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Turkish textile manufacturers wait for ITM 2021 Exhibition (c) ITM
10.12.2020

Turkish textile manufacturers wait for ITM 2021 Exhibition to expand their investments

The Turkish textile industry, which continues its exports and investments without slowing down despite the devastating pandemic, once again proved its strength, especially in this period. ITM 2021 Exhibition, which will be held in Istanbul between 22 and 26 June 2021, will provide a great advantage to companies that desire to expand their investments and introduce their brand new technologies.

The Turkish textile industry, which continues its exports and investments without slowing down despite the devastating pandemic, once again proved its strength, especially in this period. ITM 2021 Exhibition, which will be held in Istanbul between 22 and 26 June 2021, will provide a great advantage to companies that desire to expand their investments and introduce their brand new technologies.

Although there were slowdowns in the textile industry in April and May this year due to the troublesome coronavirus pandemic , the Turkish textile industry succeeded a big breakthrough with the removal of restrictions in June, thanks to both its textile production infrastructure and international exports capacity. The exports of the textile and raw materials sector increased and the companies turned to new investments. While many local companies enlarged their facilities, some of them made new investment decisions. For example, while a giant hygienic and medical fabric production facility was invested in Çorlu, another Turkish company, a global brand in textile machinery production, decided to invest 40 million Turkish Lira. Gaziantep-based spunbond and meltblown nonwoven manufacturer company added two new meltblown lines to its operations. Another company also began to invest in the production of raw materials that they import. This investment activity in Turkey, where is a manufacturing base of European customers whet the appetite of international investors. One of South Korea's largest conglomerates has rolled up its sleeves for an investment of 430 million US Dollars in Çerkezköy. Due to the investments, the purchase of textile machinery increased by 37.1 percent in the first nine months of 2020 amounting to over 1 billion US Dollars.

The Accurate Address for Investment Decisions: ITM 2021 Exhibition
Although the companies took advantage of the pandemic period as an opportunity and continued their investments, many of them are waiting for the ITM 2021 Exhibition for large machinery purchases. ITM 2021 Exhibition, which will be held between 22 and 26 June 2021 at Istanbul Tüyap Fair and Congress Center, will gather thousands of participating companies and visitors under one roof. The company officials, who will have the opportunity to observe the latest technological products to be exhibited by the international and domestic exhibitors, will direct their investments by meeting with the experts of the sector. The machines produced for technical textiles, which became even more important during the devastating pandemic period, will attract the attention of visitors. Thanks to the machinery purchases and business partnerships of both domestic and international companies, there will be great dynamism in the textile industry and the national economy.

Source:

ITM

VDMA: Young talents honoured online (c) VDMA
The winners 2020 (from top left to bottom right): Dr. Frederik Cloppenburg, Philippa Böhnke, Juan Carlos Arañó Romero, Dr. Annett Schmieder, Maximilian Speiser, Harry Lucas jun.
03.12.2020

VDMA: Young talents honoured online

In early December, the chairman of the Walter Reiners Foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association, Peter D. Dornier presented awards to six successful young engineers. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the award ceremony took place as a web conference for the first time.

Philippa Böhnke, ITM Dresden, and Juan Carlos Arañó Romero, ITA Aachen, were honoured with creativity awards for the cleverest bachelor or project work. The prizes are endowed with 3,000 euros each. Ms. Böhnke’s project dealt with composite implants for the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In his bachelor thesis, Mr. Arañó Romero has developed a spinning machine able to produce yarn with material from the moon. By this, the transport effort in space travel can be minimised, because insulating material for example necessary for a moon base can be produced on the moon directly.

In early December, the chairman of the Walter Reiners Foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association, Peter D. Dornier presented awards to six successful young engineers. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the award ceremony took place as a web conference for the first time.

Philippa Böhnke, ITM Dresden, and Juan Carlos Arañó Romero, ITA Aachen, were honoured with creativity awards for the cleverest bachelor or project work. The prizes are endowed with 3,000 euros each. Ms. Böhnke’s project dealt with composite implants for the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In his bachelor thesis, Mr. Arañó Romero has developed a spinning machine able to produce yarn with material from the moon. By this, the transport effort in space travel can be minimised, because insulating material for example necessary for a moon base can be produced on the moon directly.

Harry Lucas, TU Chemnitz, and Maximilian Speiser, Reutlingen University, were awarded two promotion prizes in the category master thesis with prize money of 3,500 euros each. The master thesis of Mr. Lucas deals with the development of a new knitting head for jacquard knitted fabrics, enabling a large variety of colours e.g. in the production of fan scarfs. Mr. Speiser showed in his master thesis a solution for increasing energy efficiency in the nonwovens process.

This year, two promotion prizes of the German Textile Machinery Industry in the dissertation category were awarded to Dr. Frederik Cloppenburg, ITA Aachen, and Dr. Annett Schmieder, TU Chemnitz. In his dissertation Mr. Cloppenburg developed a model for the optimisation of roller cards in the nonwovens process. Ms. Schmieder introduced in her dissertation a damage analysis system for fibre ropes. The system detects when a rope must be replaced e.g. in transport applications.

The award ceremony 2021 shall take place with physical presence again. It is scheduled for early May at the fair Techtextil in Frankfurt.

Source:

VDMA

TMAS member imogo develops new sustainable spray application technologies (c) TMAS
The roundtable discussion, Sustainable Finishing Methods in Textile Finishing, during ITA 2020.
16.11.2020

TMAS member imogo develops new sustainable spray application technologies

In a roundtable discussion during the recent Innovate Textiles & Apparel (ITA) textile machinery exhibition, imogo Founding Partner Per Stenflo and representatives from a number of like-minded European companies discussed the opportunities for new spray application technologies for the dyeing and finishing sector.

These technologies can achieve tremendous savings for manufacturers compared to traditional water-intensive processes it was explained at the event, held online from October 15-30th.

Pioneer
imogo – one of the latest companies to join TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association – is one of the key pioneers in this area with its Dye-Max system. Dye-Max spray dyeing technology can slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems. This is due to the extremely low liquor ratio of 0.3-0.8 litres per kilo of fabric and at the same time, considerably fewer auxiliary chemicals are required to start with.

In a roundtable discussion during the recent Innovate Textiles & Apparel (ITA) textile machinery exhibition, imogo Founding Partner Per Stenflo and representatives from a number of like-minded European companies discussed the opportunities for new spray application technologies for the dyeing and finishing sector.

These technologies can achieve tremendous savings for manufacturers compared to traditional water-intensive processes it was explained at the event, held online from October 15-30th.

Pioneer
imogo – one of the latest companies to join TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association – is one of the key pioneers in this area with its Dye-Max system. Dye-Max spray dyeing technology can slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems. This is due to the extremely low liquor ratio of 0.3-0.8 litres per kilo of fabric and at the same time, considerably fewer auxiliary chemicals are required to start with.

Obstacles
Such technologies, however, face a number of obstacles to adoption and during the ITA discussion it was agreed that 2020 has not provided the ideal climate for adventurous investors. “The textile industry is quite conservative and is definitely in survival mode at the moment and it is not the time to be a visionary,” said Stenflo. “Day to day business is about staying alive – that’s the reality for many of our customers.” Nevertheless, all of the panellists agreed that sustainable production will remain top of the agenda for the textile industry in the longer term and spray technologies for dyeing and finishing processes will be a part of it.

“Any investment in something new is a risk of course, and we have to be able to explain and convince manufacturers that there’s a good return on investment, not only in respect of sustainability, but in terms of making good business sense,” said Stenflo. “Here we could use the help of the brands of course, in putting pressure on their suppliers to be more sustainable. Governments also have a role to play, in providing incentives for producers to move in the sustainable direction. Sustainability alone will never cut it, there has to be a business case, or it won’t happen.”

Marketing
The marketing of sustainable new fibers is comparatively easy for the brands compared to explaining the difficult textile processes and the chemistries involved in fabric and garment production, he added.

“These fibers, however, currently go through all the same dirty processes that we need to get away from, so it must happen,” he said. “In developing our technologies, it has been important for us to avoid disrupting existing supply chains, stick with using off-the-shelf chemistries and dyes, and involve the dye manufacturers who are an essential part in how operations are driven today. “In fact, collaboration across the entire textile supply chain – from the brands right back to the new technology developers – is essential in moving the sustainability agenda forward.

Business models
“We are also looking into new business models in terms of how to reduce or lower the thresholds for investment and minimise the risk for the manufacturers who are looking to be the innovators,” he concluded. Also taking part in the ITA roundtable discussion were Simon Kew (Alchemie Technology, UK), Christian Schumacher (StepChange Innovations, Germany) Tobias Schurr (Weko, Germany), Rainer Tüxen (RotaSpray, Germany) and Felmke Zijilstra (DyeCoo, Netherlands).

European innovations
“It’s fantastic that all of this innovation is taking place in Europe based on established know-how and forward thinking,” said TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson.

“Spray application technologies are a perfect illustration of how new digital technologies can lead to more sustainable production, in this case by replacing water-intensive processes with the highly precise and controlled application of dyes and chemistries as vapour.
“There was a major project by the Swedish research organisation Mistra Future Fashion recently, involving many brand and academic institute partners. The project’s Fiber Bible 1 and 2 reports conclude that it’s very difficult to make assumptions that one fiber is better than another, because it’s so much about how fabrics and garments are being produced from them. The study also found that 55% of the chemicals used in a garment comes from the dyeing. This is where a number of TMAS companies can make a difference.
“An organic or recycled cotton t-shirt is not automatically more sustainable than a conventional cotton t-shirt, or even one made from synthetics – the alternative fibers are a good start but you have to consider the entire life cycle of a garment, and that includes the smart technologies in textiles production.
“TMAS members – backed by Swedish brands and advanced research institutes – are playing an active part in pushing forward new concepts that will work, and I have no doubt that digitalisation now goes hand in hand with sustainability for the textile industry’s future.”          

Oerlikon (c) Oerlikon
f.l.t.r Jochen Adler, Ralf Morgenroth, Markus Reichwein, Matthias Schmitz
15.10.2020

Oerlikon Experts share their know-how online

In order to ensure the transfer of know-how and technology in times of the pandemic, the Manmade Fibers segment of the Swiss Oerlikon Group will start its new webinar series in November. Four interesting technology lectures are planned until the end of 2020 which will be held in English. Current trends in the production of manmade fibers as well as Oerlikons technology solutions will be presented and discussed with the participants. A continuation of the webinar series is already planned for 2021.

In order to ensure the transfer of know-how and technology in times of the pandemic, the Manmade Fibers segment of the Swiss Oerlikon Group will start its new webinar series in November. Four interesting technology lectures are planned until the end of 2020 which will be held in English. Current trends in the production of manmade fibers as well as Oerlikons technology solutions will be presented and discussed with the participants. A continuation of the webinar series is already planned for 2021.

  • Factory know-how from a single source – A boost for your efficiency
    4. November 2020: 11:00-11:45h CET
    Speaker: Jochen Adler, Oerlikon Manmade Fibers CTO*
     
  • VarioFil – Your compact spinning solution
    11. November 2020: 11:00-11:45h CET
    Speaker: Ralf Morgenroth, Head of Engineering Textile Machinery BB Engineering (BBE)*
     
  • Green Technologies – Join us on the road to a sustainable fiber industry
    2. December 2020: 11:00-11:45h CET
    Speaker: Markus Reichwein, Head of Product Management Oerlikon Manmade Fibers*
     
  • VacuFil – Your future upcycling plant, from waste to value
    9. December 2020: 11:00-11:45h CET
    Speaker: Matthias Schmitz, Head of Engineering Recycling Technology, BB Engineering (BBE)*

 

*Please read the attached document for more information

Source:

Oerlikon Textile GmbH & Co. KG

Oerlikon: Virtual Exhibition (c) Oerlikon
08.10.2020

Oerlikon at Innovate Textile & Apparel Virtual Trade Show

The textile machinery industry is eagerly awaiting the start of the virtual trade show "Innovate Textile & Apparel". What and how will the more than 160 exhibitors present themselves virtually? How will the approximately 10,000 registered visitors accept the digital offer? WTIN is breaking new ground as organizer with this platform. But one thing is already certain: From 15 to 30 October 2020, they will bring the textile machinery industry a little closer together again in the Corona Pandemic. Oerlikon invites all visitors to take a look into the future of manmade fibers production and get to know the comprehensive range of products and services.

The textile machinery industry is eagerly awaiting the start of the virtual trade show "Innovate Textile & Apparel". What and how will the more than 160 exhibitors present themselves virtually? How will the approximately 10,000 registered visitors accept the digital offer? WTIN is breaking new ground as organizer with this platform. But one thing is already certain: From 15 to 30 October 2020, they will bring the textile machinery industry a little closer together again in the Corona Pandemic. Oerlikon invites all visitors to take a look into the future of manmade fibers production and get to know the comprehensive range of products and services.

"Reconnecting innovation in the textile & apparel value chain" is the motto of WTIN's virtual trade show. And Oerlikon intends to more than live up to this motto. With more than 50 active experts from sales, customer service and technology as well as partners from its international network of representatives, the Manmade Fibers segment of the Swiss Oerlikon Group will try to be represented around the clock. "It is an interesting experiment for all of us and we would like to see it succeed," explains André Wissenberg, Head of Marketing, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs. "Our aim is to meet our existing customers again, make new contacts and see 'old friends' from the industry. We have prepared an attractive digital offer for them all. Those of you who missed our roller coaster ride in Barcelona last year can now enjoy the journey through time in peace and quiet from your home office on your digital tour of the fair. And, there are no more waiting times either," promises Wissenberg.

Factory know-how from a single source
From Melt to Yarn, Fibers and Nonwovens. From the polycondensation and the processing of PTA and MEG as well as the extrusion of, for example, recycled polyester chips all the way through to hundreds of thousands of packaged and stored or directly-delivered textured bobbins for a market within the textile industry worth billions. From the planning and construction of highly complex production plants to the engineering of large-scale plant projects and competent customer services. This business model runs like a red thread through the self-conception of the Manmade Fibers segment of the Swiss Oerlikon Group. The right partner, especially – but not exclusively – for newcomers to the textile industry. "With us they get everything they need for a successful business: Factory know-how from a single source. And that's what we would like to show our visitors at our virtual trade fair booth," says Wissenberg.

Monforts texCoat coating system (c) Monforts / AWOL Media
06.10.2020

Monforts at Innovate Textile & Apparel (ITA) 2020

During the Innovate Textile & Apparel (ITA) virtual textile machinery show which will run from October 15th-30th 2020, Monforts will be emphasising its leadership position in three key fields – advanced coating, denim finishing and fabric sanforizing.

With its multi-head capability, the latest Monforts texCoat coating system provides flexibility with an unprecedented range of options and a wide range of modules available.

Refinements
“Since we acquired the coating technology that our systems are based on we have made a lot of refinements and all of them are reflected in higher coating accuracy and the resulting quality of the treated fabrics,” says Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, Jürgen Hanel.
“Our systems have the shortest fabric path from the coating unit into the stenter and we have all variations of coating application systems too – and all of these options are available in wider widths, with the engineering and manufacturing from a single source here in Europe.”

During the Innovate Textile & Apparel (ITA) virtual textile machinery show which will run from October 15th-30th 2020, Monforts will be emphasising its leadership position in three key fields – advanced coating, denim finishing and fabric sanforizing.

With its multi-head capability, the latest Monforts texCoat coating system provides flexibility with an unprecedented range of options and a wide range of modules available.

Refinements
“Since we acquired the coating technology that our systems are based on we have made a lot of refinements and all of them are reflected in higher coating accuracy and the resulting quality of the treated fabrics,” says Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, Jürgen Hanel.
“Our systems have the shortest fabric path from the coating unit into the stenter and we have all variations of coating application systems too – and all of these options are available in wider widths, with the engineering and manufacturing from a single source here in Europe.”

CYD
Denim finishing is meanwhile a field in which Monforts has an undisputed lead and it has been working closely with its many partners in the key denim manufacturing countries of Bangladesh, Brazil, China, India, Mexico Pakistan and Turkey to develop advanced solutions. The latest of these is the CYD yarn dyeing system.
“CYD is based on the proven Econtrol® dyeing system for fabrics*,” explains Monforts Head of Denim Hans Wroblowski. “It integrates new functions and processes into the weaving preparatory processes – spinning, direct beaming, warping and assembly beaming, followed by sizing and dyeing – in order to increase quality, flexibility, economic viability and productivity. The CYD system has been developed in response to a very strong market demand.”

Pre-shrinking
Monforts has also recently delivered a significant number of its latest Monfortex sanforizing lines to customers around the world.
Sanforizing is vital to final fabric quality, pre-shrinking it by compressing prior to washing, to limit any residual or further shrinkage in a made-up finished garment to less than 1%, for perfect comfort and fit over an extended lifetime.

As with industry-leading Montex stenters, Monfortex lines benefit from the latest Qualitex 800 control system which allows all parameters to be easily automated via the 24-inch colour touchscreen, including production speed, control of all fabric feed devices, rotation spray or steaming cylinder options, the width of the stretching field and the rubber belt pressure. Up to 10,000 separate process parameter records can be generated and stored by the data manager.

 

*Econtrol® is a registered mark of DyStar Colours Distribution GmbH, Germany.

20.08.2020

Energy efficiency in textile dyeing and finishing - VDMA continues technology webtalks

  • Energy efficiency will be the topic of VDMA’s next edition of Textile Machinery Webtalks on 27 August 2020 (2 pm - 4 pm CEST).  

Efficient energy management is of increasing importance in textile dyeing and finishing. Innovative machine designs with minimal water and energy consumption as well as the recovery and use of the heat energy produced in the processes represent valuable potential savings for any modern company.

The presenters at a glance:

  • Energy efficiency will be the topic of VDMA’s next edition of Textile Machinery Webtalks on 27 August 2020 (2 pm - 4 pm CEST).  

Efficient energy management is of increasing importance in textile dyeing and finishing. Innovative machine designs with minimal water and energy consumption as well as the recovery and use of the heat energy produced in the processes represent valuable potential savings for any modern company.

The presenters at a glance:

  • Ludger Sommer, Thies, will show how to manage heat energy in wetprocessing.
  • Benjamin Schnabel, Brückner Textilmaschinen is going to demonstrate how to make one of the most energy consuming processes in textile manufacturing more sustainable, eco-friendly and cost effective.
  • Fabian Buckenmayer, PLEVA Sensors and Controls will inform about the specific opportunities for an energy-efficient textile production via measuring and controlling process parameters.  

After the presentations, the experts will be available to answer the participants' questions. The webtalk series is very well received by the textile industry. During the first three webtalks, VDMA welcomed almost 900 registered participants from more than 50 countries. Registration is still possible.

Source:

VDMA e. V. Textilmaschinen

 

13.08.2020

Rieter Wins Patent Dispute in China

  • Rieter protects its innovations and products with patents and registered designs.

The company takes consistent action against patent and design infringements. In mid-July 2020, in a legal dispute, the Shanghai Intellectual Property Court of the People’s Republic of China ruled in favor of Rieter Ingolstadt GmbH (Germany).

Rieter machines stand for outstanding quality, high operational safety, excellent performance and user-friendliness as well as unique design. In order to benefit from these characteristics, competitors copy the successful Rieter machine concepts and even adopt the coveted Rieter design.

Rieter protects its innovations by means of patents and registered designs. The company takes consistent action against companies that infringe Rieter patents or designs and copy products or machines. In 2018, Rieter registered design infringe-ments by Shenyang Hongda Textile Machinery Co., Ltd. in relation to double-head draw frames, and decided to file a lawsuit against the Chinese company.

  • Rieter protects its innovations and products with patents and registered designs.

The company takes consistent action against patent and design infringements. In mid-July 2020, in a legal dispute, the Shanghai Intellectual Property Court of the People’s Republic of China ruled in favor of Rieter Ingolstadt GmbH (Germany).

Rieter machines stand for outstanding quality, high operational safety, excellent performance and user-friendliness as well as unique design. In order to benefit from these characteristics, competitors copy the successful Rieter machine concepts and even adopt the coveted Rieter design.

Rieter protects its innovations by means of patents and registered designs. The company takes consistent action against companies that infringe Rieter patents or designs and copy products or machines. In 2018, Rieter registered design infringe-ments by Shenyang Hongda Textile Machinery Co., Ltd. in relation to double-head draw frames, and decided to file a lawsuit against the Chinese company.

In mid-July 2020, the Shanghai Intellectual Property Court of the People’s Republic of China determined that the double-head draw frames JWF1316 and JWF1316T of Shenyang Hongda Textile Machinery Co., Ltd. are similar to and fall within the scope of protection of the design patent concerned. The defendant Shenyang Hongda Textile Machinery Co., Ltd. was sentenced to compensate the plaintiff Rieter Ingolstadt GmbH for financial losses and expenses.

 

More information:
Rieter China patent Design
Source:

Rieter Holding AG

VDMA: Mask production: Nothing runs without textile machinery (c) VDMA Textilmaschinen
21.07.2020

VDMA: Mask production: Nothing runs without textile machinery

  • Protective masks, everyday masks, disinfecting wipes and surgical gowns are goods in demand in times of corona.
  • In their manufacture, textile machines are at the beginning of the production chain.

The production of the textile raw material is the first step of the usually multi-stage production processes. Members of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association are at the beginning of this technological chain.

The production of protective masks starts with the manufacture of the filter material, which for surgical masks as well as FFP2 and FFP3 respirator masks consists of fine-pored nonwoven fabric to intercept coronaviruses. In addition to the systems, machines and components used for this purpose, measurement and control technology ensures the highest quality of important parameters such as basis weight and air permeability. Nonwovens used for respiratory masks have to meet the same high-quality requirements as the masks – to ensure the protection of the mask wearer.

  • Protective masks, everyday masks, disinfecting wipes and surgical gowns are goods in demand in times of corona.
  • In their manufacture, textile machines are at the beginning of the production chain.

The production of the textile raw material is the first step of the usually multi-stage production processes. Members of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association are at the beginning of this technological chain.

The production of protective masks starts with the manufacture of the filter material, which for surgical masks as well as FFP2 and FFP3 respirator masks consists of fine-pored nonwoven fabric to intercept coronaviruses. In addition to the systems, machines and components used for this purpose, measurement and control technology ensures the highest quality of important parameters such as basis weight and air permeability. Nonwovens used for respiratory masks have to meet the same high-quality requirements as the masks – to ensure the protection of the mask wearer.

Members of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association have reacted to the new market requirements in a very short time and developed new technologies for knitted, warp knitted as well as woven mouth and nose masks that can be produced without the need for sewing. For surgical masks, FFP2 respirators and social distancing masks, a wide variety of other materials and combinations of materials are used (nonwovens, woven fabrics, knitted or warp knitted fabrics and laminates thereof). Elastic bands are required to wear the masks and several association members provide technologies for their production.

Materials for masks can be treated with textile chemicals to make them antiviral and antibacterial. For this purpose, the VDMA member companies offer application systems which apply the corresponding chemicals to fabric webs. As already mentioned, quality assurance is extremely important for medical products. For this purpose, member companies of the VDMA offer software systems with which each mask can be traced through the entire production process.

VDMA members also offer solutions for the assembly of respirator masks, some of which were developed at short notice. These solutions enable respirators to be produced that meet the relevant standards and the highest quality requirements of customers and market surveillance. This applies to systems for the production of surgical masks and FFP respirators. At the end of the production chain, machines are used to pack masks in single or multiple packs.

In pandemic times, the demand for protective gowns (so-called surgical gowns) also increases. The same applies to disinfecting wipes. For these textile products, too, VDMA members manufacture tailor-made machines for production through to packaging. The quality of the products is ensured by means of measurement and control technology.

In the wake of the corona crisis, VDMA Textile Machinery has launched a new series of web events called "Textile Machinery Webtalk". Here, experts from up to four VDMA member companies present their innovative technologies on a specific topic in a maximum of 90 minutes and are available to answer questions from participants. The presentations are held in English. Participation in the web events is free of charge.
Topics of the first two webtalks were:
"Technologies for the production of melt-blown nonwovens for respiratory protection masks (FFP masks and surgical masks)."
"Technologies for the production of respiratory protection masks (FFP masks and surgical masks)."

The format is well received. Around 180 people from more than 30 countries took part in the first two webtalks. With this format, the VDMA reaches both textile and nonwovens manufacturers who already manufacture these products and companies that want to invest in new business areas.

The next webtalk will take place on 23 July 2020 from 14.00 to 16.00 (CEST) on the current topic "Technology solutions to produce fully-fashioned community face masks." Experts from KARL MAYER, STOLL by KARL MAYER and Jakob Müller will be presenting their technologies for producing everyday textile masks to an international expert audience. Interested parties can register here.

Source:

VDMA Textilmaschinen

TMAS members ready to support digital textile transformations, post Covid-19 (c) TMAS
TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson.
08.07.2020

TMAS members ready to support digital textile transformations, post Covid-19

  • Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – have adopted a range of new strategies in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, aimed at assisting manufacturers of textiles and apparel to adjust to a new normal, as Europe and other regions emerge cautiously from lockdown.

“Many European companies have been forced into testing new working methods and looking at what it’s possible to do remotely, and how to exploit automation to the full, in order to become more flexible,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Others have been taking risks where they see opportunies and there’s a new sense of solidarity among companies.

“It’s extremely encouraging, for example, that over five hundred European companies from across our supply chain are reported to have responded to the shortages of facemasks and PPE – protective personal equipment – by converting parts of their sites or investing in new equipment.”

New supply chains

  • Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – have adopted a range of new strategies in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, aimed at assisting manufacturers of textiles and apparel to adjust to a new normal, as Europe and other regions emerge cautiously from lockdown.

“Many European companies have been forced into testing new working methods and looking at what it’s possible to do remotely, and how to exploit automation to the full, in order to become more flexible,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Others have been taking risks where they see opportunies and there’s a new sense of solidarity among companies.

“It’s extremely encouraging, for example, that over five hundred European companies from across our supply chain are reported to have responded to the shortages of facemasks and PPE – protective personal equipment – by converting parts of their sites or investing in new equipment.”

New supply chains

Amongst them are TMAS members of the ACG Group, who quickly established a dedicated new nonwovens fabric converting and single-use garment making-up plant to supply to the Swedish health authorities. From a standing start in March, this is now producing 1.8 million square metres of converted fabric and turning it into 692,000 finished medical garments each month.

“In 2020 so far, we have seen new value chains being created and a certain amount of permanent reshoring is now inevitable,” says Premler-Andersson. “This is being backed by the new funding announced in the European Union’s Next Generation EU plan, with €750 billion marked for helping industry recover. As the European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has stressed, “green and digital” transitions hold the key to Europe’s future prosperity and resilience, and TMAS members have new solutions to assist in both areas.”

Remote working

Automated solutions have opened up many possibilities for remote working during the pandemic. Texo AB, for example, the specialist in wide-width weaving looms for the paper industry, was able to successfully complete the build and delivery of a major multi-container order between April and May.

“Our new Remote Guidance software now makes it possible for us to carry out some of the commissioning and troubleshooting of such new lines remotely, which has been helpful” says Texo AB President Anders Svensson.

Svegea of Sweden, which has spent the past few months developing its new CR-210 fabric relaxation machine for knitted fabrics, has also successfully set up and installed a number of machines remotely, which the company has never attempted before.

“The pandemic has definitely led to some inventive solutions for us and with international travel currently not possible, we are finding better methods of digital communication and collaboration all the time,” says Svegea managing director Hakan Steene.

Eric Norling, Vice President of the Precision Application business of Baldwin Technology, believes the pandemic may have a more permanent impact on global travel.

“We have now proven that e-meetings and virtual collaboration tools are effective,” he says. “Baldwin implemented a home office work regime from April with only production personnel and R&D researchers at the workplace. These past few months have shown that we can be just as effective and do not need to travel for physical meetings to the same extent that was previously thought to be necessary.”

Pär Hedman, Sales and Marketing Manager for IRO AB, however, believes such advances can only go so far at the moment.

“Video conferences have taken a big leap forward, especially in development projects, and this method of communication is here to stay, but it will never completely replace personal meetings,” he says. “And textile fabrics need to be touched, examined and accepted by the senses, which is impossible to do via digital media today. The coming haptic internet, however, may well even change that too.”

Social distancing

The many garment factories now equipped with Eton Systems UPS work stations – designed to save considerable costs through automation – have meanwhile benefited from the unintentional social distancing they automatically provide compared to factories with conventional banks of sewing machines.

“These companies have been able to continue operating throughout the pandemic due to the spaced nature of our automated plant configurations,” says Eton Systems Business Development Manager Roger Ryrlén. “The UPS system has been established for some time, but planned spacing has proved an accidental plus for our customers – with improved productivity.”

“Innovations from TMAS member companies have been coming thick and fast recently due to their advanced know-how in automation concepts,” Premler-Andersson concludes.  “If anything, the restrictions imposed by the Covid-19 pandemic have only accelerated these initiatives by obliging our members to take new approaches.”

Photo: Shutterstock
18.06.2020

VDMA starts technology webtalks for the textile industry

On June 22, the VDMA starts a series of Textile Machinery Webtalks. In the first edition experts from the companies Oerlikon Manmade Fibers, Mahlo and Nanoval will present technologies for the production of melt-blown nonwovens for respiratory protection masks (FFP masks and surgical masks). After the presentations, the experts will be available to answer the participants' questions. The webtalk will run from 2 – 4 pm (German time). Participation is free of charge. Interested persons can register here

Further technology webtalks on other topics are in preparation. Please check 
www.machines-for-textiles.com/webtalk for updates.
 

On June 22, the VDMA starts a series of Textile Machinery Webtalks. In the first edition experts from the companies Oerlikon Manmade Fibers, Mahlo and Nanoval will present technologies for the production of melt-blown nonwovens for respiratory protection masks (FFP masks and surgical masks). After the presentations, the experts will be available to answer the participants' questions. The webtalk will run from 2 – 4 pm (German time). Participation is free of charge. Interested persons can register here

Further technology webtalks on other topics are in preparation. Please check 
www.machines-for-textiles.com/webtalk for updates.
 

More information:
VDMA
Source:

VDMA 
Textile Machinery

ITM 2021
The ITM and Hightex Exhibitions are postponed
22.05.2020

ITM and HIGHTEX Exhibitions Postponed to 22-26 June 2021

ITM International Textile Machinery Exhibition and HIGHTEX International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Exhibition, held every two years in partnership with Tüyap Tüm Fuarcılık Inc. and Teknik Fuarcılık Inc., and in cooperation with TEMSAD, were planned to be held between June 2-6 this year. However, as effects of Corona virus (Covid-19) continue to increasingly impact all the world, ITM and HIGHTEX exhibitions had been postponed to 14-18 July 2020, but it has been announced that the events have been rescheduled to 22-26 June 2021. 

ITM International Textile Machinery Exhibition and HIGHTEX International Technical Textiles and Nonwoven Exhibition, held every two years in partnership with Tüyap Tüm Fuarcılık Inc. and Teknik Fuarcılık Inc., and in cooperation with TEMSAD, were planned to be held between June 2-6 this year. However, as effects of Corona virus (Covid-19) continue to increasingly impact all the world, ITM and HIGHTEX exhibitions had been postponed to 14-18 July 2020, but it has been announced that the events have been rescheduled to 22-26 June 2021. 

Exhibitions Preparation Continue
Preparations for ITM and HIGHTEX 2021 Exhibitions continue at full steam to bring together hundreds of manufacturers and global investors who develop leading technologies in their fields. The latest technologies and new products to be displayed at ITM and HIGHTEX Exhibitions, which will open their doors in Istanbul Tuyap Fair Convention and Congress Center next year, will meet with textile investors from all over the world.
 
ITM 2018, where textile machinery leaders exhibited their latest technological products, turned into a trade show with global launches and hosted one of the largest meetings in the world, with 1150 exhibitors from 64 countries and 58.942 visitors (14.248 of them foreigners) from 94 countries.

Source:

Teknik Fuarcılık INC

02.04.2020

Predictive maintenance reduces downtime on PCMC’s Xcut saw

New tissue log saw allows operators to track critical component lifecycles

Paper Converting Machine Company (PCMC), part of Barry-Wehmiller, has announced that the Xcut saw, its newest tissue log saw, now has the ability to use predictive maintenance to reduce unplanned downtime.

With this new capability, operators will be able to track the lifecycles of critical components and monitor the performance of others. The saw will provide notifications regarding upcoming maintenance requirements before they become critical issues, allowing operators to have replacement parts ready when the time comes.

The Xcut saw will monitor and collect information from servo motor feedback, vibration sensors and other devices, and alert operators when the machine needs maintenance. For example, if an axis becomes more difficult to turn or experiences abnormal vibrations, the predictive maintenance system will provide an alert that the gearbox may need to be replaced.

New tissue log saw allows operators to track critical component lifecycles

Paper Converting Machine Company (PCMC), part of Barry-Wehmiller, has announced that the Xcut saw, its newest tissue log saw, now has the ability to use predictive maintenance to reduce unplanned downtime.

With this new capability, operators will be able to track the lifecycles of critical components and monitor the performance of others. The saw will provide notifications regarding upcoming maintenance requirements before they become critical issues, allowing operators to have replacement parts ready when the time comes.

The Xcut saw will monitor and collect information from servo motor feedback, vibration sensors and other devices, and alert operators when the machine needs maintenance. For example, if an axis becomes more difficult to turn or experiences abnormal vibrations, the predictive maintenance system will provide an alert that the gearbox may need to be replaced.

This multifaceted approach to predictive maintenance allows operators to tackle multiple maintenance tasks at the same time, which reduces downtime and gets the machine back into production more quickly.

More information:
textile machinery
Compact II (c) Owl Media
Compact II
03.03.2020

Eltex of Sweden AB reports success with its Eye Compact II yarn

A close eye on quality with the Eye Compact II

Eltex of Sweden AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, reports solid success with its Eye Compact II yarn monitoring system for carpet tufting machines, since its launch at ITMA 2019 in Barcelona last June.

The sensor units of the Eye Compact II,Brian Hicks, Eltex CEO explains, have been successfully miniaturised to approximately a third of the size of those with the established Compact system, allowing them to be mounted on the very latest high speed tufting machines that are graphics driven, with limited space at the puller rollers.

Early stage prevention
Unlike the sensor systems that are employed at later positions on tufting machines – in order to detect faults in the formed fabric – Eye Compact II technology is about prevention at an earlier stage, through the detection of missing yarns.

A close eye on quality with the Eye Compact II

Eltex of Sweden AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, reports solid success with its Eye Compact II yarn monitoring system for carpet tufting machines, since its launch at ITMA 2019 in Barcelona last June.

The sensor units of the Eye Compact II,Brian Hicks, Eltex CEO explains, have been successfully miniaturised to approximately a third of the size of those with the established Compact system, allowing them to be mounted on the very latest high speed tufting machines that are graphics driven, with limited space at the puller rollers.

Early stage prevention
Unlike the sensor systems that are employed at later positions on tufting machines – in order to detect faults in the formed fabric – Eye Compact II technology is about prevention at an earlier stage, through the detection of missing yarns.

Critically, the sensors need to be installed after the last puller roller and before the tufting needles, because otherwise the roller could still be feeding yarns that will not been successfully taken by the needles. This is only possible with the extremely slim Eye Compact II units, which can also be positioned either above or below the rollers.

Guarantee
Another benefit is that the sensors can be arranged more closely together, with each of them monitoring 16 yarn positions, and their robustness ensures that once fitted, there is little the technicians or operators need to do.

Automatic
The Eye Compact II system easily learns pattern changes and displays the number of yarns involved to the operator for confirmation, and different parameters for different yarns groups can also even be set if required. With its research and development work primarily carried out at its headquarters in Osby, Sweden, and North American sales and service operated from its subsidiary in South Carolina, the manufacturing plant of Eltex has been located at Templemore in Ireland since 1976, providing significant advantages in terms of high flexibility and logistical services to customers on both sides of the Atlantic.

 

More information:
Eltex of Sweden AB TMAS
Source:

Owl Media

The SFL-2000 is the result of a four-year development project (c) AWOL
10.02.2020

ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström teamed up with Juki Corporation


In the latest technology innovation from members of TMAS (the Swedish textile machinery association), ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström have teamed up with Juki Corporation – the world’s leading sewing machine manufacturer – in the development of a new automated line concept that can considerably speed up the production of finished filter bags.

Woven or nonwoven filter bags employed in a wide range of industrial processes may be under the radar as products, but they represent a pretty significant percentage of technical textiles production.

According to a recent report from BCC research, a leading US analyst covering this sector, industrial filtration represented a $555 million market in 2019 and some of the key areas where such filter bags are employed include:


In the latest technology innovation from members of TMAS (the Swedish textile machinery association), ACG Kinna and ACG Nyström have teamed up with Juki Corporation – the world’s leading sewing machine manufacturer – in the development of a new automated line concept that can considerably speed up the production of finished filter bags.

Woven or nonwoven filter bags employed in a wide range of industrial processes may be under the radar as products, but they represent a pretty significant percentage of technical textiles production.

According to a recent report from BCC research, a leading US analyst covering this sector, industrial filtration represented a $555 million market in 2019 and some of the key areas where such filter bags are employed include:

  • Metal fabrication, with effective filtration required for manual and automated welding, thermal cutting, blasting and machining, especially for coolant filtration.
  • The process and energy industries, including foundries, smelters, incinerators, asphalt works and energy production plants.
  • Other key manufacturing fields – often where dust is generated – including the production of timber, textiles, composites, waste handling and minerals, in addition to chemicals, food production, pharmaceuticals, electronics and agriculture.

Line integration
The new SFL-2000 line is the result of a four-year development project between Juki Central Europe, headquartered in Poland, and the two ACG companies.

It is capable of handling a wide range of different filter media, and as an all-in-one solution, can produce high quality and accurate seams to pre-defined parameters, with optional modules allowing for customised constructions.

 

More information:
ACG Kinna ACG Nyström TMAS
Source:

AWOL

14.01.2020

Saurer at ITME Africa

As a member of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association, Saurer will give visitors the opportunity to learn about the company and to gain an overview of its spinning and embroidery offerings at ITME Africa from 14 to 16 February 2020. At the exhibition, visitors will learn more about Saurer’s extensive spinning offerings, which enable customers to process a wide range of fibres depending on their needs using ring-, worsted- and compact- or rotor-spinning technologies. Autoairo, the group’s new double-sided air-spinning machine, will also be introduced to prospective clients.

As a member of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association, Saurer will give visitors the opportunity to learn about the company and to gain an overview of its spinning and embroidery offerings at ITME Africa from 14 to 16 February 2020. At the exhibition, visitors will learn more about Saurer’s extensive spinning offerings, which enable customers to process a wide range of fibres depending on their needs using ring-, worsted- and compact- or rotor-spinning technologies. Autoairo, the group’s new double-sided air-spinning machine, will also be introduced to prospective clients.

More information:
Saurer
Source:

Saurer AG

The stand-alone Coloreel unit provides complete freedom in the creation of unique embroideries. (c) TMAS
The stand-alone Coloreel unit provides complete freedom in the creation of unique embroideries.
05.12.2019

TMAS welcomes two technology groundbreakers

Swedish textile machinery association TMAS is welcoming two new companies – both at the forefront of sustainable and Industry 4.0-enabled technologies – to its membership.

A new benchmark for embroidery
The first is Coloreel, the developer of a thread coloring unit which enables the instant and high-quality coloring, fixation, washing and lubrication of thread to take place simultaneously to the actual embroidering of a fabric, representing a bold and entirely new approach to this traditional field.

Based on a CMYK ink system, Coloreel’s advanced colorization software and instant thread coloring technology allows a single needle to carry out what previously required multiples of them, and with much more consistent stitch quality.

Swedish textile machinery association TMAS is welcoming two new companies – both at the forefront of sustainable and Industry 4.0-enabled technologies – to its membership.

A new benchmark for embroidery
The first is Coloreel, the developer of a thread coloring unit which enables the instant and high-quality coloring, fixation, washing and lubrication of thread to take place simultaneously to the actual embroidering of a fabric, representing a bold and entirely new approach to this traditional field.

Based on a CMYK ink system, Coloreel’s advanced colorization software and instant thread coloring technology allows a single needle to carry out what previously required multiples of them, and with much more consistent stitch quality.

Designed to work with any existing industrial embroidery machine without modification, the stand-alone Coloreel unit provides complete freedom in the creation of unique embroideries, imposing no limitations on the number of customized colors employed in designs. It allows set-up and lead times to be reduced as well as significant flexibility in production schedules, while eliminating the need for large thread inventories.

With fewer trims required for color changes, the Coloreel unit can also reduce the total production time required for complex designs by up to 80%, as well as instant reaction to the specific color requirements of customers.

“Our system is allowing customers to achieve color effects that have never been seen before – and at a new level of efficiency,” says Magnus Hellström, VP Sales & Marketing at Coloreel. “We are setting the new benchmark for the embroidery industry and we are pleased to join TMAS to help us spread the word.”

More information:
TMAS
Source:

AWOL Media

01.12.2019

MS PRINTING AT HEIMTEXTIL

  • Focus on Productivity and Efficiency

MS Printing Solutions at the next Heimtextil will focus on presenting textile printing solutions to boost cost-effective and high-quality productions, answering to Industry leaders in home and contract textile who need: productivity, quality and beneficial production process.

Attendees will see a JP4 EVO 3200 printer at work, with Bellagio reactive ink made by JK Group. This is one of MS' solutions which streamlines printing processes, reduces production times and maintenance costs, improving efficiency by:

  • Focus on Productivity and Efficiency

MS Printing Solutions at the next Heimtextil will focus on presenting textile printing solutions to boost cost-effective and high-quality productions, answering to Industry leaders in home and contract textile who need: productivity, quality and beneficial production process.

Attendees will see a JP4 EVO 3200 printer at work, with Bellagio reactive ink made by JK Group. This is one of MS' solutions which streamlines printing processes, reduces production times and maintenance costs, improving efficiency by:

  • making the best use of production buildings, minimizing the space occupied by printers: JP4 EVO is compact and functional.
  • taking full advantage of manufacturing-process, reducing downtime therefore improving productivity-performances: JP4 EVO can be fed by external roll unwinder ensuring timing optimization.
  • using inks with a custom-made waveform, lowering the most common defects due to the interaction between ink and printheads, improving your productivity and competitiveness

The show will be the occasion for the Technical and Sales Teams to illustrate all details which characterize Minilario.  The printing machine, launched at the last ITMA, is the ideal choice for those searching for: flexibility, quality, speed, energy efficiency and sustainability, all in one.

The 64 print heads installed on the innovative printing carriage allow Minilario to reach the shocking but real printing speed of 18m/min, fitting the Home and contract textile demand of productivity and quality, applying a cost-effective production process.

The show will offer the opportunity to remark MS's sustainability commitment, started with #transparentaswater project based on the 100/90/10 paradigm aimed to engage the whole Textile Printing Industry in a big change. The commitment continued with MS’s adhesion to the “Sustainable Technologies” project launched by ACIMIT which selects textile machinery and systems manufacturers whose production specifications ensure a low environmental impact, combining sustainability and innovation. MS' printing machines may boast “Green Label” as “Suppliers of Sustainable Technologies” (come and visit us to go deeply inside our sustainability commitment).

Source:

Image & Communication JK Group S.p.A.

Photo: TMAS
04.11.2019

Swedish machinery companies see major opportunities at Heimtextil 2020

The decision by Messe Frankfurt, the organiser of the annual Heimtextil exhibition for home textiles, to significantly expand its focus on textile technologies in 2020, has received an extremely enthusiastic response from members of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery manufacturers association.

“Heimtextil is already a huge show, having attracted well over three thousand visitors to Frankfurt in January this year, filling all twelve halls of the Messe Frankfurt fair grounds,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “The expansion of textile technologies at next January’s Heimtextil can only help further boost this international community of manufacturers and suppliers for the home textiles market at all levels, and naturally we want to be a part of it.”

The decision by Messe Frankfurt, the organiser of the annual Heimtextil exhibition for home textiles, to significantly expand its focus on textile technologies in 2020, has received an extremely enthusiastic response from members of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery manufacturers association.

“Heimtextil is already a huge show, having attracted well over three thousand visitors to Frankfurt in January this year, filling all twelve halls of the Messe Frankfurt fair grounds,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “The expansion of textile technologies at next January’s Heimtextil can only help further boost this international community of manufacturers and suppliers for the home textiles market at all levels, and naturally we want to be a part of it.”

  • ACG Kinna Automatic
    At Heimtextil 2019, TMAS member ACG Kinna Automatic generated a significant buzz with live demonstrations of its new robotic pillow filling system and will provide details of how it has been further developed over 2019, with several commercial systems now in place.
  • Automatex
    Meanwhile, in the first quarter of 2020, Automatex ES, the specialist in automated cutting, sewing and folding equipment, is planning to launch another innovation in advanced manufacturing for the bedding industry.
  • IRO AB
    IRO AB has consistently introduced new milestones in the field of yarn feeding technology for weaving machines and at Heimtextil 2020 will be providing information on new introductions to its product range.
  • Eltex
    Eltex is achieving considerable success with its yarn fault detection and tension monitoring systems across a range of sectors, including the tufting of carpets and the creeling of woven materials, but at Heimtextil 2020 the focus will be on its advanced systems for the sewn products sector, including the UPG-Stitch thread break sensor, which is based on the piezoelectric principle and is suitable for all types of yarns while being insensitive to dust, dirt and humidity variations.
  • Svegea of Sweden
    Svegea of Sweden now has over 60 years of experience in exclusively designing, manufacturing and installing bespoke bias cutting, roll slitting and rewinding and inspection machines.
    The company’s complete Bias System includes a tube sewing unit a bias cutter/winder for opening up previously-formed tube material – spirally on a bias – and strip cutter.
(c) Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG
30.09.2019

Monforts in two-centre VDMA delegation to Pakistan

Monforts will be part of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association’s forthcoming delegation to Pakistan which will take place from November 11th to 14th.

In total, 14 companies covering the entire textile chain are participating in the visit, which will showcase the benefits and technological innovations of German textile machinery at seminars held in both Karachi and Lahore.

A technical seminar in Karachi will be held at the Hotel Karachi Avari Towers on November 12th and a second in Lahore will be held on November 14th at the Hotel Avari Lahore Towers.

Monforts will be part of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association’s forthcoming delegation to Pakistan which will take place from November 11th to 14th.

In total, 14 companies covering the entire textile chain are participating in the visit, which will showcase the benefits and technological innovations of German textile machinery at seminars held in both Karachi and Lahore.

A technical seminar in Karachi will be held at the Hotel Karachi Avari Towers on November 12th and a second in Lahore will be held on November 14th at the Hotel Avari Lahore Towers.

“The regions surrounding both of these cities have become major hubs for textile manufacturing, especially in areas such as home textiles and denim, where Monforts enjoys market-leading positions with its finishing systems,” says area sales manager Manfred Havenlith, who in addition to presenting at the seminars, will be holding meetings and networking with existing Monforts customers and potential new ones during the trip. “The Punjab region around Karachi, as Pakistan’s largest city, for example, is now dense with denim manufacturers, many of whom have already expressed keen interest in the new Monforts CYD continuous yarn dyeing system we introduced at ITMA 2019 in Barcelona in June.”