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Jean&Len | Nachhaltige Rucksäcke aus recycelten Materialen und veganem Leder (c) Jean&Len
Jean&Len Nachhaltige Rucksäcke
24.02.2021

Jean&Len | Nachhaltige Rucksäcke aus recycelten Materialen und veganem Leder

  • Rucksack aus der Flasche: Recycelte und vegane Alltagsbegleiter für unterwegs

Der recycelte Rucksack "Hamburg"
Der ideale Begleiter: Ob ins Büro, zur Uni, zum Kurz-Wander-Trip oder zum alltäglichen Shoppen, der neue Jean&Len Rucksack “Hamburg“ ist ein nachhaltiges 2-in-1-Multifunktionstalent mit jeder Menge organisiertem Stauraum. Ob als Rucksack oder Shopper getragen, überzeugt das aus recycelten PET-Flaschen produzierte Stauwunder mit seinem schlicht-modernem Design. Der lässige Rucksack lässt sich im Handumdrehen als Shopper verwenden: Einfach den Druckknopf der Träger lösen und schon verwandelt sich der Rucksack in eine lässige Shopper-Bag, die Du über der Schulter tragen kannst. Dank des wasserabweisenden Reißverschlussmechanismus und einer Imprägnierung, die schmutz- und nässeabweisend wirkt, hält der Rucksack Wind und Wetter stand. Der Rucksack “Hamburg“ ist in den Farben Graumeliert, Khaki, Navy-Blau oder Schwarz erhältlich.

  • Rucksack aus der Flasche: Recycelte und vegane Alltagsbegleiter für unterwegs

Der recycelte Rucksack "Hamburg"
Der ideale Begleiter: Ob ins Büro, zur Uni, zum Kurz-Wander-Trip oder zum alltäglichen Shoppen, der neue Jean&Len Rucksack “Hamburg“ ist ein nachhaltiges 2-in-1-Multifunktionstalent mit jeder Menge organisiertem Stauraum. Ob als Rucksack oder Shopper getragen, überzeugt das aus recycelten PET-Flaschen produzierte Stauwunder mit seinem schlicht-modernem Design. Der lässige Rucksack lässt sich im Handumdrehen als Shopper verwenden: Einfach den Druckknopf der Träger lösen und schon verwandelt sich der Rucksack in eine lässige Shopper-Bag, die Du über der Schulter tragen kannst. Dank des wasserabweisenden Reißverschlussmechanismus und einer Imprägnierung, die schmutz- und nässeabweisend wirkt, hält der Rucksack Wind und Wetter stand. Der Rucksack “Hamburg“ ist in den Farben Graumeliert, Khaki, Navy-Blau oder Schwarz erhältlich.

Das großzügige Hauptfach inklusive einem extra Laptopfach (bis 13,3 Zoll) bietet viel Stauraum für alle Essentials des Alltags. Ein kleineres Außenfach am Rücken eignet sich besonders für wertvolle Gegenstände, damit diese gleichzeitig griffbereit und sicher aufgehoben sind. Für den optimalen Tragekomfort sorgen eine Rückenpolsterung und verstellbare Träger.

Der vegane Rucksack "Kopenhagen"
Style-Upgrade: Der Rucksack „Kopenhagen“ ist ein stylischer und funktionaler Rucksack im begehrten Skandi-Style. Das creme-beige Außenmaterial aus veganem Leder ist schmutzabweisend und leicht zu reinigen. Laptops mit einer Größe von bis zu 13, 3 Zoll können im großzügigen Hauptfach mit extra gepolstertem Laptopfach verstaut werden, wertvolle Gegenstände wie Handys finden im Geheimfach am Rücken Platz.

Die Jean&Len Rücksäcke „Hamburg“ und „Kopenhagen“ sind ab sofort im Onlineshop unter www.jeanlen.de erhältlich.

Borealis und TOMRA eröffnen Pilotanalage für Kunststoff-Rezyklat (c) Borealis/TOMRA
14.01.2021

Borealis and TOMRA open plant for post-consumer plastic waste sorting and mechanical recycling

  • Demo plant sorts post-consumer plastic waste and will produce ready-for-market fully formulated polymer pellets
  • Brand owners and converters will be able to access material for qualification and market validation in early 2021
  • EverMinds™ in action: Pioneering collaboration brings together expertise vital to advancing the circular economy

Borealis and TOMRA have today announced the operational start of their advanced mechanical recycling demo plant in Lahnstein, Germany, the result of a partnership that marries chemistry with technology for unsurpassed results.

The state-of-the-art plant processes both rigid and flexible plastic waste from households. And unlike many current recycling plants, it will produce the advanced solutions necessary for use in high-demanding plastic applications in various industries, including automotive and consumer products. With high purity, low odour, high product consistency and light colour fractions, these Borcycle™ M grade recycled polymers will meet customer quality requirements across the value chain.

  • Demo plant sorts post-consumer plastic waste and will produce ready-for-market fully formulated polymer pellets
  • Brand owners and converters will be able to access material for qualification and market validation in early 2021
  • EverMinds™ in action: Pioneering collaboration brings together expertise vital to advancing the circular economy

Borealis and TOMRA have today announced the operational start of their advanced mechanical recycling demo plant in Lahnstein, Germany, the result of a partnership that marries chemistry with technology for unsurpassed results.

The state-of-the-art plant processes both rigid and flexible plastic waste from households. And unlike many current recycling plants, it will produce the advanced solutions necessary for use in high-demanding plastic applications in various industries, including automotive and consumer products. With high purity, low odour, high product consistency and light colour fractions, these Borcycle™ M grade recycled polymers will meet customer quality requirements across the value chain.

The purpose of this demo plant is to generate material for brand owners and converters to qualify, validate and prove fit for use in their highly demanding applications. Technical success will set the groundwork for a commercial-scale advanced recycling plant.

“This plant is just the beginning of what’s possible when key players in the value chain come together to make a truly significant impact in the market,” says Volker Rehrmann, Executive Vice President and Head of Circular Economy at TOMRA. “Having just launched the new Circular Economy Division, it is clear what a large role waste management and pivotal projects like this have on moving towards a sustainable future. We are proud to have initiated one of the most advanced mechanical recycling plants when it comes to post-consumer polymer waste. This will become an important enabler as we accelerate the transformation to a circular economy in the years to come, and we are excited to be a part of this pioneering project.”

Operation of the plant is a joint enterprise between Borealis, TOMRA and Zimmerman. Borealis is responsible for the plant’s commercial success and contributes its expertise and knowledge in innovation, recycling and compounding. Likewise, TOMRA contributes as a provider of technology-led solutions and brings its proven expertise, established process and market knowledge, which, in turn, enable the circular economy through advanced collection and sorting systems. Zimmerman is a waste management company with experience in sorting multiple types of waste, including plastics, and is responsible for successful plant operations and product quality.

“At P&G we are making packaging with the ‘next life’ in mind to help drive a more robust circular economy.  We must increase the supply of high quality recycled plastic to enable the industry to deliver on this vision,” says Gian De Belder, Procter & Gamble (P&G) Technical Director, R&D Packaging Sustainability. “The innovative new approach that Borealis is taking shows potential to step-change both the quantity and quality of PCR available for our brands, and help us to achieve our 2030 goal to reduce our use of virgin plastic in packaging by 50%, or 300 kilotonnes annually. Early tests of the material looks very promising!”

Source:

ikp

Sappi: A milestone in sustainable packaging (c)Sappi Europe
Based on the motto ‘Pro Planet: Paper Packaging – welcome to the new pack-age’, Sappi presents numerous opportunities for its customers to package their food or non-food products in sustainable, premium packaging.
12.01.2021

Sappi: A milestone in sustainable packaging

  • Sappi implements innovative barrier paper technology to increase production

Sappi will introduce new barrier coating technology for functional paper packaging at its speciality mill in Alfeld, Germany, strengthening its position as the leading global provider of sustainable paper packaging solutions. Explaining the decision, Berry Wiersum, CEO Sappi Europe stated: “Expanding the use of our proprietary barrier coating technology underpins Sappi’s drive to maintain our leading position in barrier coated paper as well the commitment we have with our customers in developing innovative future focused packaging solutions which contribute towards a sustainable future”

•    Investment in sustainable barrier coating technology
•    Comprehensive expertise in future focused functional paper packaging
•    Where performance meets environmental accountability

  • Sappi implements innovative barrier paper technology to increase production

Sappi will introduce new barrier coating technology for functional paper packaging at its speciality mill in Alfeld, Germany, strengthening its position as the leading global provider of sustainable paper packaging solutions. Explaining the decision, Berry Wiersum, CEO Sappi Europe stated: “Expanding the use of our proprietary barrier coating technology underpins Sappi’s drive to maintain our leading position in barrier coated paper as well the commitment we have with our customers in developing innovative future focused packaging solutions which contribute towards a sustainable future”

•    Investment in sustainable barrier coating technology
•    Comprehensive expertise in future focused functional paper packaging
•    Where performance meets environmental accountability

The demand for paper and paperboard packaging continues to rise dramatically as consumers become increasingly mindful of the impact their buying choices have on the environment.  The call for innovative, truly sustainable solutions has never been louder. Sappi is striving to support its customers to go beyond traditional film and foil-based material solutions, growing its products ranges to meet the demands of our ever-changing world. Working directly with brand owners Sappi seeks to create future-oriented circular solutions in line with growing collective global responsibilities.

The desire to continuously evolve to meet and exceed the business needs requires ongoing investment in innovation in order to create the solutions of tomorrow. Sappi’s acquisition of Rockwell Solutions has deepened the company’s barrier paper manufacturing knowledge. Adding barrier coater capacity at Alfeld Mill further upscales our capabilities, brings this unique combination of paper, dispersion and coating technology to more customers and enables Sappi to offer customers even more competitive and attractive paper packaging solutions.

Sappi has made great strides to provide future-focused products and services – matching and exceeding the needs of consumers now and in the future – delivering recyclable packaging solutions in line with the requirements of a circular economy. Environmental accountability is at the heart of both Sappi and its customers’ needs. Through this initiative Sappi will continue to challenge the conventional packaging industry with new ideas and solutions in order to make it easier for the world and the planet to follow a circular-economy strategy.

07.01.2021

DSM/Clariter: Chemischen Recyclinglösung für Dyneema®-basierte Endprodukte

Royal DSM, ein globales wissenschaftlich fundiertes Unternehmen für Ernährung, Gesundheit und nachhaltiges Leben, und Clariter, ein internationales Clean-Tech-Unternehmen, geben heute ihre strategische Partnerschaft bekannt. Gemeinsam wollen sie eine chemische Recyclinglösung der nächsten Generation für Produkte auf Basis von Dyneema® von DSM entwickeln, einer ultrahohen Molekülmasse (Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene, UHMWPE). Als erster Schritt dieser Partnerschaft wurde eine Reihe von Musterprodukten - darunter Seile, Netze und ballistische Materialien, die mit Dyneema® hergestellt wurden - in der Clariter-Pilotanlage in Polen erfolgreich umgewandelt. Dies demonstriert das Recycling-Potenzial von Dyneema® und unterstreicht das aktive Engagement von DSM Protective Materials zur Gestaltung einer nachhaltigeren Welt.

Royal DSM, ein globales wissenschaftlich fundiertes Unternehmen für Ernährung, Gesundheit und nachhaltiges Leben, und Clariter, ein internationales Clean-Tech-Unternehmen, geben heute ihre strategische Partnerschaft bekannt. Gemeinsam wollen sie eine chemische Recyclinglösung der nächsten Generation für Produkte auf Basis von Dyneema® von DSM entwickeln, einer ultrahohen Molekülmasse (Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene, UHMWPE). Als erster Schritt dieser Partnerschaft wurde eine Reihe von Musterprodukten - darunter Seile, Netze und ballistische Materialien, die mit Dyneema® hergestellt wurden - in der Clariter-Pilotanlage in Polen erfolgreich umgewandelt. Dies demonstriert das Recycling-Potenzial von Dyneema® und unterstreicht das aktive Engagement von DSM Protective Materials zur Gestaltung einer nachhaltigeren Welt.

Im Einklang mit seinen ehrgeizigen Nachhaltigkeitszielen und nach der erfolgreichen Einführung von biobasiertem Dyneema® (Massenausgleich) arbeitet DSM Protective Materials aktiv an Wiederverwendungs- und Recyclinglösungen für Dyneema®-basierte Produkte am Ende ihrer Lebensdauer. Um technische Recyclinglösungen voranzutreiben, sind DSM Protective Materials und Clariter eine Partnerschaft eingegangen. Gemeinsam soll die Machbarkeit der Verwendung von Dyneema® als Ausgangsmaterial im chemischen Recyclingprozess von Clariter getestet werden. Mit Dyneema® hergestellte Musterprodukte wurden in der Pilotanlage von Clariter in Polen unter Probe gestellt. Die positiven Ergebnisse bestätigen die technische Realisierbarkeit der Umwandlung von Dyneema®-basierten Endprodukten in hochwertige Produktfamilien in Industriequalität: Öle, Wachse und Lösungsmittel durch Clariters patentierten dreistufigen chemischen Recycling-Prozess. Diese können als Inhaltsstoffe zur Herstellung neuer End- und Verbraucherprodukte weiterverwendet werden.

In Zukunft werden DSM Protective Materials und Clariter diese Initiative weiter vorantreiben, um eine nachhaltigere Welt zu gestalten. Aufbauend auf dem Erfolg des Versuchs im Labormassstab hat Clariter für 2021 Versuche im kommerziellen Massstab in seiner Anlage in Südafrika geplant. Dies mit dem Ziel, aus Dyneema® gewonnenes Rohmaterial in den europäischen Grossanlagen zu verwenden, die in den kommenden Jahren gebaut werden sollen. Darüber hinaus wird DSM weiterhin aktiv die Möglichkeiten zur Reduzierung der Umweltauswirkungen von Dyneema® über alle Produktlebensphasen hinweg untersuchen.

Source:

EMG Marcom

Melchior stellt sich für eine nachhaltige Zukunft auf © MGC
MGC - Acabamentos Têxteis, die Muttergesellschaft und gleichzeitiger Veredlungspartner von Melchior Textil, erhielt im Dezember 2020 die STeP-Zertifizierung.
05.01.2021

Melchior stellt sich für eine nachhaltige Zukunft auf

  • Melchior Textil trägt den steigenden Anforderungen an eine seriöse, nachhaltige Produktion Rechnung: Die Muttergesellschaft und gleichzeitiger Veredlungspartner des Unternehmens, die MGC - Acabamentos Têxteis (Ronfe/Portugal), wurde am 9. Dezember 2020 mit dem international anerkannten STeP by Oeko-Tex-Zertifikat ausgezeichnet.

„Das Interesse der Berufskleidungsbranche an nachhaltig produzierten Textilien ist in den vergangenen Jahren deutlich gestiegen. Mit Geweben aus Tencel- und recycelten Polyesterfasern haben wir bereits in der Vergangenheit auf die Nachfrage reagiert. Nun haben wir den Service für unsere Kunden noch einmal umfassend erweitert: Unsere Muttergesellschaft MGC- Acabamentos Têxteis wurde am 9. Dezember 2020 mit dem anerkannten Siegel „Sustainable Textile Production by Oeko-Tex“ (STeP) zertifiziert. Dieses Label ist eine der Vorbedingungen für eine Auszeichnung nachhaltig hergestellter Bekleidung, weshalb die Kollektionen unserer Kunden ab sofort für seröse, international anerkannte Textilsiegel akkreditiert werden können“, freuen sich die beiden Geschäftsführer von Melchior Textil, Manfred Seeber und Dietmar Rohrbach.

  • Melchior Textil trägt den steigenden Anforderungen an eine seriöse, nachhaltige Produktion Rechnung: Die Muttergesellschaft und gleichzeitiger Veredlungspartner des Unternehmens, die MGC - Acabamentos Têxteis (Ronfe/Portugal), wurde am 9. Dezember 2020 mit dem international anerkannten STeP by Oeko-Tex-Zertifikat ausgezeichnet.

„Das Interesse der Berufskleidungsbranche an nachhaltig produzierten Textilien ist in den vergangenen Jahren deutlich gestiegen. Mit Geweben aus Tencel- und recycelten Polyesterfasern haben wir bereits in der Vergangenheit auf die Nachfrage reagiert. Nun haben wir den Service für unsere Kunden noch einmal umfassend erweitert: Unsere Muttergesellschaft MGC- Acabamentos Têxteis wurde am 9. Dezember 2020 mit dem anerkannten Siegel „Sustainable Textile Production by Oeko-Tex“ (STeP) zertifiziert. Dieses Label ist eine der Vorbedingungen für eine Auszeichnung nachhaltig hergestellter Bekleidung, weshalb die Kollektionen unserer Kunden ab sofort für seröse, international anerkannte Textilsiegel akkreditiert werden können“, freuen sich die beiden Geschäftsführer von Melchior Textil, Manfred Seeber und Dietmar Rohrbach.

Voraussetzung für Berufskleidungskollektionen mit Nachhaltigkeitsprädikat

Für die Zertifizierung nach STeP hat MGC - Acabamentos Têxteis, Muttergesellschaft und Veredlungspartner von Melchior Textil, strenge Vorgaben in den Bereichen Chemikalien-, Umwelt und Qualitätsmanagement, soziale Verantwortung sowie Gesundheitsschutz und Arbeitssicherheit erfüllt. Die Auszeichnung mit dem seriösen, selbst durch Greenpeace anerkannten Standard war der krönende Abschluss einer intensiven Vorbereitung. Das Zertifikat ist nun für drei Jahre gültig.

 

Source:

Textilberatung Hamburg

Lamme Textielbeheer supports "Dibella up" with tons of laundry. (c) Lamme Textile Management
Six tons of bed linen, towels and napkins on the way to a new "life". Owner Jan Lamme (left) and Assistant Operations Manager Frank David are collecting for more sustainability in the textile service.
09.12.2020

Lamme Textielbeheer supports "Dibella up" with tons of laundry.

  • "Dibella up" records its first big success

Aalten, "Dibella up" is bearing its first fruits. Since the launch of the recycling concept initiated in August 2020, six tons of sorted laundry items have already been returned to Dibella and converted into new ones by the company in farsighted reuse projects. The customer who has been involved in the project from the very beginning is Lamme Textielbeheer from Nederhorst den Berg. The Dutch textile service provider sees the initiative as an important measure for more appreciation of resources.

  • "Dibella up" records its first big success

Aalten, "Dibella up" is bearing its first fruits. Since the launch of the recycling concept initiated in August 2020, six tons of sorted laundry items have already been returned to Dibella and converted into new ones by the company in farsighted reuse projects. The customer who has been involved in the project from the very beginning is Lamme Textielbeheer from Nederhorst den Berg. The Dutch textile service provider sees the initiative as an important measure for more appreciation of resources.

Dibella has taken the closed-loop approach of the textile service as a model and has taken a step towards a completely closed cycle with the "Dibella up" project. The system includes unlimited reuse and recycling of the fibre raw materials bound in the textiles. To this end, the company's own textile qualities, which are selected from laundries, are taken back and passed on to selected upcycling projects. Polyester-cotton blended fabrics are processed there into high-quality bags. Pure natural fibre textiles as well as blended fabrics with at least 50 percent cotton are chemically converted into an important raw material for cellulose fibre production, while the remaining polyester is still being thermally recycled for technical reasons.

Six tons of laundry from the Netherlands

Lamme Textielbeheer was immediately enthusiastic about the "Dibella up" initiative. The committed company has been involved in various Dibella sustainability projects for many years and recognises the future-oriented character of the new project. "Our will to cooperate was immediately clear after Dibella's managing director Ralf Hellmann presented the upcycling project, because we see it as an important measure for the prudent use of resources," reports Jan Lamme, managing director of the company of the same name. "Within a very short period of time, we therefore jointly started to take back our discarded, no longer usable old textiles. In this way, we have already been able to return six tonnes of laundry for a new product cycle. This corresponds exactly to our idea of upcycling!". "Dibella provides stable, reusable cartons for shipping," says a delighted Frank David, Lamme's Assistant Operations Manager. "This makes collection much easier for us and we don't have to take any means of transport out of our laundry".

Prepared for the mega-trend of recycling management

Dibella would like to build on the initial joint success and further expand the initiative for a closed textile cycle in the industry. "The awareness of sustainability is high in the textile rental service. But the next mega-trend is already emerging. The future lies in closed-loop recycling. With "Dibella up", we are offering our customers the opportunity to get involved now and make resources usable in the long term. We are happy about every new cooperation partner who appreciates the value of textiles as much as we do".

Source:

Dibella b.v.

Flax for Composites: Woven tapes made of natural fibres by vombaur (c) Elke Wetzig, Wikimedia
Lightweight, firm, sustainable: Flax tape by vombaur
02.12.2020

Flax for Composites: Woven tapes made of natural fibres by vombaur

Flax has accompanied people for thousands of years, in linen fabrics, in ropes, as insulation material. And until the present day. With woven tapes made of flax, vombaur makes the functional and ecological advantages of natural fibres available for lightweight design.

Lightweight and firm
Flax fibres are particularly rigid and tear-proof. Textiles made of the natural material therefore give natural fibre reinforced plastic (NFP) special stability. Additionally, flax has a low density. The components thus combine high rigidity and strength with low weight. Another functional plus: natural fibre reinforced plastics are less prone to splintering than glass fibre reinforced plastics.

Sustainable material
The cultivation of flax binds CO2 and the production of NFP generates 33 percent lower CO2 emissions than conventional fibre reinforced plastics. The energy consumption is 40 percent lower. This reduces production costs and improves the material's CO2 footprint. Punch-packing arguments for natural fibre tapes – like flax tape by vombaur – in lightweight design applications.

Flax has accompanied people for thousands of years, in linen fabrics, in ropes, as insulation material. And until the present day. With woven tapes made of flax, vombaur makes the functional and ecological advantages of natural fibres available for lightweight design.

Lightweight and firm
Flax fibres are particularly rigid and tear-proof. Textiles made of the natural material therefore give natural fibre reinforced plastic (NFP) special stability. Additionally, flax has a low density. The components thus combine high rigidity and strength with low weight. Another functional plus: natural fibre reinforced plastics are less prone to splintering than glass fibre reinforced plastics.

Sustainable material
The cultivation of flax binds CO2 and the production of NFP generates 33 percent lower CO2 emissions than conventional fibre reinforced plastics. The energy consumption is 40 percent lower. This reduces production costs and improves the material's CO2 footprint. Punch-packing arguments for natural fibre tapes – like flax tape by vombaur – in lightweight design applications.

Circular Economy
Circular Economy – this also works in lightweight design. The number of recycling cycles without loss of quality is higher for natural fibre reinforced plastics than for glass or carbon fibre reinforced plastics: the thermoplastic matrix of the composite can be melted and recycled after a product life cycle. The natural fibres can "live on" in other products – injection moulded products for example.

Versatile applications
"Composites from our flax tapes are used to reinforce high-tech skis as well as for extruding state-of-the-art window sections – the applications are countless," explains Tomislav Josipovic, Sales Manager with vombaur. "As a development partner, we support applications for the automotive, wind energy, construction, sports and many other industries with our composite textiles."

More information:
vombaur Naturfasern Composites
Source:

stotz-design.com

DITF: Nachhaltige Leuchten aus Papiergarn (c) quintessence design
Demonstratorleuchte „THIRTY-ONE”
12.11.2020

DITF: Nachhaltige Leuchten aus Papiergarn

  • Lichterlebnisse leicht wie Papier
  • Wohlfühlatmosphäre mit Leuchten aus Papiergarn - ökologisch und nachhaltig

Papier ist ein nachwachsender Rohstoff, ist nahezu überall verfügbar und kann recycelt werden. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) haben diesen natürlichen Werkstoff in Form von Papiergarnen verarbeitet und daraus formschöne Leuchten entwickelt. Das Ergebnis des Forschungsprojekts „Papierlicht“ sind nachhaltige Produkte mit ansprechendem Design, die kostengünstig hergestellt werden können. Die Leuchten sind voll recycelfähig.

Der Klimaschutz und die Umweltbelastung durch Mikroplastik erfordern neue Ideen, wie nachwachsende Ressourcen sinnvoll genutzt werden können. Die Forscher an den DITF haben Papiergarn mit Hilfe der Strukturspultechnologie zu sehr leichten Strukturkörpern verarbeitet. Der Herstellungsprozess ist so flexibel, dass viele verschiedene Formen möglich sind und das Licht je nach Anwendungsgebiet unterschiedlich gelenkt werden kann. Die entsprechenden lichttechnischen Kennwerte wurden an den DITF ermittelt.

  • Lichterlebnisse leicht wie Papier
  • Wohlfühlatmosphäre mit Leuchten aus Papiergarn - ökologisch und nachhaltig

Papier ist ein nachwachsender Rohstoff, ist nahezu überall verfügbar und kann recycelt werden. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) haben diesen natürlichen Werkstoff in Form von Papiergarnen verarbeitet und daraus formschöne Leuchten entwickelt. Das Ergebnis des Forschungsprojekts „Papierlicht“ sind nachhaltige Produkte mit ansprechendem Design, die kostengünstig hergestellt werden können. Die Leuchten sind voll recycelfähig.

Der Klimaschutz und die Umweltbelastung durch Mikroplastik erfordern neue Ideen, wie nachwachsende Ressourcen sinnvoll genutzt werden können. Die Forscher an den DITF haben Papiergarn mit Hilfe der Strukturspultechnologie zu sehr leichten Strukturkörpern verarbeitet. Der Herstellungsprozess ist so flexibel, dass viele verschiedene Formen möglich sind und das Licht je nach Anwendungsgebiet unterschiedlich gelenkt werden kann. Die entsprechenden lichttechnischen Kennwerte wurden an den DITF ermittelt.

Aus den Papiergarnen werden mit einer neuartigen Methode dreidimensionale Körper gefertigt. Die Garne werden mit einem Klebstoff fixiert, der ebenfalls aus nachwachsenden und abbaubaren Rohstoffen besteht. Auf die sonst übliche tragende Grundstruktur aus Metall kann verzichtet werden. Das hat mehrere Vorteile für die Umwelt: Durch den Wegfall von Draht entsteht bei der Herstellung weniger Kohlenstoffdioxid. Bei der von den DITF entwickelten Leuchte THIRTY-ONE werden dadurch mehr als zwei Kilogramm CO2-Äquivalente eingespart – pro Stück!
Ohne Metallstruktur wiegen die Papierlampen auch deutlich weniger und können leichter transportiert werden. Nach der Nutzung können die Leuchten in das Kreislaufsystem eingebracht werden.

Das Forschungsteam hat drei Demonstratorleuchten aufgebaut die zeigen, was für Möglichkeiten unterschiedliche Garnstärken, Farben und die verschieden gespulten Strukturen eröffnen. Darüber hinaus zeigen die ermittelten mechanischen Kennwerte heute schon ein großes Potential für die Nutzung in anderen Anwendungsfeldern wie beispielsweise Konstruktionsbauteile. Hierfür stehen an den DITF viele Funktionsmuster zur Verfügung.

Lenzing: Stefan Doboczky (CEO) (c) Lenzing
Lenzing: Stefan Doboczky (CEO)
09.11.2020

Canopy ranking: Lenzing for the first time achieves highest Hot Button category

The Lenzing Group scored a total of 30.5 points (4 points more compared to last year) and received for the first time a leading dark green shirt, the highest Hot Button ranking category. Lenzing once again convinced the non-profit organization Canopy with its innovative vision with regard to circular economy and REFIBRA™ technology, its high level of transparency in wood and pulp sourcing, as well as its active contribution towards protecting forests and preserving biodiversity.

In this widely recognized ranking, Canopy grades the world’s 31 largest producers of wood-based fibers with respect to their sustainable wood and pulp sourcing, their efforts with regard to using alternative non-wood feedstock and their achievements for lasting conservation in critical forests round the globe.

The Lenzing Group scored a total of 30.5 points (4 points more compared to last year) and received for the first time a leading dark green shirt, the highest Hot Button ranking category. Lenzing once again convinced the non-profit organization Canopy with its innovative vision with regard to circular economy and REFIBRA™ technology, its high level of transparency in wood and pulp sourcing, as well as its active contribution towards protecting forests and preserving biodiversity.

In this widely recognized ranking, Canopy grades the world’s 31 largest producers of wood-based fibers with respect to their sustainable wood and pulp sourcing, their efforts with regard to using alternative non-wood feedstock and their achievements for lasting conservation in critical forests round the globe.

Leading in sustainable sourcing with a decade-long clean record
Wood and pulp are the most important raw materials for Lenzing’s sustainable production of cellulosic fibers. The Lenzing Group is particularly proud of its decade-long clean record of sustainable wood sourcing, evidenced by its long-standing credible commitment to wood certification, which Lenzing pioneered already in the 1990s. Lenzing’s commercial wood sources are  100 percent either certified by FSC® or PEFC™, or controlled in line with FSC® standards.

Social impact and afforestation project in Albania
At the backdrop of Lenzing’s long history of clean sourcing, the company is even more aware that the global forests are seriously threatened by illegal logging and deforestation but also by the consequences of climate change. This is why Lenzing – in addition to supporting a number of Canopy’s conservation projects – has set up a social impact and afforestation project in Albania (Southern Europe).*

Special focus on sustainable plantations in Brazil
For its latest investment in a pulp mill in Brazil, Lenzing actively collaborates with Canopy to ensure that the wood sourcing is in line with sustainable practices. The plant will be among the highest productive and energy-efficient facilities in the world and will feed the 40 percent excess bioelectricity generated on site as “green energy” into the public grid.*

REFIBRA™ technology: Commercially available since 2017
As a long-standing player in the industry, Lenzing has undertaken extensive research into many different alternative non-wood cellulose sources such as annual plants, like hemp, straw, and bamboo. Until now, textile waste has turned out to be the most promising alternative feedstock for scaled commercial use.
Lenzing’s lyocell fiber produced with the breakthrough REFIBRA™ technology (Eco Cycle technology for nonwoven applications) uses textile waste as part of the feedstock and is an important step towards a circular economy.*

50 percent recycled content by 2024
It is Lenzing’s vision to make textile waste recycling a common standard process like paper recycling and to offer fibers produced with REFIBRA™ technology with up to 50 percent recycled content from post-consumer waste by 2024.

 

*Please read attached document for more information

More information:
Lenzing Canopy Sustainability Refibra
Source:

Lenzing

Anlagentechnik zum Carbonfaser-Recycling im Zentrum für Textilen Leichtbau am STFI, Foto: Dirk Hanus.
28.10.2020

Innovationen beim Recycling von Carbonfasern

  • Kohlenstoff mit mehreren Leben

Geht es um die Zukunft der motorisierten Mobilität, reden alle vom Antrieb: Wie viel E-Auto, wie viel Verbrenner verträgt die Umwelt und braucht der Mensch? Zugleich stellen neue Antriebe erhöhte Anforderungen nicht nur an den Motor, sondern auch an dessen Gehäuse und die Karosse: Für solch anspruchsvolle Anwendungen kommen häufig Carbonfasern zum Einsatz. Wie der Antrieb der Zukunft, sollten auch die Werkstoffe am Fahrzeug umweltfreundlich sein. Deshalb ist Recycling von Carbonfasern gefragt. Lösungen dafür haben Institute der Zuse-Gemeinschaft entwickelt.

  • Kohlenstoff mit mehreren Leben

Geht es um die Zukunft der motorisierten Mobilität, reden alle vom Antrieb: Wie viel E-Auto, wie viel Verbrenner verträgt die Umwelt und braucht der Mensch? Zugleich stellen neue Antriebe erhöhte Anforderungen nicht nur an den Motor, sondern auch an dessen Gehäuse und die Karosse: Für solch anspruchsvolle Anwendungen kommen häufig Carbonfasern zum Einsatz. Wie der Antrieb der Zukunft, sollten auch die Werkstoffe am Fahrzeug umweltfreundlich sein. Deshalb ist Recycling von Carbonfasern gefragt. Lösungen dafür haben Institute der Zuse-Gemeinschaft entwickelt.

Carbonfasern, auch als Kohlenstofffasern oder verkürzt als Kohlefasern bekannt, bestehen fast vollständig aus reinem Kohlenstoff. Sehr energieaufwändig wird er bei 1.300 Grad Celsius aus dem Kunststoff Polyacrylnitril gewonnen. Die Vorteile der Carbonfasern: Sie haben kaum Eigengewicht, sind enorm bruchfest und stabil. Solche Eigenschaften benötigt man z.B. am Batteriekasten von E-Mobilen oder in Strukturbauteilen der Karosserie. So arbeitet das Sächsische Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI) aktuell gemeinsam mit Industriepartnern daran, statisch-mechanische Stärken der Carbonfasern mit Eigenschaften zur Schwingungsdämpfung zu verknüpfen, um die Gehäuse von E-Motoren im Auto zu verbessern. Angedacht ist in dem vom Bundeswirtschaftsministerium geförderten Projekt die Entwicklung sogenannter Hybridvliesstoffe, die neben der Carbonfaser als Verstärkung weitere Faserstoffe enthalten. „Wir wollen, die Vorteile unterschiedlicher Faserstoffe verbinden und so ein optimal auf die Anforderungen abgestimmtes Produkt entwickeln“, erläutert Marcel Hofmann, STFI-Abteilungsleiter Textiler Leichtbau.

Damit würden die Chemnitzer Forschenden bisherige Vliesstoff-Lösungen ergänzen. Sie blicken auf eine 15-jährige Geschichte in der Arbeit mit recycelten Carbonfasern zurück. Der globale Jahresbedarf der hochwertigen Fasern hat sich im vergangenen Jahrzehnt fast vervierfacht, laut Angaben der Industrievereinigung AVK auf zuletzt rd. 142.000 t. „Die steigende Nachfrage hat das Recycling immer stärker in den Fokus gerückt“, betont Hofmann. Carbonfaserabfälle sind ihm zufolge für etwa ein Zehntel bis ein Fünftel des Preises von Primärfasern erhältlich, müssen aber noch aufbereitet werden. Dreh- und Angelpunkt für den Forschungserfolg der recycelten Fasern sind konkurrenzfähige Anwendungen. Die hat das STFI nicht nur am Auto, sondern auch im Sport-Freizeitsektor sowie in der Medizintechnik gefunden, so in Komponenten für Computertomographen. "Während Metalle oder Glasfasern als potenzielle Konkurrenzprodukte Schatten werfen, stört Carbon die Bilddarstellung nicht und kann seine Vorteile voll ausspielen“, erläutert Hofmann.

Papier-Knowhow nutzen
Können recycelte Carbonfasern nochmals den Produktkreislauf durchlaufen, verbessert das ihre CO2-Bilanz deutlich. Zugleich gilt: Je kürzer die Carbonfasern, desto unattraktiver sind sie für die weitere Verwertung. Vor diesem Hintergrund entwickelten das Forschungsinstitut Cetex und die Papiertechnische Stiftung (PTS), beide Mitglieder der Zuse-Gemeinschaft, im Rahmen eines Forschungsvorhabens ein neues Verfahren, das bislang wenig geeignet erscheinende Recycling-Carbonfasern ein zweites Produktleben gibt. „Während klassische Textilverfahren die ohnehin sehr spröden Recycling-Carbonfasern in Faserlängen von mind. 80 mm trocken verarbeiten, beschäftigten wir uns mit einem Verfahren aus der Papierindustrie, welches die Materialien nass verarbeitet. Am Ende des Prozesses erhielten wir, stark vereinfacht gesprochen, eine flächige Matte aus recycelten Carbonfasern und Kunststofffasern“, erläutert Cetex-Projektingenieur Johannes Tietze das Verfahren, mit dem auch 40 mm kurze Carbonfasern zu attraktiven Zwischenprodukten recycelt werden können. Das danach in einem Heißpressprozess entstandene Erzeugnis dient als Grundmaterial für hochbelastbare Strukturbauteile. Zusätzlich wurden die mechanischen Eigenschaften der Halbzeuge durch die Kombination mit endlosfaserverstärkten Tapes verbessert. Das Recyclingprodukt soll, so die Erwartung der Forschenden, glasfaserverstärkten Kunststoffen, Konkurrenz machen, z.B. bei Anwendungen im Schienen- und Fahrzeugbau. Die Ergebnisse fließen nun in weiterführende Forschung und Entwicklung im Kooperationsnetzwerk Ressourcetex ein, einem geförderten Verbund von 18 Partnern aus Industrie und Wissenschaft.

Erfolgreiche Umsetzung in der Autoindustrie
Industriereife Lösungen für die Verwertung von Carbonfaser-Produktionsabfällen werden im Thüringischen Institut für Textil- und Kunststoff-Forschung Rudolstadt (TITK) entwickelt. Mehrere dieser Entwicklungen wurden mit Partnern beim Unternehmen SGL Composites in Wackersdorf industriell umgesetzt. Die Aufbereitung der so genannten trockenen Abfälle, hauptsächlich aus Verschnittresten, erfolgt nach einem eigenen Verfahren. „Dabei führen wir die geöffneten Fasern verschiedenen Prozessen zur Vliesherstellung zu“, sagt die zuständige Abteilungsleiterin im TITK, Dr. Renate Lützkendorf. Neben den Entwicklungen für den Einsatz z.B. im BMW i3 in Dach oder Hintersitzschale wurden im TITK spezielle Vliesstoffe und Verfahren für die Herstellung von Sheet Molding Compounds (SMC) etabliert, das sind duroplastische Werkstoffe, die aus Reaktionsharzen und Verstärkungsfasern bestehen und zum Pressen von Faser-Kunststoff-Verbunden verwendet werden. Eingang fand dies z.B. in einem Bauteil für die C-Säule des 7er BMW. „In seinen Projekten setzt das TITK vor allem auf die Entwicklung leistungsfähigerer Prozesse und kombinierter Verfahren, um den Carbonfaser-Recyclingmaterialien auch von den Kosten her bessere Chancen in Leichtbauanwendungen einzuräumen“, betont Lützkendorf. So liege der Fokus gegenwärtig auf dem Einsatz von CF-Recyclingfasern in thermoplastischen Prozessen zur Platten- und Profilextrusion. „Ziel ist es, die Kombination von Kurz- und Endlosfaserverstärkung in einem einzigen, leistungsfähigen Prozess-Schritt zu realisieren.“

Source:

Deutsche Industrieforschungsgemeinschaft Konrad Zuse e.V.

Lenzing Logo (c) Lenzing Group
29.09.2020

Lenzing is founding partner of the Renewable Carbon Initiative

Eleven leading companies from six countries founded the Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI) in September 2020 under the leadership of nova-Institute (Germany). The aim of the initiative is to support and speed up the transition from fossil carbon to renewable carbon for all organic chemicals and materials.

Besides Lenzing, these ten companies are founding members of the RCI, which also form the Core Advisory Board: Beiersdorf (Germany), Cosun Beet Company (The Netherlands), Covestro (Germany), Henkel (Germany), LanzaTech (USA), NESTE (Finland), SHV Energy (The Netherlands), Stahl (The Netherlands), Unilever (UK) and UPM (Finland).

Eleven leading companies from six countries founded the Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI) in September 2020 under the leadership of nova-Institute (Germany). The aim of the initiative is to support and speed up the transition from fossil carbon to renewable carbon for all organic chemicals and materials.

Besides Lenzing, these ten companies are founding members of the RCI, which also form the Core Advisory Board: Beiersdorf (Germany), Cosun Beet Company (The Netherlands), Covestro (Germany), Henkel (Germany), LanzaTech (USA), NESTE (Finland), SHV Energy (The Netherlands), Stahl (The Netherlands), Unilever (UK) and UPM (Finland).

The Renewable Carbon Initiative (RCI) addresses the core problem of climate change, which is extracting and using additional fossil carbon from the ground. The vision is stated clearly: By 2050, fossil carbon shall be completely substituted by renewable carbon, which is carbon from alternative sources: biomass, direct CO2 utilisation and recycling. The founders are convinced that this is the only way for chemicals, plastics and other organic materials to become sustainable, climate-friendly and part of the circular economy – part of the future.

Robert van de Kerkhof, Chief Commercial Officer of the Lenzing Group: „We at Lenzing believe that we need to create strategic partnerships to implement systemic change. Therefore, we support the Renewable Carbon Initiative. First of all, because it is the right thing to do and, second, it is also fully aligned with our corporate strategy. Therefore, we are part of the RCI from the beginning and its commitment to start acting now.”

Michael Carus, CEO of nova-Institute and head of the Renewable Carbon Initiative: “This is about a fundamental change in the chemical industry. Just as the energy industry is being converted to renewable energies, so renewable carbon will become the new foundation of the future chemical and material industry. The initiative starts today and will be visibly present from now on. We want to accelerate the change.”

The main avenues on which the initiative wants to deliver change are threefold. One, the initiative strives to create cross-industry platforms that will demonstrate feasibility of renewable carbon in tangible activities. Two, one main target will be to advocate for legislation, taxation and regulation changes to give renewable carbon a level commercial playing field to play on. Finally, the third avenue will be to create a wider pull for sustainable options by raising awareness and understanding of renewable carbon level amongst the business community and the wider public.

The Renewable Carbon Initiative has made a powerful start with eleven international member companies and the personal support of more than 100 industry experts. The initiative hopes to gain many additional members and supporters in the upcoming months to keep the strong momentum of the initiative. Working together, RCI will support and accelerate the transition from fossil to renewable carbon for all organic chemicals and materials.

In the end, the aim is as complex as it is simple: renewable energy and renewable carbon for a sustainable future. Within the RCI Lenzing will especially focus on further greening up the textile and nonwoven businesses. Here we will promote this concept and encourage our partners to become a part of this vision.

More information about the Renewable Carbon Initiative can be found on www.renewable-carbon-initiative.com.

More information:
Lenzing Group nova Institute
Source:

Lenzing Group

VacuFil (c) Oerlikon
24.09.2020

Recycling becomes a focus

Mountains of waste, plastic-infested oceans, negative CO2 footprints – the need for more sustainable ways of living has never been more urgent. Consequently, it is logical that recycling solutions are becoming increasingly important within the textile industry. This was also tapped into at the first virtual Global Fiber Congress in Dornbirn with a session that focused specifically on the topic. In front of around 400 participants, Markus Reichwein, Head of Product Management at Oerlikon Barmag, also spoke about solutions currently on the market.

As one of only manufactureres, the Oerlikon Group’s Manmade Fibers segment offers the entire mechanical recycling chain –from preparing the recycled materials, producing the melt all the way through to the textured package. Here, the company utilizes the VacuFil solution supplied by its subsidiary Barmag Brückner Engineering (BBE) –which, in addition to mastering bottle-to-bottle and bottle-to-textile processes, is also able to process textile waste into chips. This permits the running of textile production operations very much in line with the zero-waste philosophy.

Mountains of waste, plastic-infested oceans, negative CO2 footprints – the need for more sustainable ways of living has never been more urgent. Consequently, it is logical that recycling solutions are becoming increasingly important within the textile industry. This was also tapped into at the first virtual Global Fiber Congress in Dornbirn with a session that focused specifically on the topic. In front of around 400 participants, Markus Reichwein, Head of Product Management at Oerlikon Barmag, also spoke about solutions currently on the market.

As one of only manufactureres, the Oerlikon Group’s Manmade Fibers segment offers the entire mechanical recycling chain –from preparing the recycled materials, producing the melt all the way through to the textured package. Here, the company utilizes the VacuFil solution supplied by its subsidiary Barmag Brückner Engineering (BBE) –which, in addition to mastering bottle-to-bottle and bottle-to-textile processes, is also able to process textile waste into chips. This permits the running of textile production operations very much in line with the zero-waste philosophy.

VacuFil ensures a stable process in the case of recycled quality yarns
The reliable removal of contaminants is vital for a stable and efficient spinning process and outstanding yarn quality. At the same time, stable operating conditions with minimal fluctuations are essential. The greatest challenge here is the differing qualities of the bottle flakes fed into the system, as the extrusion process is barely able to balance these fluctuations. Here, the VacuFil concept counters with blending silos, which reduce the differences in the viscosity of the polymers considerably and guarantee high yarn and fabric quality.

The VacuFil concept is installed upstream to an Oerlikon Barmag POY system, which transforms the recycled melt into filament yarn of the accustomed high quality. As texturing solutions, Oerlikon Barmag offers its state-of-the-art automatic eAFK-series systems, including the latest generation of the eAFK Evo, which was unveiled at the ITMA Barcelona last year. Yarn manufacturers wishing to continue texturing manually can use the eFK series.

With the VarioFil R+, producers of smaller batches now also have a compact system with an integrated recycled materials preparation unit at their disposal. The system offers a special extrusion system for bottle flake materials, the very latest metering and mixing technology for spin-dying and expanded 2-stage melt filtration. The four spinning positions are each equipped with an Oerlikon Barmag 10-end WINGS POY winder.

While mechanical recycling has already been extensively developed, chemical recycling for mixed fabrics is still presenting the textile industry with huge challenges. The Oerlikon Group’s Manmade Fibers segment is currently working on solutions and concepts for transforming these fabrics into new textiles.

 

More information:
Oerlikon Sustainability Yarns
Source:

Oerlikon

Bio Composites Procedure (c) AZL Aachen GmbH
24.09.2020

Starting market and technology study on the Potential for bio-based composite materials

Sustainability and environmental responsibility are important developments for the current design of productions and products. In order to obtain a comprehensive evaluation of the potential of bio-based composites, the AZL, together with an industry consortium, is investigating the market potential, future applications and relevant technologies for bio-based composite materials. The 5-month market and technology study will start on October 22nd, 2020 and is open to interested companies. Companies such as REHAU, an Automotive Tier 1, Asahi Kasei, Johns Manville, Mahr Metering Systems and several material manufacturers are participating in the study.

Bio-plastics are well established in industry, especially in packaging applications. The market for biopolymers is expected to grow from USD 10.5 billion in 2020 to USD 27.9 billion in 2025. At the same time, bio-based raw materials, such as natural fibers, are available on the market in a cost-effective manner. Composites with wood or natural fiber content are also increasingly used in products.

Sustainability and environmental responsibility are important developments for the current design of productions and products. In order to obtain a comprehensive evaluation of the potential of bio-based composites, the AZL, together with an industry consortium, is investigating the market potential, future applications and relevant technologies for bio-based composite materials. The 5-month market and technology study will start on October 22nd, 2020 and is open to interested companies. Companies such as REHAU, an Automotive Tier 1, Asahi Kasei, Johns Manville, Mahr Metering Systems and several material manufacturers are participating in the study.

Bio-plastics are well established in industry, especially in packaging applications. The market for biopolymers is expected to grow from USD 10.5 billion in 2020 to USD 27.9 billion in 2025. At the same time, bio-based raw materials, such as natural fibers, are available on the market in a cost-effective manner. Composites with wood or natural fiber content are also increasingly used in products.

Dr. Michael Emonts, Managing Partner of AZL: "Together with our partner companies we want to identify hidden business potential for composites with bio-based materials. To do so, we will reapply our established approach for market and technology studies: Based on a detailed market analysis, we will dive deep into the technological evaluation of technologies, applications and business cases.”

Based on a detailed market segmentation, AZL's technology experts analyze the various market segments in terms of their size, growth potential, relevant players and existing and future applications. For the identified applications, the participants in the study will receive detailed insight into the respective technical and legal requirements as well as an overview of value chains, processes and materials. In the following, the strengths and challenges of bio-composites compared to conventional materials are elaborated. The consortium will select the components with the highest potential, for which suitable production scenarios will be developed and analyzed in terms of costs in a business case analysis.

"We are participating in the AZL study to identify and evaluate new product areas with bio-materials. The technological analyses of the AZL studies have already helped us in the past to initiate new developments," says Dr. Steven Schmidt, Director Technology Platforms Materials at REHAU, explaining the motivation for working with the AZL and the industry consortium. "As one of the 50 Sustainability & Climate Leaders, we at REHAU are incorporating environmentally friendly materials into more and more products. Wherever the company is active - from the furniture and construction industries to the automotive industry - REHAU is already developing and manufacturing high-quality products from recycled raw materials. By 2025, REHAU plans to increase its recycling rate across the Group to significantly more than 15 percent and at the same time reduce CO2 emissions by at least 30 percent," adds Dr. Steven Schmidt.

Bio-composites will also be the topic of the upcoming Lightweight TechTalk by AZL on September 29, 2020. Experts from industry and academia will give technology and market insights on sustainability and recycling of composites in 6 presentations. Registration is free of charge at: https://azl-aachen-gmbh.de/termine/recycling-of-composites/.

The kick-off of the project will take place on October 22nd, 2020 in the form of a video conference. Further background information on the project can be found under the following link: https://azl-aachen-gmbh.de/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/2020-251_OP_Bio-Bases_Composites.pdf

(c) Sateri
23.09.2020

FINEXTM Reaches New Milestones; Launches Officially at Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics

FINEXTM, Sateri’s marquee brand for recycled fibre, is now certified to the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) which provides verification of recycled raw materials through the supply chain.

RCS is intended for use with any product that contains at least 5% recycled material. Sateri has successfully produced FINEXTM viscose fibres with up to 20% recycled content. Under the RCS certification process, each stage of production is required to be certified, beginning at the recycling stage and ending at the last seller in the final business-to-business transaction.

These new developments were announced at the official launch of FINEXTM on September 23, 2020. About 160 guests, mostly senior representatives of major fashion brands and fabric and garment makers, gathered to celebrate the milestones that cement the status of FINEXTM as a game changer for sustainable fashion.

Themed ‘Sustainable Fashion for the Future’, the launch was jointly hosted by Sateri and China International Fashion Fair (CHIC) on the sidelines of the three-day Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, a major industry expo.

FINEXTM, Sateri’s marquee brand for recycled fibre, is now certified to the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) which provides verification of recycled raw materials through the supply chain.

RCS is intended for use with any product that contains at least 5% recycled material. Sateri has successfully produced FINEXTM viscose fibres with up to 20% recycled content. Under the RCS certification process, each stage of production is required to be certified, beginning at the recycling stage and ending at the last seller in the final business-to-business transaction.

These new developments were announced at the official launch of FINEXTM on September 23, 2020. About 160 guests, mostly senior representatives of major fashion brands and fabric and garment makers, gathered to celebrate the milestones that cement the status of FINEXTM as a game changer for sustainable fashion.

Themed ‘Sustainable Fashion for the Future’, the launch was jointly hosted by Sateri and China International Fashion Fair (CHIC) on the sidelines of the three-day Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, a major industry expo.

In his address, Allen Zhang, President of Sateri, said, “The development of FINEXTM has been an intensive effort for Sateri from initial commercialisation, to partnering brands like Lafuma and Rico Lee, and finally to today’s launch. This is all made possible with collaboration across the value chain – working alongside yarn spinners, garment makers and brand partners – to bring a high quality and more planetfriendly product to consumers. The fashion industry is changing fast and, beyond functionality, circularity is now of the greatest importance in apparel manufacturing.”

In the ‘2020 Sustainable Fashion Report’ released by China’s leading business news publication CBNweekly earlier this week, results of a survey with stakeholders in the fashion value chain reinforced the potential of textile recycling as a solution to the problem of textile waste arising from over-consumption and production. The report identified technology and capital as the biggest barriers to textile recycling and highlighted the critical role brands play in mobilising manufacturers and consumers to advance sustainable fashion.

As part of its efforts to promote textile fibre recycling in China, Sateri is in dialogue with the China Association of Circular Economy (CACE) to undertake a comprehensive study on the industrial-scale textile waste recycling landscape in the country. The study is expected to commence next year.

More information:
FinexTM Sateri recycling fibers
Source:

Omnicom Public Relations Group / Sateri

Design fürs Recycling in der Modebranche verbreiten (c) Hohenstein
Durch kreisförmige Bewegungen wird in dieser Maschine zur Textilprüfung u.a. die Scheuerfestigkeit geprüft
24.08.2020

Design fürs Recycling in der Modebranche verbreiten

  • Recycling ist mehr als eine Mode.

Doch zur Mode soll künftig verstärkt sinnvolles Recycling gehören: Die Menschen in Deutschland kaufen pro Jahr im Schnitt 26 kg Textilien pro Kopf, davon 12-15 kg Bekleidung. Ein hochwertiges Recycling ist angesichts dieser großen Mengen eine große Herausforderung. Zum verbesserten Recycling gehört Kreislaufwirtschaft, die schon beim Design von Produkten ans „Leben danach“, nämlich das nächste oder erneuerte Erzeugnis denkt. Wie das für Kleidung funktionieren kann, zeigen wir exemplarisch am Beispiel eines aktuellen Forschungsprojekts: Teil 2 unserer Serie zum Design für Recycling.

  • Recycling ist mehr als eine Mode.

Doch zur Mode soll künftig verstärkt sinnvolles Recycling gehören: Die Menschen in Deutschland kaufen pro Jahr im Schnitt 26 kg Textilien pro Kopf, davon 12-15 kg Bekleidung. Ein hochwertiges Recycling ist angesichts dieser großen Mengen eine große Herausforderung. Zum verbesserten Recycling gehört Kreislaufwirtschaft, die schon beim Design von Produkten ans „Leben danach“, nämlich das nächste oder erneuerte Erzeugnis denkt. Wie das für Kleidung funktionieren kann, zeigen wir exemplarisch am Beispiel eines aktuellen Forschungsprojekts: Teil 2 unserer Serie zum Design für Recycling.

Getränkeflaschen aus dem Kunststoff PET eignen sich schon heute aufgrund ihrer Sortenreinheit ideal fürs Recycling, und zwar nicht nur für Verpackungen. Unter dem Motto „Von der Faser zur Faser“ nutzt das die angewandte Forschung im Verbundprojekt DiTex für Mietwäsche. Die eingesetzten Fasern stammen aus recycelten PET-Flaschen, die Mietwäsche selbst soll nach ihrem ersten Lebenszyklus wieder zu Wäsche recycelt werden. „Mietwäsche eignet sich auch deshalb gut fürs Konzept ‚Design for Recycling‘, weil sich ihre Nutzung genau nachvollziehen lässt, was optimale Voraussetzungen fürs Recycling bietet“, erläutert Projektleiterin Dr. Anja Gerhardts vom Forschungsinstitut Hohenstein. Das Institut aus Baden-Württemberg ist in dem vom Institut für ökologische Wirtschaftsforschung (IÖW) initiierten und koordinierten Vorhaben für Textilprüfungen und Produktspezifikationen zuständig. Fürs Nutzen statt Besitzen entwickeln die Verbundpartner je eine kreislauffähige Linie von Bettwäsche sowie von Polo- und Businesshemden. Die Hemden dienen als Dienstkleidung für Polizei und Rettungsdienst.

Intelligentes Etikett speichert Informationen Über den gesamten Nutzungskreislauf wird die Wäsche mit einer digitalen Tracking-ID ausgestattet. Dieses „intelligente“ Etikett speichert Informationen wie Faserherkunft, Materialkomposition und Beschaffenheit des Textils. Dadurch können Recyclingunternehmen die Produkte besser sortieren, den Recycling-Anteil erhöhen und aufwerten. In zahlreichen Waschversuchen wird in Hohenstein nun getestet, wie gut das Tracking-Tool sich bewährt, wie es um Reißfestigkeit, Weißgrad, Farbqualität, Haltbarkeit und Tragekomfort der Textilien bestellt ist, wenn sie im gewerblichen Textilservice bis zu 200 Mal gewaschen, geschleudert und getrocknet werden. „In DiTex bringen wir Nutzer, Beschaffer und Recycler von Textilien an einen Tisch, um kreislauffähiges Produktdesign Realität werden zu lassen“, erläutert Anja Gerhardts.

„Praxisnahe Forschung zu Fasern und Textilien gehört zu den Kernkompetenzen vieler unserer Institute, sei es für Industrieprodukte oder für verbrauchernahe Erzeugnisse. Projekte wie DiTex zeigen innovative Lösungen zum Design fürs Recycling. Durch den interdisziplinären Ansatz in unserem Verbund können auch andere Branchen von solchen Lösungen lernen“, erklärt die Geschäftsführerin der Zuse-Gemeinschaft, Dr. Annette Treffkorn.

More information:
Zuse-Gemeinschaft Recycling
Source:

Zuse-Gemeinschaft

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. (c)Paimion
Rester Paimio end-of-life textile refinement
18.08.2020

The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-life textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy, which is developing the plant in Paimio, recycles companies' end-of-life textiles, and Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto Oy (LSJH), which will hire a production area at the same facility, processes households' end-of-life textiles. The plant will process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles every year, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste.

The textile industry’s end-of-life textile problem is intolerable. Natural resources are increasingly used to manufacture products, but these materials are lost at the end of their life cycle. About 100 million kilograms of textile waste are generated annually in Finland alone. Reusing this material could reduce the textile industry’s carbon footprint and significantly reduce the use of natural resources.

Rester Oy and LSJH will drive the textile sector towards a circular economy and begin processing textile waste as an industrial raw material. The Nordic countries’ first industrial end-of-textile refinement plant will open in Paimio in 2021. The 3,000-square-metre plant is being developed by Rester Oy, which recycles companies' end-of-life textiles and industrial waste materials. LSJH, which processes households’ end-of-life textiles on its production line, will hire part of the plant.

Outi Luukko, Rester Oy’s board chair, says, “The processing plant will begin a new era of textile circular economy in Finland. As industry pioneers, we are launching a system change in Scandinavia. The transition of the textile industry from a linear model to a circular economy is essential, as virgin materials cannot sustain the current structure of the textile industry. And why should it, when there is so much recyclable material available?”

From the perspective of Rester Oy’s main owner, work clothing supplier Touchpoint, the circular economy plant not only represents resource efficiency, but is also necessary from the perspective of the entire life cycle of a responsible work clothing collection.

Luukko adds, “Finding a local solution to a global problem is a huge leap in the right direction and raises Finland's profile as a pioneer of circular economy."

The future plant will be able to process 12,000 tonnes of end-of-life textiles annually, which represents about 10% of Finland’s textile waste. Both production lines produce recycled fibre, which can be used for various industrial applications, including yarn and fabric, insulating materials for construction and shipping industries, acoustic panels, composites, non-woven and filter materials, and other technical textiles, such as geo-textiles.

LSJH is piloting a full-scale refinement plant

LSJH has launched a pilot production line for processing households' end-of-life textiles. Unfortunately, consumers' end-of-life textiles are heterogeneous, making them a challenging raw material for further processing. Before processing, the textiles are sorted by material into various fibre classes using optical identification technology developed by LSJH and its partners. This ensures the quality of the raw material and the resulting fibre products.

Jukka Heikkilä, managing director for Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto, explains: “On the basis of the experiences gathered from the pilot project, Lounais-Suomen Jätehuolto is preparing a full-scale refinement plant in the Turku region. As soon as 2023, the plant will process Finnish households' end-of-life textiles. The project involves all waste treatment plants owned by Finnish municipalities.”

Paimio has ambitious goals for circular economy companies

Rester’s initiative aims to create a circular economy cluster in Paimio that combines the processing and reuse of end-of-life textile fibres. Paimion Kehitys Oy, which is owned by the City of Paimio and the local association of enterprises, supports the development of circular economy companies in Paimio.

Mika Ingi, managing director for Paimion Kehitys Oy, says, “We want to step out of our traditional municipal role and create significant added value for everyone taking part. That is why we are involved in the development of a new modern service model based on ecosystem thinking. We are piloting the textile cluster, followed in the coming years by clusters focusing on plastic, construction, and energy. The aim of our service is to support and help develop new profitable business by bringing circular economy companies and their potential customers to innovate together."

The foundation stone of the processing plant was laid today (18 August 2020). The processing plant will begin operations in February 2021.

ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei launches its new fabric collection imbued with the brand’s sustainable story-making © GB Network
ECOSENSOR™ 100% recycled polyamide fabrics
06.08.2020

ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei launches its new fabric collection imbued with the brand’s sustainable story-making

  • ECOSENSOR™’s new references combine high-performance and innovation to empower people with the possibility to live life naturally both for mind and body.
  • The new range is woven from certified ingredients, a completely traceable production process and highly certified suppliers               

"A New Eco high-tech force of Nature", a bold claim, a daring attitude and true facts. ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei has concentrated all its key values into a Nature-driven and high-tech fabric collection that respects the environment and human being.

Sustainability, active climate control, exquisite touch and extreme performance co-habit the textiles: the collection is made of wovens and knits where the main technology is represented by GRS - Global Recycle Standard certified polyamide and polyesters, sometime combined with ROICA™ recycled stretch yarns and dyed and finished with Oekotex Standard 100 certified processes and/or by BlueSign® partners’ companies.

But there is much more than it meets the eye.

Behind the new collection is a great story of sustainability.

  • ECOSENSOR™’s new references combine high-performance and innovation to empower people with the possibility to live life naturally both for mind and body.
  • The new range is woven from certified ingredients, a completely traceable production process and highly certified suppliers               

"A New Eco high-tech force of Nature", a bold claim, a daring attitude and true facts. ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei has concentrated all its key values into a Nature-driven and high-tech fabric collection that respects the environment and human being.

Sustainability, active climate control, exquisite touch and extreme performance co-habit the textiles: the collection is made of wovens and knits where the main technology is represented by GRS - Global Recycle Standard certified polyamide and polyesters, sometime combined with ROICA™ recycled stretch yarns and dyed and finished with Oekotex Standard 100 certified processes and/or by BlueSign® partners’ companies.

But there is much more than it meets the eye.

Behind the new collection is a great story of sustainability.

"Our international team strives to innovate with a human-based approach to research and develop solutions that meet high-performance standards as well as the transparency and traceability of both the ingredients and the supply chain", says Mr. Hashimoto, Senior Managing Director of Asahi Kasei Advance, the global materials innovator and manufacturer.

Indeed, the company has set the high bar all its suppliers and partners must match. Such criteria include: thoroughly transparency and traceability of both materials and production, corporate responsibility at all levels and a strategic commitment granted by influential certifications such as GRS - Global Recycle Standard for recycled ingredients and processes, as well as Bluesign® and OekoTex Standard 100 certifications, which focus on environmentally-friendly impact of the dyeing and finishing processes.

The human, environmentally-friendly and cutting-edge imprint of ECOSENSOR™ ultimate collection reflects a vision for a more responsible way of fabric manufacturing.

A new force of nature, because story telling truly must match the story making.

Sustainable leadership for GtA with new Monforts Montex wide width lines (c) AWOL Media
GtA Managing Director Andreas Niess
27.07.2020

Sustainable leadership for GtA with new Monforts Montex wide width lines

Following the successful commissioning of two new Monforts Montex wide-width stenter lines and additional environmental management equipment at its plant in Germany, GtA – Society for Textile Equipment GmbH – is aiming to be the first textile finishing company to become entirely CO2-neutral in the manufacture of all of its products by 2025.

GtA is a partner company to Germany’s large-format digital printing fabric leader, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH, which has has this year been able to considerably expand its portfolio due to the new Monforts lines.

Headquartered in Gross-Zimmern, close to Frankfurt, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH and its partners in Germany have an annual production of 37 million square metres of warp knits for a range of end-use applications, including garments, automotive interiors and technical textiles, but increasingly with a concentration on digital printing substrates.

Fault-free textiles

Following the successful commissioning of two new Monforts Montex wide-width stenter lines and additional environmental management equipment at its plant in Germany, GtA – Society for Textile Equipment GmbH – is aiming to be the first textile finishing company to become entirely CO2-neutral in the manufacture of all of its products by 2025.

GtA is a partner company to Germany’s large-format digital printing fabric leader, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH, which has has this year been able to considerably expand its portfolio due to the new Monforts lines.

Headquartered in Gross-Zimmern, close to Frankfurt, Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH and its partners in Germany have an annual production of 37 million square metres of warp knits for a range of end-use applications, including garments, automotive interiors and technical textiles, but increasingly with a concentration on digital printing substrates.

Fault-free textiles

A new standard in pure white, 100% clean and fault-free textile substrates has been demanded by this market in recent years due to the rapid growth in digitally-printed banners and billboards – often referred to as ‘soft signage’.

The substrates of choice for digital printing are 100% polyester warp knits which are resilient and allow excellent take-up of inks, and vibrant colours and clear and precise images to be achieved with digital printing techniques. The knitted construction also has the advantage of elasticity, which is a plus in terms of flexibility for installers.

Critically, the warp knitted fabrics have extremely smooth surfaces which is becoming increasingly important due to the general move away from PVC coatings which were the standard in the past.

It was to finish these fabrics for Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH as well as providing such services for many other customers, that the GtA plant in Neresheim, Baden-Württemberg, was established in 2015.

The purpose-built plant on a greenfield site was initially equipped with a fully-automated, 72 metre long Monforts installation comprising a washing machine integrated with a 3.6 metre wide, seven-chamber Montex stenter. The line quickly went from single to double shift production and then to 24/7 operation  to meet demand.

Expanded widths

Building on the success of this installation, GtA has now installed two more Montex stenter lines – both in expanded working widths of 5.6 metres and purpose-built at Montex GmbH in Austria.

A six-chamber Montex unit is combined with a washing machine to guarantee the purity of the substrates, while a five-chamber line is integrated with a wide-width coating machine. This new coating capability at GtA has led to a number of new additions to the Georg and Otto Friedrich DecoTex range for digital printing, including wide width fabrics with flame retardant, antimicrobial and non-slip finishes.

The new Montex stenter lines benefit from all of the latest innovations from Monforts, including the Smart Sensor system for the optimised maintenance planning of key mechanical wear components on the stenters. A comprehensive overview of the condition of all parts at any time is now available for operators within the highly intuitive Qualitex visualization software.

With Qualitex, all article-specific settings can be stored and the formulations for thousands of treatment processes called up again at any time. Individual operators can also personalise their dashboards with the most important machine functions and process parameters.

Environmental commitment

GtA is run by a seasoned team of textile professionals led by Managing Director Andreas Niess.

“We have received excellent service from Monforts from the outset and we were happy to place the order for these two new lines as part of our ongoing cooperation,” he says. “With all of the latest Monforts advances in technology we are fully in control of all production and quality parameters with these lines, as part of our significant commitment to innovative environmental technology.”

The GtA plant, which operates in near-cleanroom conditions, has also been equipped with proprietary technology to fully exploit the Monforts air-to-air heat recovery systems that are now standard with Montex stenters.

“Around 30 per cent of our investment volume at the site goes to energy-saving measures and we are sure that this commitment is worthwhile,” Mr Niess says. “As an example, our integrated heat recovery system fully exploits the waste heat from the process exhaust air and the burner exhaust gases of the Monforts stenters, allowing us to achieve an exhaust air temperature of  between 30 to 34°C, compared to what would conventionally be between 140 to 160°C. Another focus has been on exhaust air purification technology and here too, the latest technology has been installed with integrated heat recovery elements.”

This, he adds, saves 52% of the energy that would normally be used – equating to 5,800,000 KwH per year. The necessary audits for energy-efficient companies are also carried out annually.

In addition, GtA has purpose-designed the automatic chemical mixing and dosing systems that feed the padders for the key treatments that are carried out on the fabrics through the stenters.

The company is going further, however, in its pursuit of clean production and raw materials.

"We want to be an asset and not a burden on our immediate environment and therefore do not use any additives containing solvents," Mr Niess says. “We were the first to use fully halogen-free flame retardant chemistry, and we use bio-based, finely ground alumina products for the washing process instead of surfactants. PES polyester yarns made from recycled material are also increasingly used and the latest additions to our raw materials portfolio, the RC-Ocean products, are made from recycled sea plastic.

“We are now planning a combined heat and power plant for the production of electrical energy and heat and we will also build a photovoltaic system that converts solar radiation into electrical energy. GtA wants to be the first textile finishing company to be CO2-neutral in the manufacture of all of its products by 2025. The complete heat supply and heating for the 13,000 square metre production hall, as well as the office building and the hot water supply for the domestic water, is already energy-neutral. We are convinced that this commitment will pay off in the long term and our positive business development proves that sustainability and business profitability are perfectly compatible.”

In addition to the products for Georg and Otto Friedrich GmbH, GtA  offers its manufacturing capacities for other customers as a contract service.

All products are manufactured in accordance with Öko-Tex Standard 100, product class 1 and the company is also involved in the research and development of new sustainable manufacturing processes, in cooperation with many regional universities and funding project partners.

Source:

AWOL Media for A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG

Die drapilux-Monatsempfehlung für klassische und moderne Hotels. © drapilux
drapilux 131
22.07.2020

Die drapilux-Monatsempfehlung für klassische und moderne Hotels.

Textilien sind untrennbarer Teil des Interieurs, denn sie geben einem Raum Atmosphäre und eine gute Akustik. Doch welcher Stoff ist für welchen Zweck am besten geeignet?

  • Skandinavisches Flair: drapilux 131

Der Artikel überzeugt durch sein reduziertes skandinavisch anmutendes Dessin, das jedem Raum zeitlose Eleganz und Frische verleiht. Der skandinavische Einrichtungstrend verbindet Einfachheit und Funktionalität perfekt. Eine Kombination, die sich auch den in zarten, naturnahen Farben der vier Kolorits wiederfindet. So wird dem raumhohen Dessin eine gewisse Großzügigkeit verliehen. Neben seinem Dessin zeichnet sich drapilux 131 durch seine Nachhaltigkeit aus. Gedruckt wird der Artikel auf der Grundqualität von drapilux 104, der mit einem neuartigen Garn gewebt wird. Dieses enthält einen Anteil an nachhaltig produzierten Fasern aus recycelten PET-Flaschen.

Textilien sind untrennbarer Teil des Interieurs, denn sie geben einem Raum Atmosphäre und eine gute Akustik. Doch welcher Stoff ist für welchen Zweck am besten geeignet?

  • Skandinavisches Flair: drapilux 131

Der Artikel überzeugt durch sein reduziertes skandinavisch anmutendes Dessin, das jedem Raum zeitlose Eleganz und Frische verleiht. Der skandinavische Einrichtungstrend verbindet Einfachheit und Funktionalität perfekt. Eine Kombination, die sich auch den in zarten, naturnahen Farben der vier Kolorits wiederfindet. So wird dem raumhohen Dessin eine gewisse Großzügigkeit verliehen. Neben seinem Dessin zeichnet sich drapilux 131 durch seine Nachhaltigkeit aus. Gedruckt wird der Artikel auf der Grundqualität von drapilux 104, der mit einem neuartigen Garn gewebt wird. Dieses enthält einen Anteil an nachhaltig produzierten Fasern aus recycelten PET-Flaschen.

Source:

schönknecht : kommunikation
gesellschaft für public relations und marketing mbh

 New Recycled Fibre FinexTM in Stores; Sateri Partners Fashion Brands to Unveil Product (c) Finex
Finex Circularity Model
08.06.2020

New Recycled Fibre FinexTM in Stores; Sateri Partners Fashion Brands to Unveil Product

Shanghai – Sateri has unveiled FinexTM as its new product brand for recycled fibre. FinexTM, short for ‘Fibre Next’, is an innovative next-generation cellulosic fibre containing recycled content. Internationally known outdoor brand Lafuma has produced FinexTM apparel ahead of 618, China’s major mid-year online shopping festival, while independent China designer Rico Lee will launch his FinexTM apparel next month.

Since its announcement in March this year of a breakthrough in commercial production of viscose using recycled textile waste, Sateri has worked closely with its downstream yarn and garment manufacturing partners to bring the recycled fibre product to the consumer market.

Shanghai – Sateri has unveiled FinexTM as its new product brand for recycled fibre. FinexTM, short for ‘Fibre Next’, is an innovative next-generation cellulosic fibre containing recycled content. Internationally known outdoor brand Lafuma has produced FinexTM apparel ahead of 618, China’s major mid-year online shopping festival, while independent China designer Rico Lee will launch his FinexTM apparel next month.

Since its announcement in March this year of a breakthrough in commercial production of viscose using recycled textile waste, Sateri has worked closely with its downstream yarn and garment manufacturing partners to bring the recycled fibre product to the consumer market.

“We’re pleased to collaborate with Sateri as one of their first brand partners for FinexTM. Sateri’s dedication to this partnership made it possible for Lafuma to produce T-shirts with this fine quality fibre in a short time. T-shirts made with FinexTM will be among the offerings Lafuma has in store for the 618 festival as we look to support environmentally-friendly and excellent performance solutions to strengthen our position as a leading outdoor apparel brand,” said Wu Qian, General Manager of Lafuma China.

Echoing similar sentiments is Rico Lee who established his own independent label in 2014, “I jumped at the opportunity to collaborate with Sateri when they approached me because FinexTM encapsulates what my brand stands for – Beautiful Technology that combines function and fashion.”

Tom Liu, Sateri’s Commercial Vice President said, “Like our flagship brand EcoCosy®, FinexTM is made from bio-based natural fibres. Innovation and technology has made cellulosic textile fibre recycling possible and FinexTM represents how nature not only renews itself but that products made from nature can also be regenerated. This, at its heart, is what circular fashion looks like. Our brand promise to customers remains constant– Sateri’s products are sustainable, high quality, efficient, and cost-effective. The FinexTM tagline ‘Together For A Better Next’ expresses our aspiration to be the partner of choice for next-generation fibre - we thank Lafuma and Rico Lee for pioneering with us on this quest.”

Last month, Sateri announced its entry into China’s Lyocell fibre market. The recent string of product portfolio expansion announcements is underpinned by Sateri’s business strategy to capture value. Allen Zhang, President of Sateri said, “Being the world’s largest viscose producer gives us the advantages that come with volume, but value is what we hope differentiates us. By this, we don’t only mean higher value products like Lyocell or FinexTM but also the value we bring to communities, country, climate and customers.”

Globally, less than 1% of material used to produce clothing is recycled into new clothing. This presents a big opportunity for textile fibre recycling, particularly in China which is the largest textile producing country in the world. Last month, Sateri became a council member of the China Association of Circular Economy (CACE). The company will work closely with CACE’s Textile Waste Comprehensive Utilisation Committee to establish standards and promote industrial-scale textile waste recycling. Sateri is part of the Singapore-based RGE group of companies which has committed USD200 million into next-generation textile fibre innovation and technology.