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30.01.2024

ECHA: New chemicals database

ECHA CHEM is a new solution for publishing information on chemicals. The first release, available now, includes information from all REACH registrations.

ECHA’s current Information on chemicals platform, launched in 2016, grew rapidly and contains today information on over 360 000 chemicals. In 2022, ECHA announced that it would create a new system for publishing chemicals data. ECHA CHEM allows the Agency to better handle the growing diversity and quantity of data, while taking advantage of technological advancements.

ECHA maintains the largest chemicals database in the European Union (EU), combining industry-submitted data with information generated in the EU’s regulatory processes. ECHA CHEM is the new solution to share with the public the growing amount of information hosted by the Agency.

In the first version of ECHA CHEM, the information from all the over 100 000 REACH registrations are included that companies have submitted to ECHA. Later this year, the database will be expanded with the redesigned Classification and Labelling Inventory, followed by the first set of regulatory lists.

ECHA CHEM is a new solution for publishing information on chemicals. The first release, available now, includes information from all REACH registrations.

ECHA’s current Information on chemicals platform, launched in 2016, grew rapidly and contains today information on over 360 000 chemicals. In 2022, ECHA announced that it would create a new system for publishing chemicals data. ECHA CHEM allows the Agency to better handle the growing diversity and quantity of data, while taking advantage of technological advancements.

ECHA maintains the largest chemicals database in the European Union (EU), combining industry-submitted data with information generated in the EU’s regulatory processes. ECHA CHEM is the new solution to share with the public the growing amount of information hosted by the Agency.

In the first version of ECHA CHEM, the information from all the over 100 000 REACH registrations are included that companies have submitted to ECHA. Later this year, the database will be expanded with the redesigned Classification and Labelling Inventory, followed by the first set of regulatory lists.

More information:
ECHA database REACH chemicals
Source:

European Chemicals Agency

(c) Hohenstein
15.03.2023

Hohenstein: First 3D measurement study to improve garment sizing for children

Garment fitting pioneer Hohenstein has conducted the first ever measurement series on babies and toddlers. The data will aid the pattern development and fit assessment that is particularly challenging for children's clothing. The new database will help brands and manufacturers design their children's clothing in an accurate, efficient and more sustainable way using fit testing and pattern optimisation.

Hohenstein has been taking body measurements for all target groups since 1957. Based on regular serial measurements taken with 3D body scans over 20 years, data is continuously updated. With the measurement of toddlers and babies, Hohenstein is now closing a large gap in the German market for the first time. 5626 girls and boys in sizes 56 to 182 were measured. This means that 3D scans of infants are available for the first time. The 3D body data form an indispensable basis for customer-specific measurement tables, child-friendly patterns and gradings, optimal fits as well as 3D children's avatars for the simulation of clothing.

Garment fitting pioneer Hohenstein has conducted the first ever measurement series on babies and toddlers. The data will aid the pattern development and fit assessment that is particularly challenging for children's clothing. The new database will help brands and manufacturers design their children's clothing in an accurate, efficient and more sustainable way using fit testing and pattern optimisation.

Hohenstein has been taking body measurements for all target groups since 1957. Based on regular serial measurements taken with 3D body scans over 20 years, data is continuously updated. With the measurement of toddlers and babies, Hohenstein is now closing a large gap in the German market for the first time. 5626 girls and boys in sizes 56 to 182 were measured. This means that 3D scans of infants are available for the first time. The 3D body data form an indispensable basis for customer-specific measurement tables, child-friendly patterns and gradings, optimal fits as well as 3D children's avatars for the simulation of clothing.

Hohenstein offers a wide range of tests for safe children's clothing from a single source. In addition to fit and pattern, Hohenstein carries out risk assessments and safety tests for children's clothing (e.g. cords according to DIN EN 13682), UV protection according to different standards, tests for harmful substances according to OEKO-TEX®, among others. Toy testing is also part of the portfolio.

Source:

Hohenstein

23.02.2023

New online tool maps PFAS hotspots in businesses ahead of EU ban

The EU's plans to ban PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemicals will have an immense impact on companies globally. Perhaps even more than expected, as many manufacturers are unaware that they may have PFAS chemicals in their product line. A new online tool, launched today by NGO ChemSec, will help to solve this problem.

Just a couple of weeks after the big PFAS restriction proposal in the EU was published, ChemSec launches the PFAS Guide, which helps companies investigate the use of persistent chemicals within their businesses. The main feature of the PFAS Guide is the searchable database uncovering different PFAS uses and functions. The online tool also provides guidance on different aspects of the phase-out process from regulation and investigation all the way to testing and supply chain communication.

The EU's plans to ban PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemicals will have an immense impact on companies globally. Perhaps even more than expected, as many manufacturers are unaware that they may have PFAS chemicals in their product line. A new online tool, launched today by NGO ChemSec, will help to solve this problem.

Just a couple of weeks after the big PFAS restriction proposal in the EU was published, ChemSec launches the PFAS Guide, which helps companies investigate the use of persistent chemicals within their businesses. The main feature of the PFAS Guide is the searchable database uncovering different PFAS uses and functions. The online tool also provides guidance on different aspects of the phase-out process from regulation and investigation all the way to testing and supply chain communication.

“We’ve been working to support companies in chemical substitution for a long time, and the last few years we’ve gathered a group of companies working specifically on the PFAS issue. The discussions with them made it clear to us that a main challenge is understanding if and where in your business you may have PFAS”, says Dr. Anna Lennquist, Project Leader for the PFAS Guide.

PFAS are a source of growing concern
It has been estimated that 95 percent of all manufactured goods rely on some form of industrial chemical process. A large share of the chemicals used in these processes have been linked to adverse impacts on human health and the environment. PFAS are a clear example of this problem. PFAS have been manufactured and used in products such as make-up, non-stick pans, water- and greaseproof textiles, food-packaging materials, and firefighting foam since the 1950s and are still used in a wide variety of products around the world today.

But they are also substances of growing concern due to their problematic properties. Per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of several thousand man-made chemicals that accumulate in the environment and cause health impacts for generations. They are, for example, linked to cancer, lung disease, diabetes, reproductive abnormalities and learning difficulties. Since PFAS do not degrade, these “forever chemicals” are now so widespread that is safe to say that every single human being on the planet have detectable levels of these toxic chemicals in their blood.

A couple of weeks ago, a big proposal to restrict PFAS in the EU was published. The five EU Member States behind the proposal submitted a broad restriction proposal that clearly shows the need for the industry to put all resources into phasing out all PFAS substances.

More information:
PFAS ChemSec chemicals
Source:

ChemSec

(c) TMAS
30.12.2022

Climate impact mapping of Swedish textile machinery

Over the past year, TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association, has been working with ClimatePartner on a corporate carbon footprint (CCF) mapping project with its member companies, as a natural step towards supporting a more sustainable textile industry.

Over half of the members of TMAS are participating in the project, which involves calculating each operation’s Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions in order to identify the current climate impact and areas where reductions can be made.

“Integrating climate action into strategies is becoming increasingly important in Europe and we have decided to take a pro-active role,” says TMAS secretary general Therese Premler-Andersson. “There is growing pressure from customers to be more transparant in this area and forthcoming legislation will soon make it necessary for all to take climate actions. TMAS members, however, recognise the benefit of taking action now, not least in terms of taking responsibility and demonstrating credibility.”

The CCF project’s scope examines all aspects of a business split into five areas:

Over the past year, TMAS, the Swedish Textile Machinery Association, has been working with ClimatePartner on a corporate carbon footprint (CCF) mapping project with its member companies, as a natural step towards supporting a more sustainable textile industry.

Over half of the members of TMAS are participating in the project, which involves calculating each operation’s Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions in order to identify the current climate impact and areas where reductions can be made.

“Integrating climate action into strategies is becoming increasingly important in Europe and we have decided to take a pro-active role,” says TMAS secretary general Therese Premler-Andersson. “There is growing pressure from customers to be more transparant in this area and forthcoming legislation will soon make it necessary for all to take climate actions. TMAS members, however, recognise the benefit of taking action now, not least in terms of taking responsibility and demonstrating credibility.”

The CCF project’s scope examines all aspects of a business split into five areas:

  • Facility Management (heating, electricity, water, cooling agents and waste disposal).
  • Employee Mobility (commuting and company cars).
  • Business Travel (flights travel by train, rental cars).
  • Procurement (production, packaging and office materials).
  • Logistics (inbound and outbound).

Primary data is being used wherever possible and emission factors originate from internationally recognised databases such as ecoinvent and GEMIS.

The ClimatePartner measurement programme is based on the guidelines of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (GHG Protocol), and factors in all greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto Protocol. These are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorocarbons (PFC), sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) and nitrogen trifluoride (NF3).

Each of these gases affect the atmosphere differently and remain in the atmosphere for different lengths of time. Rather than reporting on each gas separately, they are expressed as a CO2 equivalent (CO2e) for the sake of simplicity. A CO2e is essentially a conversion into a ‘global warming potential’ value that enables the influence of different gases on global warming to be compared.

17.11.2021

NCTO welcomes Biden Administration’s Buy American Waiver Process

National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) President and CEO Kim Glas issued a statement welcoming the Biden administration’s launch of new database and waiver process for government contract solicitations made under the Buy American Act.

You can read the statement here.

National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) President and CEO Kim Glas issued a statement welcoming the Biden administration’s launch of new database and waiver process for government contract solicitations made under the Buy American Act.

You can read the statement here.

Source:

NCTO

08.07.2021

ECHA: Candidate List updated with eight hazardous chemicals

Some of the newly added substances are used in consumer products such as cosmetics, scented articles, rubber and textiles. Others are used as solvents, flame retardants or to manufacture plastics products. Most have been added to the Candidate List because they are hazardous to human health as they are toxic for reproduction, carcinogenic, respiratory sensitisers or endocrine disruptors.

Companies must follow their legal obligations and ensure the safe use of these chemicals. They also have to notify ECHA under the Waste Framework Directive if their products contain substances of very high concern. This notification is submitted to ECHA’s SCIP database and the information will later be published on the Agency’s website.

Some of the newly added substances are used in consumer products such as cosmetics, scented articles, rubber and textiles. Others are used as solvents, flame retardants or to manufacture plastics products. Most have been added to the Candidate List because they are hazardous to human health as they are toxic for reproduction, carcinogenic, respiratory sensitisers or endocrine disruptors.

Companies must follow their legal obligations and ensure the safe use of these chemicals. They also have to notify ECHA under the Waste Framework Directive if their products contain substances of very high concern. This notification is submitted to ECHA’s SCIP database and the information will later be published on the Agency’s website.

Background
The Candidate List includes substances of very high concern that may have serious effects on our health or the environment. These substances may be placed on the Authorisation List in the future, which means that companies would need to apply for permission to continue using them. The Candidate List has now 219 entries – some of these cover groups of chemicals so the overall number of impacted chemicals is higher.
 
Under the REACH Regulation, companies may have legal obligations when their substance is included – either on its own, in mixtures or in articles – in the Candidate List. Any supplier of articles containing a Candidate List substance above a concentration of 0.1 % weight by weight has to give sufficient information to their customers and consumers to allow safe use.
 
Importers and producers of articles containing a Candidate List substance have six months from the date of its inclusion in the list (8 July 2021) to notify ECHA. Suppliers of substances on the Candidate List (supplied either on their own or in mixtures) have to provide their customers with a safety data sheet.
 
As of 5 January 2021, suppliers of articles on the EU market containing Candidate List substances in a concentration above 0.1% weight by weight must notify these articles to ECHA’s SCIP database. This duty comes from the Waste Framework Directive.
 
More information on these obligations and related tools are available here.

Source:

European Chemicals Agency