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Cavitec: Technology for breathable laminates at Techtextil 2024 (c) Cavitec, Santex Rimar Group
03.04.2024

Cavitec: Technology for breathable laminates at Techtextil 2024

Cavitec, part of Santex Rimar Group, presents the redesigned Caviscreen at Techtextil Frankfurt. Caviscreen features latest technology for breathable laminates.

Caviscreen was developed as a hotmelt coating and laminating unit for breathable sportswear, rainwear and protective clothing – with and without applying a membrane. The redesigned machine shows a brand-new method to supply adhesive more evenly and precisely. Using PUR adhesive (polyurethane reactive adhesive) goes with additional benefits like strong bonding capabilities and versatility.

Caviscreen’s hotmelt screen printing is a special system for high-end application garments. With this Caviscreen system, a PUR adhesive is transferred onto the substrate through a rotary screen, similar to the well-established textile printing method. The adhesives are fed from the drum melter through a heated hose to the traversing adhesive distribution system inside the rotary screen, just behind the doctor blade.

Cavitec, part of Santex Rimar Group, presents the redesigned Caviscreen at Techtextil Frankfurt. Caviscreen features latest technology for breathable laminates.

Caviscreen was developed as a hotmelt coating and laminating unit for breathable sportswear, rainwear and protective clothing – with and without applying a membrane. The redesigned machine shows a brand-new method to supply adhesive more evenly and precisely. Using PUR adhesive (polyurethane reactive adhesive) goes with additional benefits like strong bonding capabilities and versatility.

Caviscreen’s hotmelt screen printing is a special system for high-end application garments. With this Caviscreen system, a PUR adhesive is transferred onto the substrate through a rotary screen, similar to the well-established textile printing method. The adhesives are fed from the drum melter through a heated hose to the traversing adhesive distribution system inside the rotary screen, just behind the doctor blade.

The adhesive is pressed by the doctor blade through the screen holes and transferred to the substrate. Different dot pattern (mesh or irregularly) and different screen thicknesses allow different coating weight and adhesive coverages.

The traversing adhesive dispenser is used to distribute the adhesive automatically over the set working width that – an additional technical benefit – can be set without any mechanical changes.

Cavitec’s screen coating system achieves high bonding strength while using less adhesive than other coating processes, because of applying the coating on the surface of the substrate and like this, the adhesive has less tendency to penetrate the substrate.

Bonding strength, softness of the fabric and the breathability are defined by the coating weight and the coverage. The rotary screen allows users to regulate and adapt the coverage respectively the coating weight. Cavitec offers a large selection of screens that are essential to fulfil the fabric requirements. A further advantage is the ease and efficiency of switching from one screen to another by simply unlocking the bayonet fitting. The IR-heater cover opens pneumatically and the lightweight screen can be easily removed by hand. Unlike with other methods, there's no need to deal with hot oil or any other heated liquid that requires cooling down.

The Caviscreen technology supports manufacturers by reducing costs with screens priced at a mere fraction, just 10%, of common gravure roller prices.

 

Source:

Aepli Communication GmbH

27.03.2024

KARL MAYER GROUP at SaigonTex 2024

At the upcoming SaigonTex, taking place from April 10th to 13th in Ho Chi Minh City, the KARL MAYER GROUP will present its innovations.

DThe KARL MAYER exhibition for warp preparation is entirely dedicated to sustainability. With BLUEDYE, an innovative machine is introduced, which ensures more sustainability and lower costs in the process of indigo dyeing. Thanks to innovative technological solutions, the amounts of water and chemicals used are significantly reduced. Additionally, less yarn waste is generated. Another innovation for more sustainability is CASCADE, a steam and condensation system that requires significantly less steam in the drying process of sizing and indigo dyeing plants by using a solution for energy recycling that is protected against imitation.

For the warp knitting sector, the group of companies presents its latest technological developments. Highlights include a digital solution from KM.ON for optimizing production management (DPM), innovations for enhancing performance in the HKS segment, and a double raschel machine that enables unique creative multi-color designs in spacer textiles with more colour and new Jacquard techniques.

At the upcoming SaigonTex, taking place from April 10th to 13th in Ho Chi Minh City, the KARL MAYER GROUP will present its innovations.

DThe KARL MAYER exhibition for warp preparation is entirely dedicated to sustainability. With BLUEDYE, an innovative machine is introduced, which ensures more sustainability and lower costs in the process of indigo dyeing. Thanks to innovative technological solutions, the amounts of water and chemicals used are significantly reduced. Additionally, less yarn waste is generated. Another innovation for more sustainability is CASCADE, a steam and condensation system that requires significantly less steam in the drying process of sizing and indigo dyeing plants by using a solution for energy recycling that is protected against imitation.

For the warp knitting sector, the group of companies presents its latest technological developments. Highlights include a digital solution from KM.ON for optimizing production management (DPM), innovations for enhancing performance in the HKS segment, and a double raschel machine that enables unique creative multi-color designs in spacer textiles with more colour and new Jacquard techniques.

"Vietnam is a growing market for textile production, which is gaining importance especially for major international sports brands," says Eddy Ho, Senior Sales Manager at KARL MAYER.
The sales professional expects a large number of visitors, especially from Vietnam, China, Taiwan, and South Korea. SaigonTex is one of the most important textile machinery exhibitions in East Asia, located in close proximity to production centres. Vietnam is, in turn, the second most important market for the KARL MAYER GROUP after China. It benefits from increasing foreign direct investments in textile production from China, Taiwan, and South Korea.

Source:

KARL MAYER GROUP

(c) TMAS
25.03.2024

TMAS: Microfactory for filter bags in Sweden

ACG Kinna Automatic and ACG Nyström – members of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association – have delivered the first microfactory for the production of fully finished filter bags to an international filtration industry customer, in cooperation with JUKI Central Europe.

The microfactory’s configuration is based on two separate interconnecting modules – the Smart Filter Line (SFL) and the Filtermaster 2.0. The SFL handles the fabric feeding from rolls and its folding prior to seam construction, which can either be by automatic sewing, welding or with sewing and taping, depending on specifications. Very rapid changeover of the modular seaming methods can be achieved during product changes. The specific size of the now fully-tubular fabric is then precisely cut to size for each individual unit and further folded ready to be fed into the Filtermaster 2.0. The Filtermaster 2.0 then automatically attaches the reinforcement, bottom and snap rings onto the filter tube with a second Juki sewing head on a robotic arm, to form the fully finished filter bag ready for packaging.

ACG Kinna Automatic and ACG Nyström – members of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association – have delivered the first microfactory for the production of fully finished filter bags to an international filtration industry customer, in cooperation with JUKI Central Europe.

The microfactory’s configuration is based on two separate interconnecting modules – the Smart Filter Line (SFL) and the Filtermaster 2.0. The SFL handles the fabric feeding from rolls and its folding prior to seam construction, which can either be by automatic sewing, welding or with sewing and taping, depending on specifications. Very rapid changeover of the modular seaming methods can be achieved during product changes. The specific size of the now fully-tubular fabric is then precisely cut to size for each individual unit and further folded ready to be fed into the Filtermaster 2.0. The Filtermaster 2.0 then automatically attaches the reinforcement, bottom and snap rings onto the filter tube with a second Juki sewing head on a robotic arm, to form the fully finished filter bag ready for packaging.

Filter bags are employed in a wide range of industrial processes and while they may be largely under the radar as products, they represent a pretty significant percentage of overall technical textiles production.
They are used in foundries, smelters, incinerators, asphalt plants and energy production plants. Other key manufacturing fields – often where dust is generated – include the production of timber, textiles, composites, waste handling and minerals, in addition to chemicals, food production, pharmaceuticals, electronics and agriculture.

As a further example of the scale of the industry and the high volumes of fabrics involved, one supplier has delivered a single order of 30,000 filter bags to be used for flue gas cleaning at a European power plant. The bags can also be anywhere up to twelve metres in length and frequently have to be replaced.

Source:

Textile Machinery Association of Sweden

Lenzing: Sustainable geotextiles as glacier protection and jacket (c) UN Nations
22.03.2024

Lenzing: Sustainable geotextiles as glacier protection and jacket

The Lenzing Group has created an innovative concept that contributes to the sustainable protection of our glaciers while inspiring collective action for sustainable practices and a circular economy in the nonwovens and textile value chain. The concept, which was artistically staged by the Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto, was presented on March 21, 2024, as part of the International Day of Forests celebrations at the Palais des Nations, the headquarters of the United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG).

The melting of glaciers is being severely impacted by global warming. Geotextiles are used to protect ice and snow. However, the nonwovens used for this are made of fossil-based fibers, which allow microplastics1 to enter the valley via streams and may enter the food chain through small organisms and animals. Nonwovens made from cellulosic LENZING™ fibers, which are biodegradable at the end of their life cycle and can be completely recycled, are the sustainable solution to this problem.

The Lenzing Group has created an innovative concept that contributes to the sustainable protection of our glaciers while inspiring collective action for sustainable practices and a circular economy in the nonwovens and textile value chain. The concept, which was artistically staged by the Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto, was presented on March 21, 2024, as part of the International Day of Forests celebrations at the Palais des Nations, the headquarters of the United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG).

The melting of glaciers is being severely impacted by global warming. Geotextiles are used to protect ice and snow. However, the nonwovens used for this are made of fossil-based fibers, which allow microplastics1 to enter the valley via streams and may enter the food chain through small organisms and animals. Nonwovens made from cellulosic LENZING™ fibers, which are biodegradable at the end of their life cycle and can be completely recycled, are the sustainable solution to this problem.

The covering of a small area with the new material made from LENZING™ fibers was tested for the first time during a field test on the Stubai Glacier. Four meters of ice were saved from melting. This was confirmed in a study conducted by the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian glacier lift operators on the Stubai Glacier in Tyrol (Austria). In 2023, the pilot project was successfully extended to all Austrian glaciers used by tourists.

Last year, the project was also awarded first place in the prestigious Swiss BIO TOP Awards for wood and material innovations.

Lenzing takes this innovation project as an opportunity to inspire collaborative action towards sustainable practices and circularity in the textile value chain. Together with a network of innovative partners, Lenzing is working on processing geotextiles into new textile fibers giving them a second life as a garment. The use of geotextiles is usually limited to two years, after which the nonwovens would be disposed of. In the first phase of the pilot project, the recycling of nonwovens made for geotextiles use has been successfully tested and a fashionable “Glacier Jacket” has been produced, showcasing that the recycling of geotextiles is viable. Next to Lenzing, the network includes Marchi & Fildi Spa, a specialist in the field of mechanical recycling, the denim fabric manufacturer Candiani Denim and the fashion studio Blue of a Kind.

Robot system (c) STFI
20.03.2024

STFI: Highlights of textile research at Techtextil 2024

STFI will be presenting high-end textile products and solutions at Techtextil 2024. The highlights from current research results and innovations provide an insight into the digitalisation of textile production, show applications for 3D printing and smart technical textiles and provide examples of particularly sustainably designed products as well as innovative approaches for protective and medical textiles.

The central highlight of STFI's presence at Techtextil is a robot system that demonstrates the automated processing of a bobbin frame on a small scale. The pick-and-place application demonstrates camera-supported gripping of the bobbins. The robot is part of the STFI's “Textile Factory of the Future” which demonstrates automation solutions for the textile industry in a laboratory environment.

STFI will be presenting high-end textile products and solutions at Techtextil 2024. The highlights from current research results and innovations provide an insight into the digitalisation of textile production, show applications for 3D printing and smart technical textiles and provide examples of particularly sustainably designed products as well as innovative approaches for protective and medical textiles.

The central highlight of STFI's presence at Techtextil is a robot system that demonstrates the automated processing of a bobbin frame on a small scale. The pick-and-place application demonstrates camera-supported gripping of the bobbins. The robot is part of the STFI's “Textile Factory of the Future” which demonstrates automation solutions for the textile industry in a laboratory environment.

From the field of sustainable products and solutions, a sleeping bag with bio-based and therefore vegan filling material and a natural fibre-based composite element for furniture construction, in which LEDs and capacitive proximity sensors for contactless function control have been applied using embroidery technology, will be on show. Printed heating conductor structures demonstrate current research work for the e-mobility of the future, as the individually controllable seat and interior heating should ultimately reduce weight and save energy compared to conventional heating systems.

While a protective suit for special task forces protects against the dangers of a Molotov cocktail attack, a shin guard and a knee brace with patellar ring illustrate the process combination of 3D printing and UV LED cross-linking. Other highlights from lightweight textile construction include the rib of a vertical rudder of an Airbus A320 and a green snowboard made from recycled carbon fibres.

More information:
STFI Techtextil Smart textiles
Source:

Sächsisches Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI)

Professor Dr.-Ing. Markus Milwich Photo: DITF
Professor Dr.-Ing. Markus Milwich.
19.03.2024

Markus Milwich represents "Lightweight Design Agency for Baden-Württemberg"

Lightweight design is a key enabler for addressing the energy transition and sustainable economy. Following the liquidation of the state agency Leichtbau BW GmbH, a consortium consisting of the Allianz Faserbasierter Werkstoffe Baden-Württtemberg (AFBW), the Leichtbauzentrum Baden-Württemberg (LBZ e.V. -BW) and Composites United Baden-Württemberg (CU BW) now represents the interests of the lightweight construction community in the State.

The Lightweight Design Agency for Baden-Württemberg is set up for this purpose on behalf of and with the support of the State. The Lightweight Construction Alliance BW is the central point of contact for all players in the field of lightweight construction in the State and acts in their interests at national and international level. Professor Markus Milwich from the German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) represents the agency.

Lightweight design is a key enabler for addressing the energy transition and sustainable economy. Following the liquidation of the state agency Leichtbau BW GmbH, a consortium consisting of the Allianz Faserbasierter Werkstoffe Baden-Württtemberg (AFBW), the Leichtbauzentrum Baden-Württemberg (LBZ e.V. -BW) and Composites United Baden-Württemberg (CU BW) now represents the interests of the lightweight construction community in the State.

The Lightweight Design Agency for Baden-Württemberg is set up for this purpose on behalf of and with the support of the State. The Lightweight Construction Alliance BW is the central point of contact for all players in the field of lightweight construction in the State and acts in their interests at national and international level. Professor Markus Milwich from the German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) represents the agency.

The use of lightweight materials in combination with new production technologies will significantly reduce energy consumption in transportation, the manufacturing industry and the construction sector. Resources can be saved through the use of new materials. As a cross-functional technology, lightweight construction covers entire value chain from production and use to recycling and reuse.

The aim of the state government is to establish Baden-Württemberg as a leading provider of innovative lightweight construction technologies in order to strengthen the local economy and secure high-quality jobs.

Among others, the "Lightweight Construction Alliance Baden-Württemberg" will continue the nationally renowned "Lightweight Construction Day", which acts as an important source of inspiration for a wide range of lightweight construction topics among business and scientific community.

Professor Milwich, an expert with many years of experience and an excellent network beyond the State's borders, has been recruited for this task. In his role, Milwich also represents the state of Baden-Württemberg on the Strategy Advisory Board of the Lightweight Construction Initiative of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action, which supports the cross functional-technology and efficient transfer of knowledge between the various nationwide players in lightweight construction and serves as a central point of contact for entrepreneurs nationwide for all relevant questions.

From 2005 to 2020, Professor Milwich headed the Composite Technology research at the DITF, which was integrated into the Competence Center Polymers and Fiber Composites in 2020. He is also an honorary professor at Reutlingen University, where he teaches hybrid materials and composites. "Lightweight design is an essential aspect for sustainability, environmental and resource conservation. I always showcase this in research and teaching and now also as a representative of the lightweight construction community in Baden-Württemberg," emphasizes Professor Milwich.

Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung