated in the year 2068.

On the opposite side of the spectrum the Fast-Forward concept, developed by Prof Kay Politowicz and Dr Kate Goldsworthy, explores alternative modes of production and use for a sustainable ‘fast-fashion’ application. Advantages with regards to climate impact are enabled through lighter material choices, nonwoven fabric production, no launder, clear routes to recovery and redistributed manufacturing systems. A sliding scale of ‘speed’ from ultra-fast forward through to a more widely accepted length of use, with adaptations to production processes and end of life, is presented. The prototypes are made from a new bio-based nonwoven material co-developed with Dr Hjalmar Granberg at RISE Research Institute of Sweden & University of the Arts London. The composition of the paper is a mix of cellulose pulp and bio-based PLA fibre, making the garment 100% biodegradable or recyclable in existing paper recycling systems.

Working closely with industry partner Filippa K made commercial testing possible. By implementing research into existing value chains, Filippa K was able to produce a coat that is 100% recycled and recyclable, as well as a concept dress that is 100% bio-based and biodegradable. The garments are a part of Filippa K’s Front Runner series and will be available in selected stores on November 26th. With a focus on products’ length of use and maximizing fabric value retention, Filippa K are dedicated to becoming fully circular by 2030.

“Being part of the fashion industry comes with many challenges, especially when considering the fact that we are the second most polluting industry after oil. Our industry needs to change and we believe adapting to circular models, like nature’s ecosystem, is one important solution. We want to be able to offer beautiful clothing and to make business within the planetary boundaries.”
- Elin Larsson, Sustainability Director, Filippa K

To validate the design research presented, a Life Cycle Assessment was performed on the prototypes. Mistra Future Fashion affiliated Dr. Greg Peters, Chalmers University of Technology, together with additional LCA Researchers at RISE, conclude that the production of fibres and fabrics are the main processes impacting the environment during the garment life cycles. Therefore, to extend the lifetime of existing garments and design for re-use, as done in the Service Shirt, is indeed the superior alternative compared to a reference garment.

“Compared with garments of the same mass, the extended life garments represent a large improvement in environmental performance over the reference garments, outperforming the reference garments in all effect categories. This superiority is primarily a consequence of avoiding garment production via reprinting and reassembly of the initial garment to extend its useful life.”
- Dr Greg Peters, LCA Researcher at Chalmers University of Technology

Another way to circumvent the impacts of fast fashion is to develop materials with considerably lower impacts during production, and which also avoid the barriers to recycling faced by conventional garments. Instead of hinder consumers from buying new, the act of acquiring a new garment could in fact be sustainable. The paper-based short life garments considered in this assessment show considerable impact savings when compare to the benchmark garment. Dr. Peters says,

“The paper-based garments benefit from the lower impacts of the material (fibre production, spinning and knitting) compared with conventional cotton, from their relatively light weight and also on account of the lower impacts in garment production and use.”