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(c) Lindauer DORNIER GmbH
Maja Dornier (lhs) and Prof. Dr. Wolf Mutschler (rhs) hand over the Peter Dornier Foundation Award, endowed with 5,000 euros, to the award winner Dipl.-Ing. Mathis Bruns
26.07.2022

Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 honours textile research on woven heart valve

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease is one of the most common natural causes of death. Every year, it is the cause of death of around 17 million people worldwide. The Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 has now awarded a research work that is to improve the medical care of people with insufficient heart valve function in the future and prolong the patients' lives.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease is one of the most common natural causes of death. Every year, it is the cause of death of around 17 million people worldwide. The Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 has now awarded a research work that is to improve the medical care of people with insufficient heart valve function in the future and prolong the patients' lives.

The human heart is a high-performance machine: over the course of a person's life, it beats almost three billion times, pumping around 200 million litres of blood through the body. Enormous stresses that can sometimes lead to life-threatening signs of wear and tear. If a heart valve gets out of step, patients usually get artificial-mechanical or biological valves as a replacement. However, mechanical solutions imply patients to take blood-thinning medication for the rest of their lives. In addition, there may be audible closing noises. For example, almost a quarter of patients with mechanical heart valves complain of sleep disturbances. Biological heart valves, on the other hand, such as those made from animal tissue, require a great deal of manual work and have a shorter lifetime.

Potential of weaving for medical products demonstrated
For this reason, Graduate Engineer Mathis Bruns at the Institute for Textile Machinery and High-Performance Textile Materials Technology (ITM) at the TU Dresden is researching an implant alternative made of fabric. As part of a research project that also involved heart surgeons from the Dresden Heart Centre and the University Hospital in Würzburg, Mr. Bruns provided important findings for weaving an artificial heart valve in his diploma thesis. For his work entitled "Development of tubular structures with integrated valve function", Mathis Bruns has now received the Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022, endowed with 5,000 euros. In his laudation, Dr. Adnan Wahhoud, former head of the development department of air-jet weaving machines at DORNIER in Lindau, said: "With his work, the winner of the award demonstrates very clearly the potential of weaving technology to produce fabrics of complex form, geometry and structure with the aim of prolonging and improving people's lives." The award-winning thesis enriches research into three-dimensional tissues for use in medicine.

Weaving replacement heart valves without seams
"A particular advantage of our approach is the integral production method", says foundation prize winner Mathis Bruns. “The geometry and function of a heart valve is that complex that woven heart valves could not be produced in this form previously. Through the combined use of a rigid rapier weaving machine with bobbin shield and a Jacquard machine, it is possible to weave the replacement heart valve in such a way that it no longer has be sewn together. Even the tubular structures for the blood vessels and the integrated valve function are ‘all of one piece’. Seams are always a weak point in textile medical products," Mr. Bruns adds. “Another advantage of the woven heart valve is the possibility to insert it by the help of minimally invasive surgery. Hence, the folded valve which is about the size of a tea light is to be pushed with a catheter via the bloodstream to the target position in the heart and unfolded there. The patient's chest and heart would then no longer have to be cut open”, explains prize winner Mr. Bruns.

Textile structure is similar to human tissue
A wide variety of medical products have always been produced on DORNIER weaving machines. Customers use them to produce fabrics for bandages, prostheses, blood filters and orthoses among other things. For Mathis Bruns, it is only evident that implants such as heart valves will more and more be woven on the machines from Lindau in the future. "Textile tissue is very similar to human tissue," he says. The human body consists largely of thread-like materials, just as a textile fabric is made up of thousands of individual threads. "Muscle fibres convey force impulses, nerve tracts send stimuli such as pain and brain cells convey information via thread-like dendrites and axons." Because of their ‘thread-like properties’, woven implants are therefore particularly suitable for medical applications.

Dissertation and Creativity Award of the German Textile Machinery Foundation 2018 to go to Aachen (c) VDMA. Eric Otto, Susanne Fischer, Dr. Benjamin Weise, Peter D. Dornier (Chairman Walter Reiners-Stiftung), Alon Tal, Jan Merlin Abram (left to right)
01.10.2018

Dissertation and Creativity Award of the German Textile Machinery Foundation 2018 to go to Aachen

The Mechanical Engineering Industry Association (VDMA) has awarded two prizes to graduates of the Institut für Textiltechnik (ITA) of RWTH Aachen University - the dissertation prize and the creativity prize of the Walter Reiners Foundation of German Textile Machinery 2018. ITA alumnus Dr Benjamin Weise was awarded the dissertation prize for the development of novel fibres for textile charge storage devices. For their work on a guide to 4D product design, Jan Merlin Abram and Aalon Tal (both ITA students) were honoured with the creativity prize. The dissertation prize is endowed with €5,000 whilst the creativity prize contains a one-year scholarship of €250 per month. Peter D. Dornier, President of the Walter Reiners Foundation and Chairman of the Management Board of Lindauer DORNIER, presented the awards on the 18 September 2018 at the 18th Textile Machinery Forum in the Digital Capability Center in Aachen, Germany.

Graphene revolutionizes all-in-one - supercaps, reduction of terahertz radiation and antistatics

The Mechanical Engineering Industry Association (VDMA) has awarded two prizes to graduates of the Institut für Textiltechnik (ITA) of RWTH Aachen University - the dissertation prize and the creativity prize of the Walter Reiners Foundation of German Textile Machinery 2018. ITA alumnus Dr Benjamin Weise was awarded the dissertation prize for the development of novel fibres for textile charge storage devices. For their work on a guide to 4D product design, Jan Merlin Abram and Aalon Tal (both ITA students) were honoured with the creativity prize. The dissertation prize is endowed with €5,000 whilst the creativity prize contains a one-year scholarship of €250 per month. Peter D. Dornier, President of the Walter Reiners Foundation and Chairman of the Management Board of Lindauer DORNIER, presented the awards on the 18 September 2018 at the 18th Textile Machinery Forum in the Digital Capability Center in Aachen, Germany.

Graphene revolutionizes all-in-one - supercaps, reduction of terahertz radiation and antistatics

In his dissertation "Development of graphene-modified multifilament yarns for the production of textile charge storage devices", laureate Dr Benjamin Weise developed novel fibres made of polyamide and graphene and further processed them into textile surfaces. The newly developed polyamide graphene fibres are featuring a multitude of advantages:

  • Due to their high performance in the charge storage area, they are predestined for use in double-layer capacitors, so-called super capacitors, or supercaps in short. Compared to lithium-ion batteries, supercaps offer significantly higher power density and a longer lifetime as no chemical reactions are taking place. towing to the graphene platelets in the filaments, it is now possible for the first time to integrate a charge storage device directly into a textile without having to sew in a rechargeable battery. This new fibre is therefore suitable for prospective use in smart textiles, for instance in a textile defibrillator.
  • The new graphene-modified polyamide fibres can attenuate inident terahertz radiation up to 25 % of their original intensity. Terahertz radiation, for example, offers transmission rates of 100 Mbit/sec and is therefore of high interest for high-performance wireless communication. However, the radiation could damage sensible electronics as in aircrafts if this technology will be used widespread. Consequently, the shielding of the radiation is of high importance, e.g. in the form of fibre composite components in the aircraft, which protect the on-board electronics.
  • As the fibres are showcasing a dissipative electrical conductivity, personal protective equipment is another prospective field of application.  

The development of a pilot process for graphene-modified fibres and the production of textile demonstrators are novel and disruptive attainments of Dr Weise’s PhD thesis and the reason for the award ceremony to him. Due to its outstanding properties, the European Union is funding research on graphene within the frame of the "Graphene Flagship" with an overall budget of one billion Euro (source: http://graphene-flagship.eu/project/Pages/About-Graphene-Flagship.aspx).

Modular product design of 4D products is now possible in simplified form

How can three-dimensional products change their shape over time and thus become "four-dimensional"? The students Jan Merlin Abram and Aalon Tal provide answers to this question in their project work "Leitfaden zur Auslegung hybrider morphender Textilien am Beispiel eines Scharniers" (Guidelines for the Design of Hybrid Morphing Textiles Using the Example of a Hinge), for which they were awarded the creativity prize. In their work, the students offer a guideline for the development of a four-dimensional textile from the idea to the demonstrator. Four-dimensional textiles, for example, consist of a hybrid material of elastic textile on which three-dimensional structures are printed. The fourth dimension describes the change in shape and/or a property over a defined period of time (= morphing).  This change is caused by external influences such as light and heat.

Every year, the Foundation of the German Textile Machinery awards prizes for the best dissertation, diploma or master's thesis and the creativity prize for the smartest student research project. Further prizes were awarded to Eric Otto, ITM Dresden, and Susanne Fischer, Reutlingen University.

Source:

Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University

ITA

Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany and Taiwan Pavilions to join Cinte Techtextil China (c) Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd
15.08.2018

Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany and Taiwan Pavilions to join Cinte Techtextil China

From 4 – 6 September, leading innovations and technologies from around the world will feature in the Shanghai New International Expo Centre for Cinte Techtextil China 2018. With a growing technical textile market in China and Asia, big industry names will come to showcase new products. The Belgium, Germany and Taiwan Pavilions are predicted to draw a crowd with their return, while the Czech Republic Pavilion makes its debut appearance.

From 4 – 6 September, leading innovations and technologies from around the world will feature in the Shanghai New International Expo Centre for Cinte Techtextil China 2018. With a growing technical textile market in China and Asia, big industry names will come to showcase new products. The Belgium, Germany and Taiwan Pavilions are predicted to draw a crowd with their return, while the Czech Republic Pavilion makes its debut appearance.

Fresh innovation from the Taiwan Pavilion
The Taiwan Pavilion lives up to its reputation as one of the leading sources of industry innovation. Ten exhibitors in the Taiwan Pavilion will showcase a variety of innovations ideal for a number of industries. With advances in medical and hygiene product technologies, exhibitors Web-Pro Corporation will offer protective cover-all materials that resist pathogens and micro-organisms and multi-layered PE films for hygiene products, while Kae Hwa Industrial will introduce their developments in materials that protect against viruses. Four Elements Energy Biotechnology will showcase their multi-functional Masterbatch product, a unique FDA-qualified, anti-mildew and transparent plastic additive that repels bacteria.

Other exhibitors to watch out for in the Taiwan Pavilion include Ritex Machinery, who will display their Air Through machinery which can be applied to nonwoven fabrics for hygienic, medical and filtration uses. Everlight Chemical Industrial’s Evereco® adhesives introduce an eco-friendly solution with heat-resistance and other resilient properties. Also offering eco-friendly alternatives is TomLong Techstile and their TPU coated fabrics, ideal for waterproof and inflatable products.

Productivity and efficiency at the German Pavilion
Following high demand in the Chinese market, the German Pavilion returns with around 30 exhibitors, showcasing their expertise in efficiency in textile production. Highlights include Baumüller Nürnberg’s modular concepts and intelligent automations which allow flexible reactions to changeable market requirements. Edelmann Technology brings new high speed winder systems for increased production rates and new concepts for reducing contamination in products. ISRA Surface Vision will present 100% inline optical surface inspection methods for quality control and process optimisations. Another product to watch out for is Kufner’s xShield®, a lightweight, soft textile with 99% shielding efficiency against electromagnetic radiation.

Other big names in the German Pavilion include Autefa Solutions, Brückner Textile Technologies, Dornier Lindauer, IBENA, J.H. Ziegler, Kufner, Perlon and more.

Belgium Pavilion returns along with a Czech Republic debut
Organised by Fedustria (Belgian Textile, Woodworking and Furniture Industry Federation), the Belgium Pavilion will include textile recycling company Belrey Fibres, engineered fabrics by Pennel & Flipo for marine and rescue industries, as well as leading coating specialists Vetex who will feature a variety of functional tapes, and R&D institute Centexbel who carry out research projects across the entire textile and polymer production chain.

The new Czech Republic Pavilion organised by ATOK, the Association of Textile-Clothing–Leather Industry, will showcase three exhibitors who will provide solutions for technical yarn, fabric processing and nonwoven fabrics. These include: GF Machinery, showcasing R&D and production of special machines and lines for glass / basalt yarn and fabric processing; Retex’s nonwoven needle-punched and air laid textiles; and STAP, Europe’s biggest manufacturer of narrow fabrics.

The Cinte Techtextil China fair is recognised by European manufacturers as a gateway to the Asian market. With investment from China boosting the technical textile industry, and more Asian countries than ever developing their technical markets, Cinte Techtextil China 2018 is set to be a hub of business potential.

 

 

More information:
Cinte Techtextil China
Source:

Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd