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The Montex®Coat ticks all the right boxes for coating success in 2021 (c) Monforts
A recent Montex®Coat installation at a European mill.
24.02.2021

The Montex®Coat ticks all the right boxes for coating success in 2021

Flexibility, product uniformity and automation are the keys to success for coating businesses in today’s rapidly-changing technical textiles industry, explained Jürgen Hanel, Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, at the recent 1st World Congress on Textile Coating.

Introducing the latest Montex®Coat magnetic roller coating option to virtual delegates from around the world at the conference organised by International Newsletters, Hanel explained why this technology makes perfect sense now

“The magnetic roller system allows a wide range of coatings and finishes to be carried out, while being easy to handle for operators and much easier to clean at the end of the process,” he said. “It provides textile finishers with an expanded range of options due to the fully-adjustable positioning of the magnet within the roller and with four different magnet positions possible, can be set to operate both as a direct coating system and as an indirect coater.”

Flexibility, product uniformity and automation are the keys to success for coating businesses in today’s rapidly-changing technical textiles industry, explained Jürgen Hanel, Monforts Head of Technical Textiles, at the recent 1st World Congress on Textile Coating.

Introducing the latest Montex®Coat magnetic roller coating option to virtual delegates from around the world at the conference organised by International Newsletters, Hanel explained why this technology makes perfect sense now

“The magnetic roller system allows a wide range of coatings and finishes to be carried out, while being easy to handle for operators and much easier to clean at the end of the process,” he said. “It provides textile finishers with an expanded range of options due to the fully-adjustable positioning of the magnet within the roller and with four different magnet positions possible, can be set to operate both as a direct coating system and as an indirect coater.”

With traditional dip coating systems, he added, as well as with many standard knife coating technologies, there is always a difference in the tension between the centre and the edges of the wide width fabrics being treated – and hence the amount of pressure with which the coating is applied. With the use of a magnetic roller, equal pressure is applied across the full width of the fabric, with consistent results even at wide widths of over 2.4 metres. In addition, adjusting the roller surface, rather than changing the coating formulation to match the required add-on and viscosity for each coating effect required, leads to much higher output from the line.

Cleaner and less wasteful
The contribution of such flexible and resource-saving new technologies to a cleaner and less wasteful textile industry was a key theme at the congress – held virtually across the four afternoons of February 11th, 12th, 18th and 19th – as was digitalization and the many advantages it is providing.

“A typical integrated Monforts coating line is automated from the inlet feed to the winder,” Hanel told delegates. “Adjustments can also be made simply and easily from the touchscreen and with the new hand-held remote controller which has recently been introduced for the Montex®Coat unit.”

Manual adjustment, he added, is time consuming and needs the attention of an experienced operator or the reproducibility will not be accurate between coating operations. The adjustment by motors allows each coating to be stored and downloaded again for 100% reproducibility.

The motors can be fully controlled from the touchscreen and all necessary adjustments carried out remotely, making switching from one process to another extremely quick and easy.
The accuracy that is now being demanded by today’s most exacting customers is met with an optional carbon fibre roller – especially in dealing with the winding tension required in the processing of materials such as prepregs for composites and other heavyweight fabrics. Typical applications for the Montex®Coat include the finishing of tents and awnings, black-out roller blinds and sail cloth, automotive interior fabrics and medical disposables. Full PVC coatings, pigment dyeing or minimal application surface and low penetration treatments can all be accommodated.

“The World Congress on Textile Coating was characterised by some very stimulating presentations and forums between the speakers and a global audience of textile specialists,” Jürgen Hanel concluded. “It truly reflected the high level of positive changes now taking place in not just textile coating, but the entire textile industry. I look forward to the next edition, which hopefully will be a face-to-face event for even deeper level discussions and debate.”

Dyeing industry first for 7H with imogo (c) Imogo
The imogo team (left to right): Per Stenflo, textile process specialist Ellinor Niit and CEO Joacim Wellander.
10.02.2021

Dyeing industry first for 7H with imogo

Swedish commission dyeing company 7H Färgeri is looking to propel itself to the forefront of sustainable fabric production with the installation of the first industrial scale imogo Dye-Max spray dyeing line.
Currently under construction, the line will be delivered in the first week of March to the 7H plant close to the Swedish city of Borås. It will have a full working width of 1.8 metres with an operating speed of up to 50 metres for the reactive dyeing of cellulosic fibre-based fabrics. In addition, it will be capable of carrying out the application of a wide range of fabric pre-treatments and finishing processes, providing the company with unbeatable flexibility in production.

A proven Mini-Max laboratory unit for pre-determining application volumes and colour matching will also be delivered as part of the contract.

With the potential to slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems, the DyeMax has gained considerable attention since the concept was outlined and a prototype machine constructed in 2019.

Swedish commission dyeing company 7H Färgeri is looking to propel itself to the forefront of sustainable fabric production with the installation of the first industrial scale imogo Dye-Max spray dyeing line.
Currently under construction, the line will be delivered in the first week of March to the 7H plant close to the Swedish city of Borås. It will have a full working width of 1.8 metres with an operating speed of up to 50 metres for the reactive dyeing of cellulosic fibre-based fabrics. In addition, it will be capable of carrying out the application of a wide range of fabric pre-treatments and finishing processes, providing the company with unbeatable flexibility in production.

A proven Mini-Max laboratory unit for pre-determining application volumes and colour matching will also be delivered as part of the contract.

With the potential to slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems, the DyeMax has gained considerable attention since the concept was outlined and a prototype machine constructed in 2019.

Pilot scale trials have subsequently been carried out with many well-known international textile companies and their brand partners.
The application unit of the Dye-Max consists of a closed chamber containing a series of spray cassettes with precision nozzles for accurate and consistent coverage, in combination with the patented imogo Pro Speed valve that controls the volume to be applied.

Control and precision
“We are achieving an extremely low liquor ratio of around 0.5-1 litres per kilo of fabric and we fully control the pickup, applying precisely what is required to the specific fabric,” says imogo founding partner Per Stenflo. “Compared to traditional padders there is no contamination of the dyebath or dilution of the dye liquor to worry about.
Fast changeovers with virtually no waste together with a high production speed enable a high productivity and unmatched production flexibility. The system is also equipped with an exhaust system and droplet separator to ensure that the environment around the unit is safe and free from particles.

The imogo Mini-Max meanwhile frees up valuable production time by avoiding wasteful pre-runs. The user simply sets the recipe with the Mini-Max and transfers the parameters to the Dye-Max recipe database for the system to be fully production ready.

7H Färgeri was founded in 1935 and has established itself as the Nordic region’s most complete dyeing and processing plant, specialising in technical and functional textiles for the automotive and soft furnishings sectors, as well as functional and protective clothing.

The family-owned business is now run by brothers Johan and Peter Engelmann.
“We are pleased to be pioneering a sustainable first for the dyeing industry,” said Johan Engelmann. “Our goal is to offer the market products and services with the highest quality in the most climate-smart and sustainable way, and imogo’s spray technology will give us the opportunity to offer innovative new services and products to both existing and new customers. It will be a very exciting journey.”

World Congress on Textile Coating
On February 12th Per Stenflo will make a presentation entitled ‘Transforming Textile Dyeing’ during the online World Congress on Textile Coating which is held over four days, between February 11th and 19th.

13.01.2021

The first online World Congress on Textile Coating

  • World Congress on Textile Coating, to take place on 11-12 & 18-19 February 2021.

The conference organisers have developed a well-structured programme of five sessions over four days with live discussion forums following each session for maximum attendee participation.

“The programme aims to be inspiring and informative, and will showcase the best innovations and collaborative actions in the industry. Functionality can be added to textiles and nonwovens at the beginning or the end of the supply chain, with an increasing range of raw materials, offering many options when designing and realizing a high-performance fabric. At the other end, there are many ways, such as applying a coating, to add functionality to an otherwise finished product. For example, the current pandemic has prompted new commercial anti-viral processes and four such presentations will outline the impact on industry and its response to the global pandemic,” says Dr Nick Butler, head of the conference organising committee.

  • World Congress on Textile Coating, to take place on 11-12 & 18-19 February 2021.

The conference organisers have developed a well-structured programme of five sessions over four days with live discussion forums following each session for maximum attendee participation.

“The programme aims to be inspiring and informative, and will showcase the best innovations and collaborative actions in the industry. Functionality can be added to textiles and nonwovens at the beginning or the end of the supply chain, with an increasing range of raw materials, offering many options when designing and realizing a high-performance fabric. At the other end, there are many ways, such as applying a coating, to add functionality to an otherwise finished product. For example, the current pandemic has prompted new commercial anti-viral processes and four such presentations will outline the impact on industry and its response to the global pandemic,” says Dr Nick Butler, head of the conference organising committee.

World Congress on Textile Coating will feature time dedicated to networking, encouraging attendees to interact with conference speakers and industry peers throughout the online programme, offering the opportunity to expand professional networks. All the presentations and discussion forums will be recorded for post-event viewing. Event sponsors imogo AB, Lamberti SpA, JX Nippon ANCI and Weitmann & Konrad GmbH & Co. KG will give individual presentations and host Q&A during the four days of the event.

For the full programme, speakers and abstracts please visit https://www.technical-textiles.online/WCTC.

Source:

AWOL Media

Call for Papers, International Conference on Textile Coating and Laminating
Call for Papers, International Conference on Textile Coating and Laminating
26.06.2018

Call for Papers, International Conference on Textile Coating and Laminating

The conference will focus on areas of high impact and growth potential, for example smart and intelligent textile coatings and laminates, digital printing and coatings, substrates and coated nonwovens.
Now in its 27th year, this will be the 19th in this established conference series which has become one of the most important meeting places for the global textiles coating and laminating industry.  Previously attending companies can be found on the conference website, where other details can also be located.

CALL FOR PAPERS
The core of the conference programme will be presentations by invited experts, but in order to give an opportunity for anyone with exciting and relevant ideas to present to a high-level international audience, a call for papers is being issued for contributions in the following areas, with emphasis on work that will impact the industry, now and in the future.  Suggested topics include the following:

The conference will focus on areas of high impact and growth potential, for example smart and intelligent textile coatings and laminates, digital printing and coatings, substrates and coated nonwovens.
Now in its 27th year, this will be the 19th in this established conference series which has become one of the most important meeting places for the global textiles coating and laminating industry.  Previously attending companies can be found on the conference website, where other details can also be located.

CALL FOR PAPERS
The core of the conference programme will be presentations by invited experts, but in order to give an opportunity for anyone with exciting and relevant ideas to present to a high-level international audience, a call for papers is being issued for contributions in the following areas, with emphasis on work that will impact the industry, now and in the future.  Suggested topics include the following:

  • new developments in machinery and techniques such as bonding systems, developments in polymers, surface modifications, techniques for extreme properties etc.
  • smart textile coatings and laminates
  • technology for growth, eg nanotechnology, antimicrobial/antibacterial, green technology, developments in self-decontaminating etc.
  • growth markets and applications such as solar/thermal, fuel cells, composites, medical/biotechnology, extreme materials etc.
  • environmental issues
  • disruptive technology - new developments that will potentially change the industry, such as digital printing, graphene and nanotechnology in membranes, and alternatives for PVC etc.