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 cooperation of ELA and ELCA (c) Sébastien D‘Halloy
At this year's JEC World in Paris, the future cooperation of ELA and ELCA was sealed to strengthen lightweight technology in Europe. Image: from left to right: Freek de Bruijn, Jean Pierre Heijster, Wolfgang Seeliger, Laure, Carsten Lies, Eric Pierrejean, Cécile Bedouet, Ricardo del Valle, Aitor Hornés, Emma Arussi, Lena Wollbeck
18.05.2022

Strong partnership for European lightweight technology

Cooperating alliances for lightweight technology: The European Lightweight Association (ELA) and the European Lightweight Clusters Alliance (ELCA) have decided to work together. Both European lightweight clusters are united by the common goal of giving the enormous economic and ecological potential of lightweight technology more visibility in politics, business and science at European, national and regional level. In addition, complementary expertises of work form the basis for the future partnership, from which European lightweight technology can optimally benefit.

"We see great potential in the future cooperation of the ELA and the ELCA to advance lightweight technology in Europe with combined forces," says Dr Katharina Schöps as representative of the ELCA. "In this way, we are strengthening the global competitiveness of European companies and at the same time making a significant contribution to climate protection," says Jean-Pierre Heijster of the ELA about the cooperation of the European lightweight technology networks.

Cooperating alliances for lightweight technology: The European Lightweight Association (ELA) and the European Lightweight Clusters Alliance (ELCA) have decided to work together. Both European lightweight clusters are united by the common goal of giving the enormous economic and ecological potential of lightweight technology more visibility in politics, business and science at European, national and regional level. In addition, complementary expertises of work form the basis for the future partnership, from which European lightweight technology can optimally benefit.

"We see great potential in the future cooperation of the ELA and the ELCA to advance lightweight technology in Europe with combined forces," says Dr Katharina Schöps as representative of the ELCA. "In this way, we are strengthening the global competitiveness of European companies and at the same time making a significant contribution to climate protection," says Jean-Pierre Heijster of the ELA about the cooperation of the European lightweight technology networks.

Together, ELCA and ELA represent a growing network of more than 4,500 companies and more than 600 research institutions from 12 European countries active in lightweight technology across different
sectors and industries. This brings together the two largest lightweight technology communities in Europe. Lightweight solutions from Europe can thus gain visibility and be implemented more quickly in global markets.

Joining forces to strengthen lightweight technologies ́ market position at the European level ELCA and ELA want to improve the positioning of lightweight technologies and materials with joint activities and events, in particular to prioritise them on the agenda of the European Commission. The cooperation thus wants to send a clear signal to Brussels. Especially with the view to achieve European climate protection goals; lightweight technology has the potential to conserve valuable resources and reduce CO 2 emissions. At the same time, the improved sustainability with the same or even optimised performance brings valuable competitive advantages for companies. Lightweight products and technologies Made in Europe can thus become a unique selling point for European stakeholders on international markets.

With this cooperation, ELCA and ELA combine their respective strengths: ELCA, as the European Lightweight Clusters Alliance, has very successfully created a resilient pan-European innovation ecosystem for lightweight technology in recent years. ELA, on the other hand, is particularly characterised by its close ties to industrial users. As a result, the existing ecosystem is enriched and a more demand-oriented development and faster market introduction is made possible. In this way, both lightweight technology networks will complement each other optimally in the future in order to bring technology and markets together in a targeted manner.

03.03.2022

Lenzing opens lyocell plant in Thailand

  • Project delivered on schedule and at budget after two and a half years of construction despite challenges arising from a global pandemic
  • New state-of-the-art lyocell plant with a capacity of 100,000 tons will help serve the growing demand for sustainably produced fibers
  • Important milestone towards a carbon-free future has been set

The Lenzing Group is pleased to announce the completion of its key lyocell expansion project in Thailand. The new plant, one of the largest of its kind in the world with a nameplate capacity of 100,000 tons per year, started production on schedule and will help to even better meet the increasing customer demand for TENCEL™ branded lyocell fibers. For Lenzing, the project also represents an important step towards strengthening its leadership position in the specialty fiber market and into a carbon-free future.

  • Project delivered on schedule and at budget after two and a half years of construction despite challenges arising from a global pandemic
  • New state-of-the-art lyocell plant with a capacity of 100,000 tons will help serve the growing demand for sustainably produced fibers
  • Important milestone towards a carbon-free future has been set

The Lenzing Group is pleased to announce the completion of its key lyocell expansion project in Thailand. The new plant, one of the largest of its kind in the world with a nameplate capacity of 100,000 tons per year, started production on schedule and will help to even better meet the increasing customer demand for TENCEL™ branded lyocell fibers. For Lenzing, the project also represents an important step towards strengthening its leadership position in the specialty fiber market and into a carbon-free future.

The construction of the plant located at Industrial Park 304 in Prachinburi, around 150 kilometers northeast of Bangkok, started in the second half of 2019 and proceeded largely according to plan, despite the challenges arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The recruiting and onboarding of new employees has been successful. Investments (CAPEX) amounted to approx. EUR 400 mn.

“The demand for our wood-based, biodegradable specialty fibers under the TENCEL™, LENZING™ ECOVERO™ and VEOCEL™ brands is growing very well. In Asia in particular, we see huge growth potential for our brands based on sustainable innovation. With the production start of the lyocell plant in Thailand, Lenzing reached an important milestone in its growth journey, supporting our ambitious goal to make the textile and nonwoven industries more sustainable”, said Robert van de Kerkhof, Member of the Managing Board.

In 2019, Lenzing made a strategic commitment to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions per ton of product by 50 percent by 2030. The target is to be climate-neutral by 2050. Due to the established infrastructure, the site in Thailand can be supplied with sustainable biogenic energy and contribute significantly to climate protection.

Together with the key project in Brazil and the substantial investments at the existing sites in Asia, Lenzing is currently implementing the largest investment program in its corporate history (with more than approx. EUR 1.5 bn). Lenzing will continue to drive the execution of its strategic projects, which are to make a significant contri-bution to earnings from 2022.

Source:

Lenzing AG

01.02.2022

EURATEX: High energy costs undermine crucial transformation of the textile and clothing industry

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

  1. The apparel and textile industry needs a safe supply with sufficient green energy (electricity and gas) at internationally competitive prices.
  2. The transformation of industry requires access to very significant amounts of renewable energy at competitive costs. Additional investments in infrastructure will also be needed to guarantee access to new renewable energy supplies.
  3. Until a global (or at least G 20 level) carbon price or other means for a global level playing field in climate protection are implemented, competitive prices for green energy must be granted at European or national levels (e.g. CCfDs, reduction on levies, targeted subsidies).
  4. As the European textile and clothing sector faces global competition mainly form countries/regions with less stringent climate ambitions, it is of utmost importance that the European textile and clothing companies are prevented form direct and indirect carbon leakage.
  5. EU-policy should support solutions, e.g. through targeted subsidies (for hydrogen, energy grids, R&D, technology roadmap studies etc.).
  6. A dedicated approach for SMEs might be appropriate as SMEs do not have the skills/know-how to further improve their energy efficiency and/or becoming carbon neutral.
  7. CAPEX and OPEX support will be necessary for breakthrough technologies, like hydrogen.
  8. The Fit-for-55-Package must support the European Textile and Clothing industry in decarbonization and carbon neutrality. The EU must therefore advocate a global level playing field more than before. The primary goal must be to establish an internationally uniform, binding CO2 pricing, preferably in the form of a standard at G-7 / G-20 level.
  9. EU-policy must not hinder solutions, e.g. we need reasonable state aid rules (compensating the gap between national energy or climate levies and a globally competitive energy price should not be seen as a subsidy).
  10. The European Textile and Clothing industry has made use of economically viable potentials to continuously improve energy efficiency over many years and decades. The obligation to implement further measures must be taken considering investment cycles that are in line with practice. Attention must be paid to the proportionality of costs without weakening the competitive position in the EU internal market or with competitors outside the EU.

Please see the attached position paper for more information.

Source:

EURATEX

The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe (c) Mimaki EMEA
Traditionally, apparel manufacturing has centred on a production chain model of sourcing materials and producing garments in bulk, microfactories are now enabling on-demand, on-location production
12.01.2022

Mimaki Europe: The Green Revolution

  • The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe

With the all-important COP26 Climate Change Conference having taken centre stage in November, there is no time like the present for the fashion world to rally together in stepping up sustainability efforts and getting carbon emissions under control. Globally, the fashion industry is now estimated to account for around 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 20 percent of wastewater , making the pursuit of greener production methods more pertinent than ever before. Thankfully, we are seeing a new era of production enter the fashion arena, with the increasing emergence of technologically advanced, highly automated microfactories.

Along with reducing unnecessary waste through on-demand production, microfactories have a smaller ecological footprint than traditional garment production and require no water use during the production process, making it not only a faster solution, but a greener one too.

  • The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe

With the all-important COP26 Climate Change Conference having taken centre stage in November, there is no time like the present for the fashion world to rally together in stepping up sustainability efforts and getting carbon emissions under control. Globally, the fashion industry is now estimated to account for around 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 20 percent of wastewater , making the pursuit of greener production methods more pertinent than ever before. Thankfully, we are seeing a new era of production enter the fashion arena, with the increasing emergence of technologically advanced, highly automated microfactories.

Along with reducing unnecessary waste through on-demand production, microfactories have a smaller ecological footprint than traditional garment production and require no water use during the production process, making it not only a faster solution, but a greener one too.

Last year’s FESPA saw Mimaki team up with fashion designer Carolina Guzman to bring her designs to life in real time at the show, setting up its own working microfactory live on-site to take her designs from screen to garment within just a day. Guzman’s designs were created using Mimaki’s TS100-1600 Sublimation Printer, before being transferred to textile, digitally cut and finally pieced together. Devised with a string of ethical and environmental objectives threaded throughout, the microfactory also exclusively utilised eco-friendly Greentex fabric, and any remaining material was donated to Sheltersuit: a wind- and waterproof coat that can be transformed into a sleeping bag, which is provided free of charge to homeless people and refugees.

Through working with a number of strategic partners – including transfer printing expert, Klieverik; paper solutions specialist, Neenah Coldenhove; and digital cutting equipment provider, Summa – Mimaki was able to produce a collection of unique, high-quality garments live on the stand during the tradeshow, demonstrating to visitors from more than 100 countries some of the key reasons that microfactories seem set to change the future of fashion…

Unparalleled speed and versatility
Where traditionally, apparel manufacturing has centred on a production chain model of sourcing materials and producing garments in bulk, microfactories are now enabling on-demand, on-location production, making it possible to create everything from unique, one-off pieces and samples right through to entire product lines – all at unprecedented speeds. This means greater flexibility and customisation, enabling designers to modify or update designs and respond to market trends as they occur.

Simplified supply chains and minimised risk
The microfactory setup brings production in-house and on-demand, minimising the cost of not only storing stock, but also of shipping it and responsibly disposing of unsold items. Where recent geopolitical events have highlighted the fragility of global supply chains, microfactories offer a unique independence from these systems, empowering garment manufacturers to future-proof their businesses, become less reliant on external systems and suppliers, and reduce the risk of disruptions.

A boosted bottom line and a greener future
Facilitating savings in a whole line of resources, from physical storage and production space to time and energy, microfactories ultimately have the potential to significantly increase profitability for garment manufacturers, with the additional benefit of being easily scalable as production increases. Perhaps even more compelling, however, are the environmental considerations. Demonstrated on a small scale through Mimaki’s recent project, the environmental benefits inherent to microfactory production will have an even greater impact as it becomes more prolific and commonplace throughout the fashion world, with the potential to effect meaningful environmental change as adoption increases in the years to come.

VDMA: Top young talent with cutting-edge topics  (c) VDMA
The 2021 winners (from top left to right): Dr Martin Hengstermann, Irina Kuznik, Kai-Chieh Kuo.
10.11.2021

VDMA: Top young talent with cutting-edge topics

The Chairman of the Walter Reiners-Stiftung foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association, Peter D. Dornier has awarded prizes to three successful young engineers. The award-winning works provide practical solutions on the topic of circular economy. For example, the recycling of carbon fibres, which are used to produce lightweight components for the automotive industry. Or the environmentally friendly production of yarns from crab shells. Another topic was medical applications: The processing of ultra-fine yarns into stents for aortic repair. The award ceremony took place online on 9 November as part of the Aachen-Dresden-Denkendorf International Textile Conference.  

With a creativity prize, endowed with 3,000 euros, the foundation honoured the diploma thesis of Irina Kuznik, TU Dresden. She used a creative approach to realise solutions for processing chitosan into fibre yarn.

The Chairman of the Walter Reiners-Stiftung foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association, Peter D. Dornier has awarded prizes to three successful young engineers. The award-winning works provide practical solutions on the topic of circular economy. For example, the recycling of carbon fibres, which are used to produce lightweight components for the automotive industry. Or the environmentally friendly production of yarns from crab shells. Another topic was medical applications: The processing of ultra-fine yarns into stents for aortic repair. The award ceremony took place online on 9 November as part of the Aachen-Dresden-Denkendorf International Textile Conference.  

With a creativity prize, endowed with 3,000 euros, the foundation honoured the diploma thesis of Irina Kuznik, TU Dresden. She used a creative approach to realise solutions for processing chitosan into fibre yarn.

Mr Kai-Chieh Kuo was awarded the diploma/master's thesis promotion prize of 3,500 euros. With his master's thesis, which was written at RWTH Aachen University, Mr Kuo contributes to the production of vital components used in medicine. The stents made of ultra-fine yarns are made possible by an innovative modification of the classic tube weaving process.

The Walter Reiners Foundation rewarded the doctoral thesis of Dr. Martin Hengstermann with the promotional prize in the dissertation category, endowed with 5,000 euros. The thesis deals with the production of recycled carbon fibres. These can be used to produce lightweight components for motor vehicle and aircraft construction or the wind energy sector.

New Prize Sustainability / Circular Economy
The environmental conditions of the textile industry and machine construction are changing. Topics such as climate protection and the circular economy are becoming central. From this perspective, the board of the Walter Reiners Foundation has decided to further develop the foundation's prize system.

In 2022, the foundation will for the first time offer a prize with a focus on design / sustainability. Peter D. Dornier, Chairman of the Foundation, explained: "Already in the design phase, one can set the parameters so that a textile product can be reintroduced after use into the economic cycle for a high-quality application. For example, through the appropriate use of materials and finishing. We are looking for solutions for resource-saving design, technology and manufacturing processes."   

22.10.2021

VDMA Textile Machinery publishes position paper

In a position paper published on 22 October 2021, the companies organised in the VDMA Textile Machinery Association welcome the ambitions of the EU to promote climate protection, in particular the approach of combining the goals for the EU textile and clothing industry into a sector-specific strategy.

Up to now, the increasing textile consumption around the world, due to growing population and purchasing power has been accompanied by a rising use of resources. “The textile machinery companies organised in the VDMA are geared towards a functioning circular economy. With our highly efficient technologies we are an indispensable partner in this transition process”, explained Regina Brückner, Chairwoman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Associate of Brückner Trockentechnik.  

In a position paper published on 22 October 2021, the companies organised in the VDMA Textile Machinery Association welcome the ambitions of the EU to promote climate protection, in particular the approach of combining the goals for the EU textile and clothing industry into a sector-specific strategy.

Up to now, the increasing textile consumption around the world, due to growing population and purchasing power has been accompanied by a rising use of resources. “The textile machinery companies organised in the VDMA are geared towards a functioning circular economy. With our highly efficient technologies we are an indispensable partner in this transition process”, explained Regina Brückner, Chairwoman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Associate of Brückner Trockentechnik.  

In the new position paper, the executive board of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association emphasises that the new framework must be practicable. Ms Brückner said: “The EU must strike the right balance between necessary, yet also minimal, legislative regulation. A successful transition requires a level playing field which sets out fair rules for sustainability, thereby enabling European companies to nonetheless increase their international competitiveness.”

You can find the complete position paper in the attachment.

Source:

VDMA e. V

Recycling secures raw materials for a climate-neutral Europe © ALBA Group
Newly published: the studie “resources SAVED by recycling”.
06.10.2021

Recycling secures raw materials for a climate-neutral Europe

Recycling is the key factor in achieving the EU climate targets. This is shown by the results of the "resources SAVED by recycling" study published today, which Fraunhofer UMSICHT prepared on behalf of the ALBA Group, one of the ten leading recycling companies worldwide. According to the study, 3.5 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and 28.8 million tons of primary resources could be saved in 2020 alone. Further potential could be raised, for example, through minimum quotas for the use of recycled raw materials.

Recycling is the key factor in achieving the EU climate targets. This is shown by the results of the "resources SAVED by recycling" study published today, which Fraunhofer UMSICHT prepared on behalf of the ALBA Group, one of the ten leading recycling companies worldwide. According to the study, 3.5 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and 28.8 million tons of primary resources could be saved in 2020 alone. Further potential could be raised, for example, through minimum quotas for the use of recycled raw materials.

“Fit for 55” thanks to the circular economy: the recycling of raw materials leads to a systematic reduction in the greenhouse gas emissions of our civilisation – and can therefore make a key contribution to achieving the EU climate goals. This is the outcome of the “resources SAVED by recycling” study presented today, which the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT prepared on behalf of the ALBA Group. Thanks to the closed-loop circulation of 4.8 million tonnes of recyclable materials, the ALBA Group succeeded in preventing some 3.5 million tonnes of climate-damaging greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2020 alone. This amount is equivalent to the emissions from some five million return flights between Frankfurt am Main and Mallorca. At the same time, recycling also secures valuable raw materials for the industry: in 2020, in comparison with primary production, recycling saved 28.8 million tonnes of resources, such as crude oil and iron ore.

“The circular economy is one of the strongest pace-setters on the journey to achieving climate neutrality,” highlights Dr. Axel Schweitzer, CEO of the ALBA Group. “We will only achieve the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55 per cent throughout Europe by 2030 if we make consistent use of recycled raw materials.” This includes the area of plastics, for example: compared with primary plastics made from crude oil, the use of high-quality recycled plastics achieves a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions of more than 50 per cent. “It is now necessary to lever this potential,” explains Schweitzer. “We are expecting the new Federal Government in Germany to act decisively and push ahead directly with the transition to a circular economy. The environmental benefits of recycling due to its clearly superior CO2 balance should also find reflection in prices. As immediate climate protection measures, clear industry standards for recyclates combined with minimum quotas on the use of recycled raw materials in products and packaging are also urgently necessary. Last but not least, the state sector is also called upon to prioritise resource protection in the area of procurement. Sustainable procurement can ultimately provide a significant boost to the circular economy”.

Plastics, metals, waste electrical (and electronic) equipment, wood, paper, cardboard, cartons or glass: the Fraunhofer UMSICHT has now been researching the specific benefits of recycling for 14 years. Detailed comparisons have also been made of the primary processes and recycling processes for the various material flows. “This means we can precisely quantify the extent to which the recycling activities of the ALBA Group can contribute to reducing the burden on the environment,” explains Dr.-Ing. Markus Hiebel, Director of the Department for Sustainability and Participation at Fraunhofer UMSICHT. Hiebel believes that the greatest savings can be achieved if the entire value chain is aligned consistently with the circular principle: “The transformation towards a genuine circular economy requires completely new thinking. Products should be designed and managed to ensure that they contain recycled raw materials right from the start – which enables them to be recycled appropriately.”

Source:

Fraunhofer-Institut für Umwelt-, Sicherheits- und Energietechnik UMSICHT

 

Graphical material: Borealis
26.08.2021

Drinking cups using chemically recycled polypropylene

Swiss dairy company Emmi is partnering with Borealis and Greiner Packaging to produce iced coffed drinking cups using chemically recycled polypropylene.

The cups are produced by Greiner Packaging and the chemically recycled material comes from Borealis, one of the world’s leading providers of advanced and circular polyolefin solutions based in Vienna, Austria.

Emmi, Switzerland’s largest milk processor is committed to climate protection and the circular economy. The dairy company has the stated goal to make all of its packaging 100% recyclable and is committed to various measures to promote circularity such as packaging that contains at least 30% recyclate by 2027.

Swiss dairy company Emmi is partnering with Borealis and Greiner Packaging to produce iced coffed drinking cups using chemically recycled polypropylene.

The cups are produced by Greiner Packaging and the chemically recycled material comes from Borealis, one of the world’s leading providers of advanced and circular polyolefin solutions based in Vienna, Austria.

Emmi, Switzerland’s largest milk processor is committed to climate protection and the circular economy. The dairy company has the stated goal to make all of its packaging 100% recyclable and is committed to various measures to promote circularity such as packaging that contains at least 30% recyclate by 2027.

From September 2021 Emmi will use at least 100 tonnes of plastic based on the recycled material each year. Chemical recycling renews plastic back to plastic creating recycled materials with a level of purity equivalent to fossil-fuel based PP and hence, fit for protective, food-safe and other demanding applications. In this way, Emmi is utilizing difficult to recycle feedstock preventing plastic waste that would be likely landfilled or incinerated. In the future, depending on the availability of suitable material, the amount of recycled plastic in packaging is to be further increased.

The new technology to recover the polypropylene is currently still in its infancy, where Greiner Packaging and Borealis are leading the way. Only limited quantities of chemically recycled polypropylene are currently available, and Emmi is one of only a few food manufacturers to have secured a share of the chemically recycled polypropylene plastic through its early commitment and long-standing collaboration with the development companies.

The chemically recycled material used for the cups consists entirely and solely of ISCC (International Sustainability & Carbon Certification) material, on a mass balance basis. Mass balance is a methodology that makes it possible to track the amount and sustainability characteristics of circular and/or bio-based content in the value chain and through each step of the process. This provides transparency ultimately also to the consumers, enabling them to know that the product they are buying is based on this renewable material.

More information:
Polypropylen Borealis
Source:

Borealis

Marabu to be climate neutral from July 2021 (c) Marabu GmbH & Co. KG
01.07.2021

Marabu to be climate neutral from July 2021

Marabu is one of the first ink manufacturers to achieve climate neutrality. All Marabu Business Units will, where possible, make a specific contribution to achieve the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with PROJECT GREEN and therefore participate in the Green Deal.

Marabu is one of the first ink manufacturers to achieve climate neutrality. All Marabu Business Units will, where possible, make a specific contribution to achieve the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with PROJECT GREEN and therefore participate in the Green Deal.

"We are safeguarding the future of the next generations and are proud that we have managed to be a climate neutral company from July 2021 with the Tamm and Bietigheim sites. All our products, whether printing inks or creative colours, are climate neutral, too," explains York Boeder, CEO Executive Committee. "Our so-called PROJECT GREEN combines all measures that are taking us on our journey to climate neutrality. Climate protection is a particular concern for us, to which we have made a binding commitment within the scope of an extensive sustainability strategy. In accordance with our Marabu Green Deal, we avoid and reduce emissions wherever possible, e. g. by using green electricity, energy-saving schemes, mobility concepts or environmentally friendly materials. We offset all unavoidable CO2 emissions by supporting internationally certified climate protection projects. We are continually implementing measures to improve our carbon footprint and update them annually to make their success measurable. We have therefore set ourselves the active goal of reducing our CO2 emissions by another 25 % by 2030."

For decades, Marabu has invested in the research and development of safe production processes, environmentally friendly products, and clean technologies with the aim of preserving the natural environment. Marabu has worked with Climate Partner to analyse all the CO2 emissions from the sites in Tamm and Bietigheim and determine its carbon footprint. Including all product-related factors such as raw materials and logistics, Marabu currently generates approx. 18,500 tons of unavoidable CO2 emissions. This value is the positive result of a number of climate-friendly measures pursued by Marabu, such as the early switch to green electricity in 2007.

Marabu's main activities to avoid and reduce CO2 emissions:

  • Energy - Switching to green electricity from hydropower
  • Mobility - Migration of the company's vehicles to electric and hybrid cars as well as in e-charging stations
  • Production - Use of renewable energies and resource-efficient production processes
  • Raw materials - Replacing critical substances with environmentally friendly alternatives for new and existing products
  • Transporting - Climate-neutral freight carriers and lower-emission transport methods like shipping or road transport replace air freight wherever possible
  • Product technology - Modern, low-emission products
Source:

Marabu GmbH & Co. KG

Lenzing supports school competition on circular economy and climate protection (c) Lenzing
VCÖ BRG SolarCity Linz Gruppenfoto
22.06.2021

Lenzing supports school competition on circular economy and climate protection

  • Excellent project to encourage ingenuity among young students
  • Experiment on biodegradability of textiles and nonwovens produces impressive results
  • EUR 30,000 in prize money for a total of 209 participating schools in and outside Austria
  • Lenzing views supporting these kinds of projects as part of its sustainability mission

Lenzing – The Association of Chemistry Teachers in Austria – known by its German abbreviation, VCÖ – has been holding project competitions that thrill students and take them beyond the traditional syllabus for 30 years. Every two years, it highlights a key topic for ninth- and tenth-graders to explore by conducting special experiments and learning from their observations and conclusions.

  • Excellent project to encourage ingenuity among young students
  • Experiment on biodegradability of textiles and nonwovens produces impressive results
  • EUR 30,000 in prize money for a total of 209 participating schools in and outside Austria
  • Lenzing views supporting these kinds of projects as part of its sustainability mission

Lenzing – The Association of Chemistry Teachers in Austria – known by its German abbreviation, VCÖ – has been holding project competitions that thrill students and take them beyond the traditional syllabus for 30 years. Every two years, it highlights a key topic for ninth- and tenth-graders to explore by conducting special experiments and learning from their observations and conclusions.

This year, the 16th installment of the competition is called, “Achieving a cleaner climate and a circular economy with chemistry”. These topics are also near and dear to the heart of globally active fiber manufacturer Lenzing. That’s why the company promptly announced that it was prepared to support this project competition in several different ways. First, Lenzing made a contribution toward the sponsorship fund totaling EUR 30,000. Second, it initiated a special prize on biodegradability – a topic of growing importance given the huge challenges involved in reducing plastic waste. Finally, Lenzing placed a recognized expert at the students’ disposal to provide assistance and answer questions: Michaela Kogler, Project Manager Nonwovens & Technical Products.

Teaming up with rainworms

Two teams were tasked with biodegrading different fibers – just like those used to produce textiles and nonwovens – with the active participation of worms. Students at BRG solarCity in Linz buried fiber nonwovens, a basic material used in wet wipes and other products, in soil that was populated with numerous rainworms, while students at Vöcklabruck Junior High School for Sports and Integration layered textiles into a vermicomposting bin. Both experiments intended to determine the extent to which certain materials would biodegrade quickly. As it turned out, both projects showed that wood-based fibers, like those that Lenzing manufactures for the textile and nonwoven industry, break down very rapidly into natural constituents that swiftly pass into the soil. In contrast, fossil-based plastics such as polyester or polyethylene cannot be decomposed by worms or bacteria but remain in the soil, sometimes for hundreds of years.

The prizes for this year’s competition were awarded on June 11. The competition attracted entries from no fewer than 209 schools, including 11 from outside Austria. For more information on the projects and the winners, visit www.vcoe.or.at.

Lenzing awarded several times Internationalization (c) Lenzing AG
17.06.2021

Lenzing awarded several times Internationalization

  • First place in the Austria’s Leading Companies business competition
  • Winner of the Global Player Award for successful internationalization

Lenzing AG has two renowned national awards to celebrate. Austria’s Leading Companies (ALC), which was held on Wednesday, June 16, 2021, again recognized the country’s most successful companies. In a competition organized by PwC Austria, Die Presse newspaper and KSV1870, a credit protection firm and business platform, Lenzing won first prize in the “Climate protection” category.

At the ALC Awards, the company’s performance is what counts. Balance sheet figures and sales and earnings growth over the past three fiscal years, alongside a weighted system of key performance indicators, ensure that the results are objective. A carefully selected jury then decides on the final ranking across the various categories. “In these challenging times for the economy, the ALC Award offers valuable recognition and motivation for the future. In periods of crisis, innovation, moving with the times and a change of perspective are crucial”, added the organizers.

  • First place in the Austria’s Leading Companies business competition
  • Winner of the Global Player Award for successful internationalization

Lenzing AG has two renowned national awards to celebrate. Austria’s Leading Companies (ALC), which was held on Wednesday, June 16, 2021, again recognized the country’s most successful companies. In a competition organized by PwC Austria, Die Presse newspaper and KSV1870, a credit protection firm and business platform, Lenzing won first prize in the “Climate protection” category.

At the ALC Awards, the company’s performance is what counts. Balance sheet figures and sales and earnings growth over the past three fiscal years, alongside a weighted system of key performance indicators, ensure that the results are objective. A carefully selected jury then decides on the final ranking across the various categories. “In these challenging times for the economy, the ALC Award offers valuable recognition and motivation for the future. In periods of crisis, innovation, moving with the times and a change of perspective are crucial”, added the organizers.

Successful internationalization
For no less than the 26th time, this year saw the award of the Export Prize of the Austrian Federal Economic Chamber (WKO) to companies that have been highly successful in markets abroad. The jury chose Lenzing as the winner of the Global Player Award 2020.

The prize is awarded to companies that have built up a strong position on the global market over the past several years. The Global Player Award recognizes businesses that have established an efficient network outside of Austria and are actually considered to be pioneers in exporting goods or services within a particular country or sector.

Frankfurt Fashion Week: hosting the future of fashion © Lottermann and Fuentes
Anita Tillmann and Detlef Braun
02.12.2020

Frankfurt Fashion Week: hosting the future of fashion

  • Looking to the future – Frankfurt Fashion Week is positioning itself with a consistently sustainable agenda and propelling the transformation of a modern, resource-efficient fashion industry.

The Conscious Fashion Campaign (CFC), working in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships (UNOP), will be the presenting partner and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be a prerequisite for all exhibitors by 2023. And the Frankfurt Fashion SDG Summit by CFC is set to become the leading international conference for sustainability in the fashion world. The future of fashion has begun – and its key players will be coming together in Frankfurt am Main from 5-9 July 2021.
 

  • Looking to the future – Frankfurt Fashion Week is positioning itself with a consistently sustainable agenda and propelling the transformation of a modern, resource-efficient fashion industry.

The Conscious Fashion Campaign (CFC), working in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships (UNOP), will be the presenting partner and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be a prerequisite for all exhibitors by 2023. And the Frankfurt Fashion SDG Summit by CFC is set to become the leading international conference for sustainability in the fashion world. The future of fashion has begun – and its key players will be coming together in Frankfurt am Main from 5-9 July 2021.
 
Frankfurt am Main, 2 December 2020. Joining forces to improve the fashion industry: Frankfurt Fashion Week is positioning itself as the host of the future of fashion and actively driving forward the transformation towards a future-oriented, more sustainable fashion and textile industry. All decision-makers looking to instigate this change will be coming together in Frankfurt am Main from 5-9 July 2021. The initiators of Frankfurt Fashion Week – Messe Frankfurt and the Premium Group – have achieved a real coup: Conscious Fashion Campaign, working in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships, will be the presenting partner. Messe Frankfurt will build on its collaboration with the United Nations Office for Partnerships and establish Frankfurt Fashion week as the platform on which to advance the Sustainable Development Goals and help guide the fashion industry into the 'Decade of Action'.
 
“Frankfurt will play host to the whole world. We are seeing a very positive response indeed,” confirmed Peter Feldmann, Senior Mayor of the City of Frankfurt am Main, at today’s digital press conference, before going on to say: “The fact that the initiators are able to rethink the concept of a Fashion Week in such a way is extremely impressive and proves that the fashion industry is correctly interpreting the signs of the present and future. The time has come for value creation and values to be reconciled. Consistent alignment with the Sustainable Development Goals is an important step in this direction.”
 
“Frankfurt Fashion Week aims to play a crucial role in finding solutions for macrosocial challenges and supporting the goals of international politics such as the European Green Deal. The fashion and textile industries are also expected to be climate-neutral by 2050. If we want to achieve this, we all need to pull together. Frankfurt Fashion Week is inviting all initiators and supporters of sustainable concepts and congresses or shows dedicated to sustainability to meet in Frankfurt, partake in discussions and make tangible decisions for the greater good. We will connect the most relevant players and pave the way for a future-proof fashion and textile industry,” says Detlef Braun, CEO of Messe Frankfurt.
 
“Given its global reach, the fashion industry is uniquely positioned to collaborate and engage on the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular on climate action and responsible production and consumption,” said Annemarie Hou, Acting Executive Director of the United Nations Office for Partnerships. “Frankfurt Fashion Week and the Summit will serve as an important platform for education and engagement of the fashion and textile industry in the Decade of Action,” emphasised Ms Hou.
 
The aim of Frankfurt Fashion Week is for all exhibitors, participants and partners to align with the Sustainable Development Goals by 2023. The SDGs will also be incorporated into all formats of Frankfurt Fashion Week. This will help to make the UN’s sustainability goals visible and tangible for the Fashion Week audience, therefore bringing its claim, goals and specific proposals for implementation to an international opinion-forming fashion and lifestyle community. During a one-day Frankfurt Fashion SDG Summit presented by Conscious Fashion Campaign, topics like gender equality, clean water, climate protection, social justice and their significance for a forward-looking fashion industry will be examined in greater depth. Another point on the sustainability agenda: Frankfurt Fashion Week is launching a Sustainability Award for outstanding, innovative, sustainable design, alongside other categories with a global appeal for the fashion and textile industry.
 
"We are committed to setting the wheels of transformation in motion. Not only does the overall mindset have to fundamentally change; the entire industry also needs to have the courage to be transparent and honest. It’s important to see values and value creation as opportunities rather than contentious. We are doing what we do best: connecting the relevant players at all levels. With its ecosystem, Frankfurt Fashion Week will become the enabler. We are creating a platform that will orchestrate industry-wide change. With this as our inspiration, we are also developing our tradeshow formats from a ‘marketplace of products’ to a ‘marketplace of purpose and ideas’,” explains Anita Tillmann, Managing Partner of the Premium Group.
 
A new start in Frankfurt: In summer 2021 the entire fashion industry will be coming to the metropolis on the Main river to inform themselves, be inspired, discuss, negotiate and celebrate. “There’s a huge need to finally meet in person again, to exchange ideas and be inspired. At the same time, digital tools and formats have become an integral part of the fashion industry,” says Markus Frank, Head of the City of Frankfurt’s Department of Economic Affairs and therefore also responsible for its creative industry. “To implement such a future-oriented, all-encompassing overall concept, Frankfurt’s business and creative scenes offer an almost unique concentration of different expertise with its internationally networked agencies, universities and museums. The city’s multifaceted, high-end club, bar and restaurant scene, diverse hotel industry and internationally renowned retail landscape will become the stage for this. This network will be a key factor in the successful implementation of Frankfurt Fashion Week and the way in which it will expand into the public space as a cultural and social happening.”
 
A number of major publishing houses are also showing their commitment to the new Fashion Week in Frankfurt with conferences, events and awards: Textilwirtschaft, the leading professional fashion journal by the Deutscher Fachverlag publishing house, is moving its traditional meeting of the industry’s top decision-makers – the TW Forum, the presentation of the renowned Forum Award, as well as its subsequent conference – from Heidelberg to Frankfurt’s Palmengarten botanical gardens, and will therefore be kicking off Frankfurt Fashion Week on Sunday evening and Monday morning. The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung will be hosting its traditional fashion party for the first time in Frankfurt and publishing a special edition of its FAZ Magazin on Frankfurt Fashion Week. And the ZEIT publishing group is holding its ‘UNLOCK Style by ZEITmagazin’ conference, which was established in 2014, and the ZEITmagazin Fashion Week party in Frankfurt for the first time and will dedicate the whole new issue of ZEITmagazin Frankfurt to Frankfurt Fashion Week. Condé Nast will also be involved in next summer’s Frankfurt Fashion Week with an exclusive event by GQ. And the Burda publishing house will also be represented with various event formats from its lifestyle and fashion brands.There will also be talks with SHINE  Conventions, the organiser of GLOW, about what a mutual collaboration could look like.
 
Frankfurt Fashion Week is also delighted to have the Fashion Council Germany (FCG) on board.  The FCG is theinstitution when it comes to German fashion design. It promotes designers, is committed to gaining more political relevance and strengthens the international visibility and awareness of German fashion. At Frankfurt Fashion Week, the FCG will contribute selected formats, such as its already established Fireside Chat, and a future-oriented accelerator format to support German designers.
 
“What really impresses me about Fashion Week is the whole networking aspect: the creative industries will meet the financial world and sustainability is the common denominator. The Green Finance Cluster is another project that we could link with Frankfurt Fashion Week in the future. This will provide new inspiration in the fashion industry, which will certainly extend way beyond its own horizon of Frankfurt and Hesse. After a very difficult year for the trade fair industry, the concept is an encouraging breath of fresh air,” sums up Tarek Al-Wazir, Hesse’s Minister of Economics, Energy, Transport and Regional Development and Deputy Minister-President of the state of Hessen.

12.10.2020

CHT Germany GmbH: Sustainable heat for sustainable chemical solutions

  • Efficient heat supply of the future reduces environmentally harmful CO2

The heating sector offers a variety of options for the energy turnaround. One of them is district heating. This is an efficient energy source that makes an important contribution to sustainability and climate protection, especially when used within heat and energy-intensive companies. The CHT Group for speciality chemicals has opted to utilise the district heating supplied by the Tübingen public utilities (swt) at its headquarters in Tübingen - and thus reduce CO2 and the use of fossil fuels. This also resulted in the district heating network of the municipal utilities being extended by an additional half kilometre.

  • Efficient heat supply of the future reduces environmentally harmful CO2

The heating sector offers a variety of options for the energy turnaround. One of them is district heating. This is an efficient energy source that makes an important contribution to sustainability and climate protection, especially when used within heat and energy-intensive companies. The CHT Group for speciality chemicals has opted to utilise the district heating supplied by the Tübingen public utilities (swt) at its headquarters in Tübingen - and thus reduce CO2 and the use of fossil fuels. This also resulted in the district heating network of the municipal utilities being extended by an additional half kilometre.

Until recently, heating, hot water and various process steam applications within the CHT site in Bismarckstrasse, Tubingen were fed from a central steam generation plant fired by heating oil. Now three of four company buildings are connected to the swt district heating network and the process steam applications have been decentralised. The fourth building has already been equipped with a modern CHP system for many years. In the future, this building will be prepared for district heating. The conversion to district heating supply will be made as soon as the CHP plant has reached the end of its operating life. In order to connect the CHT headquarters to the district heating, the municipal utilities have extended their supply network by around 570 metres during a four-month construction period. The heat now flows through newly installed transfer stations where it is measured, regulated, transferred and finally fed into the buildings' heating circuits.

Dr. Bernhard Hettich, Chief Technical Officer of CHT Germany GmbH: "As a company CHT focuses on worldwide sustainability. This not only includes products but also the sustainable use of resources at the individual locations. At our headquarters in Tübingen, our efforts are directed towards reducing energy consumption and optimising it with regard to renewable energies. With this investment we will continue to reduce CO2 emissions and the consumption of fossil fuels for the energy we consume. As a Tübingen company, we are therefore pleased to be connected to the local district heating network and to be able to use its advantages for the benefit of our sustainability strategy".

High heat demand offers great savings potential
CHT's heat requirements are high as the three buildings already connected require around 1.3 million kilowatt hours of heat per year. With the fourth building included, the heat requirement is even 1.6 million kilowatt hours. With the conversion to district heating CHT saves about 152 tons of CO2 per year. An investment in the district heating connection is therefore an investment in the future, both from an ecological and economic point of view. CHT has invested 180,000 Euro in the district heating connection.

 

Please read the attached document for more information

Source:

CHT Germany GmbH

10,460 kilometers: First direct complete train with Austrian TENCEL™ branded fibers from Vienna to China (c) Lenzing Aktiengesellschaft
Departure ceremony with Federal Minister Leonore Gewessler
20.08.2020

10,460 kilometers: First direct complete train with Austrian TENCEL™ branded fibers from Vienna to China

  • Due to the short-term increase in demand from Chinese customers, Lenzing AG is breaking new ground. For the first time in the history of Austria, a local company is sending goods that are 100 percent produced in Austria directly to China by train.

Vienna – The Lenzing Group stands for the ecologically responsible production of specialty fibers made from the renewable raw material wood. Due to the high demand from Chinese brands and retailers for sustainably produced fibers, Lenzing delivers fibers from the two Austrian production sites Lenzing and Heiligenkreuz directly to customers in China by train for the first time.

  • Due to the short-term increase in demand from Chinese customers, Lenzing AG is breaking new ground. For the first time in the history of Austria, a local company is sending goods that are 100 percent produced in Austria directly to China by train.

Vienna – The Lenzing Group stands for the ecologically responsible production of specialty fibers made from the renewable raw material wood. Due to the high demand from Chinese brands and retailers for sustainably produced fibers, Lenzing delivers fibers from the two Austrian production sites Lenzing and Heiligenkreuz directly to customers in China by train for the first time.

Austria's first complete train with goods exclusively “Made in Austria” will leave the Vienna South Terminal towards China on August 20, 2020 at 11 am. The train is loaded with Lenzing fibers and provided by NUNNER Logistics. In strict compliance with the COVID-19 protective measures, Leonore Gewessler, Federal Minister for Climate Action, Environment, Energy, Mobility, Innovation and Technology, His Excellency Xiaosi Li, Ambassador of the People's Republic of China in Austria, Stefan Doboczky, CEO of the Lenzing Group, Thomas Kargl, Board Member of the ÖBB Rail Cargo Group, Erwin Cootjans, CEO Nunner Logistics and Erich Hampel, Chairman of the Board of the B&C Private Foundation, took part in the departure ceremony.

The train, which started at Vienna, brings 41 containers with TENCEL™ branded Lyocell and Modal fibers with a total value of EUR 1.8 million directly to customers in China. On its 16-day trip to Shanghai, the train covers a total of 10,460 kilometers and passes seven countries: Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, Belarus, Russia, Kazakhstan and China. “With this new transport route, we can meet the high demand from our customers for sustainably produced fibers more quickly. Thanks to train transport, the urgently needed fibers arrive at our customers in China twice as quickly as by sea freight,” says Stefan Doboczky, CEO of the Lenzing Group. Lenzing has had very good experiences with rail transport for a long time when it comes to delivering the renewable raw material wood to its plants. Almost 70 percent of the wood processed at the Lenzing site is already delivered by rail. “Our declared goal is to shift more freight traffic to rail. Rail is the only way to combine climate goals and economic interests and thus transport growth. That is why we are happy to be part of this unique project for our long-standing customer,” says Thomas Kargl, Board Member of the ÖBB Rail Cargo Group. “Transporting goods by rail to China is possible. And this train from Vienna to China is an integral part of climate protection. Because we want to support the shift from road to rail, especially in freight transport. Today's train is the first step – I am convinced this train will set an example”, says Leonore Gewessler, Federal Minister for Climate Action, Environment, Energy, Mobility, Innovation and Technology.

Sateri Joins Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action, Pledges Ambitious Climate Change Goals and Steps Up Industry Engagements (c) Sateri
01.07.2020

Sateri Joins Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action, Pledges Ambitious Climate Change Goals and Steps Up Industry Engagements

Shanghai - Sateri has signed the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action, becoming the first viscose producer in China to support this global fashion agenda. An initiative convened by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), this charter calls on the fashion industry to support the goals of the Paris Agreement in limiting global temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, by achieving 30 per cent aggregate reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2030, including the supply chain.

Niclas Svenningsen, Manager of Global Climate Action, UNFCCC, said, “UNFCCC is excited to have Sateri joining the Fashion Industry Charter on Climate Action and committing towards global climate action as the first Chinese viscose producer to do so. We hope that it will inspire more textile companies from China to join and take action.”

Shanghai - Sateri has signed the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action, becoming the first viscose producer in China to support this global fashion agenda. An initiative convened by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), this charter calls on the fashion industry to support the goals of the Paris Agreement in limiting global temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, by achieving 30 per cent aggregate reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2030, including the supply chain.

Niclas Svenningsen, Manager of Global Climate Action, UNFCCC, said, “UNFCCC is excited to have Sateri joining the Fashion Industry Charter on Climate Action and committing towards global climate action as the first Chinese viscose producer to do so. We hope that it will inspire more textile companies from China to join and take action.”

As a signatory of the Charter, Sateri looks forward to participating in relevant Working Groups which bring together stakeholders and experts in the fashion and textile sectors. In recent months, Sateri has joined several other leading industry multi-stakeholder associations. These include the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC), China Association of Circular Economy (CACE), and the European Disposables and Nonwovens Association (EDANA).

Allen Zhang, President of Sateri, said, “Sateri is committed to growing our business as sustainably as we can. Our adoption of the Fashion Charter goals is a bold leap but we believe that pushing the boundaries is necessary. We are also stepping up on our engagement with industry partners to be part of the collective action to accelerate efforts against climate change.  As we formulate Sateri Vision 2030 for a sustainable business, carbon reduction will be one of our key focus areas”.

In addition to stepping up greenhouse gas emission reductions in its own operations, the company will continue to support decarbonisation efforts of the downstream textile value chain. Late last year, in collaboration with the China National Textile and Apparel Council (CNTAC), a Climate Leadership Whitepaper was published. The paper analysed how innovation in Sateri’s EcoCosy® fibre products help reduce carbon emission during yarn and fabric manufacturing stages, and also proposed next steps in achieving industry-wide emission reduction goals.   

Sateri attained an ‘A-‘ score in CDP (formerly Carbon Disclosure Project) for Climate Change in 2019;  a score which is higher than the ‘C’ average globally, in Asia, as well as in the Textiles and Fabric Goods sector. 

Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung awards ITA graduate and a project at ITA with sponsorship prizes (c) Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung
Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung sponsorship award winner picture 2020 (Ricarda Wissel: row 1, first from right, Simon Kammler, row 4, first from right)
25.06.2020

Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung awards ITA graduate and a project at ITA with sponsorship prizes

Carbon dioxide-based fibre for climate protection and interdisciplinary training with novel Smart Textiles test rig

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung, based in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, honours a project of the Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University, short ITA, and awards a sponsorship prize to the ITA graduate Ricarda Wissel on 25 June 2020. She is awarded for her outstanding bachelor thesis " Implementation of elastic yarns made from carbon dioxide based thermoplastic polyurethane in socks " with funding for a subject-specific continuation of her education. The ITA receives the project sponsorship prize for the project "Smart Textiles - an interdisciplinary training course to promote young scientists in future technologies", which was submitted to the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung by ITA´s PhD candidate Simon Kammler.

Carbon dioxide-based fibre from industrial waste contributes to climate protection

Carbon dioxide-based fibre for climate protection and interdisciplinary training with novel Smart Textiles test rig

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung, based in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, honours a project of the Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University, short ITA, and awards a sponsorship prize to the ITA graduate Ricarda Wissel on 25 June 2020. She is awarded for her outstanding bachelor thesis " Implementation of elastic yarns made from carbon dioxide based thermoplastic polyurethane in socks " with funding for a subject-specific continuation of her education. The ITA receives the project sponsorship prize for the project "Smart Textiles - an interdisciplinary training course to promote young scientists in future technologies", which was submitted to the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung by ITA´s PhD candidate Simon Kammler.

Carbon dioxide-based fibre from industrial waste contributes to climate protection

ITA scientist Dr.-Ing. Pavan Manvi has developed a melt spinning process at ITA for the production of elastic yarn from thermoplastic polyurethane, in which carbon dioxide is used as one of the raw materials. In her bachelor thesis, Ricarda Wissel successfully developed a process chain for the CO2-based yarn in a textile end product for the first time. In cooperation with the company FALKE and Dr Manvi, who supervised Ms. Wissel's work, the yarn was used to produce a sock (see figure "FALKE sock with carbon dioxide filaments").

By reusing carbon dioxide from industrial waste as a raw material for textile and clothing products, the carbon dioxide balance can be improved and thus contributes directly to climate protection. The sponsorship prize of the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung is endowed with 6,000 € for the specialist further training of Ms. Wissel.

Interdisciplinary training with development of a new type of measuring stand for the future-oriented research field "Smart Textiles

The development of textiles with additional digital functions, so-called "Smart Textiles", is considered a future-oriented field of research. In his project submission, ITA´s doctoral candidate Simon Kammler presented a concept for a lecture series on Smart Textiles at ITA and develops a new type of measuring stand for measuring the capacity and conductivity of fibres. The project is funded by the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung with a prize money of 10,000 Euro.

Smart Textiles enable the textile to interact with the environment and the human user. Today they are therefore in demand in many areas of everyday life such as sport, health, living, life and mobility and offer completely new practical solutions. In combination with digital networked services, Smart Textiles promise support and innovation in almost all situations of daily life.

With the conception of a new lecture series, Mr. Simon Kammler is supporting ITA in its goal of providing the best possible training for young scientists. The focus is on imparting far-reaching interdisciplinary skills in order to master the challenges of current fields of research.

Background:

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung supports particularly talented young people from all areas of the textile industry. Its purpose is the promotion of subject-specific education and further education as well as the promotion of projects at universities, academic schools and vocational schools, which are characterised by the sustainable communication of innovative learning content in science and research. In total, thirteen sponsorship prizes were awarded in 2020. Due to the Corona crisis, the forum of TextilWirtschaft, which is normally the venue for the awards ceremony, unfortunately had to be cancelled in 2020.

Lenzing Logo (c) Lenzing
Lenzing Logo
20.03.2020

Lenzing Group’s Sustainability Report for 2019 published

  • First fiber producer to have an approved science-based target – CO2 neutrality by 2050
  • Breakthrough in REFIBRA™ technology – worn textiles can also be used as fiber raw material
  • Pioneer in the introduction of blockchain technology for fiber recognition
  • On track to meet all sustainability targets

Lenzing – Just ahead of the “Day of Forests ” on March 21, which the FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations) introduced in the 1970s in response to global deforestation, the Lenzing Group presents its Sustainability Report 2019. This sets out how the company is actively dealing with the global challenges.

Lenzing produces fibers from the renewable raw material wood and is well known among its customers and partners in the global textile and nonwoven fabric industry for the clear position it takes as a sustainable producer. It is no accident that the new report is appearing on the International Day of Forests. Lenzing’s sustainable practices in procurement, especially for wood and pulp, were once again ranked as leading in the 2019 reporting year (Hot Button Report).

  • First fiber producer to have an approved science-based target – CO2 neutrality by 2050
  • Breakthrough in REFIBRA™ technology – worn textiles can also be used as fiber raw material
  • Pioneer in the introduction of blockchain technology for fiber recognition
  • On track to meet all sustainability targets

Lenzing – Just ahead of the “Day of Forests ” on March 21, which the FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations) introduced in the 1970s in response to global deforestation, the Lenzing Group presents its Sustainability Report 2019. This sets out how the company is actively dealing with the global challenges.

Lenzing produces fibers from the renewable raw material wood and is well known among its customers and partners in the global textile and nonwoven fabric industry for the clear position it takes as a sustainable producer. It is no accident that the new report is appearing on the International Day of Forests. Lenzing’s sustainable practices in procurement, especially for wood and pulp, were once again ranked as leading in the 2019 reporting year (Hot Button Report).

“Stand up! A gainst business as usual ”

Under the motto “Stand up! Against business as usual ”, Lenzing emphasizes its wider responsibilities over and above its products. Business - as - usual scenarios have to be overcome, in particular for climate protection. With a science-based target, Lenzing is taking action to master the problems caused by climate change. The Lenzing Group is committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions per ton of product by 50 percent by 2030 (baseline: 2017). The Science-Based Target s initiative has approved Lenzing’s climate target as science-based.

Breakthrough in REFIBRA™ technology

One of Lenzing’s strategic principles under its “Naturally positive” sustainability strategy and a focus in the 2019 Sustainability Report is the circular economy. To address the enormous textile waste challenges of industry and society, Lenzing has developed a unique recycling technology branded REFIBRA™. This technology enables garment production waste to be reprocessed into fibers. 

 

 

More information:
Lenzing
Source:

Lenzing

13.11.2019

Energy storage in retail: ENERGY STORAGE EUROPE cooperates with EuroShop

At EuroShop 2020 from 16 to 20 February, ECOpark will focus on energy storage solutions, cost reduction and climate protection
In future, the ENERGY STORAGE EUROPE (ESE) trade fair will cooperate with EuroShop, the world’s leading trade fair for retail investment requirements. As part of this cooperation, commercial enterprises will receive information on how they can use storage systems to implement energy saving measures, which in turn help them secure competitive advantages and commit to climate protection. ESE is expanding the user initiative that was started last year and which also comprises the cooperation with ProWein, the world’s leading trade fair for wines and spirits, as well as GNTM, the world’s leading trade fairs for metallurgy and foundry technology. The next ENERGY STORAGE EUROPE will take place in Düsseldorf from 10 to 12 March 2020.

At EuroShop 2020 from 16 to 20 February, ECOpark will focus on energy storage solutions, cost reduction and climate protection
In future, the ENERGY STORAGE EUROPE (ESE) trade fair will cooperate with EuroShop, the world’s leading trade fair for retail investment requirements. As part of this cooperation, commercial enterprises will receive information on how they can use storage systems to implement energy saving measures, which in turn help them secure competitive advantages and commit to climate protection. ESE is expanding the user initiative that was started last year and which also comprises the cooperation with ProWein, the world’s leading trade fair for wines and spirits, as well as GNTM, the world’s leading trade fairs for metallurgy and foundry technology. The next ENERGY STORAGE EUROPE will take place in Düsseldorf from 10 to 12 March 2020.

“Our analyses show that many commercial users in retail, the metal industry and viticulture currently don't see storage as an integrated part of their energy systems and thus do not tap potentials for energy efficiency and climate protection,” says Andreas Moerke, Director ESE. “By cooperating with the leading trade fairs in these industries, we can show thousands of companies how energy storage can contribute to climate protection. In the coming months, we will approach the numerous customers of these trade fairs and connect them to energy storage system providers at ESE.”

Source:

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH

Foto: Ulrich Thiele
06.10.2019

15th China International Recycled Polyester and PET Packaging Conference & Exhibition

During the conference it was very interesting to see how the Chinese recycling industry in general and the Chinese polyester recycling industry in detail is on its way to digest the drastic measures of the Chinese government to ban the import of any plastic waste from January first, 2018 onward.

While Europe is struggling with individual measures such as the ban on drinking tubes, cotton swabs, balloons, plastic bags or disposable tableware, the Chinese leadership has created eight ministerial administrative units covering the entire complex of environmental protection, renewable energies, circular economy including recycling and climate protection. There is still a substantial gap to European environmental standards but Chinese velocity of progress is impressive in this field.

More than 360 delegates form China and oversees listened to the latest results in polyester recycling technology, production and market and exchanged their recent experiences. Especially the exhibition was core of social and technical networking.

During the conference it was very interesting to see how the Chinese recycling industry in general and the Chinese polyester recycling industry in detail is on its way to digest the drastic measures of the Chinese government to ban the import of any plastic waste from January first, 2018 onward.

While Europe is struggling with individual measures such as the ban on drinking tubes, cotton swabs, balloons, plastic bags or disposable tableware, the Chinese leadership has created eight ministerial administrative units covering the entire complex of environmental protection, renewable energies, circular economy including recycling and climate protection. There is still a substantial gap to European environmental standards but Chinese velocity of progress is impressive in this field.

More than 360 delegates form China and oversees listened to the latest results in polyester recycling technology, production and market and exchanged their recent experiences. Especially the exhibition was core of social and technical networking.

Two contributions from governmental organizations and three from industry associations are underlining the high administrative attention of the recycling issue and loop economy in general.

Source:

Dr. Thiele Polyester Technology

26.06.2019

Lenzing Group builds world’s largest lyocell fiber plant in Thailand

 

  • Lenzing plans to invest more than EUR 1 bn in new lyocell fiber production facilities
  • First expansion phase with 100,000 tons approved in Thailand
  • State-of-the-art production plant enhances global specialty fibers footprint
  • Accelerates business growth with TENCEL™ branded fibers
  • Biogenic energy supply fosters low CO2 emissions and climate protection  

Lenzing – The Lenzing Group is substantial increasing its production of lyocell fibers to meet the strong demand for these products and further strengthening its position as an industry leader in specialty fibers. Over the next years, it plans to invest more than EUR 1 bn in new production facilities for lyocell fibers. The first expansion phase of this ambitious growth plan, the construction of a state-of-the art lyocell fiber production plant in Prachinburi (Thailand), has now been approved. The plant will have a capacity of 100,000 tons and feature investments of approximately EUR 400 mn.

 

  • Lenzing plans to invest more than EUR 1 bn in new lyocell fiber production facilities
  • First expansion phase with 100,000 tons approved in Thailand
  • State-of-the-art production plant enhances global specialty fibers footprint
  • Accelerates business growth with TENCEL™ branded fibers
  • Biogenic energy supply fosters low CO2 emissions and climate protection  

Lenzing – The Lenzing Group is substantial increasing its production of lyocell fibers to meet the strong demand for these products and further strengthening its position as an industry leader in specialty fibers. Over the next years, it plans to invest more than EUR 1 bn in new production facilities for lyocell fibers. The first expansion phase of this ambitious growth plan, the construction of a state-of-the art lyocell fiber production plant in Prachinburi (Thailand), has now been approved. The plant will have a capacity of 100,000 tons and feature investments of approximately EUR 400 mn.

More information:
Lenzing Tencel-Lyocell
Source:

Corporate Communications & Investor Relations Team Lenzing AG