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17.11.2020

Kelheim Fibres Partner of ETP in „Bio-Based Fibres“ and “Circular Economy” programs

The Bavarian viscose speciality fibres manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has partnered with the European Technology Platform for the Future of Textiles and Clothing (ETP) in two strategic programs: “Bio- Based Fibres” and “Circular Economy”.

Against the backdrop of the increasingly important sustainability debate, fundamental changes inside the textile supply chain are taking place. The two three-year ETP programmes “Bio-Based Fibres” and “Circular Economy” are a clear response to this. The goal is to bring key players from industry and science together to develop a long-term strategy to actively shape the sustainable realignment of the European textile industry.

The Bavarian viscose speciality fibres manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has partnered with the European Technology Platform for the Future of Textiles and Clothing (ETP) in two strategic programs: “Bio- Based Fibres” and “Circular Economy”.

Against the backdrop of the increasingly important sustainability debate, fundamental changes inside the textile supply chain are taking place. The two three-year ETP programmes “Bio-Based Fibres” and “Circular Economy” are a clear response to this. The goal is to bring key players from industry and science together to develop a long-term strategy to actively shape the sustainable realignment of the European textile industry.

“We have been manufacturing bio-based fibres for almost 85 years – these fibres are made from the renewable material wood and they are fully biodegradable at the end of their product lifecycle. As an alternative to crude-oil based materials, these fibres are becoming increasingly popular in various applications. Part of the reason for this is the fact that we can functionalize our speciality fibres during the production process and give them the exact properties that are required for different end uses. In terms of performance, they can keep up with synthetic materials”, explains Dr. Marina Crnoja-Cosic, head of New Business Development at Kelheim Fibres.

But Kelheim’s sustainability criteria also include the full life cycle of their products: When a textile, after its use, can become the raw material for new fibres and new products, for Crnoja-Cosic that is a huge advantage in terms of sustainability. “We want the best possible result – bio-based fibres AND circular economy are the way to get there.”

Source:

Contact Kelheim Fibres

Pump components made from zirconium oxide ceramic (c) Oerlikon
Pump components made from zirconium oxide ceramic
12.11.2020

Oerlikon: Robust pumps for sophisticated special fibers

At first glance, rowing boats, the Airbus 380, safety equipment and stadium roofing have very little on common. They receive their specific properties as a result of the use of special fibers, among other things: aramid fibers and carbon fibers are processed into special yarns that are frequently deployed as compound materials. These fibers are growing in demand as the world seeks to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels; new solutions are required to reduce weight and replace heavy metallic parts.

Aramid fibers are produced in a highly-chemical process that is extremely aggressive; the acrylic precursor used to manufacture carbon fibers is a different process, but again no less difficult. In these sophisticated processes, the gear metering pumps are not only responsible for the high-precision control of the melt transport; durability, resistance within aggressive environments and cost efficiency also play decisive roles.

At first glance, rowing boats, the Airbus 380, safety equipment and stadium roofing have very little on common. They receive their specific properties as a result of the use of special fibers, among other things: aramid fibers and carbon fibers are processed into special yarns that are frequently deployed as compound materials. These fibers are growing in demand as the world seeks to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels; new solutions are required to reduce weight and replace heavy metallic parts.

Aramid fibers are produced in a highly-chemical process that is extremely aggressive; the acrylic precursor used to manufacture carbon fibers is a different process, but again no less difficult. In these sophisticated processes, the gear metering pumps are not only responsible for the high-precision control of the melt transport; durability, resistance within aggressive environments and cost efficiency also play decisive roles.

Special materials for special tasks
The process, the expected pump lifespan and the maintenance frequency are the decisive factors for choosing the materials from which the pumps and their components are manufactured. For optimum results, Oerlikon Barmag offers solutions that intelligently combine the various materials and the latest technologies. Whether in the case of surfaces with ceramic coatings, gears and shafts featuring DLC coatings, pumps made from cobalt alloys (StelliteTM) or robust and durable Oerlikon Barmag hybrid constructions comprising zirconium oxide ceramic and duplex stainless steel – the high-precision ZP- and GM-series pumps are design-optimized depending on the intended use. Various seal systems and customized drive concepts round off the pump program.

Source:

Oerlikon

vombaur: Composites for Aviation and Automotive (c) vombaur
Pioneering tech tex
04.11.2020

vombaur: Composites for Aviation and Automotive

  • Composite textiles for modern mobility
  • Extremely lightweight, high tensile components by vombaur

In the snow, on a plane, in an electric vehicle or on a bicycle: no matter where and how we are on the road – composite textiles by vombaur ensure that we make good progress. With materials that are both extremely light and extremely reliable.

Lightweight components for modern mobility
Modern mobility relies on high-tech lightweight components Narrow textiles by vombaur are woven from high-performance fibres. On looms that are specially made for particularly demanding composite textiles: the textile company uses special machines to produce high-tech woven tapes with closed selvedges and elasticated UD tubulars that retain their 0° orientation over the entire length of the component – regardless of the diameter. Since they do not exhibit undesired break points caused by seams or welding, they not only have a particularly high bursting strength, they are also extremely reliable and durable.

  • Composite textiles for modern mobility
  • Extremely lightweight, high tensile components by vombaur

In the snow, on a plane, in an electric vehicle or on a bicycle: no matter where and how we are on the road – composite textiles by vombaur ensure that we make good progress. With materials that are both extremely light and extremely reliable.

Lightweight components for modern mobility
Modern mobility relies on high-tech lightweight components Narrow textiles by vombaur are woven from high-performance fibres. On looms that are specially made for particularly demanding composite textiles: the textile company uses special machines to produce high-tech woven tapes with closed selvedges and elasticated UD tubulars that retain their 0° orientation over the entire length of the component – regardless of the diameter. Since they do not exhibit undesired break points caused by seams or welding, they not only have a particularly high bursting strength, they are also extremely reliable and durable.

Challenging applications
"From snowboards to aerospace – the applications for our composite textiles are demanding; the mechanical, chemical and thermal requirements are extreme," explains COO Christoph Schliefer. "As a development partner, we at vombaur are therefore often involved in product development at an early stage. We specify our woven tapes and tubulars individually for each project to suit the specific task at hand."

High quality raw materials, wide variety of geometries
The variety of shapes is virtually unlimited. vombaur manufactures 3D fabrics for composites in individual special shapes from carbon, aramid, glass or hybrids. Curves, edges, tubulars, spiral fabrics – the shape of the 3D fabrics, like the material itself, depends entirely on the task at hand. Powder or non-woven coatings create additional important properties.

Pioneering tech tex
"Developments in the field of modern mobility are happening at a rapid pace," emphasizes Schliefer. "With our composite textiles for extremely lightweight and high tenacity components, we at vombaur are also pushing these developments forward."

Logo (c) Kelheim Fibres
02.11.2020

Kelheim Fibres scores a leading position in Canopy’s 2020 Hot Button Report

The Bavarian viscose speciality fibre manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has achieved a leading score in Canopy’s 2020 Hot Button Report. Kelheim Fibres ranks overall among the top 5 producers and was even able to improve their good previous year’s result.

While the company – as in 2019 - is assessed as “low risk" of sourcing from Ancient & Endangered Forests, Kelheim is proud to have invested significantly in “Next Generation Fibre Solutions,” and hopes to reach commercial scale by 2025. Also, highlighted in the report is Kelheim’s increase of the proportion of FSC®-certified fibre.

Kelheim has accepted the recommendation to develop an action plan for continuous improvement of their sustainability: With a certification according to ISO 50001 (energy management), certification according to EMAS (expected at the end of 2020), the application to join ZDHC (Roadmap to Zero) and the newly created position of a sustainability manager, the viscose fibre experts have accomplished a considerable success in a short space of time.

The Bavarian viscose speciality fibre manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has achieved a leading score in Canopy’s 2020 Hot Button Report. Kelheim Fibres ranks overall among the top 5 producers and was even able to improve their good previous year’s result.

While the company – as in 2019 - is assessed as “low risk" of sourcing from Ancient & Endangered Forests, Kelheim is proud to have invested significantly in “Next Generation Fibre Solutions,” and hopes to reach commercial scale by 2025. Also, highlighted in the report is Kelheim’s increase of the proportion of FSC®-certified fibre.

Kelheim has accepted the recommendation to develop an action plan for continuous improvement of their sustainability: With a certification according to ISO 50001 (energy management), certification according to EMAS (expected at the end of 2020), the application to join ZDHC (Roadmap to Zero) and the newly created position of a sustainability manager, the viscose fibre experts have accomplished a considerable success in a short space of time.

Canopy’s Hot Button Report not only stands for ethically correct raw material sourcing – it is an overall sustainability indicator for viscose fibre producers.”, so Matthew North, Commercial Director at Kelheim Fibres. “We are proud of our ranking and will follow this path further: Our fibres offer an ecofriendly alternative to synthetic materials. That includes certified sustainable raw material sourcing, resource saving and low-emission production processes as well as the continuous search for improvements and future-oriented solutions.“

Source:

Kelheim Fibres

Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd. Moves to Digital Production with Mimaki Tiger (c) Mimaki
The Tiger-1800B MkII, Mimaki’s flagship industrial volume textile printer
22.10.2020

Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd. Moves to Digital Production with Mimaki Tiger

  •   Mimaki Tiger-1800B MkII Printers for Faster, High-Quality Textile Printing

Amsterdam - Mimaki Europe, a leading manufacturer of inkjet printers and cutting systems, announces today that Pakistani textile company, Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd., is leveraging multiple Mimaki Tiger industrial textile printing units to take its business to the next level. As a result of on the outstanding performance and process optimisation delivered by the Mimaki digital printing equipment, the company has been able to adapt to changes in the textile industry and is now projected to reinforce its market position and expand its capabilities in high-quality textile production.

  •   Mimaki Tiger-1800B MkII Printers for Faster, High-Quality Textile Printing

Amsterdam - Mimaki Europe, a leading manufacturer of inkjet printers and cutting systems, announces today that Pakistani textile company, Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd., is leveraging multiple Mimaki Tiger industrial textile printing units to take its business to the next level. As a result of on the outstanding performance and process optimisation delivered by the Mimaki digital printing equipment, the company has been able to adapt to changes in the textile industry and is now projected to reinforce its market position and expand its capabilities in high-quality textile production.

Headquartered in Faisalabad, Punjab province – the second largest textile hub in Pakistan –, Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd. mainly serves the high fashion industry and uses its cutting-edge technology to print about 100,000 metres daily. Faced with recent challenges in the global textile market, management at Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd. embarked on innovating the company’s business model, shifting from conventional to digital printing. In doing so, the company invested in Mimaki’s advanced industrial textile technology and installed three Mimaki Tiger-1800B MkII units. “We were – and still are – experiencing a massive transformation in the printing segment, with brands demanding high quality products delivered within short deadlines. This change in our customers’ requirements urged us to move to digital printing,” says Muhammad Asif, CEO at Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd. “Our choice has already proved sound as our brand-new Tiger-1800B MkII printing systems have enabled us to cope with the high standards of the fashion industry in terms of both quality and delivery times. In addition, we have been able to gradually enhance our production processes in a cost-effective way.”

The Tiger-1800B MkII is Mimaki’s flagship industrial volume textile printer, available either in dye sublimation configuration for transfer printing or with reactive ink for direct-to-textile printing. Of the three Mimaki Tiger-1800B MkII solutions operating at Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd., two are equipped with reactive inks, enabling the company to directly print onto natural fibres such as cotton and linen, as well as onto manufactured cellulose fibres, including rayon and nylon. The third Mimaki Tiger-1800B MkII features sublimation inks serves the ever-growing printed polyester market, allowing the company to strategically diversify its product portfolio.

“There are several features of the Tiger-1800B MkII that benefit our production and our business at large. The MAPS (Mimaki Advanced Pass System), just to name one, prevents banding and colour-shifting to deliver a higher standard of quality, while the NRS (Nozzle Recovery System) provides uninterrupted production, minimising downtime and ensuring superior results. The sticky belt system together with the large-size ink tanks (with a capacity of 10kg) and the high-performance software RIP TxLink3 are some of the other features that make these printers efficient, user-friendly and reliable,” says Asif.

Asif concludes, “Looking at the future, our aim is to set up a print department featuring only Mimaki’s technologies. We are already considering the next steps to make this possible, knowing that we can count on the support of Signtrade, Mimaki’s dealer in the region and our trustworthy partner.”

Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd. was founded in 1992 by Muhammad Asif’s father Haji Muhammad Yousaf and his partner Haji Rasheed Ahmad. Established as a dyeing company, Moti Fabrics (Pvt) Ltd. was able to gradually diversify the business over the years to become an advanced textile printing specialist. Today, the company is an established provider to the high fashion industry in Pakistan and on an international level.

“The story of Moti Fabrics is incredibly inspiring. Belonging to a region with such rooted textile printing heritage, the company has been able to embrace a new, challenging business model in order to stay at pace with the changing demand from the textile industry and has succeeded,” comments Ronald van den Broek, General Sales Manager at Mimaki Europe. “Customers like Moti Fabrics make us proud as they demonstrate how our advanced Mimaki Tiger industrial textile series can be the enabling technology for those textile companies planning the shift from conventional to digital printing.”

Bandagenband (c) JUMBO Textil
20.10.2020

JUMBO-Textil: Narrow textiles with a function

Technical textiles fulfil many functions: they hold, they lift, they fixate, they stretch – and they tension. In this function narrow textiles fulfil an important task in product development. And they offer significant advantages over metal or plastic tensioning devices such as springs, clamps or cable ties.

Properties
Textiles are light: a property that plays a central role in modern mobility. Textiles are flexible: from extremely high to extremely low elasticity: the force-elongation behaviour of elasticated narrow textiles can be precisely defined. Depending on the tensioning task to be performed. Textiles tension in tight packaging spaces: elastics can also be used where space is too tight for springs and clasps. Textiles are energy efficient: lightweight, with high tensioning force. Textiles are easy to handle: replace a connector spontaneously and without tools, quickly change the length or roll up and store a supply. And textiles are sustainable: natural fibres and rubber are natural and ecologically degradable raw materials; synthetic fibres can be completely produced from recycled materials.

Technical textiles fulfil many functions: they hold, they lift, they fixate, they stretch – and they tension. In this function narrow textiles fulfil an important task in product development. And they offer significant advantages over metal or plastic tensioning devices such as springs, clamps or cable ties.

Properties
Textiles are light: a property that plays a central role in modern mobility. Textiles are flexible: from extremely high to extremely low elasticity: the force-elongation behaviour of elasticated narrow textiles can be precisely defined. Depending on the tensioning task to be performed. Textiles tension in tight packaging spaces: elastics can also be used where space is too tight for springs and clasps. Textiles are energy efficient: lightweight, with high tensioning force. Textiles are easy to handle: replace a connector spontaneously and without tools, quickly change the length or roll up and store a supply. And textiles are sustainable: natural fibres and rubber are natural and ecologically degradable raw materials; synthetic fibres can be completely produced from recycled materials.

Applications
Development teams in numerous industries leverage these properties for their products. For example, for flexible machine parts in mechanical engineering, for switch contacts in electrical engineering, for oscillation-capable locking systems in the construction industry, for noise- and vibration-free seating systems in the automotive sector or for grip rings in the toys industry.

Tasks
Particularly en vogue today, when we are spending more time than usual in our own homes: applications for narrow textiles in the furniture industry. They go far beyond the area of legacy home textiles: as tensioning elements in armchairs, sofas and chairs, as hinge solutions in cupboards, as fixation elements in extendable or folding tables. Narrow textiles are used for gripping tasks almost everywhere in the living room.

"JUMBO-Textil specialises in precisely implementing the individual requirements for defined force-elongation values of elasticated narrow textiles: we adapt the technical properties of our products precisely to the specific task and the respective raw materials," explains Werner Thiex, Sales Director Automotive. "Precise technical specification plus sustainable raw materials – this is a crucial combination in the 21st century".

Source:

stotz-design.com

World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy (c) pixabay
Cotton
07.10.2020

October, 7th: World Cotton Day

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

According to the WTO, the aim of World Cotton Day is to highlight the global economic importance of cotton and to raise awareness of the raw material by recognising the work of everyone involved in its cultivation, processing and trade. At the same time, within the framework of international cooperation, it is hoped that supporters and investors can be found to aid with technological and economic progress within the cotton value chain.

This time, the entire world cotton community will be involved in World Cotton Day on Wednesday, 7 October 2020. A wide variety of campaigns and events are taking place everywhere to draw attention to the importance of cotton and its possible uses.

Cotton is one of the most relevant agricultural raw materials in the world. Around 26 million tonnes of it are harvested annually. Approximately 150 million people in almost 80 countries around the world live from the cultivation of the natural fibre. A large number of these live in developing countries, where cotton cultivation is of particular importance as a cash crop.

Cotton is known as an agricultural product that is turned into a textile. The raw material is indispensable in fashion and clothing – and has been for thousands of years. But the use of cotton now goes far beyond textiles. For example, cosmetic products such as hand creams and hair shampoo are made from the oil of cotton seeds. The raw material is also used in the manufacture of banknotes, furniture and technical textiles, as well as in medical technology.

Against the background of the current discussion on sustainability and sustainable consumption, the role of natural fibres is becoming even more important. Cotton is biodegradable and a renewable resource. It can be grown again and again in agriculture through cultivation in crop rotation. This secures incomes and enables efficient value creation within the global production and processing chain.

The Bremen Cotton Exchange will actively support World Cotton Day with cross-media coverage. In addition, in time for World Cotton Day, three thematically different, emotionally appealing short films about cotton will be launched. They are aimed at consumers as customers of the textile and clothing trade and provide information about the benefits and properties of cotton and answer questions about its sustainability. In keeping with the times, they will be published via virtual media.

Kelheim (c) Kelheim Fibres GmbH
23.09.2020

Kelheim Fibres für den Sustainability Heroes Award nominiert

Kelheim Fibres ist unter den Finalisten für den Sustainability Heroes Award in der Kategorie Nachhaltige Innovation. Der Preis wird von der DQS (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nachhaltigkeit) und der DGQ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Qualität) an Vorreiter im Bereich Nachhaltigkeit vergeben und soll aktives Engagement weiter anspornen.

Der Viskosespezialfaserhersteller bewirbt sich um den Award mit ihren innovativen Fasern auf Pflanzenbasis, die einen erheblichen Beitrag für eine plastikfreie Zukunft im Bereich der absorbierenden Hygieneprodukte (z.B. Menstruations- oder Inkontinenzprodukte) leisten können.

Durch den Produktionsprozess können Viskosefasern – im Gegensatz zu anderen pflanzenbasierten Fasern – gezielt modifiziert und funktionalisiert werden. So können sie exakt auf das Anforderungsprofil der einzelnen Bestandteile des Hygieneproduktes abgestimmt werden (von besonders saugfähig bis wasserabweisend) und reichen damit an die Leistungswerte von synthetischen Fasern heran, die heute noch mehrheitlich in diesen Produkten für den Einmalgebrauch zu finden sind.

Kelheim Fibres ist unter den Finalisten für den Sustainability Heroes Award in der Kategorie Nachhaltige Innovation. Der Preis wird von der DQS (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nachhaltigkeit) und der DGQ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Qualität) an Vorreiter im Bereich Nachhaltigkeit vergeben und soll aktives Engagement weiter anspornen.

Der Viskosespezialfaserhersteller bewirbt sich um den Award mit ihren innovativen Fasern auf Pflanzenbasis, die einen erheblichen Beitrag für eine plastikfreie Zukunft im Bereich der absorbierenden Hygieneprodukte (z.B. Menstruations- oder Inkontinenzprodukte) leisten können.

Durch den Produktionsprozess können Viskosefasern – im Gegensatz zu anderen pflanzenbasierten Fasern – gezielt modifiziert und funktionalisiert werden. So können sie exakt auf das Anforderungsprofil der einzelnen Bestandteile des Hygieneproduktes abgestimmt werden (von besonders saugfähig bis wasserabweisend) und reichen damit an die Leistungswerte von synthetischen Fasern heran, die heute noch mehrheitlich in diesen Produkten für den Einmalgebrauch zu finden sind.

Während sich umweltbewusste Anwender(innen) heute oft zwischen einem sicheren Gefühl und einem guten Gewissen entscheiden müssen, tragen die Bayerischen Faserexperten perspektivisch dazu bei, dass immer mehr Produkte beidem gerecht werden: Kelheim Fibres verbindet nachhaltig gefertigte und vollständig biologisch abbaubare Fasern mit der technischen Performance von synthetischen Fasern. Ziel ist es, den Einsatz von rohölbasiertem Plastik in Wegwerfprodukten und seinen negativen Einfluss auf die Umwelt zu reduzieren.

Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH

(c) Kelheim Fibres GmbH
23.09.2020

Kelheim Fibres nominated for the Sustainbability Heroes Award

Kelheim Fibres has been selected as a finalist for the Sustainability Heroes Award in the category “Sustainable Innovation”. The award is presented by DQS (German Association for Sustainability) and DGQ (German Association for Quality) to pioneers in sustainability and aims to further encourage active involvement in this field.
 
The viscose speciality fibres manufacturer has secured the selection with its innovative plant-based fibres that can substantially contribute to a plastic-free future in absorbent hygiene products such as femcare or incontinence products.

In contrast to other plant-based fibres, viscose fibres can be precisely modified and functionalised during the production process. They can be adapted to meet the exact requirements of the single components of a hygiene product in terms of their liquid management properties (from water repellent to highly absorbent) and so match the performance of synthetic fibres that are still used in the majority of these single-use products.

Kelheim Fibres has been selected as a finalist for the Sustainability Heroes Award in the category “Sustainable Innovation”. The award is presented by DQS (German Association for Sustainability) and DGQ (German Association for Quality) to pioneers in sustainability and aims to further encourage active involvement in this field.
 
The viscose speciality fibres manufacturer has secured the selection with its innovative plant-based fibres that can substantially contribute to a plastic-free future in absorbent hygiene products such as femcare or incontinence products.

In contrast to other plant-based fibres, viscose fibres can be precisely modified and functionalised during the production process. They can be adapted to meet the exact requirements of the single components of a hygiene product in terms of their liquid management properties (from water repellent to highly absorbent) and so match the performance of synthetic fibres that are still used in the majority of these single-use products.

Whereas today, environmentally conscious consumers must often decide between feeling safe and a clear conscience, the Bavarian fibre experts are actively developing more and more products that do justice to both: Kelheim combines sustainably manufactured and completely biodegradable fibres with the technical performance of synthetic fibres. The aim is to help to reduce the use of crude-oil-based plastics in single-use products and their negative impact on the environment.

Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH

(c) Sateri
23.09.2020

FINEXTM Reaches New Milestones; Launches Officially at Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics

FINEXTM, Sateri’s marquee brand for recycled fibre, is now certified to the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) which provides verification of recycled raw materials through the supply chain.

RCS is intended for use with any product that contains at least 5% recycled material. Sateri has successfully produced FINEXTM viscose fibres with up to 20% recycled content. Under the RCS certification process, each stage of production is required to be certified, beginning at the recycling stage and ending at the last seller in the final business-to-business transaction.

These new developments were announced at the official launch of FINEXTM on September 23, 2020. About 160 guests, mostly senior representatives of major fashion brands and fabric and garment makers, gathered to celebrate the milestones that cement the status of FINEXTM as a game changer for sustainable fashion.

Themed ‘Sustainable Fashion for the Future’, the launch was jointly hosted by Sateri and China International Fashion Fair (CHIC) on the sidelines of the three-day Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, a major industry expo.

FINEXTM, Sateri’s marquee brand for recycled fibre, is now certified to the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) which provides verification of recycled raw materials through the supply chain.

RCS is intended for use with any product that contains at least 5% recycled material. Sateri has successfully produced FINEXTM viscose fibres with up to 20% recycled content. Under the RCS certification process, each stage of production is required to be certified, beginning at the recycling stage and ending at the last seller in the final business-to-business transaction.

These new developments were announced at the official launch of FINEXTM on September 23, 2020. About 160 guests, mostly senior representatives of major fashion brands and fabric and garment makers, gathered to celebrate the milestones that cement the status of FINEXTM as a game changer for sustainable fashion.

Themed ‘Sustainable Fashion for the Future’, the launch was jointly hosted by Sateri and China International Fashion Fair (CHIC) on the sidelines of the three-day Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, a major industry expo.

In his address, Allen Zhang, President of Sateri, said, “The development of FINEXTM has been an intensive effort for Sateri from initial commercialisation, to partnering brands like Lafuma and Rico Lee, and finally to today’s launch. This is all made possible with collaboration across the value chain – working alongside yarn spinners, garment makers and brand partners – to bring a high quality and more planetfriendly product to consumers. The fashion industry is changing fast and, beyond functionality, circularity is now of the greatest importance in apparel manufacturing.”

In the ‘2020 Sustainable Fashion Report’ released by China’s leading business news publication CBNweekly earlier this week, results of a survey with stakeholders in the fashion value chain reinforced the potential of textile recycling as a solution to the problem of textile waste arising from over-consumption and production. The report identified technology and capital as the biggest barriers to textile recycling and highlighted the critical role brands play in mobilising manufacturers and consumers to advance sustainable fashion.

As part of its efforts to promote textile fibre recycling in China, Sateri is in dialogue with the China Association of Circular Economy (CACE) to undertake a comprehensive study on the industrial-scale textile waste recycling landscape in the country. The study is expected to commence next year.

More information:
FinexTM Sateri recycling fibers
Source:

Omnicom Public Relations Group / Sateri

Collaboration Between DuPont™ Sorona® and Sateri’s EcoCosy® Results in Innovative Fabrics for Fashion and Athleisure (c) Sateri
StretchCosy
10.09.2020

Innovative Fabrics for Fashion and Athleisure

  • Collaboration Between DuPont™ Sorona® and Sateri’s EcoCosy®

DuPont™ Sorona® and Sateri’s EcoCosy® have together developed a new fabric called StretchCosy™. The fabric uses a blend of Sorona®, a partially plant-based fibre, and Sateri’s ultra-comfortable and near weightless EcoCosy® fibres to achieve a soft material that is highly stretchable, shape-retaining and, most importantly, sustainably sourced.

StretchCosy™ combines the mechanical stretch of Sorona® stretch fibres, which gives it excellent stretch and long-lasting, consistent recovery, with the soft, cotton-like breathability and smooth silk-like texture of EcoCosy® for an unparalleled fabric that is high-performing and well-suited for fashion and sportswear.

  • Collaboration Between DuPont™ Sorona® and Sateri’s EcoCosy®

DuPont™ Sorona® and Sateri’s EcoCosy® have together developed a new fabric called StretchCosy™. The fabric uses a blend of Sorona®, a partially plant-based fibre, and Sateri’s ultra-comfortable and near weightless EcoCosy® fibres to achieve a soft material that is highly stretchable, shape-retaining and, most importantly, sustainably sourced.

StretchCosy™ combines the mechanical stretch of Sorona® stretch fibres, which gives it excellent stretch and long-lasting, consistent recovery, with the soft, cotton-like breathability and smooth silk-like texture of EcoCosy® for an unparalleled fabric that is high-performing and well-suited for fashion and sportswear.

Created in 2019, StretchCosy™ is a fabric breakthrough that made it possible for natural plant-based fibres to be more extensively used in various applications, e.g. t-shirts, shirting, bottoms, jackets, dresses, hoodies and underwear. Previously, cellulosic fibres were rarely found in sportswear, due to concerns such as pilling. The combination of Sorona® and EcoCosy® in StretchCosy™ has eliminated this concern, hinting at the future of activewear where performance combined with sustainability will be the norm.

Source:

Omnicom Public Relations Group

First Swiss “Community Mask” with TESTEX label by Schoeller Textil AG and Forster Rohner AG Photo: Schoeller Textil AG
First Swiss “Community Mask” with TESTEX label by Schoeller Textil AG and Forster Rohner AG
21.08.2020

First Swiss “Community Mask” with TESTEX label by Schoeller Textil AG and Forster Rohner AG

With immediate effect, the first fabric mask with the official “TESTEX Community Mask” test label is available from the two Swiss textile firms, Schoeller Textil AG and Forster Rohner AG. Since May, the companies have been able to offer their masks with official EMPA recommendation. The sustainable and economical quality products consist primarily of recycled performance fabric which can be recycled once again at the end of its service life.

Swiss cooperation
With the product from the two companies based in the east of Switzerland, Schoeller Textil AG and Forster Rohner AG, the Swiss market now boasts the first textile mask featuring the label “TESTEX Community Mask”. Together with the EMPA, TESTEX has developed a testing procedure which analyses textile masks with regard to their filter function, spray resistance, comfort of wear, reusability and additionally skin-friendliness of the textiles. By now, numerous Swiss and international consumers, as well as the employees of major companies (e.g. transport companies) have satisfied themselves of the suitability of the Swiss Community Masks for everyday use.

With immediate effect, the first fabric mask with the official “TESTEX Community Mask” test label is available from the two Swiss textile firms, Schoeller Textil AG and Forster Rohner AG. Since May, the companies have been able to offer their masks with official EMPA recommendation. The sustainable and economical quality products consist primarily of recycled performance fabric which can be recycled once again at the end of its service life.

Swiss cooperation
With the product from the two companies based in the east of Switzerland, Schoeller Textil AG and Forster Rohner AG, the Swiss market now boasts the first textile mask featuring the label “TESTEX Community Mask”. Together with the EMPA, TESTEX has developed a testing procedure which analyses textile masks with regard to their filter function, spray resistance, comfort of wear, reusability and additionally skin-friendliness of the textiles. By now, numerous Swiss and international consumers, as well as the employees of major companies (e.g. transport companies) have satisfied themselves of the suitability of the Swiss Community Masks for everyday use.

Recyclable fabric made with 60 % recycled fibres
The high-quality fabric components in the mask were developed by the innovative Rheintal-based company Schoeller Textil AG. The two-layer polyester fabric is hydrophilic (having an affinity to water) on the outside and hydrophobic (water-repelling) on the outside and furthermore features an antibacterial finish. Thanks to the cotton-like feel, the fabric offers pleasant wearing comfort. The sustainable fabric consists of 60 % recycled fibres. Within the framework of the wear2wear recycling cooperation (www.wear2wear.org), the masks can be recycled once again when they reach the end of their life cycle.

The reusable mask is made up by Forster Rohner AG in St. Gallen and in its European subsidiaries. It impresses with optimum fit and tested skin tolerance. All components of
the mask comply with the OEKO-TEX® Standard 100. The testing process screens for numerous controlled and non-controlled substances. Masks with the OEKO-TEX® Standard 100 label are safe to wear. Forster Rohner also added a fashion component to the technicallyinnovative mask. The subsidiary, Jakob Schlaepfer AG, created a special print for the mask of the kind otherwise only developed for famous couture and prêt-à-porter fashion labels around the world. In addition to white and plain-coloured masks, a limited edition of available print designs emerges, or specific colours or even individual print designs are created for major customers.

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. (c)Paimion
Rester Paimio end-of-life textile refinement
18.08.2020

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy and LSJH will drive the textile sector towards a circular economy and begin processing textile waste as an industrial raw material. The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. The 3,000-square-metre plant is being developed by Rester Oy, which recycles companies' end-of-life textiles and industrial waste materials. LSJH, which processes households’ end-of-life textiles on its production line, will hire part of the plant.

Outi Luukko, Rester Oy’s board chair, says, “The processing plant will begin a new era of textile circular economy in Finland. As industry pioneers, we are launching a system change in Scandinavia. The transition of the textile industry from a linear model to a circular economy is essential, as virgin materials cannot sustain the current structure of the textile industry. And why should it, when there is so much recyclable material available?”

From the perspective of Rester Oy’s main owner, work clothing supplier Touchpoint, the circular economy plant not only represents resource efficiency, but is also necessary from the perspective of the entire life cycle of a responsible work clothing collection.

Luukko adds, “Finding a local solution to a global problem is a huge leap in the right direction and raises Finland's profile as a pioneer of circular economy."

The future plant will be able to process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles annually, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste. Both production lines produce recycled fibre, which can be used for various industrial applications, including yarn and fabric, insulating materials for construction and shipping industries, acoustic panels, composites, non-woven and filter materials, and other technical textiles, such as geo-textiles.

LSJH is piloting a full-scale refinement plant

LSJH has launched a pilot production line for processing households' end-of-life textiles. Unfortunately, consumers' end-of-life textiles are heterogeneous, making them a challenging raw material for further processing. Before processing, the textiles are sorted by material into various fibre classes using optical identification technology developed by LSJH and its partners. This ensures the quality of the raw material and the resulting fibre products.

Jukka Heikkilä, managing director for Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto, explains: “On the basis of the experiences gathered from the pilot project, Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto is preparing a full-scale refinement plant in the Turku region. As soon as 2023, the plant will process Finnish households' end-of-life textiles. The project involves all waste treatment plants owned by Finnish municipalities.”

Paimio has ambitious goals for circular economy companies

Rester’s initiative aims to create a circular economy cluster in Paimio that combines the processing and reuse of end-of-life textile fibres. Paimion Kehitys Oy, which is owned by the City of Paimio and the local association of enterprises, supports the development of circular economy companies in Paimio.

Mika Ingi, managing director for Paimion Kehitys Oy, says, “We want to step out of our traditional municipal role and create significant added value for everyone taking part. That is why we are involved in the development of a new modern service model based on ecosystem thinking. We are piloting the textile cluster, followed in the coming years by clusters focusing on plastic, construction, and energy. The aim of our service is to support and help develop new profitable business by bringing circular economy companies and their potential customers to innovate together."

The foundation stone of the processing plant was laid today (18 August 2020). The processing plant will begin operations in February 2021.

U.S. Cotton Trust Protocol (c) U.S. Cotton Trust Protocol
15.07.2020

U.S. Cotton Trust Protocol: new traceability tool for US cotton

Starting midth of July, brands and retailers can join the U.S. Cotton Trust Protocol, a new system for responsibly grown cotton that will provide annual data for six areas of sustainability in line with the UN Sustainability Goals. This year-on-year data available for the first time will allow brands and retailers to better measure progress towards meeting sustainability commitments.

The Trust Protocol underpins and verifies sustainability progress through sophisticated data collection and independent third-party verification. By working with Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture and Control Union Certifications North America, the Trust Protocol enables brands and retailers to better track the cotton entering their supply chain. Brands who become members of the Trust Protocol will have access to aggregate year-over-year data on water use, greenhouse gas emissions, energy use, soil carbon and land use efficiency.

The Trust Protocol is a complement to existing sustainability programs and is designed from the ground up to fit the unique cotton mass-growing environment of the United States.

Starting midth of July, brands and retailers can join the U.S. Cotton Trust Protocol, a new system for responsibly grown cotton that will provide annual data for six areas of sustainability in line with the UN Sustainability Goals. This year-on-year data available for the first time will allow brands and retailers to better measure progress towards meeting sustainability commitments.

The Trust Protocol underpins and verifies sustainability progress through sophisticated data collection and independent third-party verification. By working with Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture and Control Union Certifications North America, the Trust Protocol enables brands and retailers to better track the cotton entering their supply chain. Brands who become members of the Trust Protocol will have access to aggregate year-over-year data on water use, greenhouse gas emissions, energy use, soil carbon and land use efficiency.

The Trust Protocol is a complement to existing sustainability programs and is designed from the ground up to fit the unique cotton mass-growing environment of the United States.

Last month the Trust Protocol was added to Textile Exchange’s list of 36 preferred fibres and materials that more than 170 participating brands and retailers can select from as part of Textile Exchange’s Material Change Index programme.

More information:
cotton supply chain traceability
Source:

Hill+Knowlton Strategies GmbH

Monforts denim mills move hemp into the mainstream © Cone Denim
Cone Denim Sweet Leaf jeans.
30.06.2020

Monforts denim mills move hemp into the mainstream

  • There is an urban legend that hemp canvas was used to make the very first pair of Levi’s jeans.
  • While this is a myth that originated in the counterculture of the 1960s, hemp is without doubt the fibre of the moment for the denim industry.

At the second Kingpins24 virtual denim show that was broadcast from New York on June 23rd and 24th, the sustainable benefits of hemp fibre were referenced by many Monforts customers who are now including it in their collections, including AGI Denim, Artistic Milliners, Black Peony, Calik, Cone Denim, Naveena Denim Mills (NDM) and Orta.

“Hemp is an easy to grow fibre which requires no irrigation, no fertilizers, no herbicides and no chemicals,” says Allan Little, Director of Product Development for Cone Denim, which has recently launched its Sweet Leaf collection featuring the fibre. “Significantly, it also uses fifty per cent or even less water than cotton in cultivation.”

It can also bring some new aesthetics to denim too, he adds.

  • There is an urban legend that hemp canvas was used to make the very first pair of Levi’s jeans.
  • While this is a myth that originated in the counterculture of the 1960s, hemp is without doubt the fibre of the moment for the denim industry.

At the second Kingpins24 virtual denim show that was broadcast from New York on June 23rd and 24th, the sustainable benefits of hemp fibre were referenced by many Monforts customers who are now including it in their collections, including AGI Denim, Artistic Milliners, Black Peony, Calik, Cone Denim, Naveena Denim Mills (NDM) and Orta.

“Hemp is an easy to grow fibre which requires no irrigation, no fertilizers, no herbicides and no chemicals,” says Allan Little, Director of Product Development for Cone Denim, which has recently launched its Sweet Leaf collection featuring the fibre. “Significantly, it also uses fifty per cent or even less water than cotton in cultivation.”

It can also bring some new aesthetics to denim too, he adds.

“Hemp has a unique colour and adds a different cast to our indigo, the drape and texture of the fabrics is different and it even adds  a bit of a unique hand, so combined with its sustainable credentials we are proud to be bringing the Sweet Leaf collection to the market.”

US supply chain

Cone is currently sourcing its hemp from France, but with much of its manufacturing now in Mexico – and with the introduction of the US Farm Bill in 2018 which has legalised the growing of legal hemp – is exploring the possibility of investing in the US supply chain.

“With US hemp we’re really at the R&D phase,” Little emphasises. “It’s a unique crop, so coming up with the right stalk to provide the right fibre is challenging. We’ve experimented with different types of seed and various methods of decortication.”

Decortication, he explains, is the mechanical removal of the outside layer of the hemp stalk to useable fibre on the inside. A second process, cottonization, is necessary to make the fibre suitable for spinning, because compared to cotton, hemp is longer, stiffer, and less flexible.

100% success

At the end of 2019, Naveena (NDM), headquartered in Karachi, introduced fabrics featuring up to 51% hemp content in blends with Tencel and recycled polyester and this year has developed the first 100% hemp denims.

“The response to the fabrics we showed last year was incredible and we were looking forward to the response to this latest development – which everyone was asking for – at the Kingpins show in Amsterdam, which unfortunately was unable to go ahead,” says NDM’s Director of Marketing Rashid Iqbal. “We produced initial samples in an undyed state because we were not sure how the wet spun yarn would react in the dyeing, but I’m happy to say we have had success in this respect and are now able to provide one hundred per cent indigo dyed hemp denim.”

Environmental benefits

“Differentiation is the key in the highly-competitive denim industry and we have assisted our customers with trials and optimised processing parameters for a range of different fibres, including hemp, both at our Advanced Technology Centre in Germany and at their own mills around the world,” says Hans Wroblowski, Monforts Head of Denim. “Given the environmental benefits of hemp, and the liberalisation of its cultivation in many parts of the world, the interest in it now comes as no surprise. We have the technologies and know-how to help our customers to fully maximise their hemp denims at all post-weaving stages of production.”

Monforts has a dominant position in the field of denim finishing with its well proven Montex stenters. It has been enjoying further recent success with its Eco Line concept based on two key technology advances – the Eco Applicator and the Thermo Stretch.

The latest Monforts innovation for denim is the CYD yarn dyeing system. This technology is based on the effective and established dyeing process for denim fabrics that is now being applied for yarn dyeing.

The CYD system also integrates new functions and processes into the weaving preparation processes – spinning, direct beaming, warping and assembly beaming, followed by sizing and dyeing – to increase quality, flexibility, economic viability and productivity. A full CYD line is now available for trials at the company’s Advanced Technology Centre.

Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung awards ITA graduate and a project at ITA with sponsorship prizes (c) Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung
Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung sponsorship award winner picture 2020 (Ricarda Wissel: row 1, first from right, Simon Kammler, row 4, first from right)
25.06.2020

Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung awards ITA graduate and a project at ITA with sponsorship prizes

Carbon dioxide-based fibre for climate protection and interdisciplinary training with novel Smart Textiles test rig

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung, based in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, honours a project of the Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University, short ITA, and awards a sponsorship prize to the ITA graduate Ricarda Wissel on 25 June 2020. She is awarded for her outstanding bachelor thesis " Implementation of elastic yarns made from carbon dioxide based thermoplastic polyurethane in socks " with funding for a subject-specific continuation of her education. The ITA receives the project sponsorship prize for the project "Smart Textiles - an interdisciplinary training course to promote young scientists in future technologies", which was submitted to the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung by ITA´s PhD candidate Simon Kammler.

Carbon dioxide-based fibre from industrial waste contributes to climate protection

Carbon dioxide-based fibre for climate protection and interdisciplinary training with novel Smart Textiles test rig

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung, based in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, honours a project of the Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University, short ITA, and awards a sponsorship prize to the ITA graduate Ricarda Wissel on 25 June 2020. She is awarded for her outstanding bachelor thesis " Implementation of elastic yarns made from carbon dioxide based thermoplastic polyurethane in socks " with funding for a subject-specific continuation of her education. The ITA receives the project sponsorship prize for the project "Smart Textiles - an interdisciplinary training course to promote young scientists in future technologies", which was submitted to the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung by ITA´s PhD candidate Simon Kammler.

Carbon dioxide-based fibre from industrial waste contributes to climate protection

ITA scientist Dr.-Ing. Pavan Manvi has developed a melt spinning process at ITA for the production of elastic yarn from thermoplastic polyurethane, in which carbon dioxide is used as one of the raw materials. In her bachelor thesis, Ricarda Wissel successfully developed a process chain for the CO2-based yarn in a textile end product for the first time. In cooperation with the company FALKE and Dr Manvi, who supervised Ms. Wissel's work, the yarn was used to produce a sock (see figure "FALKE sock with carbon dioxide filaments").

By reusing carbon dioxide from industrial waste as a raw material for textile and clothing products, the carbon dioxide balance can be improved and thus contributes directly to climate protection. The sponsorship prize of the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung is endowed with 6,000 € for the specialist further training of Ms. Wissel.

Interdisciplinary training with development of a new type of measuring stand for the future-oriented research field "Smart Textiles

The development of textiles with additional digital functions, so-called "Smart Textiles", is considered a future-oriented field of research. In his project submission, ITA´s doctoral candidate Simon Kammler presented a concept for a lecture series on Smart Textiles at ITA and develops a new type of measuring stand for measuring the capacity and conductivity of fibres. The project is funded by the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung with a prize money of 10,000 Euro.

Smart Textiles enable the textile to interact with the environment and the human user. Today they are therefore in demand in many areas of everyday life such as sport, health, living, life and mobility and offer completely new practical solutions. In combination with digital networked services, Smart Textiles promise support and innovation in almost all situations of daily life.

With the conception of a new lecture series, Mr. Simon Kammler is supporting ITA in its goal of providing the best possible training for young scientists. The focus is on imparting far-reaching interdisciplinary skills in order to master the challenges of current fields of research.

Background:

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung supports particularly talented young people from all areas of the textile industry. Its purpose is the promotion of subject-specific education and further education as well as the promotion of projects at universities, academic schools and vocational schools, which are characterised by the sustainable communication of innovative learning content in science and research. In total, thirteen sponsorship prizes were awarded in 2020. Due to the Corona crisis, the forum of TextilWirtschaft, which is normally the venue for the awards ceremony, unfortunately had to be cancelled in 2020.

 New Recycled Fibre FinexTM in Stores; Sateri Partners Fashion Brands to Unveil Product (c) Finex
Finex Circularity Model
08.06.2020

New Recycled Fibre FinexTM in Stores; Sateri Partners Fashion Brands to Unveil Product

Shanghai – Sateri has unveiled FinexTM as its new product brand for recycled fibre. FinexTM, short for ‘Fibre Next’, is an innovative next-generation cellulosic fibre containing recycled content. Internationally known outdoor brand Lafuma has produced FinexTM apparel ahead of 618, China’s major mid-year online shopping festival, while independent China designer Rico Lee will launch his FinexTM apparel next month.

Since its announcement in March this year of a breakthrough in commercial production of viscose using recycled textile waste, Sateri has worked closely with its downstream yarn and garment manufacturing partners to bring the recycled fibre product to the consumer market.

Shanghai – Sateri has unveiled FinexTM as its new product brand for recycled fibre. FinexTM, short for ‘Fibre Next’, is an innovative next-generation cellulosic fibre containing recycled content. Internationally known outdoor brand Lafuma has produced FinexTM apparel ahead of 618, China’s major mid-year online shopping festival, while independent China designer Rico Lee will launch his FinexTM apparel next month.

Since its announcement in March this year of a breakthrough in commercial production of viscose using recycled textile waste, Sateri has worked closely with its downstream yarn and garment manufacturing partners to bring the recycled fibre product to the consumer market.

“We’re pleased to collaborate with Sateri as one of their first brand partners for FinexTM. Sateri’s dedication to this partnership made it possible for Lafuma to produce T-shirts with this fine quality fibre in a short time. T-shirts made with FinexTM will be among the offerings Lafuma has in store for the 618 festival as we look to support environmentally-friendly and excellent performance solutions to strengthen our position as a leading outdoor apparel brand,” said Wu Qian, General Manager of Lafuma China.

Echoing similar sentiments is Rico Lee who established his own independent label in 2014, “I jumped at the opportunity to collaborate with Sateri when they approached me because FinexTM encapsulates what my brand stands for – Beautiful Technology that combines function and fashion.”

Tom Liu, Sateri’s Commercial Vice President said, “Like our flagship brand EcoCosy®, FinexTM is made from bio-based natural fibres. Innovation and technology has made cellulosic textile fibre recycling possible and FinexTM represents how nature not only renews itself but that products made from nature can also be regenerated. This, at its heart, is what circular fashion looks like. Our brand promise to customers remains constant– Sateri’s products are sustainable, high quality, efficient, and cost-effective. The FinexTM tagline ‘Together For A Better Next’ expresses our aspiration to be the partner of choice for next-generation fibre - we thank Lafuma and Rico Lee for pioneering with us on this quest.”

Last month, Sateri announced its entry into China’s Lyocell fibre market. The recent string of product portfolio expansion announcements is underpinned by Sateri’s business strategy to capture value. Allen Zhang, President of Sateri said, “Being the world’s largest viscose producer gives us the advantages that come with volume, but value is what we hope differentiates us. By this, we don’t only mean higher value products like Lyocell or FinexTM but also the value we bring to communities, country, climate and customers.”

Globally, less than 1% of material used to produce clothing is recycled into new clothing. This presents a big opportunity for textile fibre recycling, particularly in China which is the largest textile producing country in the world. Last month, Sateri became a council member of the China Association of Circular Economy (CACE). The company will work closely with CACE’s Textile Waste Comprehensive Utilisation Committee to establish standards and promote industrial-scale textile waste recycling. Sateri is part of the Singapore-based RGE group of companies which has committed USD200 million into next-generation textile fibre innovation and technology.

28.05.2020

Tailorlux Obtains An Exclusive Patent License From NCR Corporation

Tailorlux, developer of hidden luminescent marking solutions that prove origin and protect the integrity of consumer and industrial textile products, announces that it has obtained a patent license from US-based NCR Corporation.

Under the associated agreement, Tailorlux received a field specific exclusive license under a family of NCR patents pursuant to which Tailorlux will make and sell its IntegriTEX® marking and detection solution for textiles to customers in the United States.

The solution is designed to support and protect Tailorlux clients by enabling reliable proof of origin for their fiber and textile products (including, e.g., Egyptian, PIMA and recycled cotton, recycled PET, special fibres, filaments and other premium materials), thereby authenticating the products and protecting against counterfeiting, mixing and blending. Tailorlux will pay ongoing licensing fees to NCR pursuant to undisclosed financial terms.

Tailorlux, developer of hidden luminescent marking solutions that prove origin and protect the integrity of consumer and industrial textile products, announces that it has obtained a patent license from US-based NCR Corporation.

Under the associated agreement, Tailorlux received a field specific exclusive license under a family of NCR patents pursuant to which Tailorlux will make and sell its IntegriTEX® marking and detection solution for textiles to customers in the United States.

The solution is designed to support and protect Tailorlux clients by enabling reliable proof of origin for their fiber and textile products (including, e.g., Egyptian, PIMA and recycled cotton, recycled PET, special fibres, filaments and other premium materials), thereby authenticating the products and protecting against counterfeiting, mixing and blending. Tailorlux will pay ongoing licensing fees to NCR pursuant to undisclosed financial terms.

More information:
Tailorlux
Source:

Tailorlux GmbH

Logo Bio2X
Fortums project Bio2X
07.05.2020

Atte Virtanen appointed Head of Business Development at Fortum Bio2X

Mr Atte Virtanen has been appointed Head of Business Development at the Fortum Bio2X bioeconomy programme as of 1 May 2020. Atte will play a key role in establishing Bio2X partnerships, helping partners to advance more sustainable businesses, as well as developing industrial biorefinery operations together with the programme team.

Before joining Fortum, Atte was working 10 years in the Netherlands for Trespa International B.V and in Italy for Arpa Industriale S.p.A. In both companies, he was leading R&D activities in the areas of cellulose materials and thermosetting resins. In addition, Atte gained experience from production environment during his time at Stora Enso’s Kotka mills, where he worked several years both in paper production and in a paper impregnating plant.

Over the years, Fortum Bio2X has built a team with a focus on research and development, including piloting different production technologies. The programme is now moving on to the next phase by developing competencies in operations and maintenance. As part of this phase, Atte will help to shift the attention to commercializing the biomass fractions.

Mr Atte Virtanen has been appointed Head of Business Development at the Fortum Bio2X bioeconomy programme as of 1 May 2020. Atte will play a key role in establishing Bio2X partnerships, helping partners to advance more sustainable businesses, as well as developing industrial biorefinery operations together with the programme team.

Before joining Fortum, Atte was working 10 years in the Netherlands for Trespa International B.V and in Italy for Arpa Industriale S.p.A. In both companies, he was leading R&D activities in the areas of cellulose materials and thermosetting resins. In addition, Atte gained experience from production environment during his time at Stora Enso’s Kotka mills, where he worked several years both in paper production and in a paper impregnating plant.

Over the years, Fortum Bio2X has built a team with a focus on research and development, including piloting different production technologies. The programme is now moving on to the next phase by developing competencies in operations and maintenance. As part of this phase, Atte will help to shift the attention to commercializing the biomass fractions.

The Bio2X programme is part of Fortum’s strategy to build options for significant new businesses that improve resource efficiency and provide smart solutions. It aims to be the straw refiner with superior material efficiency and a leading supplier of responsible textile fibres. Bio2X focuses on an efficient use of the cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin fractions in order to replace fossil or otherwise detrimental raw materials in numerous end-use applications.

More information:
Fortum Sustainability
Source:

Fortum Cooperations

Logo Mimaki
Mimaki starts to produce masks
29.04.2020

Energiapura: production of masks

Energiapura – Production of reusable, customised protective masks that are also fashion accessories

Energiapura – Production of reusable, customised protective masks that are also fashion accessories

  • The Italian company, a specialist manufacturer of functional sportswear, conducted research and began producing masks in response to the COVID-19 crisis
  • Using Mimaki sublimation printers, the masks can be customised, getting away from their connotation with hospitals and transforming them into a fashion accessory

From functional sportswear to combatting the spread of the Coronavirus: Energiapura, an Italian company has developed a mask that meets the Class I medical device requirements. The EP PA 2020 (Energiapura Pure Air) facial device, optimised for air filtering and breathability, provides protection while working, and can be reused. But Energiapura has gone even further, branding and customising the masks with sublimation printing.
The EP PA 2020 mask, compliant with 93/42 EEC Medical Devices – Class I washable, meets the essential requirements of UNI EN 14683:2019. Having redirected the manufacturing process, Energiapura is now stepping up production levels to meet the rising demand from hospitals, pharmacies, chemists, companies and consumers.

Pure Air, Energiapura’s mask
The EP PA 2020 is based on a functional concept: protection, breathability and reusability are the main principles. EP PA 2020 is made up of three layers of fabric: the first, the outer layer, is DWR-treated polyester, the second is TNT polyester, providing a filtering function, and the third, which comes into contact with the face, is polyester containing special fibres, such as coolmax and carbon.  Therefore it can be reused via normal washing and steam ironing, which also sterilises it.
The CEO of Enegiapura, Alberto Olivietto explains the idea of the customisation of the mask: “We wanted to disassociate our masks from the hospital image. By decorating them with company branding and designs provided by customers.” This is where the Mimaki JV300 wide-format printer comes in.

 

More information:
corona virus face masks
Source:

(c) Mimaki Europe B.V.