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16.02.2021

Carbon with Multiple Lives: Bringing Innovations in Carbon Fiber Recycling to Market

When it comes to the future of motorized mobility, everyone talks about the power drive: How much e-car, how much combustion engine can the environment tolerate and how much do people need? At the same time, new powertrains place ineased demands not only on the engine, but also on its housing and the car body: Carbon fibers are often used for such demanding applications. Like the powertrain of the future, the materials on the vehicle should also be environmentally friendly. That is why recycling of carbon fibers is required. Institutes of the Zuse Community have developed solutions for this.

Carbon fibers consist almost completely of pure carbon. It is extracted from the plastic polyacrylonitrile at 1,300 degrees Celsius, using a lot of energy. The advantages of carbon fibers: They have almost no dead weight, are enormously break-resistant and sturdy. These properties are needed, for example, in the battery box of electric vehicles in structural components of a car body.

When it comes to the future of motorized mobility, everyone talks about the power drive: How much e-car, how much combustion engine can the environment tolerate and how much do people need? At the same time, new powertrains place ineased demands not only on the engine, but also on its housing and the car body: Carbon fibers are often used for such demanding applications. Like the powertrain of the future, the materials on the vehicle should also be environmentally friendly. That is why recycling of carbon fibers is required. Institutes of the Zuse Community have developed solutions for this.

Carbon fibers consist almost completely of pure carbon. It is extracted from the plastic polyacrylonitrile at 1,300 degrees Celsius, using a lot of energy. The advantages of carbon fibers: They have almost no dead weight, are enormously break-resistant and sturdy. These properties are needed, for example, in the battery box of electric vehicles in structural components of a car body.

The Saxon Textile Research Institute (STFI), for instance, is currently working with industrial partners on combining the static-mechanical strengths of carbon fibers with vibration damping properties to improve the housings of electric motors in cars. The project, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, is aimed at developing hybrid nonwovens that contain other fibers, in addition to carbon fiber, as a reinforcement. "We want to combine the advantages of different fiber materials and thereby develop a product that is optimally tailored to the requirements", explains Marcel Hofmann, head of department of Textile Lightweight Construction at STFI.

The Chemnitz researchers would therefore complement previous nonwoven solutions. They look back on 15 years of working with recycled carbon fibers. The global annual demand for the high-value fibers has almost quadrupled in the past decade, according to the AVK Industry Association to around 142,000 t most recently. "Increasing demand has brought recycling more and more into focus", says Hofmann. According to him, carbon fiber waste is available for about one-tenth to one-fifth of the price of primary fibers, but they still need to be processed. The key issue for the research success of recycled fibers is competitive applications. STFI has found these not only in cars, but also in the sports and leisure sector as well as in medical technology, for example in components for computer tomography. "While metals or glass fibers cast shadows as potential competing products, carbon does not interfere with the image display and can fully exploit its advantages", explains Hofmann.
 
Using Paper Know-How
If recycled carbon fibers can pass through the product cycle again, this significantly improves their carbon footprint. At the same time it applies: The shorter the carbon fibers, the less attractive they are for further recycling. With this in mind, the Cetex Research Institute and the Papiertechnische Stiftung (PTS), both members of the Zuse Community, developed a new process as part of a research project that gives recycled carbon fibers, which previously seemed unsuitable, a second product life. "While classic textile processes use dry processing for the already very brittle recycled carbon fibers in fiber lengths of at least 80 mm, we dealt with a process from the paper industry that processes the materials wet. At the end of the process, in very simplified terms, we obtained a laminar mat made of recycled carbon fibers and chemical fibers", says Cetex project engineer Johannes Tietze, explaining the process by which even 40 mm short carbon fibers can be recycled into appealing intermediates.

The resulting product created in a hot pressing process serves as the base material for heavy-duty structural components. In addition, the mechanical properties of the semi-finished products were improved by combining them with continuous fiber-reinforced tapes. The researchers expect the recycled product to compete with glass-fiber-reinforced plastics, for example in applications in rail and vehicle construction. The results are now being incorporated into further research and development in
the cooperation network of Ressourcetex, a funded association with 18 partners from industry and science.

Successful Implementation in the Automotive Industry
Industrial solutions for the recycling of carbon fiber production waste are being developed at the Thuringian Institute of Textile and Plastics Research (TITK). Several of these developments were industrially implemented with partners at the company SGL Composites in Wackersdorf, Germany. The processing of the so-called dry waste, mainly from production, is carried out in a separate procedure. "Here, we add the opened fibers to various processes for nonwoven production", says the responsible head of the department at TITK, Dr. Renate Lützkendorf . In addition to developments for applications e.g. in the BMW i3 in the roof or rear seat shell, special nonwovens and processes for the production of Sheet Molding Compounds (SMC) were established at TITK. These are thermoset materials consisting of reaction resins and reinforcing fibers, which are used to press fiber-plastic composites. This was used, for example, in a component for the C-pillar of the BMW 7 Series. "In its projects, TITK is primarily focusing on the development of more efficient processes and combined procedures to give carbon fiber recycling materials better opportunities in lightweight construction applications, also in terms of costs", says Lützkendorf. The focus is currently on the use of CF recycled fibers in thermoplastic processes for sheet and profile extrusion. "The goal is to combine short- and continuous-fiber reinforcement in a single, high-performance process step."

1) Since February 1st, 2021, Dr.-Ing. Thomas Reussmann succeeds Dr.-Ing. Renate Lützkendorf, who retired 31 January.

Source:

Zuse Community

Graphic: Pixabay
12.01.2021

East German Textile and Clothing Industry recorded a significant Drop in Sales in 2020

  • vti calls on health textiles purchasers to place more orders with domestic manufacturers
  • East German textile and clothing industry faces the Covid-19 crises with new ideas and products
  • Clothing sector more affected than the textile sector

The Association of the North-East German Textile and Clothing Industry (vti) calls on decision-makers in politics and authorities as well as in clinics and long-term care to order far more health protection textiles from local manufacturers than before. "That would be a logical step towards future-oriented, sustainable business - and furthermore in an exceptionally tough crisis situation. We are happy to arrange appropriate contacts with our companies," emphasized Dr.-Ing. Jenz Otto, Managing Director of the Chemnitz-based industry association, during an online press conference on January 8, 2021.

  • vti calls on health textiles purchasers to place more orders with domestic manufacturers
  • East German textile and clothing industry faces the Covid-19 crises with new ideas and products
  • Clothing sector more affected than the textile sector

The Association of the North-East German Textile and Clothing Industry (vti) calls on decision-makers in politics and authorities as well as in clinics and long-term care to order far more health protection textiles from local manufacturers than before. "That would be a logical step towards future-oriented, sustainable business - and furthermore in an exceptionally tough crisis situation. We are happy to arrange appropriate contacts with our companies," emphasized Dr.-Ing. Jenz Otto, Managing Director of the Chemnitz-based industry association, during an online press conference on January 8, 2021. “We don't understand the buying resistance concerning health textiles, even though the demand is huge. It is just as incomprehensible why there are still no noteworthy orders from authorities. In spring, the German federal government had already announced to provide 1 billion Euro with its economic stimulus package for national epidemic reserves for personal protective equipment. The federal states also had to take action in this regard and stock up. We urgently await the long-announced tenders for equipping the pandemic reserve stock. It is important that the purchase price is not the only measure of all things. Rather, criteria such as standard-compliant quality, traceable supply chains, the possibility of needs-based reorders and the multiple use of textiles are decisive for the safety of the population.”

When supply chains worldwide collapsed at the beginning of 2020, both authorities and many care and health facilities turned to textile companies for help. Many manufacturers launched both everyday masks and protective textiles that could be used in healthcare at short notice.
"These include highly effective bacteria and virus-repellent reusable products that enable effective textile management in the healthcare sector and at the same time prevent the piles of single-use waste from growing there," explained vti chairman Thomas Lindner, managing director of Strumpfwerk Lindner GmbH, Hohenstein-Ernstthal: “When the cheap imports from Asia reinstated, however, the interest decreased significantly. Nevertheless, numerous companies have continued to invest in new technology and aligned their production accordingly. For example, completely new production lines of face masks have been set up at several locations. Do not forget: The very expensive test procedures for medical and health textiles are a major challenge for us, the medium-sized businesses. In addition, there are still too few accredited test and certification bodies in Germany.” The fact that the companies were able to adapt to the new requirements at this rapid pace was primarily possible, because around 30 local companies and research institutes have been part of the health textiles network "health.textil", which is controlled by the vti and supported by the Free State of Saxony, for several years now. This alliance cooperates closely with practice partners such as the University Clinic of Dresden and the Elbland Clinics in Meißen. Nowadays it has expanded their activities to their neighbouring industry, research and application partner in Czech Republic. www.healthtextil.de

CO2 taxation puts medium-sized companies at a competitive disadvantage
Concerning the permanently relevant topic energy transition in Germany, vti General Manager Dr.-Ing. Jenz Otto points out that the economic framework conditions for medium-sized producers will continue to worsen with the introduction of the CO2 taxation in the midst of the current crisis. “The financial resources to be used for this will then be lacking for investments in innovative products and environmentally friendly manufacturing processes. Furthermore, our companies suffer significant competitive disadvantages compared to foreign competitors.” Björn-Olaf Dröge, managing director of the textile finishing company pro4tex GmbH, Niederfrohna, with around 100 employees, reported that the tax to be paid by his company for renewable energies adds up to around a quarter of a million euros annually. “Now the CO2 taxation for our natural gas consumption comes on top of that. For 2021 we anticipate an additional burden of almost 70,000 Euros.”

vti about the current situation in the East German industry
The East German textile and clothing industry recorded a significant loss in sales already in 2019. This trend has continued in 2020 being reinforced by the Covid-19 crises. Based on preliminary estimates, the vti assumes that the total turnover of the industry will be more than 11 percent below the previous year at the end of 2020, where the clothing sector is affected far more than the textile sector, with a decline of 35 percent. Exports, which are extremely important for the industry, also decreased in a similar magnitude. The job cuts have so far been relatively moderate, as many companies use the short-time working regulations and try to retain their permanent workforce. For 2021 the vti sees a gleam of hope in technical textiles, which have been in greater demand again in recent weeks - especially from the automotive industry. The employment cuts have so far been relatively moderate, as many companies use short-time working regulations and try to retain their permanent workforce. The vti sees a bright future for technical textiles in 2021, which have been in greater demand – especially in the automobile industry – in the last few weeks.

Of the around 16,000 employees, 12,000 work in Saxony and 2,500 in Thuringia. This makes this region one of the four largest German textile locations, along North Rhine-Westphalia, Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria. It has modern spinning mills, weaving mills, knitting mills, warp knitting mills, nonwovens manufacturers, embroidery mills, finishing companies and clothing manufacturers as well as efficient research and educational institutions. 

Over half of the turnover in the East German textile and clothing industry has so far been attributa-ble to technical textiles, followed by home textiles with around 30 percent and the clothing sector with around 10 percent. The vti acts as a stakeholder at state, federal and EU level, tariff- and so-cial partner, as well as a service provider for its around 160 member companies.

(c) Pixabay
15.12.2020

Protection against Corona: Materials research provides findings at institutes of the Zuse Community

As the year draws to a close, expectations are growing that protection against COVID-19 will soon be available. Until this is the case for large sections of the population, the successes achieved in research and industry to protect against the virus in 2020 offer a good starting point in the fight against corona and beyond. At institutes in the Zuse community, progress have been made not only in medical but also in materials research.

As the year draws to a close, expectations are growing that protection against COVID-19 will soon be available. Until this is the case for large sections of the population, the successes achieved in research and industry to protect against the virus in 2020 offer a good starting point in the fight against corona and beyond. At institutes in the Zuse community, progress have been made not only in medical but also in materials research.

These successes in materials research include innovations in the coating of surfaces. "In the wake of the pandemic, the demand for antiviral and antimicrobial surfaces has risen sharply, and we have successfully intensified our research in this area," explains Dr. Sebastian Spange, Head of Surface Technology at the Jena research institute INNOVENT. He expects to see an increasing number of products with antiviral surfaces in the future. "Our tests with model organisms show that an appropriate coating of surfaces works", emphasizes Spange. The spectrum of techniques used by INNOVENT includes flame treatment, plasma coating and the so-called Sol-Gel process, in which organic and inorganic substances can be combined in one layer at relatively low temperatures. According to Spange, materials for the coatings can be antibacterial metal compounds as well as natural substances with antiviral potential.

Nonwovens produced for mask manufacturers
In 2020, the textile expertise of numerous institutes in the Zuse community ensured that application-oriented research could prove its worth in the practical fight against pandemics. After the shortage of mask supplies in Germany at the beginning of the pandemic, textile research institutes reacted to the shortage by jumping into the breach. The Saxon Textile Research Institute (STFI), for example, converted its research facilities to the production of nonwovens to supply German and European manufacturers of particle filtering protective masks. "From March to November 2020, we supplied nonwovens to various manufacturers in order to provide the best possible support for mask production and thus help contain the pandemic. At a critical time for industry and the population, we were able to help relieve critical production capacity - an unaccustomed role for a research institute, but one we would assume again in similar situations," explains Andreas Berthel, Managing Commercial Director of STFI.

Development of reusable medical face masks
For the improvement of everyday as well as medical face masks the German Institutes for Textile and Fiber Research (DITF) are working on this project. In cooperation with an industrial partner, they are currently developing in Denkendorf, among other things, reusable medical face masks made of high-performance precision fabric using Jacquard weaving technology. The multiple use avoids waste and possible supply bottlenecks.

There are regulations for all types of masks, now also for everyday masks. At Hohenstein, compliance with standards for masks is checked. A new European guideline defines minimum requirements for the design, performance evaluation, labelling and packaging of everyday masks. "As a testing laboratory for medical products, we test the functionality of medical masks from microbiological-hygienic and physical aspects", explains Hohenstein's Managing Director Prof. Dr. Stefan Mecheels. In this way, Hohenstein supports manufacturers, among other things, with technical documentation to prove the effectiveness and safety. Respiratory protection masks (FFP 1, FFP 2 and FFP 3) have been tested at the Plastics Centre (SKZ) in Würzburg since the middle of this year. Among other things, inhalation and exhalation resistance and the passage of particles are tested. In addition, SKZ itself has entered into mask research. In cooperation with a medical technology specialist, SKZ is developing an innovative mask consisting of a cleanable and sterilizable mask carrier and replaceable filter elements.

ILK tests for mouth-nose protection
The fight against Corona is won by the contributions of humans: Of researchers in laboratories, of developers and manufacturers in the Industry as well as from the citizens on the street.
Against this background, the Institute for Air and Refrigeration Technology (ILK) in Dresden has carried out investigations into the permeability of the mouth and nose protection (MNS), namely on possible impairments when breathing through the mask as well as the protective function of everyday masks. Result: Although the materials used for the mouth-nose protection are able to retain about 95 percent of the exhaled droplets, "under practical aspects and consideration of leakages" it can be assumed that about 50 percent to 70 percent of the droplets enter the room, according to the ILK. If the mask is worn below the nose only, it can even be assumed that about 90 percent of the exhaled particles will enter the room due to the large proportion of nasal breathing. This illustrates the importance of tight-fitting and correctly worn mouth and nose protection. "On the other hand, from a physical point of view there are no reasons against wearing a mask", ILK managing director Prof. Dr. Uwe Franzke emphasizes. The researchers examined the CO2 content in the air we breathe as well as the higher effort required for breathing and based this on the criterion of overcoming the pressure loss. "The investigations on pressure loss showed a small, but practically irrelevant increase," explains Franzke.

The complete ILK report "Investigations on the effect of mouth and nose protection (MNS)" is available here.

Venue Messe Frakfurt (c) Mese Frankfurt GmbH
22.09.2020

Heimtextil 2021 to be held in May

The next Heimtextil has been postponed from January and will now be held concurrently with Techtextil and Texprocess 2021 in Frankfurt from 4 to 7 May 2021. This will result in exciting synergistic effects for the sector.
 
The current situation with respect to the corona pandemic and the associated international travel restrictions have caused Messe Frankfurt to postpone the next Heimtextil, the world’s biggest trade fair for home and contract textiles, from the planned dates in January until 4 to 7 May 2021.
     

The next Heimtextil has been postponed from January and will now be held concurrently with Techtextil and Texprocess 2021 in Frankfurt from 4 to 7 May 2021. This will result in exciting synergistic effects for the sector.
 
The current situation with respect to the corona pandemic and the associated international travel restrictions have caused Messe Frankfurt to postpone the next Heimtextil, the world’s biggest trade fair for home and contract textiles, from the planned dates in January until 4 to 7 May 2021.
     
“The bulk of the international home and contract textiles sector want us to hold Heimtextil 2021. Many companies are hoping to give their businesses a boost by taking part in the fair following the restart. And we consider it a greater obligation than ever before that we play our part in this”, explains Detlef Braun, Member of the Executive Board of Messe Frankfurt. “However, the current travel restrictions and the renewed increase in the number of infections represent a big hurdle for our very international trade fair. We are in constant contact with our exhibitors and the appropriate authorities and will do everything in our power to ensure a safe and successful Heimtextil 2021.”

Over 90 percent of exhibitors come to Heimtextil in Frankfurt from outside Germany. As part of the preparatory work for an international trade fair of this kind in January, it is necessary, for example, to commission stand-construction companies, ship the goods and book flights and hotels in September. Thus, in view of the current travel restrictions, holding Heimtextil 2021 in May instead of January offers greater planning certainty for all involved.
 
“The trend-oriented order cycles of the home and contract textiles sector require an annual event towards the beginning of the year. Techtextil and Texprocess are biennial trade fairs and are next due to be held in May 2021. For Heimtextil, this is an opportunity to join forces with the two internationally successful textile trade fairs and present the entire textile value chain simultaneously at Frankfurt Fair and Exhibition Centre”, says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles and Textile Technologies.

Additionally, holding Heimtextil concurrently with Techtextil, the leading international trade fair for technical textiles and nonwovens, and Texprocess, the leading international trade fair for processing textile and flexible materials, offers a host of exciting synergistic effects for the sector.

The close proximity to suppliers and buyers of technical textiles and nonwovens with innovative functionalities, as well as machines and the latest technologies for processing textile and flexible materials, is certain to generate interesting new perspectives for both visitors and exhibitors of Heimtextil. Indeed, the two textile fairs already aim at the home-textile sector with the ‘Hometech’ segment.
 
“We are confident that the situation with respect to the corona pandemic will have eased significantly by May, next year, and are looking forward to holding a successful and safe event together with our partners from the sector”, says Olaf Schmidt.

NEU: Nextrade - the digital marketplace
For the first time, Messe Frankfurt will provide a supplementary digital service in connection with Heimtextil 2021: Nextrade, an order and data-management portal offering new opportunities through digital 24/7 business relationships between trade-fair participants, especially against the background of the Covid-19 pandemic. There, dealers can place their orders with suppliers around the clock and, therefore, do so independently of any official pandemic regulations applying at the time. Nextrade also offers suppliers completely new sales and distribution channels, especially internationally. Nextrade was launched in conjunction with the Ambiente, Tendence and Nordstil consumer-goods and lifestyle trade fairs. As the first digital B2B market place for home and living, the portal brings together demand and supply from the whole sector and thus produces great value added for both sides:: www.nextrade.market

Techtextil / Texprocess
At the biennial Techtextil, the leading international trade fair for the sector in Frankfurt am Main, international exhibitors present the complete spectrum of technical textiles, functional apparel textiles and textile technologies for all areas of application. Techtextil is held concurrently with Texprocess, the leading trade for the garment and textile processing industry, which is aimed primarily at manufacturers of garments, fashions, upholstered furniture and leather products.

More information:
Heimtextil 2021
Source:

Messe Frankfurt GmbH

Photo: Pixabay
28.04.2020

Meltblown Productive: Fraunhofer ITWM vs. Corona - With Mathematics Against the Crisis

  • Meltblown Productive – ITWM Software Supports Nonwoven Production for Infection Protection

Simulations by the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics ITWM make processes in the manufacturing of nonwovens more efficient. Within the anti-corona program of Fraunhofer the production of infection protection is optimized.
 
Nonwovens production is currently attracting more attention than ever before from the general public, because in times of the corona pandemic, nonwovens are vital for infection protection in the medical sector and also for the protection of the entire population. Disposable bed linen in hospitals, surgical gowns, mouthguards, wound protection pads and compresses are some examples of nonwoven products.

  • Meltblown Productive – ITWM Software Supports Nonwoven Production for Infection Protection

Simulations by the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics ITWM make processes in the manufacturing of nonwovens more efficient. Within the anti-corona program of Fraunhofer the production of infection protection is optimized.
 
Nonwovens production is currently attracting more attention than ever before from the general public, because in times of the corona pandemic, nonwovens are vital for infection protection in the medical sector and also for the protection of the entire population. Disposable bed linen in hospitals, surgical gowns, mouthguards, wound protection pads and compresses are some examples of nonwoven products.

IEspecially in intensive care and geriatric care, disposable products made of nonwovens are used due to the special hygiene requirements. At the moment there are clear bottlenecks in the production of these materials. For the meltblown nonwovens class, however, it is difficult to increase production efficiency because meltblown processes are highly sensitive to process fluctuations and material impurities.
 
Although nonwovens are not all the same, the rough principle of their production is relatively similar to all industrially manufactured nonwovens: molten polymer is pressed through many fine nozzles, stretched and cooled down in an air stream and thus deposited into the typical white webs. "Meltblown" stands for the submicron fiber process whose nonwovens are responsible for the decisive filter function in face masks.
 
With meltblown technology, nonwoven fabrics are produced directly from granules. A special spinning process in combination with high-speed hot air is used to produce fine-fibered nonwovens with different structures. The fibers are highly stretched by the turbulent air flow. During this process they swirl in the air, become entangled and fall more or less randomly onto a conveyor belt where they are further consolidated - a very complex process. Nonwovens manufacturers around the world are striving to massively increase their production capacities.
 
Digital Twin Optimizes Meltblown Process    
This is where the software of the ITWM comes into play. "Our Fiber Dynamics Simulation Tool FIDYST is used to predict the movement of the fibers, their falling and the orientation with which they are laid down on the conveyor belt. Depending on the process settings, turbulence characteristics are generated and thus nonwoven qualities are created that differ in structure, fiber density and strength," explains Dr. Walter Arne from the Fraunhofer ITWM. He has been working at the institute for years on the simulation of various processes involving fibers and filaments.

The methodology is well transferable to meltblown processes. In these processes, one of the specific features is the simulation of filament stretching in a turbulent air flow - how the stretching takes place, the dynamics of the filaments and the diameter distribution. These are all complex aspects that have to be taken into account, but also the flow field or the temperature distribution. The simulations of the scientists at the Fraunhofer ITWM then provide a qualitative and quantitative insight into the fiber formation in such meltblown processes - unique in the world in this form when it comes to simulate a turbulent spinning process (meltblown).

Nonwoven Manufacturers benefit from Simulation
What does this mean for the industry? The production of technical textiles becomes more efficient, but the nonwovens can also be developed without having intensive productions tests in a real facility. This is because the simulations help to forecast and then optimize the processes using a digital twin. In this way, production capacities can be increased while maintaining the same product quality. Simulations save experiments, allow new insights, enable systematic parameter variations and solve up-scaling problems that can lead to misinvestments during the transition from laboratory to industrial plant.

Making a Contribution to Overcome the Crisis With Many Years of Expertise
"We want to demonstrate this in the project using a typical meltblown line as an example - for this we are in contact with partner companies," says Dr. Dietmar Hietel, head of the department "Transport Processes" at the Fraunhofer ITWM. "Within the framework of Fraunhofer's anti-corona program, we want to use our developed expertise and our network to contribute to overcome the crisis", reports Hietel. His department at the Fraunhofer ITWM has been pursuing research in the field of technical textiles for around 20 years. Due to its current relevance, the project not only got off to a quick start, but the implementation and results should now also be implemented quickly: The project is scheduled to run from April 15th 2020 to August 14th 2020. The kick-off meeting took place on April 17th 2020 via video conference.
 
The project "Meltblown productive" and the results are certainly interesting for nonwoven producers. The production of many mass products has often been outsourced to Asia in the past decades; the nonwovens manufacturers remaining in Germany and Europe tend to focus more on high-quality technical textiles. In the medium and longer term, this will also be a scientific preliminary work when production capacities in Germany and Europe are expanded by new plants. One lesson to be learned from the crisis will also be to reduce the dependence on producers in Asia, especially as a precautionary measure for crisis scenarios.

Source:

Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics, ITWM

The new AddiTex compound comes out of the extruder as a filament for 3D printing. © Fraunhofer UMSICHT
12.11.2019

FRAUNHOFER UMSICHT: COMPOUNDS FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, GEOTEXTILES AND WEARABLES

Whether biodegradable geotextiles, wearables from thermoplastic elastomers or functional textiles from 3D printers - the scope of plastics developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT is wide.

Insights into these projects were provided from October 16th - 23rd  in Düsseldorf: At the K, scientists presented their work on thermally and electrically conductive, biodegradable, bio-based compounds as well as compounds suitable for additive production.
 
Textile composites from the 3D printer
In the "AddiTex" project, plastics were developed that are applied to textiles in layers using 3D printing and give them functional properties. A special challenge in the development was the permanent adhesion: The printed plastic had to be both a strong bond with the textile and sufficiently flexible to be able to participate in movements and twists.

Whether biodegradable geotextiles, wearables from thermoplastic elastomers or functional textiles from 3D printers - the scope of plastics developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT is wide.

Insights into these projects were provided from October 16th - 23rd  in Düsseldorf: At the K, scientists presented their work on thermally and electrically conductive, biodegradable, bio-based compounds as well as compounds suitable for additive production.
 
Textile composites from the 3D printer
In the "AddiTex" project, plastics were developed that are applied to textiles in layers using 3D printing and give them functional properties. A special challenge in the development was the permanent adhesion: The printed plastic had to be both a strong bond with the textile and sufficiently flexible to be able to participate in movements and twists.

A flexible and flame-retardant compound was developed, which is particularly suitable for use in the field of textile sun and sound insulation, as well as a rigid compound, which is used, among other things, for reinforcing the shape of protective and functional clothing.

Geotextile filter for technical-biological bank protection
Geotextile filters for technical-biological bank protection are the focus of the "Bioshoreline" project. It stands for gradually biodegradable nonwovens, which allow a near-natural bank design of inland waterways with plants. They consist of renewable raw materials and are intended to stabilize the soil in the shore area until the plant roots have grown sufficiently and take over both filter and retention functions. The ageing and biodegradation of the fleeces begin immediately after installation, until the fleeces are gradually completely degraded.

Prototypes of the geotextile filters are currently being tested. Female scientists evaluate the plant mass formed above and below ground with and without geotextile filters as well as the influence of the soil type on plant growth and the biological degradation of the filter.

Wearables made of thermoplastic elastomers
In addition, Fraunhofer UMSICHT is developing novel, electrically conductive and flexible compounds that can be processed into thermoplastic-based bipolar plates. These plastics are highly electrically conductive, flexible, mechanically stable, gas-tight and chemically resistant and - depending on the degree of filling of electrically conductive additives - can be used in many different ways. For example, in electrochemical storage tanks (batteries), in energy converters (fuel cells), in chemical-resistant heat exchangers or as resistance heating elements.

Another possible field of application for these plastics: Wearables. These portable materials can be produced easily and cheaply with the new compounds. It is conceivable, for example, to form garments such as a vest by means of resistance heating elements. The idea behind this is called Power-to-Heat and enables the direct conversion of energy into heat.

FUNDING NOTES

"AddiTex" is funded with a grant from the State of North Rhine-Westphalia using funds from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) 2014-2020 "Investments in growth and employment". Project Management Agency: LeitmarktAgentur.NRW – Projektmanagement Jülich.

The "Bioshoreline" project (funding reference: 22000815) is funded by the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) on the basis of a resolution of the German Bundestag.

More information:
Fraunhofer-Institute UMSICHT K 2019
Source:

Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety, and Energy Technology UMSICHT

Fotos: (c) ITMA
25.06.2019

A MORE INTERNATIONAL ITMA 2019 SETS NEW RECORD WITH BIGGEST NUMBER OF EXHIBITORS

Since its launch in 1951, ITMA has enjoyed wide industry recognition as the world’s largest textile and garment technology exhibition. This year’s exhibition in Barcelona sees its reputation solidify further with the largest gathering of exhibitors in its history. The record number of exhibitors totaling 1,717 from 45 countries has set a new milestone.

Speaking at the press conference on the opening day of the 18th edition of the exhibition, Mr Fritz P. Mayer, President of the European Committee of Textile Machinery Manufacturers (CEMATEX), said: “The global economy is still facing challenges, accentuated by trade tensions and disruption. However, textile being the world’s oldest manufacturing industry has demonstrated its resilience over the years. 

Since its launch in 1951, ITMA has enjoyed wide industry recognition as the world’s largest textile and garment technology exhibition. This year’s exhibition in Barcelona sees its reputation solidify further with the largest gathering of exhibitors in its history. The record number of exhibitors totaling 1,717 from 45 countries has set a new milestone.

Speaking at the press conference on the opening day of the 18th edition of the exhibition, Mr Fritz P. Mayer, President of the European Committee of Textile Machinery Manufacturers (CEMATEX), said: “The global economy is still facing challenges, accentuated by trade tensions and disruption. However, textile being the world’s oldest manufacturing industry has demonstrated its resilience over the years. 

“This is also the spirit of our exhibitors who continually innovate and launch new technologies and solutions. We are glad that ITMA has been providing a reputable platform for textile machinery manufacturers to market their innovations. This has enabled us to record the largest number of exhibitors in ITMA’s history.”

The exhibits are showcased over 114,500 square metres of net exhibit space, a 9 per cent increase over the previous edition in 2015. The exhibition occupies all nine halls of the Gran Via venue, including the space under the linkway. To allow more companies to participate, many exhibitors were allocated lesser stand space than what they had originally applied for.  

Mr Charles Beauduin, Chairman of ITMA Services, organiser of ITMA 2019 enthused: “The exhibition would have been larger if we had not turned away applicants due to a lack of space. Unfortunately, we could not accommodate a wait-list of about 250 applicants who booked some 8,200 square metres.”

He added: “ITMA has also evolved into a more international exhibition with a rich diversity of technology offerings from both East and West. Almost half of the total number of exhibitors are from non CEMATEX countries. This augurs well for the development of ITMA into a definitive textile and garment platform for the industry.”

International participation
Of the total number of exhibitors, over half are from CEMATEX countries; the balance comprising companies from other parts of Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas. Reflecting the international composition of the participants, the largest number of exhibitors are from Italy (364 exhibitors), China (276 exhibitors), Germany (222 exhibitors), India (169 exhibitors) and Turkey (164 exhibitors).

CEMATEX countries continue to occupy the largest exhibit space, taking up 65% of the total net exhibit space. Italy booked 26% of the space, followed by Germany which booked 18%. The top non-CEMATEX countries are: Turkey with 9%, China with 8%, and India with 5% of the space booked.

Product sectors
Visitors can expect to source a wide range of integrated solutions across the entire value chain in 19 exhibit sectors. Printing, which has seen many advances being made in the last few years, is an exciting growth sector. Chalking up a 38 per cent increase in the number of exhibitors compared with the previous exhibition, it is one of the top five sectors at ITMA 2019:

  • Finishing - 325 exhibitors
  • Spinning - 281 exhibitors
  • Weaving - 182 exhibitors
  • Printing - 157 exhibitors
  • Knitting - 136 exhibitors

Nonwoven and technical textiles due to their wide range of applications continue to be an important sector at ITMA 2019. Garment making, which has been impacted by digitalisation and fast fashion, is also making a bigger impact at ITMA.

Mr Mayer said, “We are extremely pleased to bring garment technology back in focus at ITMA. While ITMA has been traditionally strong in textile making technologies, we are glad that we are able to present garment making solutions from some of the world’s most renowned technology providers. There is an increase of 27 per cent in number of exhibitors as compared with ITMA 2015." Completing the entire value chain is the showcase on fibres, yarn and fabrics. The addition of innovative fabrics in the fibre and yarn chapter at ITMA further completes the sourcing experience for buyers.
 
Focus on innovation
The theme of ITMA 2019 is ‘Innovating the World of Textiles’. To support the innovation drive, CEMATEX has introduced the ITMA Innovation Lab. A new umbrella branding of a series of activities, the Lab includes the Research and Innovation Pavilion, ITMA Speakers Platform, ITMA Sustainable Innovation Award and Innovation Video Showcase. Speakers from the industry have been invited to share their perspectives and experiences at the Speakers Platform which will be held from 21 to 25 June. A finance forum was also held on 21 June.

Co-located events and industry engagement
To encourage the exchange of knowledge, collaboration and networking, several events are staged alongside ITMA 2019. The ITMA-EDANA Nonwovens Forum and Textile Colourant and Chemical Leaders Forum have met with overwhelming response and seats have been added. Similar strong response has also been received by partner events, including the Better Cotton Initiative Seminar, European Digital Textile Conference, TexSummit Global, Planet Textiles, SAC & ZDHC Manufacturer Forum and Texmeeting by TEXFOR.

“The series of co-located events is part of ITMA’s outreach programme to engage industry partners and to create an inclusive platform for the global textile and garment community. We have over 190 international, regional and local organisations lending their support to our exhibition,” Mr Mayer said. ITMA 2019 is held at Fira de Barcelona Gran Via venue till 26 June. The opening hours are from 10.00am to 6.00pm daily, except 26 June when the exhibition will end at 4.00pm.

About CEMATEX & ITMA
The European Committee of Textile Machinery Manufacturers (CEMATEX) comprises national textile machinery associations from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. It is the owner of ITMA and ITMA ASIA. Considered the ‘Olympics’ of textile machinery exhibitions, ITMA has a 68-year history of displaying the latest technology for every single work process of textile and garment making. It is held every four years in Europe.

 

More information:
ITMA 2019
Source:

CEMATEX & ITMA Services

Photo: Pixabay
26.02.2019

TURKEY REMAINS AN IMPORTANT MARKET FOR GERMAN TEXTILE MACHINERY

  • Competition from the Far East increases modernization pressure

Turkey is an important market for German manufacturers of textile machinery. However, the textile and clothing industry has a problem: exports have been stagnating for years.

  • Competition from the Far East increases modernization pressure

Turkey is an important market for German manufacturers of textile machinery. However, the textile and clothing industry has a problem: exports have been stagnating for years.

The Turkish textile industry is broadly based: Companies manufacture all intermediate products in the country, including yarns, fibers and fabrics. Production along the entire textile value chain means great sales potential for German suppliers of textile machinery. In fact, Turkey is the second most important export market for German spinning, weaving, textile finishing machines and the like after China, as it can be seen from the figures of the Federal Statistical Office Destatis.Nevertheless, the sector is not a growth market. Apart from a few outliers upwards and downwards, Turkish textile machinery imports have remained at the same level for several years. This is due to the fact that Turkish exports of textiles and clothing are also stagnating. Particularly noticeable: companies benefited only marginally from the weak lira last year.

Textile and apparel industry benefits little from weak lira
Year Turkish exports of clothing and textiles (in US$ billion) Annual change (in %)
2015 26.3 -10.3
2016 26.1 -0.6
2017 26.7 2.1
2018 27.7 3.6

Source: Turkish Statistical Office TÜIK (http://www.tuik.gov.tr)

Increasing pressure from the Far East
Turkish clothing manufacturers are increasingly feeling the effects of competition from the Far East. Despite the high number of informal workers, wages in Turkey have risen to such an extent that they cannot keep up with the low wages of Asian sewing factories. The geographical advantage of Turkish companies over Chinese competitors is at stake because of the new Silk Road and the development of faster transport routes. Free trade agreements that the European Union is currently negotiating with India and South Korea will further increase the pressure on Turkish producers.

Slump in 3rd quarter 2018
In addition, there is the difficult economic situation in the country: the Turkish lira reached a record low, especially in the months of August to October 2018, and commercial banks raised their lending rates. As a result, financing costs for machinery from abroad suddenly increased, orders from Turkey failed to materialize, especially in the third quarter. The German knitting machine manufacturer Mayer & Cie has also noticed this, as Stefan Bühler, who is responsible for the Turkish business, reports: "In the last three months of 2018, the market was virtually dead. In the meantime, however, the industry is gradually recovering.

Akar Textile plans new factory
Announcements about new investments cannot yet be heard at this time. As early as June 2018, Akar Textile (http://www.akartextile.com) announced that it would build a new factory for 47 million Turkish lira (TL) in the municipality of Savur in southeastern Turkey. 3,000 employees are there to become employed. Akar Textile produces for companies such as C&A, Mango and H&M. Only a few months after the announcement of the project, the economic crisis in Turkey deepened in September. The extent to which the turbulence has affected the project implementation is not known.

Technical textiles as a driving force for growth
Far Eastern competition is increasing the pressure to modernize the Turkish textile industry. In the future, industry will have to compete primarily with high-quality products. Growth impulses are currently coming from the sector of technical textiles. According to industry reports, more than 200 small and medium-sized enterprises are already producing technical textiles and nonwovens in Turkey. These textiles and fabrics are being used in the automotive, packaging and cosmetics industries.

In June 2018, the Turkish METYX Group (http://www.metyx.com) invested in its machinery parc. The company is manufacturing technical textiles and has ordered a line of warp knitting machines from the German textile machine manufacturer Karl Mayer. The manufacturer of composite materials is thus increasing its capacity by 12,000 tons of glass and carbon fibers. In recent years, more and more research and development centers have emerged to promote the necessary technology transfer in the industry. The Institute for Technical Textiles at RWTH Aachen University (ITA) founded a research center in Istanbul in October 2016. In the Teknosab industrial zone in Bursa the BUTEKOM research and development center for textile technology was established in 2008. The institute offers training as well as research and development cooperation to and with companies.

However, many medium-sized textile companies often lack the money to invest in modern machinery. The short planning horizon makes an access to research and development more difficult. As a member of the management board of the German-Turkish Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Frank Kaiser has been observing the Turkish business landscape for eight years. He points out that the textile manufacturers, like other medium-sized companies in the country too, often plan in short terms. "In view of the volatile business environment, this is rational," Kaiser explains.

Turkish imports of textile machinery and exchange rate comparison  1)
Year Import from Germany
(in USD million)
Total imports
(in USD million)
Exchange rate
(1 US$ = ?TL)
2009 143 505 1.55
2011 521 1,851 1.67
2013 619 2,211 1.90
2015 382 1,398 2.72
2017 447 1,478 3.65
2018 1) 2) 490 1,774 4.81

1) the slump in the 3rd quarter is not yet visible in the annual figures for 2018; it will not become noticeable until 2019
Sources: UN-Comtrade, TurkStat 2), Bundesbank

 

 

 

 

12.02.2019

TECHNICAL TEXTILES ARE A SUCCESSFUL INDUSTRY IN ISRAEL

  • Israeli Manufacturers with increasing Presence on the World Market

The production of technical textiles is one of the leading sectors of the Israeli textile industry. Their success is not least due to intensive research and development. In view of the fierce international competition facing the Israeli textile industry, high-quality and innovative products are indispensable for stabilizing this
industry. One of the sectors that best manage this modernization is the production of technical textiles.

In 2017, this product category accounted for an estimated USD 600 million or nearly one-third of the total sales generated by the textile and apparel industry. With an export share of around 70 percent, the division is also strongly world market-oriented and accounted for USD 414 million, 43 percent of Israeli textile and clothing exports in 2017.

  • Israeli Manufacturers with increasing Presence on the World Market

The production of technical textiles is one of the leading sectors of the Israeli textile industry. Their success is not least due to intensive research and development. In view of the fierce international competition facing the Israeli textile industry, high-quality and innovative products are indispensable for stabilizing this
industry. One of the sectors that best manage this modernization is the production of technical textiles.

In 2017, this product category accounted for an estimated USD 600 million or nearly one-third of the total sales generated by the textile and apparel industry. With an export share of around 70 percent, the division is also strongly world market-oriented and accounted for USD 414 million, 43 percent of Israeli textile and clothing exports in 2017.

The production of technical textiles is based not least on strong domestic demand. The largest domestic customers include the armed forces and security forces, which demand high functionality and top quality from their suppliers. Among other things, this market segment produces bulletproof textiles, special textiles for uniforms, carrier bags for sensitive devices under field conditions and camouflage nets.

Strong domestic demand helps product development
As the Fashion & Textile Industries Association explained to Germany Trade & Invest in January 2019, direct contact with the military and internal security institutions helps companies to offer tried and tested products. In addition, according to Maya Herscovitz, director of the association, former members of the armed forces and security forces who are familiar with the requirements for corresponding products are active in the manufacturing companies.    
 
Other domestic customer industries are construction and agriculture. Building construction is increasingly relying on modern building materials, including lightweight and highly insulating textiles. The agricultural sector, on the other hand, contributes only 1.2 percent to the gross domestic product, but is capital-intensive and innovation-oriented. Safety nets are a popular agrotechnical product. In September 2018, Israeli agronomist Yossi Ofir pointed out in a contribution that climate change is leading to an increasing use of shadow nets. Last but not least, more and more Israeli farmers covered entire orchards with shade nets. 

Networking with the high-tech industry
The anchoring in the domestic market and the direct contact to customers accelerate the development of new products. At the same time, the technical textiles sector is embedded in the high-tech scene. For example, manufacturers integrate research results from nanotechnology and materials science into their products.

An example of this is Marom Dolphin, which manufactures military and civilian products and uses plastics, metal and composite materials to increase the strength of its textile products or reduce their weight. A leading manufacturer of technical textiles is Hagor Industries, which offers combat vests, protective vests, backpacks and tents of all sizes among other things, while Source - Shoresh produces textile hiking accessories. These and similar manufacturers are represented on numerous export markets.

Some companies do not offer finished products, but technological solutions. Nano Textile, for example, has launched an antibacterial sonochemical coating for textiles. Hospitals are planned as a main field of application, but according to company information other fields of application such as aircraft construction and public transport, restaurants and hotels or baby clothing may also open up. Gideon Guthrie Technical Textile also offers research and development (R&D) services in cooperation with Israeli and foreign textile manufacturers.

In addition to the activities of the company's own R&D departments, research is also carried out at universities. For example, the textile coating technology used by Nano Textile was developed at the Israeli Bar Ilan University. The Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art is home to CIRTex (The David & Barbara Blumenthal Israel Center for Innovation and Research in Textiles). The center carries out applied research on new products, production processes and applications for textiles and promotes cooperation between established companies on the one hand and start-ups and individual inventors on the other. Industrial textile research and development is supported by the Innovation Authority.

According to the trade association, the production of technical textiles will continue to increase in the coming years. As Maya Herscovitz explained to Germany Trade and Invest, manufacturers of technical textiles invest large amounts not only in the development of new products, but also in the modernization and automation of production processes. This was not only necessary for reasons of cost savings, but also because of the shortage of skilled workers on the labour market.

Israel is a net exporter of technical textiles
Der mit großem Abstand wichtigste Exportposten im Bereich technischer Textilien (SITC 657) sind The by far most important export item in the technical textiles sector (SITC 657) are nonwovens (SITC 657.2). They accounted for 67.1 percent of total exports of technical textiles in 2017, or USD 278 million. Second place went to batting, wicks and goods and products for technical use made of textile materials. With an export value of USD 88 million, they accounted for 21.6 percent of industry exports.

The most important export market in 2017 was the USA, followed by the Netherlands and Germany in a great distance. The Federal Republic of Germany purchased technical textiles worth USD 44.7 million (10.8 percent of Israeli exports) from Israel.

With USD 136 million imports accounted for 32.6 percent of exports. The three most important supplier countries - China, Turkey and Italy - were almost on a par at USD 25 million, USD 24.8 million and USD 24.2 million. Germany ranked fifth and, with a delivery value of USD 11.2 million, achieved an import market share of 8.3 percent.

Source:

Wladimir Struminski, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

Taiwan's Textile Industry sustains its Position with Innovations Photo: Pixabay
25.09.2018

TAIWAN'S TEXTILE INDUSTRY SUSTAINS ITS POSITION WITH INNOVATIONS

  • Manufacturers rely, among others, on German Machines

Tokyo (GTAI) - When it comes to functional textiles, Taiwan belongs to the international top league. To ensure that this remains the case, industry manufacturers invest in modern equipment and innovations.

Taiwan is an important global supplier of functional textiles. The sector wants to maintain this position and expand it as much as possible. They are therefore investing in new capacities, research and development. There are good sales opportunities for suppliers of pre-products and equipment.

The demand for functional textiles is increasing in the sports, leisure and footwear industries. In other sectors, such as the automotive and medical industries, building materials and agricultural aids, these are also increasingly being used. Functional textiles are usually not recognizable as Taiwan products. Nevertheless, some of them are very visible.

  • Manufacturers rely, among others, on German Machines

Tokyo (GTAI) - When it comes to functional textiles, Taiwan belongs to the international top league. To ensure that this remains the case, industry manufacturers invest in modern equipment and innovations.

Taiwan is an important global supplier of functional textiles. The sector wants to maintain this position and expand it as much as possible. They are therefore investing in new capacities, research and development. There are good sales opportunities for suppliers of pre-products and equipment.

The demand for functional textiles is increasing in the sports, leisure and footwear industries. In other sectors, such as the automotive and medical industries, building materials and agricultural aids, these are also increasingly being used. Functional textiles are usually not recognizable as Taiwan products. Nevertheless, some of them are very visible.

For example, at least 15 out of 32 teams at the 2018 FIFA World Cup wore clothing made with textiles of Taiwanese origin for internationally renowned brand names, according to the Taiwan Industrial Development Bureau (IDB). According to the Taiwan Footwear Manufacturers Association, Taiwanese manufacturers are responsible for approximately 80 percent of all sports shoes produced worldwide.

Textile manufacturers invest
Far Eastern New Century (FENC) is one of the largest textile manufacturers on the island. Its production capacity is nowadays mainly located abroad with productions in China, Japan, the USA and Vietnam. FENC is also expanding its capacity in Taiwan. Polyester spunbonded nonwovens have been produced for the Asian market in a joint venture with Freudenberg in Germany since 1987.

Freudenberg Far Eastern Spunweb has announced that it will set up a third production line for nonwovens at the Tayuan plant, thereby increasing the existing production of 20,000 tons by 11,000 tons per year. Construction of the new production facility, which is scheduled to start operations in 2020, has now begun. The latest automated production technology is to be used. According to the company, the investments amount will approximately be at USD 43 million.

Biggest companies in the textile industry in Taiwan by sales
(in USD million; change compared to previous year in %)

Company 2016 2017 Change
Far Eastern New Century Corp. 6,679 7,157 0.,9
Formosa Taffeta Co., Ltd. 1,233 1,337 2.2
Shinkong Synthetic Fiber Corporation 1,066 1,200 6.1
Eclat Textile Co., Ltd. 759 796 -1.2
Makalot Industrial Co., Ltd. 685 735 1.2
Tainan Spinning Co., Ltd. 602 692 8.3

Source: CommonWealth Magazine, Taiwan Stock Exchange

Germany remains an important equipment supplier
Taiwan's textile manufacturers import their equipment mainly from China, Japan and Germany, with some of the machines produced in China coming from companies with Japanese, German, Italian or Taiwanese parent companies. German deliveries declined by 13.7 percent to USD 71.1 compared to 2016 million in 2017. However, Taiwan's imports from Germany increased by 24.3 percent in the first six months of 2018, exceeding deliveries from Japan at USD 42.5 million.

The fact that the import of equipment remains at a high level has to do with the fact that companies in the textile industry in Taiwan are modernizing existing plants and converting them to Industry 4.0. In addition, the number of textile manufacturers in Taiwan has increased in recent years. According to statistics from the Taiwan Federation of Textiles, the number of companies rose from 3,143 to 3,214 between 2014 and 2017.

Main suppliers of textile machinery *)
to Taiwan (USD million; change in % compared to previous year)

Supplying country 2016 2017 Change
China 108.7 111.0 2.1
Japan 97.2 97.2 0
Germany 82.5 71.1 -13.7
Italy 32.8 23.8 -27.3
Switzerland 13.6 14.1 3.6
USA 19.2 12.1 -37.2
Total 405.4 364.7 -10.0

*) HS-Codes 8444-8453; without 8450
Source: Customs Statistics, Ministry of Finance

Core functions remain in Taiwan
By contrast, the production value of the textile sector fell slightly. In local currency terms, it fell in 2017 compared with 2016 by 1.7 percent. Converted to US dollars, the production value of textiles was USD 9 billion, according to the statistics from the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The production of synthetic fibers stagnated at just under USD 3 billion in 2017.

Taiwan is home to the headquarters of the often family-run textile companies. Purchasing and marketing decisions are mainly made here, and, last but not least, research and development are carried out here too. For example, several manufacturers are currently developing smart textiles with integrated temperature control, heart and location functions.

Foreign activities are diversified
The textile manufacturers are investing predominantly in new capacities outside Taiwan. For example, FENC 2018 is expanding its capacity for PET (polyethylene terephthalate) and terephthalic acid (PTA), which among others are required for the production of synthetic fibers. Together with an Indonesian and a Mexican partner, FENC acquires two new plants of a bankrupt US company in West Virginia and Texas. Among other things, this reduces the risk of possible trade restrictions and, conversely, increases the opportunity to benefit from free trade agreements.

Vietnam is also a focus of investment. Here, most Taiwanese textile companies are in the process of establishing or expanding new capacities. FENC, Formosa Taffeta, Eclat, Makalot and several others invested in the southeast Asian tigerland several years ago. By contrast, new investments in China have become rare, primarily due to rising wage costs.

 

More information:
Taiwan
Source:

Jürgen Maurer, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

INDIA'S GOVERNMENT SUPPORTS TEXTILE INDUSTRY Photo: Pixabay
11.09.2018

INDIA'S GOVERNMENT SUPPORTS TEXTILE INDUSTRY

  • Clothing exports are declining 

New Delhi (GTAI) - Structural weaknesses and fiscal reforms are affecting the Indian textile industry. Modernization and diversification are necessary. For this where support measures will come into force.

  • Clothing exports are declining 

New Delhi (GTAI) - Structural weaknesses and fiscal reforms are affecting the Indian textile industry. Modernization and diversification are necessary. For this where support measures will come into force.

In the 2016/17 fiscal year (April 1st to March 31st), India's government initiated a number of fundamental reforms such as the introduction of the nationwide Goods and Services Tax (GST) and a partial currency devaluation. These measures are intended to advance the economy as a whole in the medium to long term, but have led to uncertainty and difficulties in individual sectors, including the textile industry. Added to this are high cotton prices. The government is now trying to help the industry with individual measures. It remains to be seen whether these will be sufficient and lead to a sustained improvement. Finally, there are structural weaknesses which are also slowing down the growth of the Industry.

"The by the introduction of GST caused dent and monetary depreciation has now been overcome. However, the structural problems remain, so that no fundamental changes in the textile industry are to be expected", according to the assessment of a German supplier with many years of experience in India in talks with Germany Trade & Invest (GTAI).

Government launches aid measures
However, some government measures should provide relief. At the beginning of August 2018, import duties on 328 textile products, especially fabrics and nonwovens, were increased from around 5 to 10 percent to up to 20 percent. Also, at the beginning of the month, the Executive Board introduced four bills to amend the general VAT Act introduced on July 1st 2017. This should make refunds, for example of taxes on intermediate products, easier and faster. The introduction of GST and the delays in reimbursement have put particular pressure on the liquidity of small and medium-sized companies, which make up the bulk of textile companies. For example, the denim industry temporarily had to take 25 to 30 percent of its capacity out of production after the tax introduction.

 Also, the Ministry of Textiles wants to strengthen the to it entrusted weakening industry. At the beginning of August 2018, for example, it added changes to the Technology Upgradation Funds Scheme (TUFS), which has been in existence since 1999. This now expanded technology promotion program allows cooperative banks to provide financing to textile companies for technological improvements. They also become accessible for liability partnerships. Of the approximately USD 1.1 billion, that the central government budget is holding for the textile industry in the fiscal year 2018/19, one third, 14 percent more than in the previous year, are intended for the TUFS. Manufacturers of synthetic fibers and the clothing industry in particular are likely to benefit from this, according to industry sources.

The existence of an own Ministry of Textiles shows how important this industry is for India, not only as a source of foreign exchange, but also as an employer. The entire sector, from spinning mills, weaving mills to clothing and other finished goods, contributed around 14 percent to value creation in the manufacturing industry and 13 percent to foreign exchange revenues in 2017, and employs directly 40 million and indirectly 60 million workers.

As one of the world's leading producers of cotton, jute and silk, India has comparative advantages in the textile sector and can look back on a long tradition in processing. Accordingly, cotton is the main raw material in yarn and fabric production. After all, 5.7 billion tons of yarn were spun in 2016/17, achieving an annual average increase of 3.1 percent between 2011 and 2017. The weaving mills processed 63.5 billion square meters of fabric in 2016/17, after 61.7 billion in 2011. The proportion of cotton fabrics rose from 51 to 61 percent in 2011 to 2017. The remaining part is accounted for approximately equally by synthetic and blended fabrics.

 
Production and export growth come to a halt Based on the previously strong growth the government is optimistic. According to forecasts by the Ministry of Textile, India's textile and clothing industry is expected to more than double its sales between 2015 and 2021. Exports are expected to increase from USD 35 billion to USD 82 billion, after doubling in the period from 2006 to 2014 from USD 17.6 billion to USD 37.6 billion. After that, however, they stagnated and, at USD 35 billion in 2017/18 and missed the by the government set target by USD 10 billion. The production of textiles and clothing declined from 2015 to 2017. It is unlikely to improve in 2018.

Textile and clothing industry in India 1)
  2015/16
 
2016/17 2)  2017/18 2)
Export of textiles and textiles products USD in USD billion 18.1 18.2 18.7
Export of clothing 17.0 17.4 16.7
Import of yarn, fabrics, made-ups in USD billion 1.7 1.5 n.a.
Change of production of textiles in % -0.2 -3.2 n.a.
Change of production of non-knitted clothing in % -3.6 -3.3 n.a.


1) Financial years from 1 April to 31 March; 2) Provisional data for 2016/17 and 2017/18
Source: Statistical Office India
     

Clothing industry needs to modernize 
India's textile industry has cost advantages over industrialized countries and advanced emerging countries such as China. Smaller developing countries, however, have become well-known competitors in the meantime and have partly surpassed India in terms of clothing. So Bangladesh and Vietnam exported more clothing than India. In addition there is growing competition from other low-wage countries such as Cambodia, Sri Lanka and Indonesia. Some of these countries have free trade agreements with the EU, while India has difficulties in negotiating them. The smaller competitors have also geared their clothing industry to exports and modernized it accordingly. After all, they do not have significant local markets. The Indian textile manufacturers are different: If there is not enough quality for export, the domestic market, which has a population of 1.3 billion inhabitants and is growing strongly, is still there, industry representatives explain to GTAI.

India's apparel industry therefore still has a considerable potential for modernization and requires new production technologies, particularly to improve operating efficiency. Other structural weaknesses include strong wage increases with insufficient productivity growth and a shortage of well-trained skilled workers. Other disadvantages are the fragmentation of the clothing industry - many companies lack size - and the lack of adaptation to global fashion trends. While the fashion world is more prone to fiber mixed fabrics, the Indian clothing is not yet following this trend. There is a lack of product diversification.

The spinning and weaving sector looks more modern. Industry experts attest to it a leading international position in terms of size, technology, productivity, quality and price. This is also evident when importing machines. India was the most important export market for German spinning machines to China in 2017 and the fifth largest market for weaving machines, according to the Textile Machinery Association of the German Engineering Federation (VDMA). In textile finishing machinery, India does not rank among the top six export markets, but its competitor Bangladesh does.

Double-digit growth in foreign direct Investment 
Foreign investments in the Indian textile industry are welcome and 100 percent foundations by foreign companies are welcome. On promotional trips to countries such as Japan, Germany, Italy and France, India is actively attracting investors and has not been unsuccessful. The inflow of foreign direct investment into the textile sector, including dyed and printed textiles, amounted to USD 2.7 billion between April 2000 and September 2017. Cumulative investments increased by an annual average of 17.3 percent between 2010 and 2017. However, the bulk of the investment is being stemmed by national Indians. Total investments in India's textile sector from June 2017 to May 2018 amounted to USD 4.2 Billion.

Contact Details
Name Internet Remark
Germany Trade & Invest http://www.gtai.de/indien Foreign information for the German Export Business
AHK Indien http://www.indien.ahk.de Contact for German companies
Ministry of Textiles http://www.texmin.nic.in Ministry
Office of Textile Commissioner http://www.txcindia.gov.in Government 
Confederation of Indian Textile Industry http://www.citiindia.com Textile Association
Textile Association India http://www.textileassociationindia.org Textile Association India
The Clothing Manufacturers Association of India http://www.cmai.in Clothing Association


    

More information:
India Bangladesh(7621)
Source:

Rainer Jaensch, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

Textile innovations ‘made in Germany’ in demand in the USA (c) KameraStudio for Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
05.06.2018

Textile innovations ‘made in Germany’ in demand in the USA

‘High-Tex from Germany’ at Techtextil North America and Texprocess Americas shows again how innovative the German textile industry is.

Back to the USA: ‘High-Tex from Germany’ made a guest appearance at Techtextil North America and Texprocess Americas in Atlanta for the second time from 22 to 24 May 2018. At the special exhibition organised by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy (Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie – BMWi) in cooperation with the Association of the German Trade Fair Industry (Messeausschuss der Deutschen Wirtschaft e.V. – AUMA), a total of 66 companies presented technical textiles, nonwovens, textile-processing machines, smart textiles and textile-research projects to the trade visitors. The textile sector made its first appearance in the USA in 2000. This was followed by highly successful presentations in Shanghai in 2002, in Mumbai in 2007 and in Moscow in 2012.

‘High-Tex from Germany’ at Techtextil North America and Texprocess Americas shows again how innovative the German textile industry is.

Back to the USA: ‘High-Tex from Germany’ made a guest appearance at Techtextil North America and Texprocess Americas in Atlanta for the second time from 22 to 24 May 2018. At the special exhibition organised by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy (Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie – BMWi) in cooperation with the Association of the German Trade Fair Industry (Messeausschuss der Deutschen Wirtschaft e.V. – AUMA), a total of 66 companies presented technical textiles, nonwovens, textile-processing machines, smart textiles and textile-research projects to the trade visitors. The textile sector made its first appearance in the USA in 2000. This was followed by highly successful presentations in Shanghai in 2002, in Mumbai in 2007 and in Moscow in 2012.

“Taking ‘High-Tex from Germany’ to Atlanta again was a very good decision. The southeast of the USA has a long tradition of textile manufacturing. It is home to many companies that are always on the lookout for innovative textiles and machines for textile production and processing”, explained Detlev Rünger, German Consul General in Atlanta during the ‘High-Tex from Germany’ press conference. “Fairs bring people together. And this was evident here in Atlanta. With the overseas exhibition programme, we give small to medium-sized companies the chance to show their products in foreign markets”, said Patrick Specht of the Trade Fair Policy and EXPO Participations division of the BMWi.

“‘High-Tex from Germany’ within the framework of Techtextil North America and Texprocess Americas was a very good platform for our small to medium-sized companies. After Techtextil and Texprocess in Frankfurt, these two events are the second-most important editions of the trade-fair duo. ‘High-Tex from Germany’ came fully up to our expectations and anyone who failed to take part missed a great opportunity to be noticed”, said Marc Lorch, Member of the Board of Zwissler Holding, who represented the participating companies as exhibitor president.

Michael Metzler, Sales President of ZSK Stickmaschinen, confirmed this saying, “A German pavilion of this scope makes us extremely visible. Thanks to the excellent organisation, we were also able to concentrate on promoting our company and products.” In addition to the appealing exhibition-stand concept and the excellent organisation, the companies taking part were particularly pleased with the high visitor standard. “We regularly exhibit at Techtextil North America but taking part in ‘High-Tex for Germany’ resulted in our best ever day at a fair here. The pavilion is a real eye-catcher”, said Thomas Wiederer, Area Sales Manager, Brückner Textile Technologies. “The visitors to our exhibition stand were very interested in our products. We gained potential customers and were able to make numerous high-grade contacts. The level of interest shown in our highly innovative e-textile solutions, which are completely new in the sector, was very high. We are looking forward to the follow-up phase”, said Andreas Lanyi, Vice President Digital Unit and Internet of Things of the Hamburg-based start-up, Lunative Laboratories.

Besides gaining new customers, the focus of the companies taking part in ‘High-Tex from Germany’ was on cultivating customer relations. “The German pavilion in Atlanta once again gave us a good opportunity to get to know the US market better. We have had a factory in the vicinity of Atlanta for two years now and aim to expand our network in the long term”, said Ronny Schröder, Associate Sales Director Technical and Comfort Products, Sandler. “We like making presentations within the framework of the German pavilion very much”, added Georg Voggenreiter, Technical Sales, Maschinenfabrik Herbert Meyer. “Once again, ‘High-Tex from Germany’ was a good starting point for cultivating contacts with our customers in the USA.”

The companies taking part in ‘High-Tex from Germany’ made their presentations on around 1,300 square metres of exhibition space with their own exhibition stands, with selected exhibits on a central ‘Plaza’, in guided tours and no less than 35 lectures. Additionally, the German Institutes of Textile and Fibre Research (Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung – DITF), the Association of the Finishing, Yarns, Woven Fabrics and Technical Textiles Industry (Industrieverband Veredlung, Garne, Gewebe und Technische Textilien – IVGT), the Tübingen-Reutlingen-Zollernalb location agency and the German American Chamber of Commerce of the Southern U.S. provided insights into current research projects and offered information about the sector.

mtex+ and LiMA 2018 (c) Messe Chemnitz
22.05.2018

mtex+ and LiMA 2018: BRIDGE BUILDING BETWEEN TECHNICAL TEXTILES AND LIGHTWEIGHT

At May 29/30, 2018, 147 exhibitors from six countries present application-oriented textil and lightweight-solutions for all sectors from A to Z and introduce numerous innovations in Chemnitz - Special exhibitions and specialiced events deepen the trade fair topics and give inspiration for innovation development and business contacts

At May 29/30, 2018, 147 exhibitors from six countries present application-oriented textil and lightweight-solutions for all sectors from A to Z and introduce numerous innovations in Chemnitz - Special exhibitions and specialiced events deepen the trade fair topics and give inspiration for innovation development and business contacts

With a 10 % plus of exhibitors and an exhibition area which rose 20 % the trade fair duo mtex+ and LiMA starts at May 29/30, 2018. At hall 1 of the Messe Chemnitz 147 companies and research institutes present on 4.200 square metres application-oriented textil and lightweight-solutions for sectors from architecture to railway technology. On 3.500 square metres 134 exhibitors were represented at the previous trade fair in 2016 in Chemnitz. „We are pleased that the merging of the fields of technology technical textiles and lightweight becomes even more visible at our trade fair duo. Not only exhibitors from the Central German industry and research region demonstrate their know-how. We can as well welcome companies and research institutes from all over Germany adding Belgium, France, Austria, Switzerland and the Czech Republic in Chemnitz. To us this is the proof that the further merge of mtex+ and LiMA under the new slogan ‚Excellent connections: Technical textiles meet lightweight construction‘ works out“, emphasises Dr. Ralf Schulze, director C³ Chemnitzer Veranstaltungszentren GmbH, to which the Messe Chemnitz belongs.

Innovations from textil circuit boards to railway-components made of basalt and bamboo
The international trade fair for technical textiles mtex+ and the lightweight trade fair LiMA focus on functionalised and intelligent textiles as well as lightweight materials and –products, digitised production, process development-, process- and technology development, refinement and recycling. The exhibitors in 2018 put various innovations forward. The nonwoven-manufacturer Glatzeder arrives with a protective suit made of an entirely new material, which is suitable for work under extreme conditions. A especially for security forces made protective clothing will be shown by Wattana. Flexible textil circuit boards made of conductive nonwovens are the new development from Norafin. Vowalon presents a surface sealing for imitation leather padding which extends its service life. Light interactive components as well as tables and seating areas made of textile concrete will be shown by the TU Chemnitz. HÖRMANN Vehicle Engineering demonstrates trim - and interior components  for railway vehicles with basalt- and bamboo fibre.
New and proven special exhibitions offer insights into innovative developments besides the exhibition stands. A new addition at the program is „light.building“ belonging to lightweight in architecture and building trade and „flexible.protect“ belonging to  protection- and safety textiles for humans, nature, mobile and immobile goods. The successful exhibition „health.textil” with medicine-, health- and wellness textiles from 2016 will be continued.

Compact, intensive and international
The exhibition stand- and special exhibition-presentations demonstrate the growing application range of technical textiles and lightweight. „Hightech-textiles and lightweight solutions conquer more and more new fields of application. Compact seen should be the various possibilities in the Central German industrial metropolis Chemnitz, that is and was a centre of innovative textile industry. The atmosphere of the small but fine trade fair duo of short distances and intensive contacts is not only appreciated by the actors of the strong Saxon-Thuringian textile region but also by foreign companies and research institutes. So are the textile federation ATOK and the Techtex-Cluster CLUTEX from the Czech Republic with a multicompany stand and the Smart-Textiles-Network from Austria our guests again“, informs Dr. Jenz Otto, general manager of the Noth-Eastgerman textile- and clothing industry association (vti) and amends: „The exhibiton is not only an obligatory date for the specialised insiders but also the federal policy shows a great interest in the textil- and lightweight- competences of the region. Because of this the Commissioner for middle class and for the new Länder, Christian Hirte, follows our trade fair duo invitation.“ The vti is from the very beginning major partner and a generator of inputs for the continuous further development of the event.

You can find further information about the program as well as the trade fairs under: www.mtex-lima.de

 

Israel's textile industry is catching up again © Rosel Eckstein / pixelio.de
25.07.2017

ISRAEL'S TEXTILE INDUSTRY IS CATCHING UP AGAIN

  • Production stabilizes at lower level
  • Import of textile machines increased

Jerusalem (GTAI) - The Israeli textile and clothing industry has largely stabilized after years of decline. This applies both to the added value of the sector and to exports. Thanks to new capacities, the textile sector was able in 2106 to record a significant increase in production. In the import of textile machinery Germany plays the leading role. On the other hand, the German import market share of imports of textile and clothing products is low..

  • Production stabilizes at lower level
  • Import of textile machines increased

Jerusalem (GTAI) - The Israeli textile and clothing industry has largely stabilized after years of decline. This applies both to the added value of the sector and to exports. Thanks to new capacities, the textile sector was able in 2106 to record a significant increase in production. In the import of textile machinery Germany plays the leading role. On the other hand, the German import market share of imports of textile and clothing products is low..

For a long time, Israel's textile and clothing industry was a serious problem sector of the manufacturing industry. But now it seems to catch up itself again. This is confirmed by the production statistics. In a crisis phase between 2007 and 2013, the added value by the textile and clothing industry had declined by a total of 25.7%. While the shrinking of the clothing sector was 21.4%, the textile industry fell by 31.2%. The reasons for this development were the increasing competition from low-cost imports on the domestic market and declining exports. Since 2013, however, the figures have stabilized and are pointing upwards.

Development of the Israeli textile and clothing industry 2006 to 2016 (selected years)
Year Index of added value textile and clothing (2011 = 100,0) Index of added value textile Index of added value clothing Exports of textiles and clothing*), Mio. US$ Imports of textile and clothing*), Mio. US$
2006 128.8 130.8 128.2 1,243 1,561
2011 100.0 100.0 100.0 1,011 2,256
2012 956 918 986 952 2,241
2013 910 840 964 920 2,365
2014 932 845 999 966 2,558
2015 928 849 987 930 2,420
2016 970 983 959 914 2,480

*) HS-section XI (spun textile fabrics and articles thereof)
Source: Monthly paper on foreign trade statistics, various editions, Central Statistical Office

Product range cleared up

The stabilization was achieved through a comprehensive clearing up process in the textile and clothing industry, in the course of which products and production processes, in which Israel was no longer internationally competitive, were discontinued or outsourced to cheaper locations. Thru rationalization processes the productivity was increased.  The added value of the textile and clothing industry in 2016 per employee reached 4.8% above the level of 2011. The cumulative increase in productivity in the textile sector was 3.5 and in the clothing sector 5.6%.
The adjustment of the product range led to a drop in exports and simultaneously to an increase in imports. The Israeli manufacturers are increasingly looking to raise their turnover in high-quality and less labor-intensive products, which also have opportunities on the world market.

According to the most recent available data, the export rate of the textile and clothing industry in 2014 was 50.1%. There was an extreme division in the clothing sector: while the manufacturers of clothing products other than underwear only accounted for 3.9% of their sales in the international business, almost the entire production of underwear was exported.
The main export position of the Israeli textile industry is covered by HS heading 56 (cotton, felt and nonwovens, special yarns, twine, cordage, ropes and cables). In 2016 these products accounted for 28.7% of the textile and clothing exports, followed by synthetic or artificial filaments with 14.3%, knitted products with 13.0% of the exports.

Production structure oft he textile and clothing industry 2014
Sector Turnover in Mio. US$ *) Export rate in %
Total (1+2) 1,834 50.1
1. Textile industry 1,014 52.7
Spinning, weaving, and finishing of textiles 557 57.0
Other textiles 457 47.5
Clothing industry 820 46.8
Clothing but underwear 425 3.9
Underwear 320 96.3

*) Conversion of official internal price data according to the yearly average exchange rate
Source: Central Office of Statistics

Following the successful stabilization, the Israeli industry is also daring to create new production capacities. In 2015 and 2016 two new factories were set up for the production of nonwovens and have started to operate. On the one hand, this became reflected in increased machinery investments by the textile sector, and secondly in the strong increase in the production of the textile industry in 2016 by 15.8%.

Germany leading supplier of textile machines

Parallel to the increase in production the import of textile machinery is increasing since 2014. In 2016, it reached USD 62.2 million, more than twice the low level of 2013. German textile machinery manufacturers were able to participate in this growth in a leading position..

Import of textile machinery 2010 to 2016 (million USD)
Year Import thereof: from Germany German import market share in %
2010 21.1 4.8 22.7
2011 35.3 13.3 37.7
2012 41.5 16.3 39.3
2013 29.2 7.4 25.3
2014 34.4 10.5 30.5
2015 58.4 31.5 53.9
2016 62.2 37.5 60.2

Source: UN Comtade Database

In 2016 the German import market share of textile machinery reached a hight of 60.2%, so the Federal Republic was by far the most important delivery country, followed by Italy and France.

Leading suppliers for textile machines 2016
Country Import, Mio. US$ Import market share in %
Germany 39.5 60.2
Italy 6.3 10.1
France 4.1 6.6
Switzerland 2.6 4.2
Belgium 2.3 3.7
China 2.2 3.6
USA 1.3 2.1
Spain 1.1 1.8

Source: UN Comtrade Database

The leading supplier in the import market for garments and textile products is P.R.China. In 2016 39.3% of the imports of the HS section XI (textile materials and articles thereof) accounted for China. Germany played with 1.6% (USD 39.1 mio) only a subordinate role. The main German delivery positions were clothing and clothing accessories (HS chapters 61 and 62) with 43.7%, followed by synthetic or artificial spun fibers (14.3%).

Contact addresses
Manufacturers Association of Israel Textile and Fashion Industries Association Ansprechpartnerin: Ms. Maya Herscovitz, Director of Association
Hamered St. 29, Tel Aviv 68125 Tel.: 00972 3/519 88 55, Fax- 519 87 05 E-Mail: maya@industry.org.il,, Internet:  http://www.industry.org.il.

More information:
Israel
Source:

Wladimir Struminski, Germany Trade & Invest  www.gtai.de 

30.05.2017

IRAN'S TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY WANTS TO INVEST

  • But industry continues to be in a crisis
  • Germany leading textile machinery supplier again

Teheran (GTAI) - Iran's large, traditional textile and clothing industry fights against foreign competition. Although the manufacturers are protected against imports by import tariffs, industry representatives and the Ministry of Industry are talking about massive illegal imports. In order to improve competitiveness, investments in new plants are necessary, but the companies often lack the necessary financial resources. Textile machines from Germany are in high demand.

  • But industry continues to be in a crisis
  • Germany leading textile machinery supplier again

Teheran (GTAI) - Iran's large, traditional textile and clothing industry fights against foreign competition. Although the manufacturers are protected against imports by import tariffs, industry representatives and the Ministry of Industry are talking about massive illegal imports. In order to improve competitiveness, investments in new plants are necessary, but the companies often lack the necessary financial resources. Textile machines from Germany are in high demand.

Although the Ministry of Industry reports growth for several sectors of the textile and clothing industry for 2015/16 (Iranian year 1394, 03. 21.15 to 03. 20.16), the increased production level remains far below capacity. The data on the average utilization varies greatly, but no estimate is more than 50%, some company representatives report even 30% only. The industry also suffers from quality problems, which are mainly due to the outdated machinery park.
According to official data, there are almost 10,000 factories with about 290,000 employees in the textile and clothing sector. The industry, which is characterized by private ownership, is by government announcements often referred to as a promising economic sector with potential. Nevertheless, according to criticism it is lacking in the necessary support.

Approximately 400 mostly medium and large textile and clothing manufacturers are organized in the Association of Iran Textile Industries (http://aiti.org.ir). The spectrum of the association members ranges from cotton spinning and weaving mills to producers of acrylic and polyester yarns, synthetic fibers, machine-made carpets, wall-to-wall carpet floors, woolen and other blankets and bedspreads, clothing and up to manufacturers of textile machines and spare parts.

The main problem of the Iranian textile and clothing industry is the competition from abroad, particularly from the PR of China and Turkey. The re-exports via the Dubai trade hub have to be added too. Partially high import tariffs are intended to protect the domestic market, but a large part of the imports arrives illegally into the country. A duty of 55% is currently levied on clothing and a reduced rate of 33% applies to deliveries from Turkey. For fabrics 32% are due.

Great interest in modern technology
The Iranian textile industry wants to strengthen its competitiveness both on the domestic and international markets through the modernization of its machinery. The great interest of the sector companies in new technology shows the strong response to conferences and seminars offered by European associations and companies.

In April 2015, the  GermanTextile Machinery Association VDMA organized a symposium in Tehran in anticipation of the strong easing of Iran sanctions. About 1,100 local company representatives were able to study the offers from the 36 German textile machinery and accessories manufacturers.
The event showed the interest of the Iranian companies to look for solutions to improve their mostly old, often decades old facilities.

A considerable part of the machinery park came from Europe as already used equipment. A problem were the continuing export controls also. According to industry representatives replacement procurements were made difficult because many parts are classified as dual-use goods. Organizations from Italy and Switzerland also have organized information events for Iran's textile industry.

Machinery import decreased again
The interest in modern technology however leads to limited investments only. Due to the weak financial strength of a large part of the industrial enterprises, intensified state support measures, in particular favorable loans, are requested. The banks lend credits to textile companies with great restraint only and demand high interest rates. According to Iranian customs despite the difficult situation textile and clothing machinery worth USD 324 million were imported in 2015/16. However - this was 11% less than in 2014/15 (USD 364 million).

Germany: export of textile, clothing and leather machinery to Iran 2013 to 2016 (in EUR 1,000):
HS-Pos. Description 2013 2014 2015 2016 -11 months
  Total 16,248 39,966 48,993 25,827
84.44 Machinery for jet spinning etc. of synthetic or artificial material 83 2,991 325 1,005
84.45 Machines for preparation or processing for spinning and doubling etc. 2,145 6,699 7,140 2,612
84.46 Weaving looms 8,009 20,896 30,873 11,941
84.47 Machines for knitting, sewing, gimping, tulle, lace, embroidery, net knitting and tufting etc. 642 712 618 1,444
84.48 Auxiliary machines and devices for machines of positions 84.44, 84.45, 84.46 or 84.47 4,400 7,347 7,760 6,412
84.49 Machines for the manufacturing of felts and nonwovens 6 0 77 0
84.51 Machinery and devices for washing, drying, ironing, pressing, etc. (excluding machines of pos. 84.50). 634 915 1,629 1,672
84.52 Sewing machines 321 380 543 673
84.53 Machines and devices for processing of hides etc. 8 26 28 69


Source: Eurostat

Germany is traditionally the leading textile machinery supplier in Iran, followed by Italy. However, the sanction phase brought a turnaround in favor of Asian suppliers. According to VDMA calculations, the most important suppliers of textile machinery exported to Iran in 2013 a value of EUR 85 million only (excluding dryers, and clothing and leather technology), of which 33% were attributed to the PRC, followed by Germany (16%), Turkey (12%), Korea (Rep., 7%) and Italy (5%). Deliveries of clothing and leather technology amounted to EUR 113 million in 2013, led by Korea (Rep.) with 53%, the PRC reached 36%, Germany came to 0.3% only.

The VDMA data for 2015 show for textile machinery Germany as the leading supplier again. At the textile machinery exported to Iran German suppliers accounted for a share of 30%, the PRC fell to 22%, Turkey reached 12%, Korea (rep.) 6% and Italy 4 %. In the clothing and leather technology the Chinese-Korean dominance remained in 2015 (PRC: 49% from EURO 131 million and Korea (rep.): 41%)..

PR of China: Exports of textile, clothing and leather machinery to Iran 2013 to 2016 (in USD 1,000):
HS-Pos. Description 2013 2014 2015 2016- 11 months
  Total 84,518 133,739 103,055 75,748
84.44 Machinery for jet spinning of synthetic or artificial fibers 16,457 5,319 1,990 1,925
84.45 Machines for preparation or processing of materials for spinning, doubling etc. 288 2.602 2.844 1,269
84.46 Weaving looms 2,650 6,039 4,103 1,836
84.47 Machines for knitting, gimping tulle, lace, embroidery, knotting and tufting etc. 6,672 10,795 8,642 7,878
84.48 Auxiliary machines and devices for pos.84.44, 84.45,
84.46 or 84.47 etc.
5,684 17,061 7,319 3,921
84.49 Machines for the manufacturing of felts and nonwovens 2,053 2,029 5,540 2,900
84.51 Machinery and devices for washing, drying, ironing, pressing, etc. (excluding machines of pos. 84.50). 11,368 15,894 16,559 13,728
84.52 Sewing machines 33.567 49.714 38.191 36.182
84.53 Machines and devices for the processing of hides 5.779 24.286 17.867 6.109

Source: China Customs

According to Eurostat exports of textile, clothing and leather industry machines of the EU28 Group to Iran increased between 2013 and 2015 from EUR 38 million to EUR 89, with Germany accounting for 42% respectively 55%. Italy delivered EUR 10.4 million in 2015 (2014: EUR 14.0 million, 2013: 6.3 million). The deliveries of the EU28 Group and Germany also were declining in 2016.

 

INDEX17:  Manage change in healthcare © INDEX™17 Press Office
04.04.2017

INDEX17: MANAGING CHANGE IN HEALTHCARE

An aging population is a critical issue facing the medical and healthcare industry. The European Wound Management Association (EWMA) maintains that persons aged 65 and over will account for 30% of the EU27’s population by 2060, compared to 17% in 2008, and that the highest share of inhabitants aged over 80 years in 2060, will be in Italy (14.9%), Spain (14.5%) and Germany (13.2%), closely followed by Greece (13.5 %).

There has been an exponential growth in healthcare costs mainly driven by the increased cost of medication and devices, and in tandem, a rise in the prevalence of chronic conditions. These trends have resulted in significant changes in European hospital services, with the number of hospital facilities, as well as the number of hospital beds decreasing. Furthermore, increasing pressures for early discharge from hospitals have caused a shift in the delivery of services from the hospital to the home, especially in the field of wound management.

An aging population is a critical issue facing the medical and healthcare industry. The European Wound Management Association (EWMA) maintains that persons aged 65 and over will account for 30% of the EU27’s population by 2060, compared to 17% in 2008, and that the highest share of inhabitants aged over 80 years in 2060, will be in Italy (14.9%), Spain (14.5%) and Germany (13.2%), closely followed by Greece (13.5 %).

There has been an exponential growth in healthcare costs mainly driven by the increased cost of medication and devices, and in tandem, a rise in the prevalence of chronic conditions. These trends have resulted in significant changes in European hospital services, with the number of hospital facilities, as well as the number of hospital beds decreasing. Furthermore, increasing pressures for early discharge from hospitals have caused a shift in the delivery of services from the hospital to the home, especially in the field of wound management.


Visitors and exhibitors at INDEX™17, the world’s leading nonwovens exhibition held in Geneva from 4th-7th April 2017, will have the opportunity to hear from “Big Picture” speaker Prof. Dr. Sebastien Probst, Professor of Tissue Viability and Wound Care at the School of Health Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland. “Chronic and highly-exuding wounds can often lead to the use of unreliable and costly treatments,” explains Prof. Dr. Probst. “Patients are frequently found to be at an increased risk of infection and delayed healing, which results in an enormous negative impact on their quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Superabsorbent nonwoven dressings are increasingly being used for a more effective wound care, removing bacteria and exudates and keeping the wound bed moist. Reducing healthcare costs while maintaining high quality of care remains paramount.” Another less visible but important benefit is that these products can contribute to reducing health associated infections (HAI) which still affect 1 out of 18 patients every day in Europe.

The rich three-day INDEX™17 programme, features a Medical & Healthcare seminar on 5th April organised in conjunction with market intelligence partners WTiN, where leading speaker Prof. Dr. Sebastien Probst will put forward the key challenges faced by the medical industry, and renowned experts in the field will then discuss how nonwovens are contributing to solving these challenges.

Medical & Healthcare seminar speakers include:

  • Dr. Parikshit Goswami, Associate Professor, Director of Research and Innovation, MSc Textiles Programme Leader, Technology Research Area Leader, will deliver a welcome note.
  • Prof. Dr. Sebastian Probst, DClinPrac, RN, Professor of Tissue Viability and Wound Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Geneva, will address global trends in nonwoven medical textiles.
  • Dionysia Patrinou, Intelligence Manager/Market Strategist, Advanced Medical Materials, World Textile Information Network (WTiN), will discuss opportunities in the medical market. .
  • Paul Greenhalgh, Director of Industrial Design, Team Consulting, will speak about a patient centric approach to medical technology development.
  • Dr. Bernd Schlesselmann, Head of R&D, Freudenberg Performance Materials, will discuss the future of nonwovens in advanced wound care..

Visitors from around the world will have the opportunity to gain first-hand knowledge of the latest developments in nonwovens for medical applications.
To attend INDEX™17, you can register online at www.index17.org/.
 

Apparel Show © Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
31.01.2017

TEXPROCESS RECORDS HIGHEST NUMBER OF REGISTRATIONS IN ITS HISTORY

Living in Space: special event at Techtextil showcases textile processing technologies for the space industry: Some four months before the start of Texprocess (9 to 12 May 2017), the leading international trade fair for processing textile and flexible materials reports the highest number of registrations in its history and thus continues its pattern of growth. Even now, more floor space has been booked than the previous edition had in total. “It is well worth our while continually developing Texprocess further, with regard to the technologies and processes on display, the hall layout and the complementary programme. With this fourth edition, Texprocess is now firmly established in the marketplace and is attracting other market leaders in the sector to Frankfurt,” says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies, Messe Frankfurt.

Living in Space: special event at Techtextil showcases textile processing technologies for the space industry: Some four months before the start of Texprocess (9 to 12 May 2017), the leading international trade fair for processing textile and flexible materials reports the highest number of registrations in its history and thus continues its pattern of growth. Even now, more floor space has been booked than the previous edition had in total. “It is well worth our while continually developing Texprocess further, with regard to the technologies and processes on display, the hall layout and the complementary programme. With this fourth edition, Texprocess is now firmly established in the marketplace and is attracting other market leaders in the sector to Frankfurt,” says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies, Messe Frankfurt.

Texprocess reports growing numbers of companies signing up, particularly in the CAD/CAM and Cutting, Making, Trimming (CMT) product groups. Technologies and material for Sewing, Joining and Fastening are growing steadily, too.

Among the companies that have already signed up are: Amann, Astas, assyst/Human Solutions, Barudan, Brother, bullmer, Caron Technology, Dürkopp Adler, Epson, Filiz Makina, Gemini CAD Systems, Gerber Technology, Gütermann, Juki, Kuris Spezialmaschinen, MACPI, Malkan, Mitsubishi, Morgan Tecnica, Pfaff, Serkon Tekstil Makina, SMRE, Strima, Tajima, Teseo, Tetas, Veit, Zünd.
The range of products at Texprocess once again covers all stages in the value-creation chain for textile goods, from design, IT, cutting out, sewing, seaming, embroidery and knitting to finishing, textile printing and logistics.

Change in placement for CAD/CAM and Cutting, Making, Trimming
To make the profiles of Techtextil and Texprocess even sharper, the bonding and separating technology, CMT (Cutting, Making, Trimming), CAD/CAM and printing product segments will be concentrated together at Texprocess in hall 4.0. Thus, visitors will find Techtextil exhibitors from these segments at Texprocess. These product groups will be deleted from the Techtextil nomenclature.
Apart from this change, the overall concept behind the halls at the previous event will be retained: trade visitors will find Design, IT, CAD/CAM, CMT and Printing as well as the special IT@Texprocess section in hall 4.0. Exhibitors of machines and accessories for sewing and seaming will be presenting their products in hall 5.0 and 5.1; and hall 6.0 will showcase embroidery technology, together with finishing techniques and logistics for textiles.

The technologies of textile processing for space travel
Both exhibitors and visitors at Texprocess will, this year, have the benefit of a rather special experience at the show: under the heading 'Living in Space', Techtextil will be showcasing the wide variety of applications for technical textiles in space travel, together with the processing involved. This is a cooperative venture between Techtextil, The European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). Close to the location for, amongst others, exhibitors of functional apparel textiles in Hall 6.1, and based on the areas of application for technical textiles, a special, interactive area is to be built to display, with the help of four thematic sections, the high-tech textiles and textile processing technologies that have emerged from and for space travel. The highlight of this area is a virtual-reality experience in which visitors to Techtextil and Texprocess get to go on a virtual journey through the universe, where they will learn about the application of technical textiles in space travel and the processing required to make them.

Complementary programme with focus on Digital Printing and international Innovative Apparel Show
Digital Printing will be one the thematic focusses of the Texprocess complimentary programme. The sector's information service, the World Textile Information Network (WtiN) will, for the first time, be organising the European Digital Textile Conference at Texprocess. The conference will centre round technologies for digital printing on textiles and will be held on Wednesday 10 May in the Saal Europa in hall 4.0.
And digital printing on textiles will also be taken up as a topic in a dedicated series of lectures forming part of the Texprocess Forum. The forum offers, in hall 6.0, expert lectures on current issues in the sector, on all days of the trade fair. For the first time, the programme will have been designed jointly by three partners: the Dialog Textil-Bekleidung (DTB), die International Apparel Federation (IAF) and the World Textile Information Network (WTiN).

Following on from the success of its first edition, the Innovative Apparel Show is to be continued and set on an international footing. For the first time, there will be, as well as a German university, three European universities / colleges from outside Germany, showcasing, on the catwalk, their fashion designs from functional textiles and the processing stages that go into making them. The show will take place on all days of the trade fair. The participating universities / colleges are: Accademia Italiana, Florence / Italy; ESAD College of Art and Design, Matosinhos / Portugal; Esmod Paris/France, and the University of Trier / Germany. The young designers will be displaying designs relating to the three key themes of 'Textile Effects', 'Creative Engineering' and 'Smart Fashion'. Visitors will be able to vote for the public's award throughout the duration of the trade fair and the award will be presented at the last fashion show.

With the Texprocess Innovation Award, Messe Frankfurt seeks, for the fourth time, to honour the best new technological developments in the field. Submissions for the award may be made up until 20 February. The competition is open both to exhibitors at Texprocess 2017 and to other companies, institutes, universities, colleges and private individuals, who are not otherwise exhibiting at the fair. The awards in the various categories will be presented during the joint opening ceremony for Texprocess und Techtextil, on 9 May 2017. At the same time, there will be a special display area in Hall 4.0, showcasing all the prize-winning products at Texprocess.

Visitors will, once again, find many new IT solutions for the apparel industry in the IT@Texprocess section in Hall 4.0, where exhibitors will be presenting product life-cycle management systems (PLM), 'Cloud' applications and 3D CAD systems, which make it possible to create tailor-made clothes in real time and without the need for a Fitting.

Sewing and apparel-making technology record significant rise in Sales According to information provided by the Textile Care, Fabric and Leather Technologies section of the VDMA (Association of German machinery and plant manufacturers), conceptual partner of Texprocess, the German sewing and apparel-technology industry achieved an increase in turnover of 15.9 percent compared to the previous year in the period from January to October. “With export sales of € 523 million, Germany is in third place amongst exporting nations worldwide, behind China and Japan,” observes Elgar Straub, General Manager of the VDMA Textile Care, Fabric and Leather Technologies Association. “Our member companies are outstandingly well placed amongst the international competition. Above all, that is because they are continually developing and innovating. The individualisation of apparel, the digitalisation of the value creation chain and new technologies, such as digital printing and sustainable processing technologies, are currently at the heart of our members' planning for innovation.”

Texprocess will again be taking place in parallel to Techtextil, leading international trade fair for technical textiles and nonwovens (also from 9 to 12 May 2017). In all, 1,662 exhibitors from 54 different countries attended Texprocess and Techtextil in 2015, together with a total of 42,000 trade visitors. Over 13,300 of them came to see Texprocess. Added to that, there were around 7,600 additional visitors, who came across from the concurrently held Techtextil.

 

Apparel Show @ Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
24.01.2017

TECHTEXTIL ON A GROWTH CURVE

Living in Space: Techtextil presents technical textiles in the aerospace industry in cooperation with ESA and DLR

More exhibitors and a journey to Mars: visitors and exhibitors can look forward to an even bigger event and a completely new trade-fair experience at the coming Techtextil from 9 to 12 May 2017. With around four months still to go before the leading international trade fair for technical textiles and nonwovens opens its doors, the booked space already exceeds the total area of the last edition in 2015. Moreover, the extensive complementary programme of events is set to be distinguished by a variety of innovations in 2017. The highlight of this year’s Techtextil will be the special ‘Living in Space’ event in cooperation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Centre (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt – DLR).

Living in Space: Techtextil presents technical textiles in the aerospace industry in cooperation with ESA and DLR

More exhibitors and a journey to Mars: visitors and exhibitors can look forward to an even bigger event and a completely new trade-fair experience at the coming Techtextil from 9 to 12 May 2017. With around four months still to go before the leading international trade fair for technical textiles and nonwovens opens its doors, the booked space already exceeds the total area of the last edition in 2015. Moreover, the extensive complementary programme of events is set to be distinguished by a variety of innovations in 2017. The highlight of this year’s Techtextil will be the special ‘Living in Space’ event in cooperation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Centre (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt – DLR).

“We are branching out in completely new directions with this year’s Techtextil and are, therefore, all the more delighted about the outstanding resonance of our exhibitors”, says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies, Messe Frankfurt. “Furthermore, the fact that we have gained strong new partners, ESA and DLR, from one of the main areas of application for technical textiles represents solid evidence of the application relevance of the products and technologies shown at Techtextil.”

Exhibitors include not only international market leaders but also numerous newcomers and returnees. Significant exhibitor growth comes from European countries, particularly from Ger-
many, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland and Spain. However, additional growth is also expected to come from Asia.

Special ‘Living in Space’ exhibition and special area in Hall 6.1

In cooperation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Techtextil will illustrate the wide range of applications for technical textiles with reference to the aerospace industry under the title ‘Living in Space’. To this end, the concurrent Texprocess trade fair will also be integrated into the exhibition.

“The technical-textile sector offers the textile solutions needed to move around and survive in space. This is what we will show in a professional and at the same time entertaining way on a dedicated area at the trade fair. For visitors, the area will offer inspiration and orientation”, says Michael Jänecke, Director Brand Management Technical Textiles & Textile Processing, Messe Frankfurt.

A special area in the vicinity of exhibitors of functional apparel and technical textiles is being created in hall 6.1 and, based on the areas of application for technical textiles, will show high-tech textiles and textile-processing technology from and for the aerospace sector. The highlight of the interactive area is a virtual-reality experience. On a special area, Techtextil and Texprocess visitors can undertake a virtual journey through space to Mars and discover how technical textiles and their processing technology can make it possible to set up communities in space. Additionally, the ‘Material Gallery’ will show textile products and processing technologies from Techtextil exhibitors with links to space travel. There will also be presentations by start-ups that work at the interface of technical textiles and space travel.

In hall 6.1, exhibitors and visitors will also find the ‘Innovation made in Germany’ area of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy (Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie – BMWi), which is aimed at young, innovative companies based in Germany. Applications for a place in the BMWi area can still be made on the Techtextil website.

Change in placement for CAD/CAM and Cutting, Making, Trimming

To make the profiles of Techtextil and Texprocess even sharper, the bonding and separating technology, CMT (Cutting, Making, Trimming), CAD/CAM and printing product segments will be concentrated together at Texprocess in hall 4.0. Thus, visitors will find Techtextil exhibitors from these segments at Texprocess. These product groups will be deleted from the Techtextil nomenclature.

Complementary programme with changes to the Innovative Apparel Show

Successfully started at Techtextil and Texprocess in 2015, the Innovative Apparel Show will get in 2017 even more international with universities for fashion and design from four European countries. These universities will present their visionary product ideas using technical textiles and modern processing technologies on all four days. They are: Accademia Italiana, Florence / Italy; ESAD College of Art and Design, Matosinhos / Portugal; Esmod Paris/France, and the University of Trier / Germany. The young designers will show designs revolving around the themes of textile effects, creative engineering and smart fashion while a fashion show in the foyer of Halls 5.1 and 6.1 presents their ideas in a professional way.

Techtextil Symposium in cooperation with Dornbirn MFC 

The concept of Techtextil Symposium, one of the world’s leading events for textile research, is being expanded with the coming edition to be held in seven consecutive blocks, each of seven lectures. Thus, all lecture blocks will be expanded by one lecture. Additionally, Techtextil is working together with the Dornbirn MFC Man-made Fibres Congress for the first time. Thus, Dornbirn-MFC will organise one of the seven lecture blocks within the framework of the symposium (to be held in ‘Saal Europa’ of Hall 4.0).
Moreover, outstanding new developments and advances in the fields of technical textiles, nonwovens and functional apparel textiles will be honoured for the 14th time with the Techtextil Innovation Award, the competition for which is also open to non-exhibitors. Entries are now invited. The deadline for receipt is 20 February.

Together with the international Tensinet network, Techtextil is holding the 14th ‘Textile Structures for New Building’ competition for students and young professionals, which honours innovative and practical concepts for building with textiles or textile-reinforced materials. The closing date for receipt of entries to the competition, which is worth a total of € 8,000, is 26 February 2017. In addition to the awards ceremony, all award-winning works from the student competition and the Innovation Award will be on show in special exhibitions in hall 4.1 and hall 6.1.

Technical Textiles market continues growth
 
According to the Confederation of the German Textile and Fashion Industry (textile+mode) the textile and apparel industry with more than 130,000 employees, 1,400 companies and an annual turnover of around 32 billion euros is the second largest consumer goods industry in Germany. The growth is primarily driven by technical textiles. “German companies are the global market leaders in terms of technical textiles. For years, the turnover has been growing steadily – a proof for the innovativeness of the industry and excellent products. The digitalization of textile products and processes will furthermore trigger an innovation boost in other industries”, says Manfred Junkert, Deputy General Manager of textile+mode.

Held concurrently with Techtextil, Texprocess, Leading International Trade Fair for Processing Textile and Flexible Materials (9 to 12 May 2017), offers insights into all stages of textile processing, including finishing and digital printing. Texprocess is also characterised by an outstanding number of exhibitor registrations exceeding the results of the previous edition, too. Techtextil 2015 was attended by 28,500 trade visitors from 102 nations, as well as over 5,500 trade visitors from the parallel Texprocess.

The ‘Textile Structures for New Building’ competition for students is being held for the 14th time by Techtextil © Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
27.09.2016

TECHTEXTIL AND TENSINET INVITE ENTRIES FOR THE 14TH ‘TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR NEW BUILDING 2017’ COMPETITION FOR STUDENTS

The ‘Textile Structures for New Building’ competition for students is being held for the 14th time by Techtextil, International Trade Fair for Technical Textiles and Nonwovens, and students of civil engineering, product design and related disciplines, as well as young professionals, are invited to enter their ideas for building with textiles or textile-reinforced materials. As in the past, the competition is sponsored by the international TensiNet network with cash prizes worth a total of € 8,000. The closing date for entries is 26 February 2017.

The ‘Textile Structures for New Building’ competition for students is being held for the 14th time by Techtextil, International Trade Fair for Technical Textiles and Nonwovens, and students of civil engineering, product design and related disciplines, as well as young professionals, are invited to enter their ideas for building with textiles or textile-reinforced materials. As in the past, the competition is sponsored by the international TensiNet network with cash prizes worth a total of € 8,000. The closing date for entries is 26 February 2017.

The scientific supervision remains in the hands of Prof Werner Sobek, Director of the Institute for Lightweight Structures and Conceptual Design (ILEK) of the University of Stuttgart. For the first time, the competition is partnered by Architonic, the leading online platform for architecture and design. The award-winning works will be on show for international exhibitors and visitors during the official presentation ceremony and in a special exhibition at Techtextil 2017 from 9 to 12 May 2017. The aim of the competition is to encourage innovative and practical examples of building with textiles or textile-reinforced materials, and to promote the interests of students and young professionals.

Information about the ‘Textile Structures for New Building 2017’ competition for students

Assignment

The competition covers all aspects of building with textiles and entrants are free to choose any subject of relevance to this. An important theme is ‘Suitability for reuse and recycling’. Both supervised and unsupervised projects will be accepted.

Jury

An independent, international jury of experts comprising renowned academics, architects (building with textiles) and engineers will judge the works submitted. The Chairman of the jury is Prof Werner Sobek.

Prizes

The winners will share prize money totalling € 8,000, sponsored by the TensiNet association. Awards will be given in the following categories: macro-architecture, micro-architecture, material innovations, the environment & ecology and composites & hybrid structures.

Further information and registration at techtextil-student.com

 IVC introduces the 16th Edition of the Study "The Fiber Year" with Key Sector Data © The Fiber Year GmbH
10.05.2016

IVC INTRODUCES THE 16TH EDITION OF THE STUDY "THE FIBER YEAR" WITH KEY SECTOR DATA

  • Fiber Production for the first Time in five Years lower than Consumption
In a press conference on May 3rd 2016, the industry association IVC published in an established tradition both the national and the global sector data: Andreas Engelhardt, CEO of The Fiber Year GmbH left no question about all important raw materials, natural and synthetic fibers and nonwovens unanswered and presented In his study a forecast horizon till 2020. 20 country profiles of leading production as well as consuming nations completed next to statements from sector experts and an extensive statistical annex the new edition. The key messages were focused on production, consumption and trading volume.
 
For the first time in five years fiber production is less than consumption
 
Since 2008 the global fiber production dropped again for the first time.
  • Fiber Production for the first Time in five Years lower than Consumption
In a press conference on May 3rd 2016, the industry association IVC published in an established tradition both the national and the global sector data: Andreas Engelhardt, CEO of The Fiber Year GmbH left no question about all important raw materials, natural and synthetic fibers and nonwovens unanswered and presented In his study a forecast horizon till 2020. 20 country profiles of leading production as well as consuming nations completed next to statements from sector experts and an extensive statistical annex the new edition. The key messages were focused on production, consumption and trading volume.
 
For the first time in five years fiber production is less than consumption
 
Since 2008 the global fiber production dropped again for the first time. The global volume fell by 0.7% to 94.9 million tons. The decline was decisive caused due to cotton which experienced its steepest decline in forty years. The production in the current season is estimated with 22.0 million tons, a decrease of 15.6% compared to the previous season.  With a slight decrease in demand by 2.2% at the same time the stocks remain with over 20 million tons still at an enormous height. High growth rates of China's chemical fiber industry let expect a massive supply surplus. The global fiber demand in the past year has grown to 96.7 million tons. This represents an increase of 3.1% over the previous year, the weakest growth in four years due to a continuously decreasing growth of demand.
 
With a world population of about 7.3 billion people, this results in an average consumption per capita of 13.3 kg of textile materials for garments, home textiles, carpets and technical textiles. Synthetic fibers showed an increase of 6.6% to 60.7 million tons, significantly driven by a growth of polyester. The increase is largely caused by the area of filament yarn, as staple fibers achieved a moderate growth of 2.4% only. This can be seen as a recovery after this part of the sector showed in the last year a decline for the first time since 2008.
 
Cellulose fibers showed for the first time after seven years with strong growth a slight fall in production of 1.2% to 6.1 million tons. The market is almost completely dominated by staple fibers. Due to a growth across Europe and Asia viscose fibers could increase their volume by 1.1% to 4.9 million tons. In contrast Acetate showed a loss in a second consecutive year. A decreasing production activity was seen in all markets and regions with a global slump of 7.5% to 0.9 million tons. This drastic cut was significantly stronger than the losses in the end-use consumption, which can be seen as a clear indication of global destocking. The long-term shrinkage of cellulosic yarns for textile applications has developed further, so that the global supply of about 350 000 tons is equivalent to the level of the early 1930s.
 
The market for natural fibers experienced with a reduction of 13.2% to 28.1 million tons the biggest annual decline since 1986, which is mainly due to cotton. The production of wool was unchanged at 1.1 million tons while for bast fibers a reduction of about 5% is expected.
 
In a focus on the different countries, the People's Republic of China could further strengthen its dominant position with an increase in production output by 8.9% to more than 47 million tons. The United States could consolidate their second place despite a slight  decline of 2.5% to 2.9 million tons, while India experienced a continued decline in the fifth following year to 2.6 million tons.
 
Trading volume grows unabated
 
According to the World Trade Organization (WTO) during the year 2014 the textile and clothing exports reached around USD 820 billion. The for the yearbook researched trade flows of 26 countries and the EU (28) estimate that the worldwide export will fall to USD 780 billion in 2015. While the Chinese exports developed a first decrease in six years, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam were able to continue to raise their export value. The dynamic development particular of Vietnam with its booming textile industry can be attributed to the influence of free trade agreements.
 
Fiber production in Germany
 
Despite international trends and many political challenges, which increasingly plague the German chemical fiber producers, man-made fibers "made in Germany" are still no dying species, Dr. Wilhelm Rauch, managing director of the industry association said.
 
While in 2014 the chemical fiber industry in Germany suffered a decline in production volumes of 6.1%, the production volume stabilized at almost the same prior-year level. The production of cellulosic fibers remained with a reduction of - 6.8% (previous year - 8.6%) - conform to the worldwide slump of cotton. Synthetic fibers (in particular Polyester) however achieved a slight increase of + 1.6% (last year - 4.9%). Thus the reduction in production volumes kept with - 0.9% in limits.
 
As consequences of this a sales decline of - 4.8% and associated necessary personnel adjustments with -1.4% are alarming signals, that the site conditions for chemical fiber producers in Germany (and Europe) are urgently in a need of improvement. A positive turnaround could certainly bring a fair competition protecting and an industry-friendly approach of the EU business policy. But the emphasis of the current policy debates - about the recognition of the market economy status of China as an example of politically motivated developments let suppose a very different intension, so Mr. Rauch. Despite unfavorable economic expectant conditions it is to owe the commitment and innovation power of the local manmade fiber sector that they claim to withstand the international competition.  
 
Nevertheless, the sector would appreciate a somewhat lower political headwind.
 
Fiber processing
 
In 2015 the processing of all types of fiber in Germany could not keep the level of the previous year and suffered a decrease of -11.6%. The total imports of chemical fibers - mostly from the 28 EU countries with +54% followed by Asia with + 40% - show a plus of 1.1% (synthetic staple fibers +1.9% and filaments +1.7%), while cellulosic fibers suffered a slump of -7.4%. The total export is declining slightly (- 2.0%). Despite the reduction of total exports, here the shares in the various regions of the world compared to the previous year stood unchanged.
 
Further information is available at:
 
Andreas Engelhardt 
CEO
The Fiber Year GmbH 
Hauptstraße 19 
9042 Speicher, Schweiz 
Tel.: + 41 / 71 / 450 06 82 
 
Creta Gambillara
Economics and Public Relations
Industrievereinigung Chemiefaser e.V.
Mainzer Landstraße 55
60329 Frankfurt am Main
Tel.: 069 / 279971 – 39