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60th anniversary of Eltex of Sweden AB (c) Eltex of Sweden
21.02.2024

60th anniversary of Eltex of Sweden AB

Eltex of Sweden, a pioneer in the adoption of electronic sensors by the weaving machinery industry, is marking its 60th anniversary this month.

The electronic detection of broken or missing weft yarns during production was the problem Eltex founders Åke Rydborn and Ragnar Henriksson set out to solve with the development of the world’s first electronic weft-stop-motion. Its potential was recognised on its introduction at the 1963 ITMA exhibition in Hannover, Germany, leading to the foundation of the company in a modest 12-square-metre workshop in Älmhult, Sweden, in February 1964.

Eltex of Sweden, a pioneer in the adoption of electronic sensors by the weaving machinery industry, is marking its 60th anniversary this month.

The electronic detection of broken or missing weft yarns during production was the problem Eltex founders Åke Rydborn and Ragnar Henriksson set out to solve with the development of the world’s first electronic weft-stop-motion. Its potential was recognised on its introduction at the 1963 ITMA exhibition in Hannover, Germany, leading to the foundation of the company in a modest 12-square-metre workshop in Älmhult, Sweden, in February 1964.

By 1968 the company was operating from a modern 3,000-square-metre plant and beginning to establish a global presence, introducing the first all-in-one printed circuit board (PCB) for its sensor systems in 1971. As exports increased, further Eltex operations were established in the USA and Ireland and the company expanded its product range including energy control devices, temperature and humidity loggers, food handling safety systems, and military grade battery chargers. Further textile milestones in parallel to advances in weaving technology included optical arrival detectors for air-jet weaving machines at the beginning of the 1980s, and the QTV system for warp preparation, which introduced digital stop-motion control to the industry at the start of the 1990s. In 2009, the company branched out into carpet tufting, first with the CoTS clamp-on tube sensor for tufting machines, followed by the Compact sensor for tufting machines in 2013. In 2019 the Compact II further cemented the company’s position in this sector.

Newly developed Eltex EyETM and ACT-R
Most recently, Eltex has launched the Eltex EyETM system for the monitoring of yarn tension on warp beams. Not only does it eliminate problems when warping, but also in the subsequent weaving or tufting processes. Eltex EyETM monitors the yarn tension on all positions in real-time and a minimum and maximum allowable tension value can be set. If any yarn’s tension falls outside these values the operator can be warned or the machine stopped.

The Eltex ACT and ACT-R units meanwhile go beyond yarn tension monitoring to actually control yarn tension. This extends the application range greatly. The plug and play system automatically compensates for any differences in yarn tension that arise, for example from irregularities in yarn packages.

Eltex has been owned by Brian Hicks, Seamus O’Dwyer and Jonathan Bell since 2007, following a management buy-out and the subsequent formation of Eltex Global Holdings in Ireland. Today, its head office, Eltex of Sweden AB, is in Osby, Sweden where it provides research and development, administration and global sales for the group. Eltex Manufacturing in Ireland is now the group’s primary production facility and Eltex US, Inc. provides sales and service for North America.

Source:

Eltex of Sweden

20.02.2024

Italian Textile Machinery: 4Q 2023 Orders Remain Stationary

In the fourth quarter of 2023 Italian textile machinery orders index, drawn up by the Economics Department of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers, appears to be stationary compared to data recorded for the same period in 2022. In terms of absolute value, the index stood at 82.4 points (basis: 2015=100).

This is the result of an upswing in orders from foreign markets, counterbalanced by declining orders on the domestic front. While orders in Italy decreased at 18% rate, a 4% increase was observed abroad. The absolute value of the index on foreign markets amounted to 77.9 points, whereas it came in at 126.2 points domestically. Overall for the fourth quarter, the average order backlog yielded 3.7 months of assured production.

For the whole 2023 year, the index declined 25% overall compared to the 2022 average (absolute index of 82.4). On the home front however, the index dropped 24% (absolute index of 124.5), while slipping 25% abroad (absolute index of 78.4).

In the fourth quarter of 2023 Italian textile machinery orders index, drawn up by the Economics Department of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers, appears to be stationary compared to data recorded for the same period in 2022. In terms of absolute value, the index stood at 82.4 points (basis: 2015=100).

This is the result of an upswing in orders from foreign markets, counterbalanced by declining orders on the domestic front. While orders in Italy decreased at 18% rate, a 4% increase was observed abroad. The absolute value of the index on foreign markets amounted to 77.9 points, whereas it came in at 126.2 points domestically. Overall for the fourth quarter, the average order backlog yielded 3.7 months of assured production.

For the whole 2023 year, the index declined 25% overall compared to the 2022 average (absolute index of 82.4). On the home front however, the index dropped 24% (absolute index of 124.5), while slipping 25% abroad (absolute index of 78.4).

ACIMIT president Marco Salvadè commented the data: “The orders index for October – December 2023, as elaborated by our Economics Department, confirms an intake of orders that is still weak, with a negative trend in demand for machinery that is ongoing for the domestic market.” Nonetheless, the orders index abroad shows a slight increase. “We estimate that the global geopolitical context is still a source of concern,” continued Salvadè, specifying that, “For the first nine months of 2023, Italian exports on major global markets (i.e. China, Turkey, India and the United States of America), confirm a widespread decline. However, some positive signs emerged in the fourth quarter of last year, as reflected by the latest orders index. For 2024 we expect a consolidation of this trend reversal.”

More information:
ACIMIT
Source:

ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers

ACIMIT: Italian textile machinery orders remain stationary (c) ACIMIT
19.02.2024

ACIMIT: Italian textile machinery orders remain stationary

In the fourth quarter of 2023 Italian textile machinery orders index, drawn up by the Economics Department of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers, appears to be stationary compared to data recorded for the same period in 2022. In terms of absolute value, the index stood at 82.4 points (basis: 2015=100).

This is the result of an upswing in orders from foreign markets, counterbalanced by declining orders on the domestic front. While orders in Italy decreased at 18% rate, a 4% increase was observed abroad. The absolute value of the index on foreign markets amounted to 77.9 points, whereas it came in at 126.2 points domestically. Overall for the fourth quarter, the average order backlog yielded 3.7 months of assured production.

In the fourth quarter of 2023 Italian textile machinery orders index, drawn up by the Economics Department of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers, appears to be stationary compared to data recorded for the same period in 2022. In terms of absolute value, the index stood at 82.4 points (basis: 2015=100).

This is the result of an upswing in orders from foreign markets, counterbalanced by declining orders on the domestic front. While orders in Italy decreased at 18% rate, a 4% increase was observed abroad. The absolute value of the index on foreign markets amounted to 77.9 points, whereas it came in at 126.2 points domestically. Overall for the fourth quarter, the average order backlog yielded 3.7 months of assured production.

For the whole 2023 year, the index declined 25% overall compared to the 2022 average (absolute index of 82.4). On the home front however, the index dropped 24% (absolute index of 124.5), while slipping 25% abroad (absolute index of 78.4).
 
ACIMIT president Marco Salvadè commented: "The orders index for October – December 2023, as elaborated by our Economics Department, confirms an intake of orders that is still weak, with a negative trend in demand for machinery that is ongoing for the domestic market."

Nonetheless, the orders index abroad shows a slight increase. We estimate that the global geopolitical context is still a source of concern,” continued Salvadè, specifying that, “For the first nine months of 2023, Italian exports on major global markets (i.e. China, Turkey, India and the United States of America), confirm a widespread decline. However, some positive signs emerged in the fourth quarter of last year, as reflected by the latest orders index. For 2024 we expect a consolidation of this trend reversal."

Source:

ACIMIT - Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers

(c) Swiss Textile Machinery Swissmem
16.02.2024

Recycled fibres: Swiss manufacturers for circularity

Many end-users now expect recycled materials to be in textile products they purchase – and this is driving innovation throughout the industry. However, there are still many technical and economic issues facing yarn and fabric producers using recycled resources. Members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association offer some effective solutions to these challenges.

Synthetic recycled materials such as PET can usually be treated similarly to new yarn, but there are additional complexities where natural fibres like wool and cotton are involved. Today, there’s a trend towards mechanically recycled wool and cotton fibres.

Many end-users now expect recycled materials to be in textile products they purchase – and this is driving innovation throughout the industry. However, there are still many technical and economic issues facing yarn and fabric producers using recycled resources. Members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association offer some effective solutions to these challenges.

Synthetic recycled materials such as PET can usually be treated similarly to new yarn, but there are additional complexities where natural fibres like wool and cotton are involved. Today, there’s a trend towards mechanically recycled wool and cotton fibres.

Spinning recycled cotton
The use of mechanically recycled fibres in spinning brings specific quality considerations: they have higher levels of short fibres and neps – and may often be colored, particularly if post-consumer material is used. It’s also true that recycled yarns have limitations in terms of fineness. The Uster Statistics 2023 edition features an extended range of fibre data, supporting sustainability goals, including benchmarks for blends of virgin and recycled cotton.
In general, short fibres such as those in recycled material can easily be handled by rotor spinning machines. For ring spinning, the shorter the fibres, the more difficult it is to guide them through the drafting zone to integrate them into the yarn body. Still, for wider yarn counts and higher yarn quality, the focus is now shifting to ring spinning. The presence of short fibres is a challenge, but Rieter offers solutions to address this issue.

Knitting recycled wool
For recycling, wool fibres undergo mechanical procedures such as shredding, cutting, and re-spinning, influencing the quality and characteristics of the resulting yarn. These operations remove the natural scales and variations in fibre length of the wool, causing a decrease in the overall strength and durability of the recycled yarn. This makes the yarn more prone to breakage, especially under the tension exerted during knitting.

Adapting to process recycled materials often requires adjustments to existing machinery. Knitting machines must be equipped with positive yarn suppliers to control fibre tension. Steiger engages in continuous testing of new yarns on the market, to check their suitability for processing on knitting machines. For satisfactory quality, the challenges intensify, with natural yarns requiring careful consideration and adaptation in the knitting processes.

From fibres to nonwovens
Nonwovens technology was born partly from the idea of recycling to reduce manufacturing costs and to process textile waste and previously unusable materials into fabric structures. Nonwovens production lines, where fibre webs are bonded mechanically, thermally or chemically, can easily process almost all mechanically and chemically recycled fibres.

Autefa Solutions offers nonwovens lines from a single source, enabling products such as liners, wipes, wadding and insulation to be produced in a true closed loop. Fibres are often used up to four times for one product.

Recycling: total strategy
Great services, technology and machines from members of Swiss Textile Machinery support the efforts of the circular economy to process recycled fibres. The machines incorporate the know-how of several decades, with the innovative power and quality standards in production and materials.
Stäubli’s global ESG (environmental, social & governance) strategy defines KPIs in the context of energy consumption, machine longevity and the recycling capacity in production units worldwide, as well in terms of machinery recyclability. The machine recyclability of automatic drawing in machines, weaving systems and jacquard machines ranges from 96 to 99%.

Source:

Swiss Textile Machinery Swissmem

07.02.2024

Rieter wins Patent Dispute in China

In a judgment in December 2023, the Supreme People’s Court of the People’s Republic of China ruled in favor of Rieter in a legal dispute. The case concerned the infringement of a Rieter patent by a competitor’s draw frame. Rieter protects its innovations with patents and registered designs and consistently takes action against infringements of its intellectual property.

Rieter draw frames are known for their stable operation with high sliver quality and productivity. Scanning precision and autoleveling dynamics ensure outstanding sliver evenness and thus the production of high-quality yarns. Draw frames have also been the subject of a patent litigation by Rieter in China at various levels of jurisdiction. Rieter had sued a competitor for unauthorized use of its patented draw frame technology.

In the summer of 2022, the Shanghai Intellectual Property Court confirmed the patent infringement identified by Rieter and prohibited the accused competitor from continuing to use Rieter’s patented technology. The infringing party was also ordered to pay damages to Rieter.

In a judgment in December 2023, the Supreme People’s Court of the People’s Republic of China ruled in favor of Rieter in a legal dispute. The case concerned the infringement of a Rieter patent by a competitor’s draw frame. Rieter protects its innovations with patents and registered designs and consistently takes action against infringements of its intellectual property.

Rieter draw frames are known for their stable operation with high sliver quality and productivity. Scanning precision and autoleveling dynamics ensure outstanding sliver evenness and thus the production of high-quality yarns. Draw frames have also been the subject of a patent litigation by Rieter in China at various levels of jurisdiction. Rieter had sued a competitor for unauthorized use of its patented draw frame technology.

In the summer of 2022, the Shanghai Intellectual Property Court confirmed the patent infringement identified by Rieter and prohibited the accused competitor from continuing to use Rieter’s patented technology. The infringing party was also ordered to pay damages to Rieter.

The culpable competitor then appealed the decision of the Shanghai court to the Supreme People’s Court of the People’s Republic of China.

In December 2023, the Supreme Court of China in Beijing upheld the Shanghai decision, confirming that the patent had been infringed. As a result, Rieter’s competitor is prohibited from selling the infringing machine types and is required to pay the damages determined by the court.

This Supreme Court decision represents a major success for Rieter in defending its proprietary technologies in China. It is further proof that foreign companies can effectively defend their intellectual property in China.

As the technology leader in spinning machinery manufacturing, Rieter invests around 5% of its turnover annually in research and development. Rieter protects its innovative products with patents and registered designs and takes consistent action against infringements of industrial property rights.

More information:
legal dispute patent China
Source:

Rieter AG

KARL MAYER TURKEY appoints General Manager (c) KARL MAYER GROUP
Toros Greenhalgh, General Manager of KARL MAYER TURKEY
02.02.2024

KARL MAYER TURKEY appoints General Manager

Toros Greenhalgh becomes General Manager of the new KARL MAYER subsidiary in Türkiye

In October 2023, the KARL MAYER GROUP established its own site in Bursa, Türkiye, thus increasing its presence in one of its most important markets. KARL MAYER TURKEY will meet increasing customer demands for after-sales service, spare parts (Care Solutions), and academy, in the sectors of warp knitting and warp preparation, while KARL MAYER’s long-standing regional representative ERKO focuses on machine sales.

Toros Greenhalgh was appointed General Manager of KARL MAYER TURKEY on February 1st of this year. Holding a degree in mechanical engineering and materials science from the University of Birmingham, he comes with experience in the fields of industrial plant construction management, renewable energy technologies, and the distribution of medical devices. For the past seven years he has been active in the sector of textile machinery through ERKO with particular focus on KARL MAYER machine sales, service, and spare parts.

Toros Greenhalgh becomes General Manager of the new KARL MAYER subsidiary in Türkiye

In October 2023, the KARL MAYER GROUP established its own site in Bursa, Türkiye, thus increasing its presence in one of its most important markets. KARL MAYER TURKEY will meet increasing customer demands for after-sales service, spare parts (Care Solutions), and academy, in the sectors of warp knitting and warp preparation, while KARL MAYER’s long-standing regional representative ERKO focuses on machine sales.

Toros Greenhalgh was appointed General Manager of KARL MAYER TURKEY on February 1st of this year. Holding a degree in mechanical engineering and materials science from the University of Birmingham, he comes with experience in the fields of industrial plant construction management, renewable energy technologies, and the distribution of medical devices. For the past seven years he has been active in the sector of textile machinery through ERKO with particular focus on KARL MAYER machine sales, service, and spare parts.

More information:
Karl Mayer Manager Turkey
Source:

KARL MAYER GROUP

AMPI illustration AMPI illustration
30.01.2024

FET: £50,000 for spinneret research

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) has been awarded £50,000 of grant funding to collaborate with the University of Manchester on complex spin pack and spinneret designs. This funding will provide FET with access to the expertise of four universities and the National Physical Laboratory to develop the next generation of machinery.

The grant is awarded by a consortium led by AMPI (The Advanced Machinery and Productivity Institute) and NPL (The National Physical Laboratory). AMPI’s Innovation for Machinery (I4M) programme supports businesses in West Yorkshire and Greater Manchester as part of an overall initiative to drive innovation for the UK’s advanced machinery manufacturers to meet the challenges of developing new technology and entering emerging markets.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) has been awarded £50,000 of grant funding to collaborate with the University of Manchester on complex spin pack and spinneret designs. This funding will provide FET with access to the expertise of four universities and the National Physical Laboratory to develop the next generation of machinery.

The grant is awarded by a consortium led by AMPI (The Advanced Machinery and Productivity Institute) and NPL (The National Physical Laboratory). AMPI’s Innovation for Machinery (I4M) programme supports businesses in West Yorkshire and Greater Manchester as part of an overall initiative to drive innovation for the UK’s advanced machinery manufacturers to meet the challenges of developing new technology and entering emerging markets.

In this project, FET will be working with the University of Manchester to conduct computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies on a number of complex spin pack and spinneret designs. The aim of this work is to identify areas of improvement for FET’s spin packs and spinnerets and to use computer aided designs to develop significantly more efficient versions. The goal is that the research will improve the throughput of FET extrusion systems, thus reducing the amount of polymer lost through inefficient flow paths. This development, in turn, will reduce the environmental impact of synthetic polymer processing.

FET designs, develops, and manufactures extrusion equipment for a range of high value textile material applications worldwide. Established in 1998, FET’s major strength has always been to collaborate with customers in testing, evaluating and developing high value materials with diverse, functional properties. Efficiency and sustainability are key, so enhanced development of spinneret technology will contribute significantly to these objectives.

MACH2®XS Photo SHIMA SEIKI MFG., LTD.
MACH2®XS
28.01.2024

SHIMA SEIKI at Dhaka International Textile & Garment Machinery Exhibition 2024

Operating in Bangladesh since 1996, this is the fourteenth time the Japanese manufacturer is participating in DTG.

As the Bangladeshi textile industry calls for sustainable production through innovation and digitalization, the market is keen to establish effective business models that support such production. In response, for the first time in its DTG exhibition history, SHIMA SEIKI's lineup consists entirely of WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machines. Capable of knitting an entire garment in one piece without the need for linking or sewing while using only the material required to knit one garment at a time, WHOLEGARMENT® knitting is famous for promoting sustainability in the knit factory.

Operating in Bangladesh since 1996, this is the fourteenth time the Japanese manufacturer is participating in DTG.

As the Bangladeshi textile industry calls for sustainable production through innovation and digitalization, the market is keen to establish effective business models that support such production. In response, for the first time in its DTG exhibition history, SHIMA SEIKI's lineup consists entirely of WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machines. Capable of knitting an entire garment in one piece without the need for linking or sewing while using only the material required to knit one garment at a time, WHOLEGARMENT® knitting is famous for promoting sustainability in the knit factory.

The company is showing its MACH2®XS153 WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machine in 15L gauge, as well as its SWG®091N2 "Mini" WHOLEGARMENT® knitting machine in 15 gauge. MACH2®XS features 4 needle beds and SHIMA SEIKI's original SlideNeedle™, capable of producing high-quality fine gauge WHOLEGARMENT® knitwear in all needles. SWG®091N2 provides opportunities in WHOLEGARMENT® knitting across a wide range of items in a compact, economical package. A different approach to WHOLEGARMENT knitting is also shown in the form of the N.SVR®183 machine. SHIMA SEIKI's global standard in shaped knitting, the N.SVR® series now features a model for producing WHOLEGARMENT® knitwear using every other needle in fine gauge. Shown in 18 gauge at DTG, N.SVR®183 is the ideal machine for flexible, entry-level WHOLEGARMENT® production, with the versatility to respond to fluctuating market demand.

Demonstrations are performed on SHIMA SEIKI's SDS®-ONE APEX4 design system. At the core of the company’s "Total Fashion System" concept, it provides comprehensive support throughout the supply chain, integrating production into one smooth and efficient workflow from yarn development, product planning and design, to machine programming, production and even sales promotion.

Source:

SHIMA SEIKI MFG., LTD.