From the Sector

Reset
47 results
DITF: Biopolymers from bacteria protect technical textiles Photo: DITF
Charging a doctor blade with molten PHA using a hot-melt gun
23.02.2024

DITF: Biopolymers from bacteria protect technical textiles

Textiles for technical applications often derive their special function via the application of coatings. This way, textiles become, for example wind and water proof or more resistant to abrasion. Usually, petroleum-based substances such as polyacrylates or polyurethanes are used. However, these consume exhaustible resources and the materials can end up in the environment if handled improperly. Therefore, the German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) are researching materials from renewable sources that are recyclable and do not pollute the environment after use. Polymers that can be produced from bacteria are here of particular interest.

Textiles for technical applications often derive their special function via the application of coatings. This way, textiles become, for example wind and water proof or more resistant to abrasion. Usually, petroleum-based substances such as polyacrylates or polyurethanes are used. However, these consume exhaustible resources and the materials can end up in the environment if handled improperly. Therefore, the German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) are researching materials from renewable sources that are recyclable and do not pollute the environment after use. Polymers that can be produced from bacteria are here of particular interest.

These biopolymers have the advantage that they can be produced in anything from small laboratory reactors to large production plants. The most promising biopolymers include polysaccharides, polyamides from amino acids and polyesters such as polylactic acid or polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), all of which are derived from renewable raw materials. PHAs is an umbrella term for a group of biotechnologically produced polyesters. The main difference between these polyesters is the number of carbon atoms in the repeat unit. To date, they have mainly been investigated for medical applications. As PHAs products are increasingly available on the market, coatings made from PHAs may also be increasingly used in technical applications in the future.

The bacteria from which the PHAs are obtained grow with the help of carbohydrates, fats and an increased CO2 concentration and light with suitable wavelength.

The properties of PHA can be adapted by varying the structure of the repeat unit. This makes polyhydroxyalkanoates a particularly interesting class of compounds for technical textile coatings, which has hardly been investigated to date. Due to their water-repellent properties, which stem from their molecular structure, and their stable structure, polyhydroxyalkanoates have great potential for the production of water-repellent, mechanically resilient textiles, such as those in demand in the automotive sector and for outdoor clothing.

The DITF have already carried out successful research work in this area. Coatings on cotton yarns and fabrics made of cotton, polyamide and polyester showed smooth and quite good adhesion. The PHA types for the coating were both procured on the open market and produced by the research partner Fraunhofer IGB. It was shown that the molten polymer can be applied to cotton yarns by extrusion through a coating nozzle. The molten polymer was successfully coated onto fabric using a doctor blade. The length of the molecular side chain of the PHA plays an important role in the properties of the coated textile. Although PHAs with medium-length side chains are better suited to achieving low stiffness and a good textile handle, their wash resistance is low. PHAs with short side chains are suitable for achieving high wash and abrasion resistance, but the textile handle is somewhat stiffer.

The team is currently investigating how the properties of PHAs can be changed in order to achieve the desired resistance and textile properties in equal measure. There are also plans to formulate aqueous formulations for yarn and textile finishing. This will allow much thinner coatings to be applied to textiles than is possible with molten PHAs.

Other DITF research teams are investigating whether PHAs are also suitable for the production of fibers and nonwovens.

Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF)

DITF: Modular cutting tool recognized with JEC Composites Innovation Award Photo: Leitz
Hermann Finckh (DITF) and Andreas Kisselbach (Leitz GmbH & Co. KG)
16.02.2024

DITF: Modular cutting tool recognized with JEC Composites Innovation Award

Hermann Finckh received the JEC Composites Innovation Award in the category Equipment Machinery & Heavy Industries for the innovation MAXIMUM WEIGHT REDUCTION OF COMPOSITE TOOLS. The research team from the German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) developed a new modular cutting tool for woodworking machines, which was produced and successfully tested by the industrial partner Leitz GmbH & Co. KG.

The extremely lightweight planing tool was made from carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) instead of aluminum using a completely new modular construction principle. As a result, it weighs 50 percent less than conventional tools. It enables significantly higher working speed, which enables a one-and-a-half-fold increase in productivity. The development of the extreme-lightweight principle was performed by numerical simulation and every solution was virtually tested in advance. A patent application has been filed for the concept.

Hermann Finckh received the JEC Composites Innovation Award in the category Equipment Machinery & Heavy Industries for the innovation MAXIMUM WEIGHT REDUCTION OF COMPOSITE TOOLS. The research team from the German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) developed a new modular cutting tool for woodworking machines, which was produced and successfully tested by the industrial partner Leitz GmbH & Co. KG.

The extremely lightweight planing tool was made from carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) instead of aluminum using a completely new modular construction principle. As a result, it weighs 50 percent less than conventional tools. It enables significantly higher working speed, which enables a one-and-a-half-fold increase in productivity. The development of the extreme-lightweight principle was performed by numerical simulation and every solution was virtually tested in advance. A patent application has been filed for the concept.

DITF: Recyclable event and trade fair furniture made of paper (c) DITF
Structurally wound paper yarn element with green sensor yarn.
26.01.2024

DITF: Recyclable event and trade fair furniture made of paper

A lot of waste is generated in the trade fair and event industry. It makes sense to have furniture that can quickly be dismantled and stored to save space - or simply disposed of and recycled. Paper is the ideal raw material here: locally available and renewable. It also has an established recycling process. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research (DITF) and their project partners have jointly developed a recycling-friendly modular system for trade fair furniture. The "PapierEvents" project was funded by the German Federal Environmental Foundation (DBU).

Once the paper has been brought into yarn form, it can be processed into a wide variety of basic elements using the structure winding process, creating a completely new design language.

A lot of waste is generated in the trade fair and event industry. It makes sense to have furniture that can quickly be dismantled and stored to save space - or simply disposed of and recycled. Paper is the ideal raw material here: locally available and renewable. It also has an established recycling process. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research (DITF) and their project partners have jointly developed a recycling-friendly modular system for trade fair furniture. The "PapierEvents" project was funded by the German Federal Environmental Foundation (DBU).

Once the paper has been brought into yarn form, it can be processed into a wide variety of basic elements using the structure winding process, creating a completely new design language.

The unusual look is created in the structure winding process. In this technology developed at the DITF, the yarn is deposited precisely on a rotating mandrel. This enables high process speeds and a high degree of automation. After the winding process, the individual yarns are fixed, creating a self-supporting component. A starch-based adhesive, which is also made from renewable and degradable raw materials, was used in the project for the fixation.

The recyclability of all the basic elements developed in the project was investigated and confirmed. For this purpose the research colleagues at the project partner from the Department of Paper Production and Mechanical Process Engineering at TU Darmstadt (PMV) used the CEPI method, a new standard test procedure from the Confederation of European Paper Industries.

Sensor and lighting functions were also implemented in a recycling-friendly manner. The paper sensor yarns are integrated into the components and detect contact.

Also, a modular system for trade fair and event furniture was developed. The furniture is lightweight and modular. For example, the total weight of the counter shown is well under ten kilograms and individual parts can easily be shipped in standard packages. All parts can be used several times, making them suitable for campaigns lasting several weeks.

A counter, a customer stopper in DIN A1 format and a pyramid-shaped stand were used as demonstrators. The research work of the DITF (textile technology) and PMV (paper processing) was supplemented by other partners: GarnTec GmbH developed the paper yarns used, the industrial designers from quintessence design provided important suggestions for the visual and functional design of the elements and connectors and the event agency Rödig GmbH evaluated the ideas and concepts in terms of usability in practical use.

Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF)

nominees Graphic: nova Institut
19.01.2024

Nominated Innovations for Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2024 Award

From Resource-efficient and Recycled Fibres for Textiles and Building Panels to Geotextiles for Glacier Protection: Six award nominees present innovative and sustainable solutions for various industries in the cellulose fibre value chain. The full economic potential of the cellulose fibre industry will be introduced to a wide audience that will vote for the winners in Cologne (Germany), and online.

Again nova-Institute grants the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award in the context of the “Cellulose Fibres Conference”, that will take place in Cologne on 13 and 14 March 2024. In advance, the conferences advisory board nominated six remarkable products, including cellulose fibres from textile waste and straw, a novel technology for dying cellulose-based textiles and a construction panel as well as geotextiles. The innovations will be presented by the companies on the first day of the event. All conference participants can vote for one of the six nominees and the top three winners will be honoured with the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award. The Innovation award is sponsored by GIG Karasek (AT).

From Resource-efficient and Recycled Fibres for Textiles and Building Panels to Geotextiles for Glacier Protection: Six award nominees present innovative and sustainable solutions for various industries in the cellulose fibre value chain. The full economic potential of the cellulose fibre industry will be introduced to a wide audience that will vote for the winners in Cologne (Germany), and online.

Again nova-Institute grants the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award in the context of the “Cellulose Fibres Conference”, that will take place in Cologne on 13 and 14 March 2024. In advance, the conferences advisory board nominated six remarkable products, including cellulose fibres from textile waste and straw, a novel technology for dying cellulose-based textiles and a construction panel as well as geotextiles. The innovations will be presented by the companies on the first day of the event. All conference participants can vote for one of the six nominees and the top three winners will be honoured with the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award. The Innovation award is sponsored by GIG Karasek (AT).

In addition, the ever-growing sectors of cellulose-based nonwovens, packaging and hygiene products offer conference participants insights beyond the horizon of traditional textile applications. Sustainability and other topics such as fibre-to-fibre recycling and alternative fibre sources are the key topics of the Cellulose Fibres Conference, held in Cologne, Germany, on 13 and 14 March 2024 and online. The conference will showcase the most successful cellulose-based solutions currently on the market or those planned for the near future.

The nominees:

The Straw Flexi-Dress: Design Meets Sustainability – DITF & VRETENA (DE)
The Flexi-Dress design was inspired by the natural golden colour and silky touch of HighPerCell® (HPC) filaments based on unbleached straw pulp. These cellulose filaments are produced using environmentally friendly spinning technology in a closed-loop production process. The design decisions focused on the emotional connection and attachment to the HPC material to create a local and circular fashion product. The Flexi-Dress is designed as a versatile knitted garment – from work to street – that can be worn as a dress, but can also be split into two pieces – used separately as a top and a straight skirt. The top can also be worn with the V-neck front or back. The HPC textile knit structure was considered important for comfort and emotional properties.

HONEXT® Board FR-B (B-s1, d0) – Flame-retardant Board made From Upcycled Fibre Waste From the Paper Industry – Honext Material (ES)
HONEXT® FR-B board (B-s1, d0) is a flame-retardant board made from 100 % upcycled industrial waste fibres from the paper industry. Thanks to innovations in biotechnology, paper sludge is upcycled – the previously “worthless” residue from paper making – to create a fully recyclable material, all without the use of resins. This lightweight and easy-to-handle board boasts high mechanical performance and stability, along with low thermal conductivity, making it perfect for various applications in all interior environments where fire safety is a priority. The material is non-toxic, with no added VOCs, ensuring safety for both people and the planet. A sustainable and healthy material for the built environment, it achieves Cradle-to-Cradle Certified GOLD, and Material Health CertificateTM Gold Level version 4.0 with a carbon-negative footprint. Additionally, it is verified in the Product Environmental Footprint.

LENZING™ Cellulosic Fibres for Glacier Protection – Lenzing (AT)
Glaciers are now facing an unprecedented threat from global warming. Synthetic fibre-based geotextiles, while effective in slowing down glacier melt, create a new environmental challenge: microplastics contaminating glacial environments. The use of such materials contradicts the very purpose of glacier protection, as it exacerbates an already critical environmental problem. Recognizing this problem, the innovative use of cellulosic LENZING™ fibres presents a pioneering solution. The Institute of Ecology, at the University of Innsbruck, together with Lenzing and other partners made first trials in 2022 by covering small test fields with LENZING™ fibre-based geotextiles. The results were promising, confirming the effectiveness of this approach in slowing glacier melt without leaving behind microplastic.

The RENU Jacket – Advanced Recycling for Cellulosic Textiles – Pangaia (UK) & Evrnu (US)
PANGAIA LAB was born out of a dream to reduce barriers between people and the breakthrough innovations in material science. In 2023, PANGAIA LAB launched the RENU Jacket, a limited edition product made from 100% Nucycl® – a technology that recycles cellulosic textiles by breaking them down to their molecular building blocks, and reforming them into new fibres. This process produces a result that is 100% recycled and 100% recyclable when returned to the correct waste stream – maintaining the strength of the fibre so it doesn’t need to be blended with virgin material.
Through collaboration with Evrnu, the PANGAIA team created the world’s first 100% chemically recycled denim jacket, replacing a material traditionally made from 100% virgin cotton. By incorporating Nucycl® into this iconic fabric construction, dyed with natural indigo, the teams have demonstrated that it’s possible to replace ubiquitous materials with this innovation.

Textiles Made from Easy-to-dye Biocelsol – VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (FI)
One third of the textile industry’s wastewater is generated in dyeing and one fifth in finishing. But the use of chemically modified Biocelsol fibres reduces waste water. The knitted fabric is made from viscose and Biocelsol fibres and is only dyed after knitting. This gives the Biocelsol fibres a darker shade, using the same amount of dye and no salt in dyeing process. In addition, an interesting visual effect can be achieved. Moreover, less dye is needed for the darker colour tone in the finished textile and the possibility to use the salt-free dyeing is more environmentally friendly.
These special properties of man-made cellulosic fibres will reassert the fibres as a replacement for the existing fossil-based fibres, thus filling the demand for more environmentally friendly dyeing-solutions in the textile industry. The functionalised Biocelsol fibres were made in Finnish Academy FinnCERES project and are produced by wet spinning technique from the cellulose dope containing low amounts of 3-allyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl substituents. The functionality formed is permanent and has been shown to significantly improve the dyeability of the fibres. In addition, the functionalisation of Biocelsol fibres reduces the cost of textile finishing and dyeing as well as the effluent load.

A New Generation of Bio-based and Resource-efficient Fibre – TreeToTextile (SE)
TreeToTextile has developed a unique, sustainable and resource efficient fibre that doesn't exist on the market today. It has a natural dry feel similar to cotton and a semi-dull sheen and high drape like viscose. It is based on cellulose and has the potential to complement or replace cotton, viscose and polyester as a single fibre or in blends, depending on the application.
TreeToTextile Technology™ has a low demand for chemicals, energy and water. According to a third party verified LCA, the TreeToTextile fibre has a climate impact of 0.6 kg CO2 eq/kilo fibre. The fibre is made from bio-based and traceable resources and is biodegradable.

More information:
Nova Institut nova Institute
Source:

nova Institut

Reaktor im Polymertechnikum der DITF Denkendorf. Foto: DITF
Reaktor im Polymertechnikum der DITF Denkendorf.
16.01.2024

Textile Bodenbeläge: Rezyklierbar durch intrinsische Flammhemmung

Textile Bodenbeläge mit Flammschutzmitteln verringern das Risiko eines Brandes. In gewerblichen Gebäuden werden derartige Bodenbeläge in großen Mengen verbaut. Das Recycling dieser Materialien ist jedoch schwer umzusetzen, denn die Bodenbeläge bestehen aus mehreren miteinander verbundenen Schichten und die etablierten Flammschutzmittel sind meist ökologisch problematisch. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF) und das Institut für Bodensysteme (TFI) haben ein Konzept entwickelt, das den Anteil an Flammschutzmitteln in den Teppichgarnen vermindert – bei gleichbleibend hohem Flammschutz. Die Struktur des textilen Erzeugnisses ist für das Materialrecycling optimiert.
 
Der neuartige textile Bodenbelag besteht aus schwer entflammbarem Polyamid 6 (PA6) und wird vollständig rezyklierbar sein.
 

Textile Bodenbeläge mit Flammschutzmitteln verringern das Risiko eines Brandes. In gewerblichen Gebäuden werden derartige Bodenbeläge in großen Mengen verbaut. Das Recycling dieser Materialien ist jedoch schwer umzusetzen, denn die Bodenbeläge bestehen aus mehreren miteinander verbundenen Schichten und die etablierten Flammschutzmittel sind meist ökologisch problematisch. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF) und das Institut für Bodensysteme (TFI) haben ein Konzept entwickelt, das den Anteil an Flammschutzmitteln in den Teppichgarnen vermindert – bei gleichbleibend hohem Flammschutz. Die Struktur des textilen Erzeugnisses ist für das Materialrecycling optimiert.
 
Der neuartige textile Bodenbelag besteht aus schwer entflammbarem Polyamid 6 (PA6) und wird vollständig rezyklierbar sein.
 
Das PA6 wurde mit einer intrinsischen Flammhemmung ausgerüstet. Das bedeutet, dass die flammhemmende Chemikalie, in diesem Fall eine Phosphorverbindung, nicht etwa auf die Oberfläche der Fasern aufgebracht wird, sondern chemisch an die Molekülstruktur des PA6 gebunden ist. Dadurch ist der Flammschutz dauerhaft und kann weder ausgewaschen noch in die Umgebung freigesetzt werden. Das Konzept des intrinsischen Flammschutzes ist nicht neu. Es wurde schon vor rund zehn Jahren an den DITF entwickelt, konnte inzwischen aber optimiert werden: Die im aktuellen Forschungsprojekt verwendeten Polyamide wurden hinsichtlich ihrer Viskosität und ihres Phosphorgehaltes genau eingestellt. Dadurch wurden die beiden schwer miteinander vereinbaren Anforderungen hinsichtlich Verspinnbarkeit und gleichzeitig hohem Flammschutz vollständig erfüllt.
 
Zu Fasern gesponnen wird das neuartige Material auf einer Biko-Spinnanlage in den Technika der DITF. In ihr entstehen Bikomponenten-Fasern. Diese haben einen Kern aus herkömmlichem Polyamid und einen Mantel aus PA6 mit hochkonzentriertem Flammschutz. Die Kern- und Mantel-Komponenten der Fasern ergänzen sich perfekt: Der Faserkern sorgt für eine technisch gute Verspinnbarkeit und ausreichende Festigkeit der Fasern. Die Faserhülle hingegen hat den Flammschutz dort, wo Temperatur und Flammen angreifen: auf der Oberfläche der Faser. Der Phosphoranteil von rund 0,2 Gewichtsprozent ist dabei so eingestellt, dass der Fasermantel nicht brennbar ist. Als Nebeneffekt wird das Garn kostengünstiger herstellbar, da das hochpreisige Flammschutzmittel nur in einen Teil des Faservolumens eingebracht wird. Flammtests in den DITF-Laboren verifizieren die flammhemmende Wirkung und tragen dazu bei, den optimalen Gehalt an Flammschutzmittel zu ermitteln.  
 
Der zweite Teilaspekt des Forschungsvorhabens behandelt die Herstellung und Rezyklierbarkeit des textilen Bodenbelags. Hier geht es um die sortenreine Trennung der flammhemmend ausgerüsteten Oberschicht des Bodenbelags vom textilen Rücken und den Nachweis, dass die Materialien voll rezyklierbar und damit kreislauffähig sind.  
 
Aus den an den DITF hergestellten Polymeren und Biko-Garnen entwickelt der Projektpartner TFI den textilen Bodenbelag mit einer Oberschicht aus flammhemmend modifiziertem Mulitifilamentgarn und dem textilen Rücken. Die Rückenbeschichtung ist so beschaffen, dass eine thermische Trennung des Rückens von der flammhemmenden Oberschicht möglich ist. Dafür verwendet man Hotmelt-Klebstoffe, deren Brennbarkeit ebenfalls berücksichtigt wird. Das TFI ermittelt dabei auch die Brandeigenschaften der textilen Erzeugnisse. Die Trennbarkeit von Oberschicht und Rücken wird in Laborversuchen verifiziert.

DITF: Pleated textile tube for ventilation of surgical fields Photo: Wandres GmbH micro-cleaning
06.11.2023

DITF: Pleated textile tube for ventilation of surgical fields

The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) will be exhibiting at the MEDICA medical technology trade fair in Düsseldorf from November 13 to 16, 2023. At the joint stand of Baden-Württemberg International, a new development will be shown, that can reduce infections during operations.

These nosocomial infections occur when surgical wounds are contaminated by microbes. They can lead to serious complications. The task of the contract development was to create a porous ring tube that reduces the risk of contamination during operations. Germ-free air is introduced into the operating field via the so-called airflow ring, thereby shielding pathogenic germs.

The tube is knitted from polyester and folded. This pleating ensures that the circular shape remains stable, but the tube is still flexible. The outside of the tube is coated so that the air is directed into the inner area of the airflow ring. The ring is attached to the skin with a biocompatible adhesive so that it fits tightly on curved areas of the body such as the face or around joints. The position of the ring can be easily changed.

The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) will be exhibiting at the MEDICA medical technology trade fair in Düsseldorf from November 13 to 16, 2023. At the joint stand of Baden-Württemberg International, a new development will be shown, that can reduce infections during operations.

These nosocomial infections occur when surgical wounds are contaminated by microbes. They can lead to serious complications. The task of the contract development was to create a porous ring tube that reduces the risk of contamination during operations. Germ-free air is introduced into the operating field via the so-called airflow ring, thereby shielding pathogenic germs.

The tube is knitted from polyester and folded. This pleating ensures that the circular shape remains stable, but the tube is still flexible. The outside of the tube is coated so that the air is directed into the inner area of the airflow ring. The ring is attached to the skin with a biocompatible adhesive so that it fits tightly on curved areas of the body such as the face or around joints. The position of the ring can be easily changed.

The functionality of the airflow ring was successfully demonstrated in tests with nebulized colony-forming bacteria.

The tests showed that the ring also withstands significantly worse conditions than in an operating theater, e.g. in doctors' surgeries and in situations with lower hygiene standards.

DITF: Lignin coating for Geotextiles Photo: DITF
Coating process of a cellulose-based nonwoven with the lignin compound using thermoplastic processing methods on a continuous coating line.
27.10.2023

DITF: Lignin coating for Geotextiles

Textiles are a given in civil engineering: they stabilize water protection dams, prevent runoff containing pollutants from landfills, facilitate the revegetation of slopes at risk of erosion, and even make asphalt layers of roads thinner. Until now, textiles made of highly resistant synthetic fibers have been used for this purpose, which have a very long lifetime. For some applications, however, it would not only be sufficient but even desirable for the auxiliary textile to degrade in the soil when it has done its job. Environmentally friendly natural fibers, on the other hand, often decompose too quickly. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) are developing a bio-based protective coating that extends their service life.

Textiles are a given in civil engineering: they stabilize water protection dams, prevent runoff containing pollutants from landfills, facilitate the revegetation of slopes at risk of erosion, and even make asphalt layers of roads thinner. Until now, textiles made of highly resistant synthetic fibers have been used for this purpose, which have a very long lifetime. For some applications, however, it would not only be sufficient but even desirable for the auxiliary textile to degrade in the soil when it has done its job. Environmentally friendly natural fibers, on the other hand, often decompose too quickly. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) are developing a bio-based protective coating that extends their service life.

Depending on humidity and temperature, natural fiber materials can degrade in the soil in a matter of months or even a few days. In order to significantly extend the degradation time and make them suitable for geotextiles, the Denkendorf team researches a protective coating. This coating, based on lignin, is itself biodegradable and does not generate microplastics in the soil. Lignin is indeed biodegradable, but this degradation takes a very long time in nature.

Together with cellulose, Lignin forms the building materials for wood and is the "glue" in wood that holds this composite material together. In paper production, usually only the cellulose is used, so lignin is produced in large quantities as a waste material. So-called kraft lignin remains as a fusible material. Textile production can deal well with thermoplastic materials. All in all, this is a good prerequisite for taking a closer look at lignin as a protective coating for geotextiles.

Lignin is brittle by nature. Therefore, it is necessary to blend the kraft lignin with softer biomaterials. These new biopolymer compounds of brittle kraft lignin and softer biopolymers were applied to yarns and textile surfaces in the research project via adapted coating systems. For this purpose, for example, cotton yarns were coated with lignin at different application rates and evaluated. Biodegradation testing was carried out using soil burial tests both in a climatic chamber with temperature and humidity defined precisely according to the standard and outdoors under real environmental conditions. With positive results: the service life of textiles made of natural fibers can be extended by many factors with a lignin coating: The thicker the protective coating, the longer the protection lasts. In the outdoor tests, the lignin coating was still completely intact even after about 160 days of burial.

Textile materials coated with lignin enable sustainable applications. For example, they have an adjustable and sufficiently long service life for certain geotextile applications. In addition, they are still biodegradable and can replace previously used synthetic materials in some applications, such as revegetation of trench and stream banks.

Thus, lignin-coated textiles have the potential to significantly reduce the carbon footprint: They reduce dependence on petroleum-based products and avoid the formation of microplastics in the soil.

Further research is needed to establish lignin, which was previously a waste material, as a new valuable material in industrial manufacturing processes in the textile industry.

The research work was supported by the Baden-Württemberg Ministry of Food, Rural Areas and Consumer Protection as part of the Baden-Württemberg State Strategy for a Sustainable Bioeconomy.

Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF)

Garn und Gestrick aus 100 Prozent recyceltem Aramid. Foto: DITF
Garn und Gestrick aus 100 Prozent recyceltem Aramid.
30.08.2023

Recycling: Neue Prüfroutine für hochwertigere Garne

Nachhaltigkeit war das Leitthema der diesjährigen Textilmaschinenbaumesse ITMA. Und so zeigten fast alle Firmen in Mailand neue Technologien für das Textilrecycling. Doch es ist anspruchsvoll, aus Alttextilien hochwertige Garne zu gewinnen und zu ebenso hochwertigen Produkten zu verarbeiten. Noch gibt es nicht für alle Herausforderungen die passenden technologischen Lösungen. Für jedes Material müssen die passenden Prozesse gefunden werden. Dafür haben die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) zusammen mit dem Sächsischen Textilforschungsinstitut (STFI) eine neue Prüfroutine entwickelt.

Nachhaltigkeit war das Leitthema der diesjährigen Textilmaschinenbaumesse ITMA. Und so zeigten fast alle Firmen in Mailand neue Technologien für das Textilrecycling. Doch es ist anspruchsvoll, aus Alttextilien hochwertige Garne zu gewinnen und zu ebenso hochwertigen Produkten zu verarbeiten. Noch gibt es nicht für alle Herausforderungen die passenden technologischen Lösungen. Für jedes Material müssen die passenden Prozesse gefunden werden. Dafür haben die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) zusammen mit dem Sächsischen Textilforschungsinstitut (STFI) eine neue Prüfroutine entwickelt.

Am Anfang des Recyclingprozesses steht das mechanische Reißen, bei dem die Alttextilien zerkleinert werden. In den meisten Fällen schädigt die Prozedur die Fasern. Einzelne Fasern geraten zu kurz, was den anschließenden Spinnprozess erschwert. Um die Reißmaschinen optimal einstellen zu können, wurden nach dem Reißen die Fasern klassifiziert. Dazu haben die Forscherinnen und Forscher eine neue Prüfroutine entwickelt, die mit einem speziellen Messgerät durchgeführt wurde. Die Faserlänge ist der wichtigste Parameter für die Weiterverarbeitung der Fasern und für die Qualität des fertigen Garns aus Recyclingfasern. Garnstücke, die sich noch im gerissenen Material befinden, sind immer länger als die Fasern selbst und verfälschen dadurch die Faserlängenmessung. Durch den Prüfaufbau können noch vorhandene Garnstücke nahezu ohne weitere Fasereinkürzung aufgelöst werden. Somit ist eine exakte Messung der Faserlängenverteilung des gerissenen Recyclingmaterials möglich.

Auf der Basis der Prüfergebnisse können die Reißparameter besser auf das Material abgestimmt werden, so dass die Fasern beim Reißprozess weniger eingekürzt werden. Auf diese Weise können qualitativ höherwertige Garne hergestellt werden. Die Kennwerte des optimalen Recyclingmaterials, die anhand eines statistischen Verfahrens ermittelt wurden, dienten auch dazu, für die Ausspinnung das geeignete Recyclingprodukt und für den Spinnprozess die optimalen Einstellungen und Spinnmittel zu finden.

Anschließend wurden die recycelten Materialien zu Ring- und Rotorgarn verarbeitet. In der Praxis ließ sich das Ringgarn am besten mit dem Kompaktspinnverfahren herstellen. Durch dieses Verfahren können die ohnehin schon kurzen Recyclingfasern wesentlich besser eingebunden werden. Dadurch gewinnt das Garn an Festigkeit.

Mit der neuen Prüfroutine und den dadurch optimierten Prozessen war es möglich, Garne ohne Beimischung aus 100 Prozent recycelten Aramidfasern herzustellen, die anschließend zu Gestricken weiterverarbeitet wurden. Da Aramidfasern sehr teuer sind, senkt das Verfahren die Kosten, spart Rohstoffe und trägt zu mehr Nachhaltigkeit bei. Auch Baumwollfasern wurden in Mischung von 80 Prozent Gutfasern und 20 Prozent Rezyklat versponnen. Nach Projektabschluss konnte der Rezyklatanteil bei Baumwolle auf bis zu 70 Prozent erhöht werden.

Die Forschungsarbeit von DITF und STFI zeigt, dass es möglich ist, recyceltes Material zu 100 Prozent wieder zu verarbeiten. Die Garne müssen jedoch produktorientiert eingesetzt werden, das heißt, nicht jedes Garn aus recycelten Fasern passt für jede Anwendung. Denn durch den Reißprozess kommt es unweigerlich zu Qualitätseinbußen der Fasern, zum Beispiel bei der Garnfestigkeit.

Entscheidend für die Qualität des Garns aus recycelten Fasern ist auch die Qualität des Ausgangsmaterials. Besteht das Alttextil aus vielen unterschiedlichen Materialien, müssen diese erst mühsam getrennt werden. „Die Recyclingquote ist ein wichtiges Kaufkriterium, aber man muss die Qualität des Produkts und die Anwendung im Blick behalten“ ist das Fazit von wissenschaftlicher Markus Baumann, Mitarbeiter im Projekt.

Source:

DITF

DITF: Textile structures regulate water flow of rain-retaining "Living Wall" (c) DITF
Outdoor demonstrator on the Research CUBUS. At the top is the textile water reservoir with all inputs and outputs and textile valve for rapid emptying. Below are the substrate blocks with integrated hydraulic textiles
30.06.2023

DITF: Textile structures regulate water flow of rain-retaining "Living Wall"

Climate change is causing temperatures to rise and storms to increase. Especially in inner cities, summers are becoming a burden for people. While densification makes use of existing infrastructure and avoids urban sprawl, it increases the amount of sealed surfaces. This has a negative impact on the environment and climate. Green facades bring more green into cities. If textile storage structures are used, they can even actively contribute to flood protection. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research (DITF) have developed a corresponding "Living Wall".

The plants on the green facades are supplied with water and nutrients via an automatic irrigation system. The "Living Walls" operate largely autonomously. Sensory yarns detect the water and nutrient content. The effort for care and maintenance is low.

Climate change is causing temperatures to rise and storms to increase. Especially in inner cities, summers are becoming a burden for people. While densification makes use of existing infrastructure and avoids urban sprawl, it increases the amount of sealed surfaces. This has a negative impact on the environment and climate. Green facades bring more green into cities. If textile storage structures are used, they can even actively contribute to flood protection. The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research (DITF) have developed a corresponding "Living Wall".

The plants on the green facades are supplied with water and nutrients via an automatic irrigation system. The "Living Walls" operate largely autonomously. Sensory yarns detect the water and nutrient content. The effort for care and maintenance is low.

Innovative hydraulic textile structures regulate water flow. The rock wool plant substrate on which the plants grow has a large volume in a small space thanks to its structure. Depending on how heavy the precipitation is, the rainwater is stored in a textile structure and later used to irrigate the plants. In the event of heavy rainfall, the excess water is discharged into the sewage system with a time delay. In this way, the "Living Walls" developed at the DITF help to make efficient use of water as a resource in post-densified urban areas.

The research project also scientifically investigated the cooling performance of a green facade. Modern textile technology in the substrate promotes the "transpiration" of the plants. This creates evaporative cooling and lowers temperatures in the surrounding area.

The work of the Denkendorf research team also included a cost-benefit calculation and a life-cycle analysis. Based on the laboratory and outdoor studies, a "green value" was defined that can be used to evaluate and compare the effect of greening buildings as a whole.

(c) Carsten Fulland, Zenvision
Finale Struktur als Buckyball mit den entwickelten Knoten und Pultrusions-Profilen
18.05.2023

DITF: Bioverbundwerkstoff auf der Architektur-Biennale

Die diesjährige Architektur-Biennale in Venedig sieht sich als „Laboratory of the Future“. Bioverbundwerkstoffe sind in der Architektur nicht nur Zukunftsmusik. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF) haben einen nachhaltigen Werkstoff für Stützprofile und Verbindungsknoten entwickelt, die während der Biennale vom 20. Mai bis 26. November im Palazzo Mora ausgestellt werden. Die ultraleichten Bauteile sind das Ergebnis eines Gemeinschaftsprojekts von Partnern aus Forschung und Industrie, das vom Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft gefördert wurde. Sie werden zukünftig im Bereich der mobilen Architektur und bei Pavillons und Architekturen mit geringer Traglast eingesetzt.

Die DITF hatten die Aufgabe, für den Bioverbundwerkstoff geeignete Materialen auszuwählen und Fertigungsprozesse zu entwickeln. Um einen möglichst hohen Bioanteil zu erreichen, wurden Hanf- und Flachsfasern sowie ein Harzsystem verwendet, das auf epoxidiertem Leinsamenöl basiert. Diese natürlichen Ressourcen wurden sowohl im Pultrusionsverfahren als auch im Heißpressverfahren eingesetzt.

Die diesjährige Architektur-Biennale in Venedig sieht sich als „Laboratory of the Future“. Bioverbundwerkstoffe sind in der Architektur nicht nur Zukunftsmusik. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF) haben einen nachhaltigen Werkstoff für Stützprofile und Verbindungsknoten entwickelt, die während der Biennale vom 20. Mai bis 26. November im Palazzo Mora ausgestellt werden. Die ultraleichten Bauteile sind das Ergebnis eines Gemeinschaftsprojekts von Partnern aus Forschung und Industrie, das vom Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft gefördert wurde. Sie werden zukünftig im Bereich der mobilen Architektur und bei Pavillons und Architekturen mit geringer Traglast eingesetzt.

Die DITF hatten die Aufgabe, für den Bioverbundwerkstoff geeignete Materialen auszuwählen und Fertigungsprozesse zu entwickeln. Um einen möglichst hohen Bioanteil zu erreichen, wurden Hanf- und Flachsfasern sowie ein Harzsystem verwendet, das auf epoxidiertem Leinsamenöl basiert. Diese natürlichen Ressourcen wurden sowohl im Pultrusionsverfahren als auch im Heißpressverfahren eingesetzt.

Die Verarbeitung von Naturfasern zu leistungsstarken Produkten ist anspruchsvoll, weil diese dicker, ungleichmäßiger, feuchter und auch empfindlicher sind als Hochleistungsfasern aus Glas, Carbon oder Aramid. Bisher wurden Naturfasern zum überwiegenden Teil mit erdölbasierten Harzen oder Harzen mit einem sehr geringen Bioanteil in der Pultrusion verarbeitet. Die daraus hergestellten Verbünde erreichten keine ausreichende Faser- Matrixhaftung, weshalb die mechanischen Eigen-schaften unbefriedigend waren. An den DITF konnten diese material- und prozessbedingten Probleme weitgehend gelöst werden. Hierbei war beispielsweise die Vortrocknung der Naturfaser-Rovings in der Pultrusion ein entscheidender Lösungsweg. Was bei den DITF im Labormaßstab gelang, ließ sich auch im Industriemaßstab umsetzen. Für den LightPRO Shell Pavillon, den Buckyball und für die Biennale-Ausstellung produzierte der Projektpartner CG-TEC insgesamt 800 Meter Rohrprofil, die als Stützelement verwendet wurden. Für den Knoten, der die Stützprofile verbindet, haben die Projektpartner ein Design entworfen, nach dessen Vorlage ein passendes Formwerkzeug für das Heißpressverfahren gefertigt wurde. Zum Projektende wurden an den DITF mit diesem Formwerkzeug über 60 Verbindungsknoten für den Buckyball hergestellt, von dem man jetzt einen Ausschnitt in Venedig besichtigen kann.

Praxistests haben gezeigt, dass der an den DITF entwickelte Bioverbundwerkstoff für vielfältige Anwendungen in der Architektur geeignet ist. Im Vergleich zu Glasfaserkunststoffen splittern Bioverbundwerkstoffe bei einem Crash nicht. Zudem sind sie ein nachhaltiger Baustoff. Sie verbrauchen bei ihrer Herstellung viel weniger Energie und binden langfristig eine große Menge Kohlenstoff. Sie bringen aufgrund ihrer geringen Dichte wenig Gewicht auf die Waage und sind daher für viele Anwendungen im Leichtbau geeignet. Ziel des Leichtbaus ist es, Rohstoffe, Energie und damit Kosten zu sparen. Der Einsatz von Bioverbundwerkstoffen bietet der Bauindustrie ein hohes Potenzial, neue ressourcenschonende Wege zu gehen.

Das Forschungsprojekt LeichtPRO wurde von der Fachagentur für Nachwachsende Rohstoffe (FNR) im Auftrag des Bundesministeriums für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft gefördert.

Ausgangsmaterialien für die Herstellung nachhaltiger Verbundwerkstoffe. Foto: DITF
24.04.2023

Faserverbundwerkstoff aus Biopolymeren

Gemeinsam mit den Projektpartnern CG TEC, Cordenka, ElringKlinger, Fiber Engineering und Technikum Laubholz entwickeln die DITF einen neuen Faserverbundwerkstoff (CELLUN) mit Verstärkungsfasern aus Cellulose. Die Matrix des Werkstoffs ist ein thermoplastisches Cellulosederivat, das sich in industriellen Verarbeitungsverfahren wie Heißpressen oder Pultrusion verarbeiten lässt. CELLUN aus nachwachsenden Biopolymeren ermöglicht den Ersatz von Glas- oder Carbonfasern in der Herstellung industrieller Formteile.

Innerhalb des schnell wachsenden Segments des Faserverbund-Leichtbaus werden zunehmend Organosheeets eingesetzt. Organosheets sind vorkonsolidierte Platten-Halbzeuge mit einer Matrix aus thermoplastischen Kunststoffen und verschiedenen Verstärkungsfasern in unterschiedlichster textiler Ausführung. Die Thermoplastmatrix erlaubt die Verarbeitung der Organosheets mit in der Industrie etablierten „schnellen“ Verfahren wie Heißpressen, Thermoformen, Spritzgießen mit Organoblech-Einlegern oder Pultrusion. Die Verfahren erzeugen sehr gut recycelbare, hoch funktionalisierte Bauteile mit reproduzierbarer Qualität.

Gemeinsam mit den Projektpartnern CG TEC, Cordenka, ElringKlinger, Fiber Engineering und Technikum Laubholz entwickeln die DITF einen neuen Faserverbundwerkstoff (CELLUN) mit Verstärkungsfasern aus Cellulose. Die Matrix des Werkstoffs ist ein thermoplastisches Cellulosederivat, das sich in industriellen Verarbeitungsverfahren wie Heißpressen oder Pultrusion verarbeiten lässt. CELLUN aus nachwachsenden Biopolymeren ermöglicht den Ersatz von Glas- oder Carbonfasern in der Herstellung industrieller Formteile.

Innerhalb des schnell wachsenden Segments des Faserverbund-Leichtbaus werden zunehmend Organosheeets eingesetzt. Organosheets sind vorkonsolidierte Platten-Halbzeuge mit einer Matrix aus thermoplastischen Kunststoffen und verschiedenen Verstärkungsfasern in unterschiedlichster textiler Ausführung. Die Thermoplastmatrix erlaubt die Verarbeitung der Organosheets mit in der Industrie etablierten „schnellen“ Verfahren wie Heißpressen, Thermoformen, Spritzgießen mit Organoblech-Einlegern oder Pultrusion. Die Verfahren erzeugen sehr gut recycelbare, hoch funktionalisierte Bauteile mit reproduzierbarer Qualität.

Die textile Verstärkung der Organosheets besteht vor allem aus Glas-, Carbon-, Basalt- oder Aramidfasern. Diese Fasern besitzen hohe Steifigkeiten und Zugfestigkeiten, sind jedoch in ihrer Herstellung und im Recycling energieintensiv und können nur in einem zunehmend minderwertigen Zustand recycelt werden.

Im Gegensatz dazu ist der an den DITF entwickelte CELLUN-Verbundwerkstoff eine wesentlich nachhaltigere Alternative. Für die Herstellung von CELLUN wird die Verstärkungskomponente aus nicht schmelzbaren Cellulosefasern sowie thermoplastischen, derivatisierten Cellulosefasern als Matrix zu einem Hybridroving kombiniert. Als cellulosische Verstärkungsfasern kommen Regeneratfasern der Firma Cordenka und die an den DITF entwickelten HighPerCell®-Cellulosefasern zum Einsatz.

CELLUN wird nun im Rahmen eines vom Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Klimaschutz (BMWK) geförderten Verbundprojekts zur industriellen Reife weiterentwickelt. Die Aufgaben der DITF im CELLUN-Verbundprojekt sind vor allem die Herstellung von geeigneten Verstärkungsfasern auf Basis von Cellulose und die Einbettung der Fasern in die thermoplastische Cellulose-Derivat-Matrix. Das Material wird in den hauseigenen Technika zu technischen Hybridrovingen und zu Hybridtextilien weiterverarbeitet. Über Pultrusions- und Thermoformverfahren oder im Spritzguss können schließlich Formteile hergestellt werden, die die technischen Einsatzmöglichkeiten des neuen Materials veranschaulichen.

Im weiteren Projektverlauf liegt der Fokus auf der vollständigen Kreislaufführung des CELLUN-Materials nach dem End of Life (EOL). Dazu werden zwei unterschiedliche Ansätze erforscht. Einerseits besteht die Möglichkeit, CELLUN-Formteile ohne Qualitätsverlust thermisch umzuformen. Ein zweiter möglicher Weg besteht darin, das CELLUN-Material wieder chemisch in die einzelnen Komponenten zu trennen. Diese können dann erneut wieder zu 100% als neue Ausgangsmaterialien eingesetzt werden.

CELLUN-Werkstoffe werden als umweltfreundliche, ressourcenschonende und kostengünstige Alternative zu etablierten Verbundwerkstoffen im Leichtbau- und Automotivsektor Vorteile im Markt der technischen Halbzeuge bieten. Durch die Verwendung nachwachsender Biopolymere soll ein wesentlicher Beitrag zum Umwelt- und Klimaschutz geliefert werden: Einerseits können herkömmliche Kunststoffe auf Rohölbasis substituiert werden, andererseits können CELLUN-Verstärkungs- und Matrixfasern mit nur geringem Energieeinsatz und aus natürlichen Rohstoffen hergestellt werden.

Source:

DITF

Aus Wasser gesponnene Lignin-Präkursorfasern, stabilisierte und carbonisierte Endlosfasern. Foto: DITF
Aus Wasser gesponnene Lignin-Präkursorfasern, stabilisierte und carbonisierte Endlosfasern.
13.03.2023

Neues Verfahren: Carbonfasern aus Lignin

Ein neuartiges, ebenso umweltfreundliches wie kostensparendes Verfahren zur Herstellung von Carbonfasern aus Lignin ist an den DITF entwickelt worden. Es zeichnet sich durch hohes Energiesparpotential aus. Die Vermeidung von Lösungsmitteln und die Nutzung natürlicher Rohstoffe machen das Verfahren umweltfreundlich.

Carbonfasern werden im industriellen Maßstab gewöhnlich aus Polyacrylnitril (PAN) hergestellt. Die Stabilisierung und die Carbonisierung der Fasern geschieht dabei mit langer Verweildauer in hochtemperierten Öfen. Das erfordert viel Energie und macht die Fasern teuer. Dabei entstehen giftige Nebenprodukte, die aufwendig und energieintensiv aus dem Herstellungsprozess abgetrennt werden müssen.

Ein neuartiges, ebenso umweltfreundliches wie kostensparendes Verfahren zur Herstellung von Carbonfasern aus Lignin ist an den DITF entwickelt worden. Es zeichnet sich durch hohes Energiesparpotential aus. Die Vermeidung von Lösungsmitteln und die Nutzung natürlicher Rohstoffe machen das Verfahren umweltfreundlich.

Carbonfasern werden im industriellen Maßstab gewöhnlich aus Polyacrylnitril (PAN) hergestellt. Die Stabilisierung und die Carbonisierung der Fasern geschieht dabei mit langer Verweildauer in hochtemperierten Öfen. Das erfordert viel Energie und macht die Fasern teuer. Dabei entstehen giftige Nebenprodukte, die aufwendig und energieintensiv aus dem Herstellungsprozess abgetrennt werden müssen.

Ein neuartiges, an den DITF entwickeltes Verfahren ermöglicht hohe Energieeinsparungen in all diesen Prozessschritten. Lignin ersetzt dabei das Polyacrylnitril für die Herstellung der Präkursorfasern, die in einem zweiten Prozessschritt zu Carbonfasern umgewandelt werden. Lignin als Ausgangsmaterial für die Herstellung von Carbonfasern hat bisher kaum Beachtung in der industriellen Fertigung gefunden. Lignin ist ein günstiger und in großen Mengen verfügbarer Rohstoff, der als Abfallprodukt in der Papierproduktion anfällt.

Im neuen Verfahren zur Herstellung von Ligninfasern wird zuerst Holz in seine Bestandteile Lignin und Cellulose getrennt. Ein Sulfit-Aufschluss ermöglicht die Erzeugung von Lignosulfonat, das in Wasser gelöst wird. Die wässrige Lösung von Lignin ist das Ausgangsmaterial für das Spinnen der Fasern.
Der Spinnprozess selbst erfolgt im sogenannten Trockenspinnverfahren. Dabei presst ein Extruder die Spinnmasse durch eine Düse in einen beheizten Spinnschacht. Die entstehenden Endlosfasern trocknen im Spinnschacht schnell und gleichmäßig. Das Verfahren benötigt weder Lösungsmittel noch giftige Additiven.

Die anschließenden Schritte zur Herstellung von Carbonfasern - die Stabilisierung in Heißluft und die anschließende Carbonisierung im Hochtemperaturofen - ähneln denen des üblichen Prozesses bei Verwendung von PAN als Präkursorfaser. Allerdings lassen sich die Ligninfasern im Ofen besonders schnell mit Heißluft stabilisieren und benötigen nur relativ niedrige Temperaturen in der Carbonisierung. Die Energieersparnis in diesen Prozessschritten gegenüber PAN liegt bei rund 50% und bedeutet einen echten Wettbewerbsvorteil.

Aus Wasser gesponnene Ligninfasern bieten Vorteile
Neben der umweltfreundlichen, da lösemittelfreien Herstellung, und der Energieeffizienz bietet das neue Verfahren weitere Vorteile gegenüber PAN: Lignin ist ein überaus günstiger und leicht verfügbarer Rohstoff, der aus Holz gewonnen wird. Die Verwendung eines natürlichen Rohstoffes für die Erzeugung von hochfesten Carbonfasern folgt dem Nachhaltigkeitsgedanken in der Produktion.

Der Trockenspinnprozess erlaubt hohe Spinngeschwindigkeiten. Hierdurch wird in kürzerer Zeit deutlich mehr Material produziert, als es mit PAN-Fasern möglich ist. Das ist ein weiterer Wettbewerbsvorteil, der dennoch keine Kompromisse an die Qualität der Lignin-Präkursorfasern zulässt: Diese sind äußerst homogen, haben glatte Oberflächen und keine Verklebungen. Solche strukturellen Merkmale erleichtern die Weiterverarbeitung zu Carbonfasern und letztlich auch zu Faserverbundwerkstoffen.

Zusammenfassend lässt sich sagen, dass die in dem neuen Spinnverfahren gewonnenen Präkursorfasern aus Lignin gegenüber PAN deutliche Vorteile in der Kosteneffizienz und in ihrer Umweltverträglichkeit zeigen. Die mechanischen Eigenschaften der aus ihnen hergestellten Carbonfasern sind hingegen nahezu vergleichbar – sie sind ebenso zugfest, widerstandsfähig und leicht, wie es von marktgängigen Produkten bekannt ist.

Besonders interessant dürften Carbonfasern aus Wasser gesponnenen Ligninfasern für Anwendungen in der Bau- und Automobilbranche sein, die von Kostensenkungen im Produktionsprozess in hohem Maße profitieren.

Source:

DITF

Foto: DITF
Polyesterfasern und -granulat der DITF.
23.02.2023

Neues EU-Verbundprojekt: CO2-basiertes Polyester

Start für ein EU-weites Verbundprojekt: Unter der Leitung des französischen Unternehmens Fairbrics SAS finden sich 17 Projektpartner aus sieben europäischen Ländern zusammen. Gemeinsames Ziel ist es, in einem geschlossenen Kreislauf Endprodukte aus Polyester unter Verwendung von industriellen CO2-Emissionen zu erzeugen und zur Marktreife zu führen. Die DITF stellen dabei Synthesefasern aus Kunststoffen nicht fossilen Ursprungs her.

Um die europäischen Klimaziele zu erreichen, müssen Treibhausgase langfristig und nachhaltig reduziert werden. CO2-Emissionen müssen hierfür in der Energiewirtschaft, in der Industrie sowie bei Haushalten und Kleinverbrauchern gesenkt werden. Hieran knüpft das EU-weite Verbundprojekt ‚Threading CO2‘ an, welches im Rahmen des Horizon-Förderprogramms der EU finanziert wird. Bei dem Projekt werden Produkte aus umweltfreundlich hergestelltem Polyester (PET) in die Marktreife überführt.

Start für ein EU-weites Verbundprojekt: Unter der Leitung des französischen Unternehmens Fairbrics SAS finden sich 17 Projektpartner aus sieben europäischen Ländern zusammen. Gemeinsames Ziel ist es, in einem geschlossenen Kreislauf Endprodukte aus Polyester unter Verwendung von industriellen CO2-Emissionen zu erzeugen und zur Marktreife zu führen. Die DITF stellen dabei Synthesefasern aus Kunststoffen nicht fossilen Ursprungs her.

Um die europäischen Klimaziele zu erreichen, müssen Treibhausgase langfristig und nachhaltig reduziert werden. CO2-Emissionen müssen hierfür in der Energiewirtschaft, in der Industrie sowie bei Haushalten und Kleinverbrauchern gesenkt werden. Hieran knüpft das EU-weite Verbundprojekt ‚Threading CO2‘ an, welches im Rahmen des Horizon-Förderprogramms der EU finanziert wird. Bei dem Projekt werden Produkte aus umweltfreundlich hergestelltem Polyester (PET) in die Marktreife überführt.

Die technologische Grundlage hat Firma Fairbrics SAS aus Frankreich entwickelt. Es geht um die Herstellung von Monoethylenglycol (MEG), dem Ausgangsstoff für die Herstellung von Polyester, unter Verwendung von CO2, das aus industriellen Abgasen gewonnen wird - ein neuer Ansatz, denn im klassischen Verfahren werden fossile Rohstoffe für die Produktion von Polyester verbraucht. Auf diese Weise wird nicht nur direkt die Freisetzung von CO2 in die Atmosphäre verhindert. Das CO2 trägt zusätzlich einer erhöhten Wertschöpfung bei, indem es bei der Erzeugung von hochwertigen textilen Produkten eingebunden wird. Der Kern des Projektes ist die technologische Aufskalierung des neuen MEG-Syntheseprozesses in Pilotanlagen, die den Weg für die industrielle Fertigung ebnen.

In dem EU-Verbundprojekt werden sich 17 Projektpartner mit ihrem speziellen Fachwissen einbringen und den Prozess technologisch weiterentwickeln und industriefähig machen. Die DITF Denkendorf übernehmen innerhalb des Konsortiums die Aufgabe, das Upscaling zu begleiten und den Schritt ‚vom Molekül zum Material‘ zu gehen: Aus dem nachhaltig hergestellten Monoethylenglykol werden in eigenen Laboratorien Polyester synthetisiert, zu Fasern versponnen, texturiert und weiterverarbeitet. Dabei soll überprüft werden, ob die Qualität des Polyesters sowie dessen Verspinn- und Verarbeitbarkeit in der textilen Wertschöpfungskette vergleichbar mit konventionellem Polyester ist.

Die Projektpartner Faurecia und Les Tissages de Charlieu verarbeiten die Fasern und Textilien zu Autositzen und Bekleidung, um die Qualität auch im Endprodukt beurteilen zu können. Die anschließende Rezyklierfähigkeit der Produkte wird an den DITF überprüft. Außerdem soll eine Sicherheitsmarkierung für diesen CO2-basierten Polyester entwickelt werden, um ihn vor Produktpiraterie zu schützen.

More information:
CO2 Polyesterfasern MEG
Source:

DITF

Durchführung eines Patientenscreenings mit digitaler Maßabnahme. Foto: DITF
Durchführung eines Patientenscreenings mit digitaler Maßabnahme.
31.01.2023

Verringerte Fehlerquote bei der Herstellung textiler Orthesen

Ressourceneffizienz, Zeit- und Kostenersparnis sind wesentliche Themen in der Textil- und Bekleidungsindustrie. Die Vorteile der digitalen Fertigung gelten nicht nur für Mode, sondern auch für Medizintextilien. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) haben eine digitale Plattform entwickelt, mit der passgenaue flexible textile Orthesen ressourcen-, zeit- und kosteneffizient hergestellt werden können.

Bisher werden Orthesen vornehmlich manuell angefertigt, was zu einer hohen Fehlerquote führt. Digital basierte Fertigungsketten können diesen Ausschuss deutlich reduzieren. Für die digitale Plattform wurden an den DITF die Körperkenndaten von Patientinnen und Patienten analysiert und aufbereitet, auf deren Basis standardisierte Orthesen entwickelt werden können. Dazu wurden verschiedene Körperscanmethoden untersucht sowie Methoden entwickelt, mit denen genau Maß genommen werden kann. Die Informationen der Screenings wurden verdichtet und eine digitale Grundschnitt- bzw. Schnittmoduldatenbank erstellt.

Ressourceneffizienz, Zeit- und Kostenersparnis sind wesentliche Themen in der Textil- und Bekleidungsindustrie. Die Vorteile der digitalen Fertigung gelten nicht nur für Mode, sondern auch für Medizintextilien. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) haben eine digitale Plattform entwickelt, mit der passgenaue flexible textile Orthesen ressourcen-, zeit- und kosteneffizient hergestellt werden können.

Bisher werden Orthesen vornehmlich manuell angefertigt, was zu einer hohen Fehlerquote führt. Digital basierte Fertigungsketten können diesen Ausschuss deutlich reduzieren. Für die digitale Plattform wurden an den DITF die Körperkenndaten von Patientinnen und Patienten analysiert und aufbereitet, auf deren Basis standardisierte Orthesen entwickelt werden können. Dazu wurden verschiedene Körperscanmethoden untersucht sowie Methoden entwickelt, mit denen genau Maß genommen werden kann. Die Informationen der Screenings wurden verdichtet und eine digitale Grundschnitt- bzw. Schnittmoduldatenbank erstellt.

Aus dieser Datenbank erfolgt die individuelle Modellanpassung an die Patientinnen und Patienten. Die Überprüfung der therapeutischen Passform erfolgt mit Hilfe eines Avatars in einer 3D-Simulationssoftware. Die fertigen digitalen Schnittkonstruktionen werden an einen Cutter übertragen, wo sie aus elastischen Stoffen maschinell zugeschnitten werden. Es ist ebenfalls möglich, die Schnittmuster auf einem Plotter/Drucker als Schablonen auszudrucken und anschließend manuell zuzuschneiden. Danach werden die Zuschnitte zu fertigen textilen Orthesen verarbeitet.

More information:
Orthesen digitale Plattform
Source:

DITF

22.12.2022

Fiber Society Spring Conference 2023: CALL FOR PAPERS

Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) veranstalten vom 15. bis 17. Mai die Fiber Society Spring Conference 2023.
 
Die Fiber Society ist eine gemeinnützige Vereinigung, die sich der Förderung des Wissens über Fasern, faserbasierte Produkte und Fasermaterialien verschrieben hat. Die Gesellschaft setzt sich aus Chemikern, Physikern, Ingenieuren und Designern zusammen, die sich für das Gebiet der Faserwissenschaft und -technologie interessieren.
 
Auf der Website können ab sofort Abstracts und Poster-Präsentationen für die Konferenz eingereicht werden. Die Veranstaltung findet komplett in englischer Sprache statt. Deadline für die Einreichung ist der 1. März 2023. Unter www.thefibersociety.org finden sich alle Informationen zur Konferenz und den Teilnahmebedingungen.

Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) veranstalten vom 15. bis 17. Mai die Fiber Society Spring Conference 2023.
 
Die Fiber Society ist eine gemeinnützige Vereinigung, die sich der Förderung des Wissens über Fasern, faserbasierte Produkte und Fasermaterialien verschrieben hat. Die Gesellschaft setzt sich aus Chemikern, Physikern, Ingenieuren und Designern zusammen, die sich für das Gebiet der Faserwissenschaft und -technologie interessieren.
 
Auf der Website können ab sofort Abstracts und Poster-Präsentationen für die Konferenz eingereicht werden. Die Veranstaltung findet komplett in englischer Sprache statt. Deadline für die Einreichung ist der 1. März 2023. Unter www.thefibersociety.org finden sich alle Informationen zur Konferenz und den Teilnahmebedingungen.

More information:
The Fiber Society DITF
Source:

DITF Denkendorf

Bild: Fraunhofer IAO
29.09.2022

Projekt CYCLOMETRIC: Rezyklierfähige Bauteile für das Automobil der Zukunft

Bauteile im Automobil müssen nicht mehr nur technologisch höchsten Ansprüchen genügen, sondern auch nachhaltig und rezyklierbar sein. Zukünftig müssen Ingenieurinnen und Ingenieure bei der Entwicklung nicht nur das fertige Produkt, sondern auch das Ende dessen Lebenszyklus im Blick haben. Künstliche Intelligenz soll helfen, in solchen Zyklen zu denken. dabei helfen. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) sind einer der Projektpartner im Forschungsprojekt CYCLOMETRIC, das durch das Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) gefördert und vom Projektträger Karlsruhe (PTKA) betreut wird. Entwickelt wird ein Tool, das schon während der Produktplanung Verbesserungsvorschläge macht.

Bauteile im Automobil müssen nicht mehr nur technologisch höchsten Ansprüchen genügen, sondern auch nachhaltig und rezyklierbar sein. Zukünftig müssen Ingenieurinnen und Ingenieure bei der Entwicklung nicht nur das fertige Produkt, sondern auch das Ende dessen Lebenszyklus im Blick haben. Künstliche Intelligenz soll helfen, in solchen Zyklen zu denken. dabei helfen. Die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) sind einer der Projektpartner im Forschungsprojekt CYCLOMETRIC, das durch das Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) gefördert und vom Projektträger Karlsruhe (PTKA) betreut wird. Entwickelt wird ein Tool, das schon während der Produktplanung Verbesserungsvorschläge macht.

Recycling von Hochleistungsmaterialien scheitert häufig daran, dass sich die Werkstoffe nicht in ihre ursprünglichen Bestandteile trennen lassen. CYCLOMETRIC soll dafür sorgen, dass dieses Problem nicht erst am Ende des Lebenszyklus eines Produkts gelöst werden muss. Mit den derzeitigen Methoden und Werkzeugen werden Auswirkungen auf die Umwelt oft erst gegen Ende der Entwicklung oder sogar erst nach Produktionsbeginn untersucht – obwohl die relevantesten Entscheidungen über Produkteigenschaften deutlich früher getroffen werden. Das neue System hilft, während der Entwicklung die richtigen Entscheidungen zu treffen. Dazu werden Daten, Informationen, Wissen über alle Entwicklungsphasen und Schnittstellen hinweg analysiert und bewertet. Dabei kommen Forschungsansätze des Advanced Systems Engineerings und Model-based Systems Engineerings in Verbindung mit Methoden der Ökobilanzierung sowie die Geschäftsmodellanalyse zum Einsatz.

Produktentwicklung muss täglich komplexe Parameter wie Produzierbarkeit, Rezyklierfähigkeit, Wiederverwendbarkeit, CO2-Emissionen und Kosten im Blick behalten. Nicht zuletzt müssen die Erwartungen und Gewohnheiten der Kundinnen und Kunden mitgedacht werden. Das Tool berechnet die Auswirkungen bei der Auswahl des Materials ebenso wie bei der Planung von Produktionsschritten und macht Verbesserungsvorschläge.

Als Anwendungsbeispiel für das digitale Werkzeug dient im Projekt CYCOMETRIC eine Mittelkonsolenverkleidung. Sie besteht aus nachhaltigen Textilmaterialien und verfügt über in das Textil integrierte smarte Funktionen. Das fertige Tool ist dennoch nicht auf die Automobilbranche beschränkt. Es kann in allen Industriefeldern eingesetzt werden.

Aufgabe der DITF ist die Auswahl und Prüfung geeigneter Materialien. Das Team erarbeitet die passenden Fertigungs- und Verarbeitungsprozesse und erstellt einen Prototyp. An den Prüflaboren werden Testläufe zu Funktions-, Alltags-, Langzeit- und Extremtauglichkeit der textilen Strukturen und Faserverbundwerkstoffen durchgeführt, die bei der späteren Anwendung reproduzierbar sind. Für die smarten Funktionen der Konsole werden Konzepte für Sensoren und Aktoren entwickelt.

Die DITF bringen als Partner im Forschungscampus ARENA2036 umfangreiche Erfahrungen im Leichtbau durch Funktionsintegration bei Automobilen mit. Nach Abschluss des Projekts werden die Denkendorfer Forscherinnen und Forscher Unternehmen beraten, wie Textilien verstärkt im Fahrzeuginterieur eingesetzt werden können.

Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF)

09.08.2022

Carbios joined WhiteCycle to process and recycle plastic textile waste

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 
WhiteCycle envisions that by 2030 the uptake and deployment of its circular solution will lead to the annual recycling of more than 2 million tons of the third most widely used plastic in the world, PET[2]. This project should prevent landfilling or incineration of more than 1.8 million tons of that plastic each year. Also, it should enable reduction of CO2 emissions by around 2 million tons.
 
Complex waste containing textile (PET) from end-of-life tyres, hoses and multilayer clothes are currently difficult to recycle, but could soon become recyclable thanks to the project outcomes. Raw material from PET plastic waste could go back into creation of high-performance products, through a circular and viable value chain.
 
Public and private European organizations are combining their scientific and industrial expertises:

  • industrial partners (Michelin, Mandals, KORDSA);
  • cross-sector partnership (Inditex)
  • waste management companies (Synergies TLC, ESTATO);
  • intelligent monitoring systems for sorting (IRIS);
  • biological recycling SME (Carbios);
  • product life cycle analysis company (IPOINT);
  • university, expert in FAIR data management (HVL);
  • universities, research and technology organizations (PPRIME – Université de Poitiers/CNRS, DITF, IFTH, ERASME);
  • industry cluster (Axelera);
  • project management consulting company (Dynergie).

 
The consortium will develop new processes required throughout the industrial value chain:

  • Innovative sorting technologies, to enable significant increase of the PET plastic content of complex waste streams in order to better process them;
  • A pre-treatment for recuperated PET plastic content, followed by a breakthrough recycling enzyme-based process to decompose it into pure monomers in a sustainable way;
  • Repolymerization of the recycled monomers into like new plastic;
  • Fabrication and quality verification of the new products made of recycled plastic materials

 
WhiteCycle has a global budget of nearly 9.6 million euros and receives European funding in the amount of nearly 7.1 million euros. The consortium’s partners are based in five countries (France, Spain, Germany, Norway and Turkey). Coordinated by Michelin, it has an effective governance system involving a steering committee, an advisory board and a technical support committee.

[1] Complex waste: multi materials waste (Rubber goods composites and multi-layer textile)
[2] PET: Polyethylene terephthalate

Source:

Carbios

Lavendelpflanzen kurz vor der Blüte auf dem Versuchsfeld bei Hülben. Foto: Carolin Weiler
26.07.2022

Lavendelanbau auf der Schwäbischen Alb: Ätherisches Öl aus Blüten und Textilien von Pflanzenresten

In der Provence stehen Lavendelfelder in voller Blüte. Diese Farbenpracht kann bald auch in Baden-Württemberg zu sehen sein. In einem gemeinsamen Forschungsprojekt prüfen die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF), die Universität Hohenheim und die Firma naturamus geeignete Lavendelsorten und entwickeln energieeffiziente Methoden, daraus ätherisches Öl herzustellen. Auch für die Verwertung der großen Mengen an Reststoffen, die bei der Produktion anfallen, gibt es Ideen: Die DITF erforschen, wie daraus Fasern für klassische Textilien und Faserverbundwerkstoffe hergestellt werden können.

Bei Firma naturamus am Fuße der der Schwäbischen Alb besteht eine hohe Nachfrage an hochwertigen ätherischen Ölen für Arzneimittel und Naturkosmetik. Viel spricht dafür, Lavendel vor Ort anzubauen. Die ökologische Bewirtschaftung der Lavendelfelder würde dazu beitragen, den Anteil an ökologischem Landbau im Land zu erhöhen und Transportkosten einzusparen.

In der Provence stehen Lavendelfelder in voller Blüte. Diese Farbenpracht kann bald auch in Baden-Württemberg zu sehen sein. In einem gemeinsamen Forschungsprojekt prüfen die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF), die Universität Hohenheim und die Firma naturamus geeignete Lavendelsorten und entwickeln energieeffiziente Methoden, daraus ätherisches Öl herzustellen. Auch für die Verwertung der großen Mengen an Reststoffen, die bei der Produktion anfallen, gibt es Ideen: Die DITF erforschen, wie daraus Fasern für klassische Textilien und Faserverbundwerkstoffe hergestellt werden können.

Bei Firma naturamus am Fuße der der Schwäbischen Alb besteht eine hohe Nachfrage an hochwertigen ätherischen Ölen für Arzneimittel und Naturkosmetik. Viel spricht dafür, Lavendel vor Ort anzubauen. Die ökologische Bewirtschaftung der Lavendelfelder würde dazu beitragen, den Anteil an ökologischem Landbau im Land zu erhöhen und Transportkosten einzusparen.

Der Anbau von Lavendel auf der Alb bedeutet Neuland. Die Universität Hohenheim testet deswegen an vier Standorten fünf verschiedene Sorten, zum Beispiel auf dem Sonnenhof bei Bad Boll. Ende des Jahres werden die ersten Ergebnisse erwartet.

Bei der Gewinnung der ätherischen Öle fällt eine große Menge an Reststoffen an, die bisher noch nicht verwertet wird. Aus dem Lavendelstängel können Fasern für Textilien gewonnen werden. An den DITF laufen bereits Entwicklungen und Analysen mit diesem nachwachsenden Rohstoff. Um Lavendel-Destillationsreste zu verwerten, müssen die pflanzlichen Stängel mit ihren Faserbündeln aufgeschlossen, das heißt, in ihre Bestandteile zerlegt werden. Innerhalb eines Faserbündels sind die verholzten (lignifizierten) Einzelfasern fest durch pflanzlichen Zucker, dem Pektin, verbunden. Diese Verbindung soll beispielsweise mit Bakterien oder mit Enzymen aufgelöst werden.

DITF-Wissenschaftler Jamal Sarsour untersucht verschiedene Vorbereitungstechniken und Methoden, um aus dem Material Lang- und Kurzfasern herzustellen. „Wir sind gespannt, wie hoch die Ausbeute an Fasern sein wird und welche Eigenschaften diese Fasern haben“. Projektleiter Thomas Stegmaier ergänzt: „Die Länge, die Feinheit als auch die Festigkeit der Faserbündel entscheiden über die Verwendungsmöglichkeiten. Feine Fasern sind für Bekleidung geeignet, gröbere Faserbündel für technische Anwendungen“.

Die Chancen auf dem Markt sind gut. Regionale Wertschöpfung und ökologisch und fair erzeugte Textilien sind im Trend. Dabei geht es nicht in erster Linie um Bekleidung, sondern um technische Textilien. Die für den Leichtbau so wichtigen Faserbundwerkstoffe können auch mit nachwachsenden Naturfasern hergestellt werden, wie zum Beispiel bereits mit Hanf oder Flachs. Selbst aus Hopfen-Gärresten wurde an den DITF bereits Faserverbundmaterial hergestellt. Fasern aus den Reststoffen von Lavendel könnten ein weiterer natürlicher Baustein für Hightech-Anwendungen sein.

More information:
Lavendel DITF
Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf

(c) DITF
Kick-off-Veranstaltung der Projektpartner Ende Juni in Denkendorf (von links) Alexander Artschwager (DITF), Dr. Jürgen Seibold (DITF), Alexander Artschwager (DITF), Dr. Jürgen Seibold (DITF), Jeanette Nordmann (Assyst GmbH), Alexander Mirosnicenko (DITF), Dr. Rainer Trieb (Human Solutions), Dr. Martin Lades (Assyst GmbH), Stefanie Hiss (DITF)
18.07.2022

DITF: Umweltfreundliche und nachhaltige Produktion

Der Designer hat eine Idee, der Kunde, Konsument oder Handel, schaut sie sich an und ändert noch das eine oder andere Detail nach seinem Geschmack. Danach werden Kleidungsstücke in kleinen Losgrößen hergestellt oder dank moderner Körpervermessung auf den Leib geschneidert. Digitale Technik sorgt dafür, dass die Wünsche erfüllt werden, alles passt und alles so aussieht, wie erwartet. Retoure? Das war gestern.

Digitalisierte Prozesse stellen nicht nur den Kunden zufrieden, sondern schonen auch die Umwelt. Deshalb fördert die Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt die Forschungskooperation von den Deutschen Instituten für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) und der Assyst GmbH. Rückverlagerung von Wertschöpfungsprozessen ist das Stichwort. Ergebnis: Keine Massenware für den Müll, keine Kinderarbeit, hohe ökologische Standards und geringe Transportkosten.

Der Designer hat eine Idee, der Kunde, Konsument oder Handel, schaut sie sich an und ändert noch das eine oder andere Detail nach seinem Geschmack. Danach werden Kleidungsstücke in kleinen Losgrößen hergestellt oder dank moderner Körpervermessung auf den Leib geschneidert. Digitale Technik sorgt dafür, dass die Wünsche erfüllt werden, alles passt und alles so aussieht, wie erwartet. Retoure? Das war gestern.

Digitalisierte Prozesse stellen nicht nur den Kunden zufrieden, sondern schonen auch die Umwelt. Deshalb fördert die Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt die Forschungskooperation von den Deutschen Instituten für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF) und der Assyst GmbH. Rückverlagerung von Wertschöpfungsprozessen ist das Stichwort. Ergebnis: Keine Massenware für den Müll, keine Kinderarbeit, hohe ökologische Standards und geringe Transportkosten.

„Jeder Körper ist ein Individuum“ betont Dr. Martin Lades, Assyst GmbH. Dem trägt das Projekt ECO-Shoring Rechnung. Die Erstellung eines Avatars, also dem Modell des eigenen Körpers, ist Basis. Auch gibt es Reihenmessungen in verschiedenen Regionen der Welt. Im Projekt ermöglichen Prozesse und die Datenbasis der Avalution GmbH, dass der Kunde nur noch wenige Körperkennwerte angeben muss, um eine treffsichere Passform zu bekommen. Mit der Körpergröße, dem Gewicht und Alter kann das Programm ein originalgetreues Körperdouble erstellen – das Anprobieren am Computer kann beginnen. Das Modell eignet sich in erster Linie für das Online-Shopping, aber grundsätzlich kann der Kunde sich auch direkt im Shop vermessen und beraten lassen.

More information:
DITF Nachhaltigkeit Assyst
Source:

DITF

DITF verabschieden Professor Michael Doser in den Ruhestand (c) DITF
Prof. Dr. Michael Doser, stellvertretendes Vorstandsmitglied und Prokurist der DITF
10.06.2022

DITF verabschieden Professor Michael Doser in den Ruhestand

Professor Dr. Michael Doser, stellvertretendes Vorstandsmitglied und Prokurist der Deutschen Institute für Textil-  und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF), ging Ende Mai 2022 in den Ruhestand. Fast 32 Jahre war er an den DITF tätig. Er war für alle Forschungsstellen ein wichtiger Kommunikator und Impulsgeber und engagierte sich als Wissenschaftler insbesondere für den Auf- und Ausbau des Forschungsbereichs Biomedizintechnik an den DITF.

Professor Dr. Michael Doser, stellvertretendes Vorstandsmitglied und Prokurist der Deutschen Institute für Textil-  und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF), ging Ende Mai 2022 in den Ruhestand. Fast 32 Jahre war er an den DITF tätig. Er war für alle Forschungsstellen ein wichtiger Kommunikator und Impulsgeber und engagierte sich als Wissenschaftler insbesondere für den Auf- und Ausbau des Forschungsbereichs Biomedizintechnik an den DITF.

Michael Doser begann 1990 seinen Weg an den DITF – zunächst am damaligen Institut für Textil- und Verfahrenstechnik Denkendorf (ITV) unter Professor Heinrich Planck. Als promovierter Biologe der Universität Hohenheim und mit ersten Erfahrungen als wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Institut für Genetik in Hohenheim brachte er das Rüstzeug mit, um die Textilforschung in Richtung Medizintechnik neu zu denken. Er forschte zu Pankreas und Leber im Bereich Biohybride Organe und führte zahlreiche Projekte in der Regenerationsmedizin durch mit Entwicklungen für die Haut, für Blutgefäße, Nerven, Knorpel und Knochen. Doser baute den Forschungsbereich Biomedizintechnik an den DITF rasch zu einem wichtigen Geschäftsfeld auf und übernahm bereits 1998 dessen Leitung. Mit dieser Expertise wurde die Fördergemeinschaft Körperverträgliche Textilien e.V. (FKT) gegründet, die ein Prüfsiegel für die Bewertung und Kennzeichnung körperverträglicher Textilien entwickelte. Markenhersteller wie Mey, Falke, Mattes und Ammann oder Lenzing nutzen bis heute das Qualitätssiegel.

Für seine wissenschaftliche Arbeit und sein Engagement in der Biomedizintechnik erhielt Michael Doser zahlreiche Ehrungen und Auszeichnungen, zum Beispiel den EU EUREKA Innovation Award in der Kategorie „Erfinder von morgen” für die Entwicklung eines textilbasierten Verschlusses für einen Riss in der Bandscheibe.

Über diese Projekte der Biomedizintechnik engagierte sich Doser gleichzeitig schon früh als interdisziplinärer Ideengeber und kooperativer „Verbindungsmann” für andere Forschungsbereiche in Denkendorf. Seit 2001 nahm Doser diese Aufgaben als stellvertretender Institutsleiter des damaligen ITV und später als stellvertretender Vorstand der DITF wahr und prägte damit ganz wesentlich die Geschicke der DITF.

Erfolgreiche Gremienarbeit
Neben seiner wissenschaftlichen Arbeit engagierte sich Doser in zahlreichen nationalen und internationalen Gremien sowie Normenausschüssen und nahm über viele Jahre Gutachtertätigkeit wahr, unter anderem für die Forschungsdirektion der Europäischen Union. Besonders am Herzen lag ihm seine Mitgliedschaft in der European Society of Biomaterials, in der er einige Jahre im Vorstand aktiv war und 2018 zum ESB Honorary Member ernannt wurde.

Einige DIN-, ISO- und ASTM-Normen im Bereich biologischer und medizinischer Prüfungen tragen Dosers Handschrift. Von 2006 bis 2018 war er Leiter der ISO Arbeitsgruppe 5 zum Thema Cytotoxicity und brachte in dieser Funktion einen Standard zur Prüfung der Unbedenklichkeit von Medizintextilien auf den Weg, der heute noch für die Testung aller Medizinprodukte weltweit zur Anwendung kommt.

Engagement in der Lehre
Seit 1994 gab Michael Doser sein umfangreiches Wissen an Studierende weiter, zunächst mit Vorlesungen an der Universität Stuttgart, später auch mit Lehraufträgen an den Universitäten Ulm und Tübingen. In Würdigung seines Engagements in der Ausbildung auf dem Gebiet der Medizinischen Verfahrenstechnik und Medizintechnik wurde Doser zum Honorarprofessor der Universität Stuttgart ernannt.