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High-Speed 4D Scanner now available at the ITM of TU Dresden © ITM/TU Dresden
Grand opening of the 4D scanner Move4D: System developers Daniel Gomez (right) and Carmen Gimeno (second f.t.r.) from IBV hand over the calibration scepter to Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Yordan Kyosev (middle), Head of the Chair of Assembly Technology for Textile Products, together with Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Chokri Cherif (second f.t.l.), Head of the ITM, and Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Sybille Krzywinski (left), Scientific Director of the chair
07.12.2020

High-Speed 4D Scanner now available at the ITM of TU Dresden

A Move4D scanner is the latest addition to the state-of-the-art CAE infrastructure at the Chair of Assembly Technology for Textile Products at the ITM – this comes as an early Christmas surprise that has been eagerly awaited by the researchers. The high-speed 4D scanner was developed at the IBV - Instituto de Biomecánica, Spain, and will be a valuable tool for future research projects involving interactions of humans and their clothing. Professor Yordan Kyosev, Head of the Chair of Assembly Technology for Textile Products, is just as excited as his team of researchers about the arrival of the new Move4D scanner. “By means of this scanner, we will be able to strengthen and extend our leading global position in digitalization and virtual product development for tight clothing in high-tech applications,” says Professor Kyosev who is looking forward to new co-operations in this promising field of research.

A Move4D scanner is the latest addition to the state-of-the-art CAE infrastructure at the Chair of Assembly Technology for Textile Products at the ITM – this comes as an early Christmas surprise that has been eagerly awaited by the researchers. The high-speed 4D scanner was developed at the IBV - Instituto de Biomecánica, Spain, and will be a valuable tool for future research projects involving interactions of humans and their clothing. Professor Yordan Kyosev, Head of the Chair of Assembly Technology for Textile Products, is just as excited as his team of researchers about the arrival of the new Move4D scanner. “By means of this scanner, we will be able to strengthen and extend our leading global position in digitalization and virtual product development for tight clothing in high-tech applications,” says Professor Kyosev who is looking forward to new co-operations in this promising field of research.

This high-speed scanner is able to capture an entire body with 180 Hz and a precision of < 1mm, thus guaranteeing the precise analysis of interactions between body and textile as well as deformation during motion. The Move4D can record and analyze dynamic processes at a very high speed. Hence, this device will enable researchers to make significant contributions towards enhanced functional (e.g. for the sports and medical sector) and protective clothing.

Together with three already available 3D scanners, this high-speed 4D scanner represents Dresden´s new „3D&4D Scan Lab“ at the Chair of Assembly Technology for Textile Products for the static and dynamic recording of small and medium-sized objects. Professor Kyosev and his team of 17 researchers are among the world´s leading R&D experts for clothing and technical products who will continue to expand their expertise in the field of material modelling for textile materials.


 

More information:
ITM TU Dresden 4D Scanner
Source:

© ITM/TU Dresden

TMAS member imogo develops new sustainable spray application technologies (c) TMAS
The roundtable discussion, Sustainable Finishing Methods in Textile Finishing, during ITA 2020.
16.11.2020

TMAS member imogo develops new sustainable spray application technologies

In a roundtable discussion during the recent Innovate Textiles & Apparel (ITA) textile machinery exhibition, imogo Founding Partner Per Stenflo and representatives from a number of like-minded European companies discussed the opportunities for new spray application technologies for the dyeing and finishing sector.

These technologies can achieve tremendous savings for manufacturers compared to traditional water-intensive processes it was explained at the event, held online from October 15-30th.

Pioneer
imogo – one of the latest companies to join TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association – is one of the key pioneers in this area with its Dye-Max system. Dye-Max spray dyeing technology can slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems. This is due to the extremely low liquor ratio of 0.3-0.8 litres per kilo of fabric and at the same time, considerably fewer auxiliary chemicals are required to start with.

In a roundtable discussion during the recent Innovate Textiles & Apparel (ITA) textile machinery exhibition, imogo Founding Partner Per Stenflo and representatives from a number of like-minded European companies discussed the opportunities for new spray application technologies for the dyeing and finishing sector.

These technologies can achieve tremendous savings for manufacturers compared to traditional water-intensive processes it was explained at the event, held online from October 15-30th.

Pioneer
imogo – one of the latest companies to join TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association – is one of the key pioneers in this area with its Dye-Max system. Dye-Max spray dyeing technology can slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems. This is due to the extremely low liquor ratio of 0.3-0.8 litres per kilo of fabric and at the same time, considerably fewer auxiliary chemicals are required to start with.

Obstacles
Such technologies, however, face a number of obstacles to adoption and during the ITA discussion it was agreed that 2020 has not provided the ideal climate for adventurous investors. “The textile industry is quite conservative and is definitely in survival mode at the moment and it is not the time to be a visionary,” said Stenflo. “Day to day business is about staying alive – that’s the reality for many of our customers.” Nevertheless, all of the panellists agreed that sustainable production will remain top of the agenda for the textile industry in the longer term and spray technologies for dyeing and finishing processes will be a part of it.

“Any investment in something new is a risk of course, and we have to be able to explain and convince manufacturers that there’s a good return on investment, not only in respect of sustainability, but in terms of making good business sense,” said Stenflo. “Here we could use the help of the brands of course, in putting pressure on their suppliers to be more sustainable. Governments also have a role to play, in providing incentives for producers to move in the sustainable direction. Sustainability alone will never cut it, there has to be a business case, or it won’t happen.”

Marketing
The marketing of sustainable new fibers is comparatively easy for the brands compared to explaining the difficult textile processes and the chemistries involved in fabric and garment production, he added.

“These fibers, however, currently go through all the same dirty processes that we need to get away from, so it must happen,” he said. “In developing our technologies, it has been important for us to avoid disrupting existing supply chains, stick with using off-the-shelf chemistries and dyes, and involve the dye manufacturers who are an essential part in how operations are driven today. “In fact, collaboration across the entire textile supply chain – from the brands right back to the new technology developers – is essential in moving the sustainability agenda forward.

Business models
“We are also looking into new business models in terms of how to reduce or lower the thresholds for investment and minimise the risk for the manufacturers who are looking to be the innovators,” he concluded. Also taking part in the ITA roundtable discussion were Simon Kew (Alchemie Technology, UK), Christian Schumacher (StepChange Innovations, Germany) Tobias Schurr (Weko, Germany), Rainer Tüxen (RotaSpray, Germany) and Felmke Zijilstra (DyeCoo, Netherlands).

European innovations
“It’s fantastic that all of this innovation is taking place in Europe based on established know-how and forward thinking,” said TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson.

“Spray application technologies are a perfect illustration of how new digital technologies can lead to more sustainable production, in this case by replacing water-intensive processes with the highly precise and controlled application of dyes and chemistries as vapour.
“There was a major project by the Swedish research organisation Mistra Future Fashion recently, involving many brand and academic institute partners. The project’s Fiber Bible 1 and 2 reports conclude that it’s very difficult to make assumptions that one fiber is better than another, because it’s so much about how fabrics and garments are being produced from them. The study also found that 55% of the chemicals used in a garment comes from the dyeing. This is where a number of TMAS companies can make a difference.
“An organic or recycled cotton t-shirt is not automatically more sustainable than a conventional cotton t-shirt, or even one made from synthetics – the alternative fibers are a good start but you have to consider the entire life cycle of a garment, and that includes the smart technologies in textiles production.
“TMAS members – backed by Swedish brands and advanced research institutes – are playing an active part in pushing forward new concepts that will work, and I have no doubt that digitalisation now goes hand in hand with sustainability for the textile industry’s future.”          

TMAS members ready to support digital textile transformations, post Covid-19 (c) TMAS
TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson.
08.07.2020

TMAS members ready to support digital textile transformations, post Covid-19

  • Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – have adopted a range of new strategies in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, aimed at assisting manufacturers of textiles and apparel to adjust to a new normal, as Europe and other regions emerge cautiously from lockdown.

“Many European companies have been forced into testing new working methods and looking at what it’s possible to do remotely, and how to exploit automation to the full, in order to become more flexible,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Others have been taking risks where they see opportunies and there’s a new sense of solidarity among companies.

“It’s extremely encouraging, for example, that over five hundred European companies from across our supply chain are reported to have responded to the shortages of facemasks and PPE – protective personal equipment – by converting parts of their sites or investing in new equipment.”

New supply chains

  • Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – have adopted a range of new strategies in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, aimed at assisting manufacturers of textiles and apparel to adjust to a new normal, as Europe and other regions emerge cautiously from lockdown.

“Many European companies have been forced into testing new working methods and looking at what it’s possible to do remotely, and how to exploit automation to the full, in order to become more flexible,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Others have been taking risks where they see opportunies and there’s a new sense of solidarity among companies.

“It’s extremely encouraging, for example, that over five hundred European companies from across our supply chain are reported to have responded to the shortages of facemasks and PPE – protective personal equipment – by converting parts of their sites or investing in new equipment.”

New supply chains

Amongst them are TMAS members of the ACG Group, who quickly established a dedicated new nonwovens fabric converting and single-use garment making-up plant to supply to the Swedish health authorities. From a standing start in March, this is now producing 1.8 million square metres of converted fabric and turning it into 692,000 finished medical garments each month.

“In 2020 so far, we have seen new value chains being created and a certain amount of permanent reshoring is now inevitable,” says Premler-Andersson. “This is being backed by the new funding announced in the European Union’s Next Generation EU plan, with €750 billion marked for helping industry recover. As the European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has stressed, “green and digital” transitions hold the key to Europe’s future prosperity and resilience, and TMAS members have new solutions to assist in both areas.”

Remote working

Automated solutions have opened up many possibilities for remote working during the pandemic. Texo AB, for example, the specialist in wide-width weaving looms for the paper industry, was able to successfully complete the build and delivery of a major multi-container order between April and May.

“Our new Remote Guidance software now makes it possible for us to carry out some of the commissioning and troubleshooting of such new lines remotely, which has been helpful” says Texo AB President Anders Svensson.

Svegea of Sweden, which has spent the past few months developing its new CR-210 fabric relaxation machine for knitted fabrics, has also successfully set up and installed a number of machines remotely, which the company has never attempted before.

“The pandemic has definitely led to some inventive solutions for us and with international travel currently not possible, we are finding better methods of digital communication and collaboration all the time,” says Svegea managing director Hakan Steene.

Eric Norling, Vice President of the Precision Application business of Baldwin Technology, believes the pandemic may have a more permanent impact on global travel.

“We have now proven that e-meetings and virtual collaboration tools are effective,” he says. “Baldwin implemented a home office work regime from April with only production personnel and R&D researchers at the workplace. These past few months have shown that we can be just as effective and do not need to travel for physical meetings to the same extent that was previously thought to be necessary.”

Pär Hedman, Sales and Marketing Manager for IRO AB, however, believes such advances can only go so far at the moment.

“Video conferences have taken a big leap forward, especially in development projects, and this method of communication is here to stay, but it will never completely replace personal meetings,” he says. “And textile fabrics need to be touched, examined and accepted by the senses, which is impossible to do via digital media today. The coming haptic internet, however, may well even change that too.”

Social distancing

The many garment factories now equipped with Eton Systems UPS work stations – designed to save considerable costs through automation – have meanwhile benefited from the unintentional social distancing they automatically provide compared to factories with conventional banks of sewing machines.

“These companies have been able to continue operating throughout the pandemic due to the spaced nature of our automated plant configurations,” says Eton Systems Business Development Manager Roger Ryrlén. “The UPS system has been established for some time, but planned spacing has proved an accidental plus for our customers – with improved productivity.”

“Innovations from TMAS member companies have been coming thick and fast recently due to their advanced know-how in automation concepts,” Premler-Andersson concludes.  “If anything, the restrictions imposed by the Covid-19 pandemic have only accelerated these initiatives by obliging our members to take new approaches.”

Compact II (c) Owl Media
Compact II
03.03.2020

Eltex of Sweden AB reports success with its Eye Compact II yarn

A close eye on quality with the Eye Compact II

Eltex of Sweden AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, reports solid success with its Eye Compact II yarn monitoring system for carpet tufting machines, since its launch at ITMA 2019 in Barcelona last June.

The sensor units of the Eye Compact II,Brian Hicks, Eltex CEO explains, have been successfully miniaturised to approximately a third of the size of those with the established Compact system, allowing them to be mounted on the very latest high speed tufting machines that are graphics driven, with limited space at the puller rollers.

Early stage prevention
Unlike the sensor systems that are employed at later positions on tufting machines – in order to detect faults in the formed fabric – Eye Compact II technology is about prevention at an earlier stage, through the detection of missing yarns.

A close eye on quality with the Eye Compact II

Eltex of Sweden AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, reports solid success with its Eye Compact II yarn monitoring system for carpet tufting machines, since its launch at ITMA 2019 in Barcelona last June.

The sensor units of the Eye Compact II,Brian Hicks, Eltex CEO explains, have been successfully miniaturised to approximately a third of the size of those with the established Compact system, allowing them to be mounted on the very latest high speed tufting machines that are graphics driven, with limited space at the puller rollers.

Early stage prevention
Unlike the sensor systems that are employed at later positions on tufting machines – in order to detect faults in the formed fabric – Eye Compact II technology is about prevention at an earlier stage, through the detection of missing yarns.

Critically, the sensors need to be installed after the last puller roller and before the tufting needles, because otherwise the roller could still be feeding yarns that will not been successfully taken by the needles. This is only possible with the extremely slim Eye Compact II units, which can also be positioned either above or below the rollers.

Guarantee
Another benefit is that the sensors can be arranged more closely together, with each of them monitoring 16 yarn positions, and their robustness ensures that once fitted, there is little the technicians or operators need to do.

Automatic
The Eye Compact II system easily learns pattern changes and displays the number of yarns involved to the operator for confirmation, and different parameters for different yarns groups can also even be set if required. With its research and development work primarily carried out at its headquarters in Osby, Sweden, and North American sales and service operated from its subsidiary in South Carolina, the manufacturing plant of Eltex has been located at Templemore in Ireland since 1976, providing significant advantages in terms of high flexibility and logistical services to customers on both sides of the Atlantic.

 

More information:
Eltex of Sweden AB TMAS
Source:

Owl Media

The SFL-2000 is the result of a four-year development project (c) AWOL
10.02.2020

ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström teamed up with Juki Corporation


In the latest technology innovation from members of TMAS (the Swedish textile machinery association), ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström have teamed up with Juki Corporation – the world’s leading sewing machine manufacturer – in the development of a new automated line concept that can considerably speed up the production of finished filter bags.

Woven or nonwoven filter bags employed in a wide range of industrial processes may be under the radar as products, but they represent a pretty significant percentage of technical textiles production.

According to a recent report from BCC research, a leading US analyst covering this sector, industrial filtration represented a $555 million market in 2019 and some of the key areas where such filter bags are employed include:


In the latest technology innovation from members of TMAS (the Swedish textile machinery association), ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström have teamed up with Juki Corporation – the world’s leading sewing machine manufacturer – in the development of a new automated line concept that can considerably speed up the production of finished filter bags.

Woven or nonwoven filter bags employed in a wide range of industrial processes may be under the radar as products, but they represent a pretty significant percentage of technical textiles production.

According to a recent report from BCC research, a leading US analyst covering this sector, industrial filtration represented a $555 million market in 2019 and some of the key areas where such filter bags are employed include:

  • Metal fabrication, with effective filtration required for manual and automated welding, thermal cutting, blasting and machining, especially for coolant filtration.
  • The process and energy industries, including foundries, smelters, incinerators, asphalt works and energy production plants.
  • Other key manufacturing fields – often where dust is generated – including the production of timber, textiles, composites, waste handling and minerals, in addition to chemicals, food production, pharmaceuticals, electronics and agriculture.

Line integration
The new SFL-2000 line is the result of a four-year development project between Juki Central Europe, headquartered in Poland, and the two ACG companies.

It is capable of handling a wide range of different filter media, and as an all-in-one solution, can produce high quality and accurate seams to pre-defined parameters, with optional modules allowing for customised constructions.

 

More information:
ACG Kinna ACG Nyström TMAS
Source:

AWOL

(c) IRO AB
05.07.2019

IRO AB: Zero twist for composite fabrics guaranteed

IRO AB, a member of the Vandewiele group, reports strong interest in its ZTF Zero Twist Feeder introduced at the recent ITMA 2019 in Barcelona, Spain, particularly from companies involved in the growing market of textile reinforcements for composites.

In the weaving of fibres such as carbon, glass and aramids, as well as thermoplastic tapes for highly-engineered composite fabrics, it is essential that there is no twist in the feed, which this new machine absolutely guarantees.

“The ZTF Zero Twist Feeder keeps the tape yarns or fibre tows constantly stretched to avoid the risks of any snarls or twisting,” explains Sales and Marketing Manager Pär Hedman. “During ITMA 2019 I spoke to many companies interested in this new machine, which will be supplied in bespoke versions specific to the individual needs of each customer and the intended end-use.”

IRO AB, a member of the Vandewiele group, reports strong interest in its ZTF Zero Twist Feeder introduced at the recent ITMA 2019 in Barcelona, Spain, particularly from companies involved in the growing market of textile reinforcements for composites.

In the weaving of fibres such as carbon, glass and aramids, as well as thermoplastic tapes for highly-engineered composite fabrics, it is essential that there is no twist in the feed, which this new machine absolutely guarantees.

“The ZTF Zero Twist Feeder keeps the tape yarns or fibre tows constantly stretched to avoid the risks of any snarls or twisting,” explains Sales and Marketing Manager Pär Hedman. “During ITMA 2019 I spoke to many companies interested in this new machine, which will be supplied in bespoke versions specific to the individual needs of each customer and the intended end-use.”

More information:
IRO AB Vandewiele ITMA 2019
Source:

TMAS by AWOL Media.

(c) COMSAT
04.07.2019

COMSAT opts for the Eltex EyETM

COMSAT is equipping its latest Tecmat sectional warping machine for weaving preparation with the new Eltex EyETM yarn tension monitoring system.

Unlike yarn tension monitors that are fitted solely on the weft insertion systems of weaving machines, the new Eltex technology is for the warping process prior to weaving – and instead of monitoring only the tension of the six-to-eight yarns fed by the weft insertion system the Eltex EyETM keeps a close eye on literally hundreds.

“Several hundred yarns can be fed from the creels during the warping process compared to only a few weft insertion yarns during weaving,” explains Brian Hicks, managing director of Eltex. “Tension monitoring for multiple ends has been a great challenge to achieve for us, but this new system generated tremendous interest at the recent ITMA 2019 textile machinery show and we already have systems in operation and orders on hand. The EyETM allows mills to greatly reduce problems.”

COMSAT is equipping its latest Tecmat sectional warping machine for weaving preparation with the new Eltex EyETM yarn tension monitoring system.

Unlike yarn tension monitors that are fitted solely on the weft insertion systems of weaving machines, the new Eltex technology is for the warping process prior to weaving – and instead of monitoring only the tension of the six-to-eight yarns fed by the weft insertion system the Eltex EyETM keeps a close eye on literally hundreds.

“Several hundred yarns can be fed from the creels during the warping process compared to only a few weft insertion yarns during weaving,” explains Brian Hicks, managing director of Eltex. “Tension monitoring for multiple ends has been a great challenge to achieve for us, but this new system generated tremendous interest at the recent ITMA 2019 textile machinery show and we already have systems in operation and orders on hand. The EyETM allows mills to greatly reduce problems.”

More information:
COMSAT
Source:

TMAS by AWOL Media