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(c) nova-Institut GmbH
24.01.2023

Six nominees for„Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2023“

For the third time, nova-Institute awards the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award in the frame of the “Cellulose Fibres Conference 2023” (8-9 March 2023). The conference advisory board nominated six remarkable products, including cellulose fibres from textile waste, banana production waste and bacterial pulp, a novel technology for producing lyocell yarns and a hygiene product. The innovations will be put to the vote of the conference audience on the first day of the event, with the awards ceremony taking place in the evening. The innovation award “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2023” is sponsored by GIG Karasek (AT).

For the third time, nova-Institute awards the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award in the frame of the “Cellulose Fibres Conference 2023” (8-9 March 2023). The conference advisory board nominated six remarkable products, including cellulose fibres from textile waste, banana production waste and bacterial pulp, a novel technology for producing lyocell yarns and a hygiene product. The innovations will be put to the vote of the conference audience on the first day of the event, with the awards ceremony taking place in the evening. The innovation award “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2023” is sponsored by GIG Karasek (AT).

Here are the six nominees
Vybrana – The new generation banana fibre – GenCrest Bioproducts (India)

Vybrana is a Gencrest’s Sustainable Cellulosic Fibre upcycled from agrowaste. Raw fibres are extracted from the Banana Pseudo stem at the end of the plant lifecycle. The biomass waste is then treated by the Gencrest patented Fiberzyme technology. Here, cocktail enzyme formulations remove the high lignin content and other impurities and help fibre fibrillation. The company's proprietary cottonisation process provides fine, spinnable cellulose staple fibres suitable for blending with other staple fibres and can be spun on any conventional spinning systems giving yarns sustainable apparel. Vybrana is produced without the use of heavy chemicals and minimized water consumption and in a waste-free process where balance biomass is converted to bio stimulants Agrosatva and Bio Fertilizers & organic manure.

HeiQ AeoniQ™ – technology for more sustainability of textiles – HeiQ (Austria)
HeiQ AeoniQ™ is the disruptive technology and key initiative from HeiQ with the potential to change the sustainability of textiles. It is the first climate-positive continuous cellulose filament yarn, made in a proprietary manufacturing process and the first to reproduce the properties of polyester and nylon yarns in a cellulosic, biodegradable, and endlessly recyclable fibre.
HeiQ AeoniQ™ can be manufactured from different cellulosic raw materials such as pre- and post-consumer textile waste, biotech cellulose, and non-valorized agricultural waste, such as ground coffee waste or banana peels. It naturally degrades after only 12 weeks in the soil. Each ton of HeiQ AeoniQ™ saves 5 tons of CO2 emissions. The first garments made with this innovative cellulosic filament fiber were commercially launched in January 2023.

TENCEL™ LUXE – lyocell filament yarn – Lenzing (Austria)
TENCEL™ LUXE is LENZING’s new versatile lyocell yarn that offers an urgently needed sustainable filament solution for the textile and fashion industry. A possible botanical alternative for silk, long-staple cotton, and petrol-based synthetic filaments, is derived from wood grown in renewable, sustainably managed forests, and produced in an environmentally sound, closed-loop process that recycles water and reuses more than 99 % of organic solvent. Certified by The Vegan Society, it is suitable for a wide range of applications and fabric developments, from finer high fashion propositions to denim constructions, seamless and activewear innovations, and even agricultural and technical solutions.

Nullarbor™ – Nanollose & Birla Cellulose (Australia/India)
In 2020, Nanollose & Birla Cellulose started a journey to develop and commercialize tree-free lyocell from bacterial cellulose, called Nullarbor™. The name derives from the Latin “nulla arbor” which means “no trees”. Initial lab research at both ends led to a joint patent application with the patent “production of high-tenacity lyocell fibres made from bacterial cellulose”.
Nullarbor is significantly stronger than lyocell made from wood-based pulp; even adding small amounts of bacterial cellulose to wood pulp increases the fibre toughness. In 2022, the first pilot batch of 260kg was produced with 20 % bacterial pulp share. Several high-quality fabrics and garments were produced with this fibre. The collaboration between Nanollose & Birla Cellulose now focuses on increasing the production scale and amount of bacterial pulp in the fibre.

Circulose® – makes fashion circular – Renewcell (Sweden)
Circulose® made by Renewcell is a branded dissolving pulp made from 100 % textile waste, like worn-out clothes and production scraps. It provides a unique material for fashion that is 100 % recycled, recyclable, biodegradable, and of virgin-equivalent quality. It is used by fibre producers to make staple fibre or filaments like viscose, lyocell, modal, acetate or other types of man-made cellulosic fibres. In 2022, Renewcell, opened the world’s first textile-to-textile chemical recycling plant in Sundsvall, Sweden – Renewcell 1. The plant will eventually reach 120,000 tons of annual capacity.

Sparkle sustainable sanitary pads – Sparkle Innovations (United States)
Globally, around 300 billion period products are discarded every year, resulting in millions of tons of non-biodegradable waste. Since most conventional sanitary pads contain up to 90 % plastics, they do not biodegrade for around 600 years. Sparkle has designed sustainable, plastic-free, biodegradable and compostable Sparkle sanitary pads. From product to packaging, they are made up of around 90 % cellulose-based materials with top sheet, absorbent core, release paper, wrapping paper and packaging made of cellulose-based fibres. Whether Sparkle pads end up in a compost pit, are incinerated or end up in a landfill, they are a more sustainable alternative compared to conventional pads that contain large amounts of plastics, complex petro-chemical based ingredients and artificial fragrances. When tested according to ISO 14855-1 by a leading independent lab in Europe, Sparkle pads reached over 90 % absolute biodegradation within 90 days in commercial composting conditions.

(c) Haelixa
05.01.2023

Damteks and Haelixa collaborate: Tracing recycled acrylic fiber

Haelixa, the Swiss traceability company and Damteks Textiles have announced a collaboration to mark and trace recycled acrylic fiber. Damteks is offering their recycled yarn to customers whereby they are able to place an order with the unique Haelixa DNA already attached.

The Haelixa solution is DNA markers which are solved in liquid and applied to fibers as a fine spray. Spot checks are completed after spraying to determine the presence of DNA and identify the product. The test is based on PCR technology that is 100% reliable and has forensic validity.

Damteks saw an increase in demand for blended yarn in the last year. The request is most often a composition of 30% recycled fiber with 70% standard fiber. Brands are looking for options to be more sustainable and Damteks proactively sought out an answer. They are offering the yarn with Haelixa DNA to validate the recycled acrylic in the mix.

Haelixa, the Swiss traceability company and Damteks Textiles have announced a collaboration to mark and trace recycled acrylic fiber. Damteks is offering their recycled yarn to customers whereby they are able to place an order with the unique Haelixa DNA already attached.

The Haelixa solution is DNA markers which are solved in liquid and applied to fibers as a fine spray. Spot checks are completed after spraying to determine the presence of DNA and identify the product. The test is based on PCR technology that is 100% reliable and has forensic validity.

Damteks saw an increase in demand for blended yarn in the last year. The request is most often a composition of 30% recycled fiber with 70% standard fiber. Brands are looking for options to be more sustainable and Damteks proactively sought out an answer. They are offering the yarn with Haelixa DNA to validate the recycled acrylic in the mix.

The haelixa team visited the Damteks recycling facility in Istanbul to kick off the partnership that will continue throughout 2023. The traceability program has the DNA sprayed on the recycled fibers before spinning. The project also saw the use of a tailored Haelixa liquid sprayer designed by the team based in Switzerland. When manufacturers do not have built-in moisturizing systems, Haelixa provides them with a custom unit to shower the DNA liquid onto the fibers. This sprayer is engineered to match the mechanical processing of the customer.

Damteks is a family-owned business that pride itself in carefully selecting environmentally responsible options for its production processes. On top of the certifications they have obtained including - GRS, RCS, GOTS, OCS - Damteks decided to have their products "Marked and Traced by Haelixa" to add additional credibility and reliability. Damteks plans to offer marked and traced by Haelixa yarn in different dyes as their offering to brands.

More information:
DNA marker acrylic fiber
Source:

Haelixa

(c) Trützschler
30.12.2022

Trützschler and Valérius 360 start collaborative project for recycled yarn

Valérius 360 wanted to make a sustainable, circular approach possible in the fashion industry. Working together with Trützschler, a collaborative project has now achieved high-quality recycled yarn – opening up massive potential to drive measurable progress toward a circular and sustainable textile industry.

Testing at the Trützschler Technical Center
The team from Valérius 360 wanted to find ways of improving the processes for yarns made from 50 % recycled and 50 % virgin cotton (Ne30). In particular, it was seeking ways to reduce thick and thin spots, which disturb the appearance of the textile surface.

At the Trützschler Technical Center in Mönchengladbach, they conducted special trials that showed that using a direct spinning process for this application delivers much better results than a process with a draw frame passage for rotor yarns.

In direct spinning, the sliver from the card is directly drawn in the draw frame which is integrated in the can stock. This involves one less process step than using an autoleveller draw frame, while also saving space and giving staff more time for other operations.

Valérius 360 wanted to make a sustainable, circular approach possible in the fashion industry. Working together with Trützschler, a collaborative project has now achieved high-quality recycled yarn – opening up massive potential to drive measurable progress toward a circular and sustainable textile industry.

Testing at the Trützschler Technical Center
The team from Valérius 360 wanted to find ways of improving the processes for yarns made from 50 % recycled and 50 % virgin cotton (Ne30). In particular, it was seeking ways to reduce thick and thin spots, which disturb the appearance of the textile surface.

At the Trützschler Technical Center in Mönchengladbach, they conducted special trials that showed that using a direct spinning process for this application delivers much better results than a process with a draw frame passage for rotor yarns.

In direct spinning, the sliver from the card is directly drawn in the draw frame which is integrated in the can stock. This involves one less process step than using an autoleveller draw frame, while also saving space and giving staff more time for other operations.

On-site support from Trützschler Customer Service
The team from Valérius 360 also received in-house training from the Trützschler Customer Service department. Together, they analyzed and significantly improved the process at the Valérius 360 production site. This helped to bring yarns made from recycled raw materials up to the required level of the 50% Usterstatistics. This is the reference level for yarns made from virgin raw materials. Accordingly, 50 % of all yarn producers with raw cotton for rotor yarns and comparable yarn counts produce a poorer quality.

Source:

Trützschler Group SE

(c) Dent Instrumentation
30.12.2022

BTMA: Sensor specialist becomes employee owned

BTMA member Dent Instrumentation – a specialist in contactless yarn sensors – has become an employee-owned business following the formation of a new Employee Ownership Trust (EOT).

The company, based in Colne, Lancashire, has been family owned since its founder Geoffrey Dent secured a patent for the very first contactless yarn sensor in the 1960s. It has been successfully run by his son Andrew and the family for many years.
“This deal ensures a smooth succession as well as the preservation of the company’s core family values and the Dent Instrumentation name,” said Managing Director Colin Hull. “The EOT structure will maintain the integrity of the business for years to come.”

The liability of Dent sensors makes them integral to the yarn spinning and winding processes and they have become a standard throughout the textile industry, recognised for their quality, performance and value. They are used by major manufacturers of textiles and textile machinery under either Dent or OEM machine builder brands.

BTMA member Dent Instrumentation – a specialist in contactless yarn sensors – has become an employee-owned business following the formation of a new Employee Ownership Trust (EOT).

The company, based in Colne, Lancashire, has been family owned since its founder Geoffrey Dent secured a patent for the very first contactless yarn sensor in the 1960s. It has been successfully run by his son Andrew and the family for many years.
“This deal ensures a smooth succession as well as the preservation of the company’s core family values and the Dent Instrumentation name,” said Managing Director Colin Hull. “The EOT structure will maintain the integrity of the business for years to come.”

The liability of Dent sensors makes them integral to the yarn spinning and winding processes and they have become a standard throughout the textile industry, recognised for their quality, performance and value. They are used by major manufacturers of textiles and textile machinery under either Dent or OEM machine builder brands.

30.12.2022

Toray creates Fiber that adsorbs Pathogenic Proteins in Blood

Toray Industries, Inc., announced that it has combined nanotechnology and fiber technology to create a cross-shaped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) nanopore fiber that efficiently adsorbs pathogenic proteins in the blood.

The company developed this fiber by employing its PMMA hollow fiber membrane spinning technology. Changing the nanopore size on the surface and inside the fiber makes it possible to control the types of protein that this material adsorbs. This could become a fundamental blood purification technology for a range of protein adsorption columns that cause diseases.

The fiber’s cross-shaped cross section has a larger surface area than fibers with round ones. This provides much better contact between the blood and fiber and significantly enhances protein adsorption efficiency.

Toray Industries, Inc., announced that it has combined nanotechnology and fiber technology to create a cross-shaped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) nanopore fiber that efficiently adsorbs pathogenic proteins in the blood.

The company developed this fiber by employing its PMMA hollow fiber membrane spinning technology. Changing the nanopore size on the surface and inside the fiber makes it possible to control the types of protein that this material adsorbs. This could become a fundamental blood purification technology for a range of protein adsorption columns that cause diseases.

The fiber’s cross-shaped cross section has a larger surface area than fibers with round ones. This provides much better contact between the blood and fiber and significantly enhances protein adsorption efficiency.

Toray is the only company to have commercialized a PMMA hollow-fiber membrane artificial kidney for dialysis treatment. Its new nanopore fiber benefits from PMMA’s good protein adsorption and biocompatibility. Using the structural formation of a stereocomplex from two PMMA types entangled spirally during the spinning process to form the fiber shape, Toray made it possible for the fiber itself to develop pores of several to dozens of nanometers. Depending on the pore size, large proteins cannot go inside the pores. If they are too small, they are not trapped. This enables selective adsorption of moderately sized proteins trapped in pores.

The fiber pore sizes are adjustable to the diameters of target proteins for a range of diseases. These include inflammatory proteins in sepsis, autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases, and causative proteins in chronic illnesses. Toray’s technology is thus fundamental to developing disease-causing protein adsorption columns to purify blood.

Toray’s cross-shaped cross section suppresses inter-fiber adhesion, increasing the surface area per volume and enabling highly efficient protein adsorption. For blood purification applications, higher capacity adsorption columns increase blood removal amounts from the body, which can be especially stressful for the elderly and children. The new fiber’s highly efficient protein adsorption should contribute to compact, high-performance protein adsorption columns.

Source:

Toray Industries, Inc.,

(c) FET
Business Secretary Grant Shapps discusses FET’s wet spinning system with Mark Smith, FET R&D Manager
16.12.2022

FET extrusion system features in UK Business Secretary’s visit

The UK’s new Business Secretary, Grant Shapps has visited the Henry Royce Institute’ hub in Manchester to seal the second phase of R&D investment in the institute of £95 million. Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England had previously installed its FET-200LAB wet spinning system at the University of Manchester site and this proved to be a focus for the Business Secretary’s interest, as he discussed the project with FET’s Research and Development Manager, Mark Smith.

This wet spinning technology enables fibres to be derived from sustainable wood pulp to produce high quality apparel and trials are now underway to perfect this process. FET is a world leading supplier of laboratory and pilot melt spinning systems, having successfully processed more than 35 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats.

During his visit, Shapps spoke of the investment programme as a means of reinforcing the UK’s standing as a leader in advanced materials research, development and innovation.

The UK’s new Business Secretary, Grant Shapps has visited the Henry Royce Institute’ hub in Manchester to seal the second phase of R&D investment in the institute of £95 million. Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England had previously installed its FET-200LAB wet spinning system at the University of Manchester site and this proved to be a focus for the Business Secretary’s interest, as he discussed the project with FET’s Research and Development Manager, Mark Smith.

This wet spinning technology enables fibres to be derived from sustainable wood pulp to produce high quality apparel and trials are now underway to perfect this process. FET is a world leading supplier of laboratory and pilot melt spinning systems, having successfully processed more than 35 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats.

During his visit, Shapps spoke of the investment programme as a means of reinforcing the UK’s standing as a leader in advanced materials research, development and innovation.

“R&D investment is a critical way to turbocharge Britain’s growth. Growing an economy fit for the future means harnessing the full potential of advanced materials, making science fiction a reality by supporting projects from regenerative medicine to robots developing new recycling capabilities, right across the country. Today’s £95 million investment will do just that, bringing together the brightest minds across our businesses and institutions to help future-proof sectors from healthcare to nuclear energy.”

The Henry Royce Institute was established in 2015 with an initial £235 million government investment through the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the latest £95 million sum represents the second phase of the investment.

Opportunities being investigated by Royce include lightweight materials and structures, biomaterials and materials designed for reuse, recycling and remanufacture. Advanced materials are critical to the UK future in various industries, such as health, transport, energy, electronics and utilities.

Schoeller Textil AG
22.11.2022

Transparency for the wool supply chain - partnership between Schoeller and NATIVA

  • Fully traceable and sustainable wool via blockchain
  • Transparent supply chains

Schoeller strives to offer more high-quality fabrics made from sustainable NATIVA™ wool in the future.

The NATIVA™ wool comes from certified farms in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, North America, Uruguay and Argentina. The farms comply with strict levels of animal welfare, and management and ethical work policies. To ensure animal welfare each farmer has a management plan, assessing feeding, breeding, behaviour, animal handling and health and infrastructure. This includes the prohibition of mulesing and stress free shearing.

All following steps such as wool sourcing, combing, spinning and weaving are also monitored and certified to the highest ethical and quality standards. NATIVA™ is the first global wool brand to provide Blockchain traceability from farm to consumer. This transparency in the supply chain, enabled by the NATIVA™ certification and powered by Blockchain, means brands can truly show the journey of their wool.

  • Fully traceable and sustainable wool via blockchain
  • Transparent supply chains

Schoeller strives to offer more high-quality fabrics made from sustainable NATIVA™ wool in the future.

The NATIVA™ wool comes from certified farms in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, North America, Uruguay and Argentina. The farms comply with strict levels of animal welfare, and management and ethical work policies. To ensure animal welfare each farmer has a management plan, assessing feeding, breeding, behaviour, animal handling and health and infrastructure. This includes the prohibition of mulesing and stress free shearing.

All following steps such as wool sourcing, combing, spinning and weaving are also monitored and certified to the highest ethical and quality standards. NATIVA™ is the first global wool brand to provide Blockchain traceability from farm to consumer. This transparency in the supply chain, enabled by the NATIVA™ certification and powered by Blockchain, means brands can truly show the journey of their wool.

A unique QR code is generated for each product of each brand. This code is a connection between the NATIVA™ Blockchain Platform and the NATIVA™ Blockchain Website. Customers can scan the QR code to view the NATIVA™ Blockchain Website, where they can trace in real time the journey of their wool, from farm to brand.

Benefits:

  • Complete transparency over the supply chain and product transformation.
  • End to end traceability.
  • A fantastic marketing tool for any brand.
FET-200LAB wet spinning system Photo: Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET)
21.11.2022

FET wet spinning system selected for major fibre research programme

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England has installed a FET-200LAB wet spinning system at the University of Manchester which will play a major part in advanced materials research to support sustainable growth and development.

This research programme will be conducted by The Henry Royce Institute, which operates as a hub model at The University of Manchester with spokes at other leading research universities in the UK.

The Henry Royce Institute identifies challenges and stimulates innovation in advanced UK materials research, delivering positive economic and societal impact. In particular, this materials research initiative is focused on supporting and promoting all forms of sustainable growth and development.
These challenges range from biomedical devices through to plastics sustainability and energy-efficient devices; hence supporting key national targets such as the UK’s zero-carbon 2050 target.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England has installed a FET-200LAB wet spinning system at the University of Manchester which will play a major part in advanced materials research to support sustainable growth and development.

This research programme will be conducted by The Henry Royce Institute, which operates as a hub model at The University of Manchester with spokes at other leading research universities in the UK.

The Henry Royce Institute identifies challenges and stimulates innovation in advanced UK materials research, delivering positive economic and societal impact. In particular, this materials research initiative is focused on supporting and promoting all forms of sustainable growth and development.
These challenges range from biomedical devices through to plastics sustainability and energy-efficient devices; hence supporting key national targets such as the UK’s zero-carbon 2050 target.

FET-200 Series wet spinning systems complement FET’s renowned range of melt spinning equipment. The FET-200LAB is a laboratory scale system, which is especially suitable for the early stages of formulation and process development. It is used for processing new functional textile materials in a variety of solvent and polymer combinations.

In particular, the FET-200LAB will be utilised in trials for a family of fibres made from wood pulp, a sustainable resource rather than the usual fossil fuels. Bio-based polymers are produced from biomass feedstocks such as cellulose and are commonly used in the manufacture of high end apparel. The key to cellulose and other materials like lyocell and viscose is that they can be recycled, treated and fed back into the wet spinning system for repeat manufacture.

Established in 1998, FET is a leading supplier of laboratory and pilot melt spinning systems with installations in over 35 countries and has now successfully processed more than 35 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats.

Source:

DAVID STEAD PROJECT MARKETING LTD

Texaid / Texcircle
26.10.2022

Swiss Textile Recycling Project TEXCIRLCE

After two years of joint collaboration and research the Swiss Textile Recycling Project “Texcircle” comes to an end. Partners and stakeholders have worked on the vision of a textile cluster where materials flow in circular loops. The goal of the project was to develop high-quality yarns and products incorporating such a large amount of recycled textiles as possible. In the end, several product prototypes from carpets, socks, and curtains to pullovers, padding and accessories have been developed with at least 50 % recycled fiber up to 80 % recycled fibers and yarns.

Europe has a waste problem of 7.5 million waste of which only 30-35 % is collected and less than 1 % of the textile and clothing worldwide is recycled into textiles and clothing again. It is as well found that around 80 % of the impact of a textile product lies in the design.

After two years of joint collaboration and research the Swiss Textile Recycling Project “Texcircle” comes to an end. Partners and stakeholders have worked on the vision of a textile cluster where materials flow in circular loops. The goal of the project was to develop high-quality yarns and products incorporating such a large amount of recycled textiles as possible. In the end, several product prototypes from carpets, socks, and curtains to pullovers, padding and accessories have been developed with at least 50 % recycled fiber up to 80 % recycled fibers and yarns.

Europe has a waste problem of 7.5 million waste of which only 30-35 % is collected and less than 1 % of the textile and clothing worldwide is recycled into textiles and clothing again. It is as well found that around 80 % of the impact of a textile product lies in the design.

Together with the design research expertise of the Lucerne University of Applied sciences and arts, the spinning expertise of Rieter and the sorting and collection expertise of Texaid, systems should be created where products of high quality can be produced of recycled fiber. On board were the expertise of further Cluster partners of Brands, Retailers, and the public sector to see how a joint Cluster and system coukld be established.

The Project Texcircle and cluster is led by the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Art  & Design, and in collaboration with Coop, Rieter, Jacob Rohner AG, Ruckstuhl AG, TEXAID as well as workfashion.com ag. Furthermore, Bundesamt für Zivildienst ZIVI, NIKIN AG, and Tiger Liz Textiles are supporting the project. The project is funded by Innosuisse.

Furthermore, collaboration partners from all over Europe contributed to the project to enable these prototypes and systems.

Through joint developments from the design, the collecting, sorting trials, tearing, and spinning trials until the actual production trials and product testing. The partners were able to recycle 2.5 Tons of pre-and post-consumer textile waste into product prototypes with a promising commercial interest. From socks, west, and pullovers to non-woven felts and accessories to carpets and curtains. Through our 2 years of collaboration, the teamcame across several hurdles in the textile recycling value chain which could be tackled. This was a proof of concept that a circular system is possible and the industry now has to enable this at full scale.

Source:

Texaid / Texcircle

Photo: EREMA
21.10.2022

EREMA: Circular economy for PET fibres

The textile industry is the third largest consumer of plastics. While growth rates in the production of fibres and textiles are high, the circular economy has hardly become established in this segment. The EREMA Group is now intensifying development of recycling solutions for this application with their new fibres and textiles business unit. Currently, the focus is on PET fibre materials from fibre production and subsequent processing steps. Technologies for recycling mixed fibre textiles from textile collection sources are to follow in a follow-up project phase.

The textile industry is the third largest consumer of plastics. While growth rates in the production of fibres and textiles are high, the circular economy has hardly become established in this segment. The EREMA Group is now intensifying development of recycling solutions for this application with their new fibres and textiles business unit. Currently, the focus is on PET fibre materials from fibre production and subsequent processing steps. Technologies for recycling mixed fibre textiles from textile collection sources are to follow in a follow-up project phase.

"With EREMA's VACUREMA® and INTAREMA® technology and PURE LOOP's ISEC evo technology, our company group already has an extensive range of machines for fibre and PET recycling applications. For ecologically and economically sound recycling, however, new technological solutions are needed to use the recycled fibres in higher-value end applications and to achieve a functioning circular economy," explains Wolfgang Hermann, Business Development Manager Application Fibres & Textiles, EREMA Group GmbH. The initial focus will be on PET, regarded as a key material for the production of synthetic fibres. The aim is to find recycling solutions that allow PET fibre materials to be prepared for reuse in PET fibre production processes. This is a significant step for the circular economy because PET fibres in textiles account for about two-thirds of the total volume of PET.

In this development work, the EREMA Group can build on existing know-how. Proven recycling technologies have been combined with a new IV optimiser. "This extends the residence time of the PET melt, which is particularly necessary in fibre recycling to efficiently remove spinning oils. Our recycling process also increases the IV value of the PET melt after extrusion back to the specific level that is essential for production of the fibre," explains Hermann. Waste PET fibre from production processes can therefore be further processed into rPET filament fibre, carpet yarn and staple fibre.

Fibre test centre with plant to test customers' materials
In order to accelerate development work, EREMA opened its own fibre test centre a few months ago, where a cross-company team is working on recycling solutions for fibre-to-fibre applications.

Source:

EREMA Gruppe

Photo: FET
FET-103 Monofilament meltspinning system
10.10.2022

RHEON LABS: Fibre with unique strain-rate sensitive characteristics

RHEON LABS, a fast-growing materials technology company based in Battersea, London, has completed an extensive 6 month trial with FET, a world leader in laboratory and pilot meltspinning equipment. Backed by a £173,000 grant from Innovate UK for feasibility studies, RHEON LABS has further developed its RHEON™ technology, a reactive polymer that dynamically stiffens when subjected to force. The technology can control energy of any amplitude or frequency, from small vibrations to forces at ballistic-speeds and therefore has a wide range of applications.
 
This Innovate UK Smart Grant-backed project aims to develop a hyper viscoelastic fibre from RHEON™ which displays high strain-rate sensitive properties. Creating a fibre with unique strain-rate sensitive properties will be a world first. It will enable the creation of a 'breakthrough-generation' of stretch textiles that can actively absorb, dampen and control energy during movement, rather than simply acting as a spring.

RHEON LABS, a fast-growing materials technology company based in Battersea, London, has completed an extensive 6 month trial with FET, a world leader in laboratory and pilot meltspinning equipment. Backed by a £173,000 grant from Innovate UK for feasibility studies, RHEON LABS has further developed its RHEON™ technology, a reactive polymer that dynamically stiffens when subjected to force. The technology can control energy of any amplitude or frequency, from small vibrations to forces at ballistic-speeds and therefore has a wide range of applications.
 
This Innovate UK Smart Grant-backed project aims to develop a hyper viscoelastic fibre from RHEON™ which displays high strain-rate sensitive properties. Creating a fibre with unique strain-rate sensitive properties will be a world first. It will enable the creation of a 'breakthrough-generation' of stretch textiles that can actively absorb, dampen and control energy during movement, rather than simply acting as a spring.

For close-fitting activewear and sports bras, the ability to actively control muscle mass or soft tissue movement during exercise will be a game-changing advancement. It will allow brands to engineer garments that relax during everyday use but actively stiffen during exercise for improved support and performance.
The Innovate UK grant was awarded under the category of Hyper-Viscoelastic Fibre Extrusion for Textile Manufacture. Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) enabled the customer trials at its bespoke Fibre Development Centre in Leeds, England using its in-house FET-103 Monofilament meltspinning facilities, in harness with RHEON and FET technical operatives. The next phase will be to upscale the trials of preferred materials on RHEON’s own new FET-103 meltspinning line, with FET’s continued support and expertise on hand.
 
Creating a fibre with unique strain-rate sensitive characteristics could be as radical a change in the market as the initial introduction of stretch fibre with the launch of Lycra™. The textiles would have a multitude of beneficial properties and would provide significantly less compression in the garment than conventional materials, substantially improving user comfort, support and performance.

Source:

DAVID STEAD PROJECT MARKETING LTD

11.08.2022

Milliken expands Yarn Production capabilities

  • Milliken purchases spinning plant from Gildan to strengthen internal yarn production

Milliken & Company, a diversified global manufacturer innovating in the textile, chemical, floor covering and healthcare industries, recently acquired one of the Frontier yarn plants in Mayodan, North Carolina, from Gildan. This plant acquisition expands Milliken’s open-end yarn production for its protective fabrics, workwear, government and defense, industrial, and napery textile business units.

The Frontier Spinning Plant #3, which will be renamed the Two Rivers Plant as a nod to its dedicated team and the community it serves, will become a spinning hub for Milliken. Multiple Milliken textile plants throughout the Southeast will source their yarn needs from the Two Rivers Plant.

“Adding this plant to the Milliken manufacturing footprint helps us meet current production needs and offers additional capacity for future growth,” says Kevin Brown, senior vice president of global operations for Milliken’s Textile Business. “The expansion helps us create a resilient supply chain that offers consistency and surety for both our product lines and customers.”

  • Milliken purchases spinning plant from Gildan to strengthen internal yarn production

Milliken & Company, a diversified global manufacturer innovating in the textile, chemical, floor covering and healthcare industries, recently acquired one of the Frontier yarn plants in Mayodan, North Carolina, from Gildan. This plant acquisition expands Milliken’s open-end yarn production for its protective fabrics, workwear, government and defense, industrial, and napery textile business units.

The Frontier Spinning Plant #3, which will be renamed the Two Rivers Plant as a nod to its dedicated team and the community it serves, will become a spinning hub for Milliken. Multiple Milliken textile plants throughout the Southeast will source their yarn needs from the Two Rivers Plant.

“Adding this plant to the Milliken manufacturing footprint helps us meet current production needs and offers additional capacity for future growth,” says Kevin Brown, senior vice president of global operations for Milliken’s Textile Business. “The expansion helps us create a resilient supply chain that offers consistency and surety for both our product lines and customers.”

More information:
Milliken acquisiton
Source:

Milliken

11.08.2022

BB Engineering at the K Show 2022

As a sub-exhibitor of Oerlikon, BB Engineering will present its product range in the fields of extrusion, mixing and filtration as well as PET recycling with the VacuFil and VarioFil R+ systems at the K show 2022.

BB Engineering has been focusing its development work increasingly on recycling technologies for several years. In addition to extruders, filters and mixers that are suitable for both recycling processes and the processing of recyclate, BB Engineering offers a complete PET recycling plant called VacuFil.

As a sub-exhibitor of Oerlikon, BB Engineering will present its product range in the fields of extrusion, mixing and filtration as well as PET recycling with the VacuFil and VarioFil R+ systems at the K show 2022.

BB Engineering has been focusing its development work increasingly on recycling technologies for several years. In addition to extruders, filters and mixers that are suitable for both recycling processes and the processing of recyclate, BB Engineering offers a complete PET recycling plant called VacuFil.

With VacuFil, BB Engineering has developed an innovative PET LSP recycling process. The process combines gentle large-scale filtration and targeted IV regulation for consistently outstanding rPET melt quality. Thus, much more than simple "downcycling" is possible with VacuFil. VacuFil processes a wide range of input materials - post-production and post-consumer. The patented key component Visco+ vacuum filter removes volatile impurities quickly and reliably. VacuFil is a modular system that can be designed for different recycling applications. Simple granulation is possible, but also direct feeding into further processing, e.g. in the synthetic fiber spinning mill. BBE offers VacuFil in combination with its own VarioFil compact spinning plant to produce polyester yarn.

At the K show 2022, visitors can experience the VacuFil Visco+ recycling technology in operation with a connected VarioFil spinning plant and see live how recycling yarn is produced from PET waste.

Source:

BB Engineering GmbH

Photo via Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited
01.07.2022

Indorama Ventures acquires Tollegno 1900’s Wool assets in Italy and Poland

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) completed the acquisition of the wool spinning businesses in Italy and Poland of Tollegno 1900 S.p.A. (Tollegno 1900), a leading Italian manufacturer of fabrics and yarns.

Tollegno 1900 has a family-based heritage with more than 120 years of experience and is one of the leading European textile groups with a total spinning capacity of around 3,500 tons of yarn per year with a specific focus on flat knitting and hand knitting yarns. With this acquisition, IVL secured two assets, including a spinning and top-dyeing operation in Poland and a yarn dyeing operation in Italy.

The acquisition is a strategic fit for IVL’s integrated business platform and will make a significant contribution to the sustainable growth of its Wool business, which is part of the company’s Fibers segment. It will also strengthen IVL’s footprint for worsted yarns in Europe and help extend IVL’s wool products globally with trading subsidiaries in America and Asia.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) completed the acquisition of the wool spinning businesses in Italy and Poland of Tollegno 1900 S.p.A. (Tollegno 1900), a leading Italian manufacturer of fabrics and yarns.

Tollegno 1900 has a family-based heritage with more than 120 years of experience and is one of the leading European textile groups with a total spinning capacity of around 3,500 tons of yarn per year with a specific focus on flat knitting and hand knitting yarns. With this acquisition, IVL secured two assets, including a spinning and top-dyeing operation in Poland and a yarn dyeing operation in Italy.

The acquisition is a strategic fit for IVL’s integrated business platform and will make a significant contribution to the sustainable growth of its Wool business, which is part of the company’s Fibers segment. It will also strengthen IVL’s footprint for worsted yarns in Europe and help extend IVL’s wool products globally with trading subsidiaries in America and Asia.

The operations, which will be renamed Filatura Tollegno 1900, will add more sustainable products to IVL’s portfolio, including a full traceability project of the fibers used for yarns and fabrics, as well as provide synergies with existing assets.

Giovanni Germanetti, the CEO of Tollegno, will continue in the same role with Filatura Tollegno 1900, facilitating continuity and exploring new growth as part of IVL. Lincoln Germanetti, the President and co-CEO of Tollegno, will remain with Filatura Tollegno 1900 as COO.

More information:
IVL wool Fibers yarn
Source:

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited 

Photo: Filidea Technical Yarns
27.06.2022

Filidea Technical Yarns: New products and markets under the banner of sustainable evolution

  • New yarns for the contract furnishing world, for industrial sewing threads and the challenge of biodegradable polyester

At the product level, big impulse has been given to the range of industrial sewing threads for various uses, with new references both in the polyester + polyester compositions as well as in cotton + polyester. The industrial threads, marketed as raw material, allow the company to consolidate its position on some strategic markets, such as in Germany.

As a result of the partnership with Trevira® for the spinning of the flame-retardant Trevira®CS fibre, Filidea Technical Yarns reinforces its offer of non-dyed performant yarns aimed at the world of contract furnishings. The sector of hospitality, of furnishings for public and work spaces, fairs and areas for social-cultural gatherings will find a comprehensive answer to its demands in the Trevira®CS-based yarns: with regard to fireproof standards, versatility, resistance to wear and tear, excellent colour rendering, and last but not least, the component of fibre sustainability, an essential value for the design of spaces for collective use.

  • New yarns for the contract furnishing world, for industrial sewing threads and the challenge of biodegradable polyester

At the product level, big impulse has been given to the range of industrial sewing threads for various uses, with new references both in the polyester + polyester compositions as well as in cotton + polyester. The industrial threads, marketed as raw material, allow the company to consolidate its position on some strategic markets, such as in Germany.

As a result of the partnership with Trevira® for the spinning of the flame-retardant Trevira®CS fibre, Filidea Technical Yarns reinforces its offer of non-dyed performant yarns aimed at the world of contract furnishings. The sector of hospitality, of furnishings for public and work spaces, fairs and areas for social-cultural gatherings will find a comprehensive answer to its demands in the Trevira®CS-based yarns: with regard to fireproof standards, versatility, resistance to wear and tear, excellent colour rendering, and last but not least, the component of fibre sustainability, an essential value for the design of spaces for collective use.

Continuing in the development of sustainable production across the sector, the company has undertaken two important initiatives with other actors in the textile supply chain. Filidea participates in Trick, the European blockchain project – part of the European Horizon 2020 programme – involving 29 partners from six different nations to reinforce the circular economy thanks to the development of a digital platform which is complete, traceable and available to operators in the textile sector.

MagnoLab, the network of enterprises in the textile supply chain, and of which Filidea is one of the founding members, gives the impulse to constant R&D activities. MagnoLab was established in 2022 in order to develop tangible solutions for the sector, to create values and to collaborate with regard to current and future demands.

MagnoLab brings together textile companies which are active at various stages of and with complementary roles in the supply chain, and which work in synergy and share objectives, resourcefulness and long-sightedness, with the aim of developing innovation in a structured way. MagnoLab is also open to welcome new partners.

Source:

Filidea Technical Yarns

Tearing Line Foto: Andritz
20.05.2022

ANDRITZ at TECHTEXTIL 2022

International technology group ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative nonwovens production and textile solutions at Techtextil in Frankfurt from June 21 to 24. The ANDRITZ product portfolio covers state-of-the-art nonwovens and textile production technologies, such as air-through bonding, airlay, needlepunch, spunlace, spunbond, wetlaid/WetlaceTM, converting, textile finishing, recycling, and natural fiber processing. For Techtextil, special focus lies on technologies for textile recycling, needlepunch, airlay, wetlaid glass fibers and textile calendering.

International technology group ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative nonwovens production and textile solutions at Techtextil in Frankfurt from June 21 to 24. The ANDRITZ product portfolio covers state-of-the-art nonwovens and textile production technologies, such as air-through bonding, airlay, needlepunch, spunlace, spunbond, wetlaid/WetlaceTM, converting, textile finishing, recycling, and natural fiber processing. For Techtextil, special focus lies on technologies for textile recycling, needlepunch, airlay, wetlaid glass fibers and textile calendering.

TEXTILE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGIES BASED ON TEARING
With the acquisition of ANDRITZ Laroche SAS, ANDRITZ has expanded its product portfolio to include airlay and recycling technology as well as bast fiber processing technologies. Complete recycling lines for post-consumer and industrial textile waste to produce fibers for re-spinning and/or nonwoven end-uses are one focus of this product range. Customer awareness and regulations are forcing clothing brands to recycle their textile waste in their own products. Recycled fibers can also be used in the nonwovens industry for various applications, for example in the automotive industry, for insulation, mattresses, and furniture felts.

ANDRITZ Laroche offers a complete process range of tearing lines from 50 up to 3,000 kg/h, which can be used for almost all types of pre/post-consumer textile waste. The aim is to preserve the character of the original fibers, for example cotton, by maximizing fiber length, strength and feel.

Source:

Andritz AG

(c) Oerlikon
The new Staple Fiber Technology Center in Neumünster
13.05.2022

Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions at Techtextil 2022

  • Sustainable infrastructure solutions, road safety and health protection

At this year’s Techtextil, Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions will be presenting the trade audience with new applications, special processes and sustainable solutions focusing on the production of industrial textiles. Among other things, the company will be showcasing new technology for charging nonwovens that sets new standards with regards to quality and efficiency. Between June 21 and 24, the discussions will be concentrating on airbags, seat belts, tire cord, geotextiles, filter nonwovens and their diverse applications.

  • Sustainable infrastructure solutions, road safety and health protection

At this year’s Techtextil, Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions will be presenting the trade audience with new applications, special processes and sustainable solutions focusing on the production of industrial textiles. Among other things, the company will be showcasing new technology for charging nonwovens that sets new standards with regards to quality and efficiency. Between June 21 and 24, the discussions will be concentrating on airbags, seat belts, tire cord, geotextiles, filter nonwovens and their diverse applications.

More polyester for airbags
Airbags have become an integral part of our everyday automotive lives. The yarns used in them are made predominantly from polyamide. As a result of increasingly diverse airbag applications and also the increasing size of the systems used, polyester is today used as well, depending on the application requirements and cost-benefit considerations. Against this background, the Oerlikon Barmag technologies make an invaluable contribution. In addition to high productivity and low energy consumption, they particularly excel in terms of their stable production processes. Furthermore, they comply with every high quality standard for airbags, which – as in the case of virtually all other textile products used in vehicle construction – must provide the highest level of safety for vehicle occupants. And all this without any loss of function in any climate and anywhere in the world for the lifetime of the vehicle.

Buckle up!
Seat belts play a decisive role in protecting vehicle occupants. They have to withstand tensile forces in excess of three tons and simultaneously stretch in a controlled manner in emergencies in order to reduce the load in the event of impact. A seat belt comprises approximately 300 filament yarns, whose individual, high-tenacity yarn threads are spun from around 100 individual filaments.

Invisible, but essential – road reinforcement using geotextiles
But it not just inside vehicles, but also under them, that industrial yarns reveal their strengths. Low stretch, ultra-high tenacity, high rigidity – industrial yarns offer outstanding properties for the demanding tasks carried out by geotextiles; for instance, as geogrids in the base course system under asphalt. Normally, geotextiles have extremely high yarn titers of up to 24,000 denier. Oerlikon Barmag system concepts simultaneously manufacture three filament yarns of 6,000 denier each. Due to the high spinning titers, fewer yarns can be plied together to the required geo-yarn titer in a more cost- and energy-efficient manner.

hycuTEC – technological quantum leap for filter media
In the case of its hycuTEC hydro-charging solution, Oerlikon Neumag offers a new technology for charging nonwovens that increases filter efficiency to more than 99.99%. For meltblown producers, this means material savings of 30% with significantly superior filter performance. For end users, the consequence is noticeably improved comfort resulting from significantly reduced breathing resistance. With its considerably lower water and energy consumption, this new development is also a future-proof, sustainable technology.

New high-tech Staple Fiber Technology Center
Extending to around 2,100 m2, Oerlikon Neumag in Neumünster is home to one of the world’s largest staple fiber technology centers. As of now, these state-of-the-art staple fiber technologies are also available for customer-specific trials.

The focus during the planning and the design of the Technology Center was on optimizing components and processes. Here, special attention was paid to ensuring the process and production parameters in the Technology Center system could be simply and reliably transferred to production systems. Here, the fiber tape processing line is modular in design. All components can be combined with each other as required. And comprehensive set-up options supply detailed findings for the respective process for various fiber products.

The Technology Center is also equipped with two spinning positions for mono- and bi-component processes. The same round spin packs are used for both processes, characterized by excellent fiber quality and properties and meanwhile very successfully deployed in all Oerlikon Neumag production systems. Furthermore, the spinning plant is complemented by automation solutions such as spin pack scraper robots, for example.

More information:
Oerlikon Neumag Techtextil
Source:

Oerlikon

Photo: Ralph Koch für Gebr. Otto
13.05.2022

Gebr. Otto with a specialised portfolio at Techtextil 2022

Gebr. Otto is exhibiting at this year’s Techtextil from 21 to 24 June in Frankfurt. The Dietenheim-based textile company manufactures a selected range of functional high-tech yarns made, for example, of conductive, high-strength and flame-retardant fibres. Gebr. Otto’s aim at the trade fair is to make personal contacts and to expand regional technology chains. The textile solution provider is to be found, as in past years, at the BW-I joint stand in Hall 12.1 at Booth No. C80.

Gebr. Otto is exhibiting at this year’s Techtextil from 21 to 24 June in Frankfurt. The Dietenheim-based textile company manufactures a selected range of functional high-tech yarns made, for example, of conductive, high-strength and flame-retardant fibres. Gebr. Otto’s aim at the trade fair is to make personal contacts and to expand regional technology chains. The textile solution provider is to be found, as in past years, at the BW-I joint stand in Hall 12.1 at Booth No. C80.

Growing demand for technical yarns
“In the industry Gebr. Otto is mostly known for its cotton yarns and twines,” says Robin Hefter, who is in charge of technical textiles at Gebr. Otto. Cotton is the fibre that is mainly spun in the company’s spinning mill. It has been Gebr. Otto’s main line of business for over 100 years. The technical yarns that have been in the company’s product range for a good five years are, by contrast, still relative newcomers. They account for around 10 per cent of the company’s output, their share of which is on the increase. “Technical textiles have proved to be a growth sector in recent years,” Hefter explains, “and due to current political events demand for them has increased even further.”

Portfolio with a protective character
That is a reference to personal protective equipment – clothing and gloves. Gebr. Otto’s highperformance functional yarns, many of which are based on high-tech fibres, are specially designed for use in this area. In addition to flame-retardant yarns made of meta-aramid Gebr. Otto processes antistatic or conductive fibres.

As a rule many chemical fibres are easily electrically chargeable without being able to discharge by themselves due to their low moisture absorption. That is why undesired discharges occur,
maybe even the next time you shake hands. In some situations, they can be life-threatening. “Imagine the team at a pit stop in a Formula 1 race,” Robin Hefter says. “refuelling a racing car
under pressure of time. There must not be a single spark, no matter how small.” That is why Gebr. Otto adds antistatic fibres to its technical yarns. They prevent electrostatic charging and
offer safety not only to pit stop teams but also to filling station attendants. If electric conductivity is required, conductive fibres are added. And high-strength fibres are used if high or ultra-high tensile strength is required.

Colour fastness rather than safety is required when it comes to spun-dyed yarns. The fibres take up the pigments more homogeneously than if they are dyed as yarn. They are much more colourfast and fade markedly less in sunlight because the pigment particles are better enclosed in the fibre.

Source:

Gebr. Otto Baumwollfeinzwirnerei GmbH + Co. KG

Oerlikon Barmag celebrates its 100th anniversary (c) Oerlikon Barmag
A look at the state-of-the-art assembly of a WINGS winder
30.03.2022

Oerlikon Barmag celebrates its 100th anniversary

  • Innovation begins with creativity
  • A pioneer of the manmade fiber industry

When the manmade fiber age began a century ago, a German company was responsible for the pioneering work involved. Barmag, established in 1922, was one of the world’s first companies to construct machines for the large-scale production of synthetic staple fibers. To this day, the leading manufacturer of manmade fiber spinning systems and texturing machines in Remscheid – a brand under the aegis of the Swiss Oerlikon Group since 2007 – has shaped technological progress in this sector; in future, with ever more innovations focusing on sustainability and digitalization.

  • Innovation begins with creativity
  • A pioneer of the manmade fiber industry

When the manmade fiber age began a century ago, a German company was responsible for the pioneering work involved. Barmag, established in 1922, was one of the world’s first companies to construct machines for the large-scale production of synthetic staple fibers. To this day, the leading manufacturer of manmade fiber spinning systems and texturing machines in Remscheid – a brand under the aegis of the Swiss Oerlikon Group since 2007 – has shaped technological progress in this sector; in future, with ever more innovations focusing on sustainability and digitalization.

Barmer Maschinenfabrik Aktiengesellschaft (Barmag) is founded in Barmen, located in the Bergische Land region, on March 27, 1922. The German and Dutch founders enter unchartered technological territory, one created as the result of a groundbreaking invention: in 1884, French chemist Count Hilaire Bernigaud de Chardonnet used nitrocellulose to produce the first so-called artificial silk, later known as rayon. The following decades see rapid development focusing on the search for synthetic textile fibers and their manufacturing technologies. As one of the first machine factories, Barmag battles its way through the eventful early years of the manmade fiber industry, the ‘Roaring Twenties’ and the Great Depression – and suffers the extensive destruction of its factories at the end of World War Two. Rebuilding is successful. With the unstoppable success story of purely synthetic plastic fibers such as polyamide, the company flourishes from the 1950s through to the 1970s, establishing sites in all international, for the textile industry at the time important, industrial regions and garnering prestige across the globe in the process. In the ups and downs of expansion, global competition and crises, Barmag reaches the very pinnacle of the market and becomes the preferred technological development partner for the manmade fiber industries in China, India and Turkey. The company has been a high-impact brand under the umbrella of the Oerlikon Group since 2007.

On the wings of innovation
Today, Oerlikon Barmag is a leading supplier of manmade fiber filament spinning systems and part of the Manmade Fibers Solutions business unit of the Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions Division. And our aspirations have not diminished: “The striving towards innovation and technological leadership has been, is and will always be part of our DNA”, emphasizes Georg Stausberg, CEO of Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions. In the past, this has been observable in such trailblazing innovations as the revolutionary WINGS generation of winders for POY in 2007 and WINGS for FDY in 2012. Currently, the focus of new and further developments is very much on digitalization and sustainability. Here, Oerlikon Barmag has – as one of the world’s first systems manufacturers – been implementing fully-networked smart factories for globally-leading polyester manufacturers since the end of the last decade. Within this context, digital solutions and automation are also helping to provide greater climate and environmental compatibility. This sustainability commitment is not only evidenced by the e-save label introduced for all products back in 2004: Oerlikon is endeavoring to also make all its sites carbon-neutral by 2030 and to acquire its energy exclusively from renewable sources. An ambitious target, whose achievement could be helped by the Oerlikon Barmag anniversary, states Georg Stausberg: “Innovation begins with creativity. And remembering the past provides plenty of motivation and inspiration for the future.”

24.03.2022

Polyester recycling: Thai Polyester ordered four VacuFil recycling systems from BB Engineering

BB Engineering GmbH (Germany), a subsidiary of Oerlikon Textile, is pleased to announce that Thai Polyester Co., Ltd (Thailand) has placed a major order for four VacuFil systems for recycling bottle flakes with connected direct spinning. The polyester manufacturer, established in 2001 and with an overall annual capacity of 316,800 tons, is one of Thailand’s leading producers and exclusively uses German technology. To this end, the company already operates Oerlikon Barmag and Oerlikon Neumag systems. The BB Engineer-ing VacuFil systems will be deployed to convert existing spinning plant equipment from processing polyester to processing PET bottle flakes without loss of performance.

BB Engineering GmbH (Germany), a subsidiary of Oerlikon Textile, is pleased to announce that Thai Polyester Co., Ltd (Thailand) has placed a major order for four VacuFil systems for recycling bottle flakes with connected direct spinning. The polyester manufacturer, established in 2001 and with an overall annual capacity of 316,800 tons, is one of Thailand’s leading producers and exclusively uses German technology. To this end, the company already operates Oerlikon Barmag and Oerlikon Neumag systems. The BB Engineer-ing VacuFil systems will be deployed to convert existing spinning plant equipment from processing polyester to processing PET bottle flakes without loss of performance.

BB Engineering supplies the complete recycling process – from the drying stage and extrusion, all the way through to the spinning plant-appropriate fine filtration stage. Thanks to decades of experi-ence in spinning plant technology, the German machine construc-tor also provides comprehensive spinning plant know-how and is aware of how the recycling process must be designed to ensure that the product manufactured using the spinning plant ultimately has the right quality. The four new VacuFil systems will be integrated into the existing building infrastructure and process landscape at Thai Polyester, with a total output of approx. 4,000 kg/h. The Vacu-Fil systems will be complemented by BB Engineering 3DD mixers for directly feeding dyes into the recycled melt flow. Commissioning has been scheduled for 2023.

Thai Polyester will be using the new VacuFil systems to manufac-ture its ‘EcoTPC’ recycling-brand yarns. 100% of these polyester yarns are produced from bottle, fiber and yarn waste and are all GRS certified.

Source:

BB Engineering