From the Sector

Reset
16 results
TEXHIBITION Istanbul Fabric and Textil Accessories Fair
Texhibition 2022
30.03.2022

TEXHIBITION Istanbul Fabric and Textil Accessories Fair

  • March 16-18, 2022, Istanbul Expo Center
  • Successful start of Texhibition, Istanbul Fabric and Textile Accessories Fair with over 10,000 visitors from 63 countries
  • More than 160 exhibitors presented fabrics, yarns and accessories on approx. 5,000 square meters in the Istanbul Expo Center
  • Intensive order activity in a professional trade fair atmosphere of over 1billion US$
  • The organizer's objective: to double the area and number of exhibitors for the second event in September

With over 10,000 visitors, the premiere event of Texhibition Istanbul Fabric and Textile Accessories Fair, organized by the Istanbul Textile and Raw Materials Exporters' Association (ITHIB) and the Istanbul Chamber of Commerce (ITO) from March 16th to 18th, 2022 has successfully started.

  • March 16-18, 2022, Istanbul Expo Center
  • Successful start of Texhibition, Istanbul Fabric and Textile Accessories Fair with over 10,000 visitors from 63 countries
  • More than 160 exhibitors presented fabrics, yarns and accessories on approx. 5,000 square meters in the Istanbul Expo Center
  • Intensive order activity in a professional trade fair atmosphere of over 1billion US$
  • The organizer's objective: to double the area and number of exhibitors for the second event in September

With over 10,000 visitors, the premiere event of Texhibition Istanbul Fabric and Textile Accessories Fair, organized by the Istanbul Textile and Raw Materials Exporters' Association (ITHIB) and the Istanbul Chamber of Commerce (ITO) from March 16th to 18th, 2022 has successfully started.

İTHİB President Ahmet Öksüz: "Our exhibition platforms Texhibition Istanbul Fabric and Textile Accessories Fair and IFCO, Istanbul Fashion Connection, which was launched by our sister association IHKIB in February, play an important role in making Istanbul the fashion center of the Turkish textile and clothing industry. For the follow-up event to Texhibition in September this year, we expect the number of exhibitors and space to double."

The consistently positive feedback from the exhibitors underscores this expectation, as does the great interest shown by international visitors, including those from Denmark, Germany, France, Italy, the Netherlands and the UK.

The Turkish textile industry started with an export target of US$ 15 billion in 2022. The exhibition organizers assume that their platforms will contribute US$ 1 billion. Turkey is one of the most important procurement markets for the European textile industry and is becoming even more important in the course of the global supply chain problem and is now one of the top 3 most interesting procurement locations with its low prices, good quality products, reliable suppliers and short delivery times.

Exhibitors
On offer were high-quality and innovative fabrics from the weaving sector, including Kipaş Textiles, BTD Textile, Özdoku, Bossa and Yünsa; knitters like Gülle, Saka, Örkumod or İskur showed their current collections; yarn market leaders such as Korteks, Tepa and Gama were present, as were Şimşek Ege, EMR Zippers, Çağ-Tek and Öz-El Lastik for the accessories sector. A total of 166 exhibiting companies presented themselves in clearly structured segments in a professional trade fair atmosphere.

Frame program
In the Texhibition Forum, experts discussed the topics Sustainability, New Trends, Supply Chain and GMO-Free Cotton giving an outlook on the upcoming trends and developments in the Turkish textile industry. All events were heavily frequented by visitors.

Next Texhibition September 21-23, 2022

02.03.2022

EURATEX asks EU to control the rise in oil and gas prices

Statement
Notwithstanding the industry support to the sanctions in place against Russia, EURATEX highlights that companies are at risk of stopping their production if energy and gas prices continue to rise.

The energy crisis that started at the end of last year has been worsening in the last week. Prices of energy, gas and oil has been skyrocketing. According to Reuters, Benchmark European gas prices at the Dutch TTF hub rose by 330% last year, while benchmark German and French power contracts have more than doubled.

The textile and clothing industry is facing an unprecedented situation. Many companies are considering shutting down production because of energy costs.

Statement
Notwithstanding the industry support to the sanctions in place against Russia, EURATEX highlights that companies are at risk of stopping their production if energy and gas prices continue to rise.

The energy crisis that started at the end of last year has been worsening in the last week. Prices of energy, gas and oil has been skyrocketing. According to Reuters, Benchmark European gas prices at the Dutch TTF hub rose by 330% last year, while benchmark German and French power contracts have more than doubled.

The textile and clothing industry is facing an unprecedented situation. Many companies are considering shutting down production because of energy costs.

EURATEX supports the measures taken by the EU in the Ukrainian-Russian conflict, but asks the European Union and Members States to compensate the situation by supporting their industries. Companies need access to energy at reasonable prices, may those be subsidies, removing environmental levies or VAT from bills and price caps. The transfer to renewable and cleaner sources of energy needs to speed up, so to guarantee less dependency. But it is a long process that cannot be achieved in the forthcoming months. That’s why Europe should urgently look at the available options to control such market shocks.

01.02.2022

EURATEX: High energy costs undermine crucial transformation of the textile and clothing industry

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

  1. The apparel and textile industry needs a safe supply with sufficient green energy (electricity and gas) at internationally competitive prices.
  2. The transformation of industry requires access to very significant amounts of renewable energy at competitive costs. Additional investments in infrastructure will also be needed to guarantee access to new renewable energy supplies.
  3. Until a global (or at least G 20 level) carbon price or other means for a global level playing field in climate protection are implemented, competitive prices for green energy must be granted at European or national levels (e.g. CCfDs, reduction on levies, targeted subsidies).
  4. As the European textile and clothing sector faces global competition mainly form countries/regions with less stringent climate ambitions, it is of utmost importance that the European textile and clothing companies are prevented form direct and indirect carbon leakage.
  5. EU-policy should support solutions, e.g. through targeted subsidies (for hydrogen, energy grids, R&D, technology roadmap studies etc.).
  6. A dedicated approach for SMEs might be appropriate as SMEs do not have the skills/know-how to further improve their energy efficiency and/or becoming carbon neutral.
  7. CAPEX and OPEX support will be necessary for breakthrough technologies, like hydrogen.
  8. The Fit-for-55-Package must support the European Textile and Clothing industry in decarbonization and carbon neutrality. The EU must therefore advocate a global level playing field more than before. The primary goal must be to establish an internationally uniform, binding CO2 pricing, preferably in the form of a standard at G-7 / G-20 level.
  9. EU-policy must not hinder solutions, e.g. we need reasonable state aid rules (compensating the gap between national energy or climate levies and a globally competitive energy price should not be seen as a subsidy).
  10. The European Textile and Clothing industry has made use of economically viable potentials to continuously improve energy efficiency over many years and decades. The obligation to implement further measures must be taken considering investment cycles that are in line with practice. Attention must be paid to the proportionality of costs without weakening the competitive position in the EU internal market or with competitors outside the EU.

Please see the attached position paper for more information.

Source:

EURATEX

28.01.2022

Jamé: A fluid-wear collection made with Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei

Jamé’s concept.   
Jamé is inspired by the ancient Pay-Jamé: a piece of clothing that a woman or a man used to wear for fluid wellbeing 24/7 regardless of the activity, or the location, or duration time it is needed for. It’s a comfy refined outfit to make people feel free.

Jamè’s values.
Jamé is designed and made in Italy, digitally printed and created to deliver wellness, style, and 24/7 comfort.  
Jamé’s fabric of choice is Bemberg™, a textile that gives Jamé the highest contemporary qualities: Jamé garments are cool in summer, warm in winter, perfect all year round, fashionable, trendy and versatile. The ideal companion for everyday activities, Jamé is perfect for both indoors and outdoors, the perfect outfit for every occasion, day or night.

Jamé’s concept.   
Jamé is inspired by the ancient Pay-Jamé: a piece of clothing that a woman or a man used to wear for fluid wellbeing 24/7 regardless of the activity, or the location, or duration time it is needed for. It’s a comfy refined outfit to make people feel free.

Jamè’s values.
Jamé is designed and made in Italy, digitally printed and created to deliver wellness, style, and 24/7 comfort.  
Jamé’s fabric of choice is Bemberg™, a textile that gives Jamé the highest contemporary qualities: Jamé garments are cool in summer, warm in winter, perfect all year round, fashionable, trendy and versatile. The ideal companion for everyday activities, Jamé is perfect for both indoors and outdoors, the perfect outfit for every occasion, day or night.

Environmental responsibility.
Every Jamé clothing is 100% recyclable and manufactured following a very contemporary and responsible made-to-order business model. The latest and greatest digital print technology assures us to avoid waste and over-production.
This means endless customization possibilities, creating a long lasting, high-quality product.

Styling.
Thanks to the expertise and knowledge of its founders Patrizia Marforio and Niccolò Zucchi Frua, Jamé’s vision is deeply rooted in the Italian design and textile tradition.
Jamé's historic archive - made up of more than 17.000 different textures from the 1920s to present day - seamlessly translating into the widest and deepest pattern choice in this one-of-a-kind collection.

Jamé’s fabric of choice:
Bemberg™ is the name of a technologically advanced fiber produced by Asahi Kasei. Bemberg™ is based on regenerated cellulose fiber made from the smart tech transformation of cotton linters.
As a pre-consumer material obtained from the manufacturing process of cotton seeds oil that is converted into fiber through a traceable and transparent closed loop process, Bemberg™ DNA is deeply based on a circular economy approach.
Bemberg™ is gentle on the skin, with amazing touch and exceptional moisture management properties: it quickly absorbs and releases moisture through very small waterways, keeping the wearer cool, fresh, and comfortable at any time of the year.

22.10.2021

VDMA Textile Machinery publishes position paper

In a position paper published on 22 October 2021, the companies organised in the VDMA Textile Machinery Association welcome the ambitions of the EU to promote climate protection, in particular the approach of combining the goals for the EU textile and clothing industry into a sector-specific strategy.

Up to now, the increasing textile consumption around the world, due to growing population and purchasing power has been accompanied by a rising use of resources. “The textile machinery companies organised in the VDMA are geared towards a functioning circular economy. With our highly efficient technologies we are an indispensable partner in this transition process”, explained Regina Brückner, Chairwoman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Associate of Brückner Trockentechnik.  

In a position paper published on 22 October 2021, the companies organised in the VDMA Textile Machinery Association welcome the ambitions of the EU to promote climate protection, in particular the approach of combining the goals for the EU textile and clothing industry into a sector-specific strategy.

Up to now, the increasing textile consumption around the world, due to growing population and purchasing power has been accompanied by a rising use of resources. “The textile machinery companies organised in the VDMA are geared towards a functioning circular economy. With our highly efficient technologies we are an indispensable partner in this transition process”, explained Regina Brückner, Chairwoman of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association and Managing Associate of Brückner Trockentechnik.  

In the new position paper, the executive board of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association emphasises that the new framework must be practicable. Ms Brückner said: “The EU must strike the right balance between necessary, yet also minimal, legislative regulation. A successful transition requires a level playing field which sets out fair rules for sustainability, thereby enabling European companies to nonetheless increase their international competitiveness.”

You can find the complete position paper in the attachment.

Source:

VDMA e. V

(c) Asahi Kasei
20.10.2021

ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei Advance launches its FW 22/23 fabric collection

For its FW 22/23 collection, ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei Advance presents a high-tech fabric collection, which implements a new generation of values, with the aim of keeping nature, body and mind in harmony.

The whole collection is focused on advanced technology and environmental responsibility. Thanks to ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei Advance’s unique value-chain based on recycling technology, most part of its yarns are certified by the renowned GRS (Global Recycled Standard). Even the dyeing and finishing phases - key moments for  performance wear - have been certified by international labels such as bluesign® and OEKO-TEX® Standard 100.

The collection is composed of 7 outerwear fabric, 22 sportswear fabrics and 7 innerwear fabrics.

For its FW 22/23 collection, ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei Advance presents a high-tech fabric collection, which implements a new generation of values, with the aim of keeping nature, body and mind in harmony.

The whole collection is focused on advanced technology and environmental responsibility. Thanks to ECOSENSOR™ by Asahi Kasei Advance’s unique value-chain based on recycling technology, most part of its yarns are certified by the renowned GRS (Global Recycled Standard). Even the dyeing and finishing phases - key moments for  performance wear - have been certified by international labels such as bluesign® and OEKO-TEX® Standard 100.

The collection is composed of 7 outerwear fabric, 22 sportswear fabrics and 7 innerwear fabrics.

Among the compositions of the fabrics, dominant are the recycled polyamide (58%) and polyester (39%) yarns. The stretch component present in 22 articles of the collection is based on ROICA™ EF by Asahi Kasei - the sustainable recycled stretch yarn made from pre-consumer waste. In addition, 8 fabrics of the FW22/23 collection are made of Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei - the high-tech yarn born from the transformation of cotton linters through a fully circular, transparent and traceable process with an amazing precious hand, optimal moisture management characteristics,  whose end of life guarantees its biodegradability and it also carries GRS certification.

Source:

Asahi Kasei / GB Network

(c) Euratex
EU-27 Textile & Clothing Turnover
12.10.2021

EURATEX: Latest economic data confirm further recovery of the textile and clothing industry

European Textiles and Clothing (T&C) industry coming out of the Covid19-crisis, but facing new challenges ahead. This recovery may however be disrupted by the current supply chain and energy problems. Latest economic data on the European T&C industry confirm further recovery from the corona pandemic. The textile activity has now surpassed its pre-pandemic level from Q4 2019 (+3.6%); the clothing sector still remains 11.5% below, but continues to improve.

European Textiles and Clothing (T&C) industry coming out of the Covid19-crisis, but facing new challenges ahead. This recovery may however be disrupted by the current supply chain and energy problems. Latest economic data on the European T&C industry confirm further recovery from the corona pandemic. The textile activity has now surpassed its pre-pandemic level from Q4 2019 (+3.6%); the clothing sector still remains 11.5% below, but continues to improve.

In quarter-on-quarter terms, the EU turnover showed signs of improvements across the sector. The textile turnover increased by +3.3% in Q2 2021, after slightly contracting in Q1 2021. Similarly, the business activity in the clothing sector expanded by +7% in Q2 2021, after increasing by +1% in the previous quarter.
 
In the 2nd quarter 2021, the EU-27 trade balance for T&C improved, resulting mostly from an increase of export sales across third markets and a drop of textile imports. T&C Extra-EU exports boomed by +49% as compared with the same quarter of the previous year. T&C Extra-EU imports went down by -26% as compared with the same quarter of the previous year, following a decrease of imports from some main supplier countries. EU imports from China and the UK collapsed due to a combination of Brexit and weaker demand in Europe.
 
During the second quarter of 2021, job creation was slowly stabilising in the textile industry (-0.2% q-o-q), while employment in the clothing sector continued to be affected by lower levels of production activity in industry during the first part of the year (-1.2%). When compared to its pre-pandemic level in Q4 2019, EU employment in Q2 2021 was still 4.4% down in textiles and 11.8% down in clothing.

However, this fragile recovery is hampered by higher shipping costs and prices’ increase in raw materials and energy. The cost of energy, in particular gas, has increased more than 3 times since the beginning of this year. Since the announcement of the EU’s “Fit for 55” package, we have seen CO2 prices rising above €60. This inevitably has an impact on the industry’s competitiveness, especially in a global context. The future recovery is also threatened by some factors limiting production, such as shortage of labour force and equipment, which are putting additional pressure on T&C industries.

Director General Dirk Vantyghem commented on these latest figures: “Our companies have shown great resilience during the pandemic, and their latest export performance is an encouraging sign of recovery. This recovery may however be disrupted by the current supply chain and energy problems. Once again, recent developments show that this transition towards more sustainable production can only work if organised in a global context, avoiding carbon leakage and with an effective level playing field. This must be considered in the upcoming EU Textiles Strategy.”

More information:
Euratex
Source:

Euratex

LOVE HERO uses Kornit Digital for sustainable Fashion (c) Kornit Digital Europe GmbH / LOVE HERO
17.09.2021

LOVE HERO uses Kornit Digital for sustainable Fashion

Kornit Digital announced that the London-based LOVE HERO fashion label uses Kornit’s sustainable, digitized, on-demand production capabilities to deliver its complete line of nature-themed apparel.

All fabrics are traceable and certified via their blockchain platform, Retraced, to minimize their eco footprint. Cut-and-sew operations take place in Portugal.

LOVE HERO is currently engaged with Kornit on the mechanics of imprinting silk, biodegradable nylon, and other diverse materials. One such application involves two-sided fabrics—nylon on top, with cotton on the reverse.

“Kornit is committed to becoming the operating system for sustainable fashion fulfillment, on demand,” says Chris Govier, KDEU Managing Director. “With visionary creators like Joshua and LOVE HERO ready to test the bounds of our design and color capabilities, and our growing network of digitized producers ready to make those visions tangible with speed, economy, and quality from all corners of the globe, we’re changing the public percetion of what digital can do—meeting the global sustainability imperative, without demanding compromise from any actor in that value chain.”

Kornit Digital announced that the London-based LOVE HERO fashion label uses Kornit’s sustainable, digitized, on-demand production capabilities to deliver its complete line of nature-themed apparel.

All fabrics are traceable and certified via their blockchain platform, Retraced, to minimize their eco footprint. Cut-and-sew operations take place in Portugal.

LOVE HERO is currently engaged with Kornit on the mechanics of imprinting silk, biodegradable nylon, and other diverse materials. One such application involves two-sided fabrics—nylon on top, with cotton on the reverse.

“Kornit is committed to becoming the operating system for sustainable fashion fulfillment, on demand,” says Chris Govier, KDEU Managing Director. “With visionary creators like Joshua and LOVE HERO ready to test the bounds of our design and color capabilities, and our growing network of digitized producers ready to make those visions tangible with speed, economy, and quality from all corners of the globe, we’re changing the public percetion of what digital can do—meeting the global sustainability imperative, without demanding compromise from any actor in that value chain.”

Source:

Kornit Digital Europe GmbH / pr4u

15.09.2021

REACH4Textiles: Better market surveillance for textile products

The REACH4texiles project just kicked off. Funded by the European Commission, it aims at exploring solutions for fair and effective market surveillance on textile products.

Every year, about 28 billion of garments circulate across Europe, 80% of which are imported from outside the EU and its jurisdiction.
 
Inevitably, such huge volumes pose enormous challenges for market surveillance authorities which are called to ensure that uncompliant dangerous products are kept away from the EU citizens.

The European Union has the world most comprehensive chemical legislation which is set to protect consumers, the environment and, theoretically, even the competitiveness  of the business.

Such EU chemical legislation evolves constantly, increasing scope and ambition. New restrictions impact authorities and sectors like the European textile value chain and generate new costs for all actors.

Evidence suggests that such advanced regulatory framework is not completed with an equally advanced or effective EU-wide control system capable of ensuring compliance, especially in the case of imported products.

The REACH4texiles project just kicked off. Funded by the European Commission, it aims at exploring solutions for fair and effective market surveillance on textile products.

Every year, about 28 billion of garments circulate across Europe, 80% of which are imported from outside the EU and its jurisdiction.
 
Inevitably, such huge volumes pose enormous challenges for market surveillance authorities which are called to ensure that uncompliant dangerous products are kept away from the EU citizens.

The European Union has the world most comprehensive chemical legislation which is set to protect consumers, the environment and, theoretically, even the competitiveness  of the business.

Such EU chemical legislation evolves constantly, increasing scope and ambition. New restrictions impact authorities and sectors like the European textile value chain and generate new costs for all actors.

Evidence suggests that such advanced regulatory framework is not completed with an equally advanced or effective EU-wide control system capable of ensuring compliance, especially in the case of imported products.

The REACH4texiles project aims at exploring solutions for fair and effective market surveillance on textile products; it pools together the key actors to address three objectives:

  • Keep non-compliant products away from the single market.
  • Increase skills and knowledge.
  • Support a Network addressing chemicals in textiles and applying the EU regulation 2019/1020

The 2 years project will share best practices, identify efficient approaches against non-compliant products, offer training and support for a more effective surveillance and for level playing field.

The project welcomes collaboration with concerned authorities across the EU Member States.

Details:

A well-functioning EU market surveillance system is an essential prerequisite to protect citizen, the environment and competitiveness of responsible business. When it comes to textiles, the broad range of products, the large set of REACH subjected chemicals used in textiles as well as industrial strategies like fast fashion make this a challenging task.

Challenges may include lack of resources, difficulties in identifying higher risk products, cost and management of chemical tests, lack of test methods and knowledge of best practices. These challenges are yet likely to increase with the upcoming REACH restrictions and the growth of e-commerce.

Because of this, products that do not comply with REACH regulations encounter today little or no barriers to enter the market. This creates not only a health risk for Europeans but also undermines the competitivity of responsible businesses that take all necessary measures to comply with these regulations.

Addressing the challenges requires more knowledge at market surveillance and stronger collaboration between these authorities, the textile and clothing industry and testing laboratories. More knowledge about the identification of risk baring textile products and REACH chemicals likely to be used in these products, suitable test methods and strategies such as fast screening on REACH chemicals, trustworthiness of labels, etc can increase the effectiveness of market surveillance considerably.

The REACH4Textiles first objective (keep non-compliant products away from the EU Market) will be pursued by increasing knowledge on market surveillance functioning by and working on a risk-based approach to identify products at higher risk.

The second objective supports a network to address the specificities of chemicals in textiles with market surveillance authorities and involving other relevant stakeholders. The third objective focuses on sharing knowledge with market surveillance actors on textile products and suitable test methodologies.

Supported by the European Commission DG Growth, the project team is coordinated by the Belgian test and research center Centexbel and include the European Textiles and Apparel industry confederation, EURATEX, the German national textile and fashion association Textile und Mode, t+m, the Italian association Tessile e Salute. Several other European industry associations and national authorities are welcomed to become involved through the project activities.   

More information:
Euratex market surveillance Import
Source:

Euratex

27.07.2021

Nastrificio di Cassano: Responsible and certified labels and tags

100% sustainability lives in the smallest detail, starting with the label, the element that can tell the story of responsibility. This is why Nastrificio di Cassano has created NDC Green, Made in Italy and fully traceable range that guarantees high quality standards while respecting the planet.
 
NDC Green comprises 4 categories:

100% sustainability lives in the smallest detail, starting with the label, the element that can tell the story of responsibility. This is why Nastrificio di Cassano has created NDC Green, Made in Italy and fully traceable range that guarantees high quality standards while respecting the planet.
 
NDC Green comprises 4 categories:

  • LABìO ECO-SOFT®: made using TENCEL™ lyocell  yarn which is compostable and biodegradable (as attested by TUV Austria), this product boasts performances and is resistant up to 10 domestic washings at 30°. The reference is produced with fifteen times less water consumption than cotton production and the resins used are GOTS certified.
  • LABìO HANGreen is the smart solution for the creation of hard tags, hangtags, shopping bags and garment covers and, as LABIO ECO-SOFT® range, it’s made with  compostable and biodegradable TENCEL™ lyocell yarn and the resin is compostable, too. These peculiarities make this product unique.
  • ACETATE NAIA™, the 'smart satin' that respects forests and oceans, is the NAIA™ single-ingredient solution produced by Eastman: the 100% traceable, compostable and biodegradable cellulose yarn in both soil and sea respects the natural growth rate of forests.
  • RECYCLED POLYESTER: is made from post-consumer yarn recycled from GRS-certified PET bottles. Available in both satin and resinated taffeta versions, it guarantees excellent printability for an elegant and sophisticated look
Checkpoint Systems: Research Report „Utilising RFID in Retailing: Insights on Innovation“ (c) Checkpoint Systems GmbH
25.06.2021

Checkpoint Systems: Research Report „Utilising RFID in Retailing: Insights on Innovation“

A research report released today has revealed the innovative new ways retailers are using RFID technology in-store to improve profitability. Authored by Emeritus Professor Adrian Beck from the University of Leicester and the ECR Retail Loss Group and supported by Checkpoint Systems, Utilising RFID in Retailing: Insights on Innovationhighlights how companies are employing the technology for a broader range of purposes. It demonstrates the value the technology is bringing to their businesses and ultimately, the impact it is delivering to their bottom line. Crucially, it also shows thatmore retailers than ever are recognizing the benefits of RFID and driving uptake within their organisations. The report claims that as businesses are becoming more established in their use of RFID-generated data, they are gradually incorporating more usecases into their business-as-usual practices.

The report claims that as businesses are becoming more established in their use of RFID-generated data, they are gradually incorporating more usecases into their business-as-usual practices.

A research report released today has revealed the innovative new ways retailers are using RFID technology in-store to improve profitability. Authored by Emeritus Professor Adrian Beck from the University of Leicester and the ECR Retail Loss Group and supported by Checkpoint Systems, Utilising RFID in Retailing: Insights on Innovationhighlights how companies are employing the technology for a broader range of purposes. It demonstrates the value the technology is bringing to their businesses and ultimately, the impact it is delivering to their bottom line. Crucially, it also shows thatmore retailers than ever are recognizing the benefits of RFID and driving uptake within their organisations. The report claims that as businesses are becoming more established in their use of RFID-generated data, they are gradually incorporating more usecases into their business-as-usual practices.

The report claims that as businesses are becoming more established in their use of RFID-generated data, they are gradually incorporating more usecases into their business-as-usual practices.

In particular, more and more retailers reported using RFID to streamline the audit process (as an alternative to infrequent organisational stock takes), which not only delivers considerable cost savings, but also provides more regular insights into the status of inventories. It also found that using RFID was having a significant impact on store processes. While RFID has always been key to inventory accuracy, some companies are now using this data to further improve business activities such as reducing phantom out of stocks, improving rapid stock search and find tasks and developing an efficient ship from store (SFS) capability.

Beyond the more traditional retail model, RFID was seen as a key facilitator in delivering omnichannel retailing by all those questioned. Without the inventory accuracy offered by RFID, few retailers believed they could reliably use their stores as fulfilment centres to output online orders. Indeed, one retailer admitted to only making RFID-enabled store stock available for this purpose. The use of RFID to improve online order accuracy is also becoming more commonplace, to reduce errors in the picking and packing process, therefore improving customer satisfaction. One retailer reported a 90% reduction in incorrect orders and customer complaints since introducing RFID into the process.

Looking to the future, one area where the benefits of RFID are starting to be tested is self-checkouts (SCO). While currently limited due to the need to have a 100% SKU tagging strategy in place, retailers are starting to recognize the benefits the technology could offer including increased speed of checkout, reduced likelihood of double scanning and thereby improved customer service. Another area where retailers also reported reaping the benefits of RFID was loss prevention. While none of those interviewed argued that reducing loss was the primary reason for investing in RFID, many acknowledged they were benefiting from it by using the technology to tackle refund frauds, enable dynamic loss product profiling, manage e-frauds and identify stolen products.

Source:

Checkpoint Systems GmbH / Carta GmbH

15.06.2021

EURATEX Statement on the EU-US Summit

The European textile and apparel industry welcomes the organisation of the EU-US Summit in Brussels, and hopes that political leaders will launch a new era of closer cooperation across the Atlantic. Both the Covid19 pandemic and recent geopolitical tensions call for global solutions; the EU and the US should take a leadership role in developing that new global framework.

EU-US trade in textiles and apparel have dropped by nearly 20% in 2020 (just under €6 bln), while imports from other countries, in particular China, have increased spectacularly (+45% into the EU). At the same time, global supply chains came under pressure, and access to certain raw materials for the industry became difficult and costly.

Against this background, EURATEX does not call for protectionism, but a better functioning of global supply chains, with common rules which are applied by all. The EU and US authorities should put their full influence to establish a level playing field for our industry across the globe, promoting environmental and social standards. Sustainable and circular textiles should become the norm, thus contributing to a greener planet and creating high quality jobs.  

The European textile and apparel industry welcomes the organisation of the EU-US Summit in Brussels, and hopes that political leaders will launch a new era of closer cooperation across the Atlantic. Both the Covid19 pandemic and recent geopolitical tensions call for global solutions; the EU and the US should take a leadership role in developing that new global framework.

EU-US trade in textiles and apparel have dropped by nearly 20% in 2020 (just under €6 bln), while imports from other countries, in particular China, have increased spectacularly (+45% into the EU). At the same time, global supply chains came under pressure, and access to certain raw materials for the industry became difficult and costly.

Against this background, EURATEX does not call for protectionism, but a better functioning of global supply chains, with common rules which are applied by all. The EU and US authorities should put their full influence to establish a level playing field for our industry across the globe, promoting environmental and social standards. Sustainable and circular textiles should become the norm, thus contributing to a greener planet and creating high quality jobs.  

At bilateral level, the EU and US should resume their work on mutual recognition of standards and certification procedures, thus saving considerable costs for our companies while maintaining the highest safety standards. Custom procedures can be simplified on both sides, and joint research, e.g. in smart textiles, should be promoted.

EURATEX welcomes the recent progress in provisionally eliminating additional duties on several American and European products due to the Airbus-Boeing trade dispute. It is a very positive sign that EURATEX would like to highlight in a particularly difficult context for the textile and clothing industry at European, American and even global levels. EURATEX calls on both US and EU institutions to eliminate such duties permanently and build on a common positive agenda for the benefit of EU and US companies and consumers.

EURATEX Director General Dirk Vantyghem commented: "Both the EU and US are developing a new business model for their industry. We should make sure these models can complement and reinforce each other. If not, we risk losing global leadership, not just in terms of market share but also in terms of values and standards."

09.06.2021

EURATEX calls for an effective EU Industrial strategy

On the occasion of releasing its 2021 Spring Report, EURATEX calls the European Institutions to implement a new Industrial Strategy which will effectively support the European textiles industry. EURATEX welcomes the fact that Textile and Clothing industry is recognised as one of the 14 essential ecosystems of the European economy, but we need to take effective measures to support these sectors, and take into consideration the global dimension.

On the occasion of releasing its 2021 Spring Report, EURATEX calls the European Institutions to implement a new Industrial Strategy which will effectively support the European textiles industry. EURATEX welcomes the fact that Textile and Clothing industry is recognised as one of the 14 essential ecosystems of the European economy, but we need to take effective measures to support these sectors, and take into consideration the global dimension.

Economic data for 2020 in EURATEX Spring Report show preoccupying trends. Figures reflect a dramatic contraction in demand and production: EU turnover contracted by -9.3% in textiles (which is in line with the general manufacturing average) and by -17.7% in clothing, compared with 2019. Furthermore, supply chain disruptions and substantial price increases of some raw materials are putting significant pressure on the T&C industries across Europe. The trade deficit for European textiles and clothing jumped from € -47 bln in 2019 to € -62 bln in 2020, an increase of more than 30%, which is almost entirely due to the import of Chinese face masks and related products. Fortunately, more recent figures from the 1st quarter of 2021 indicate some signs of recovery.

That figure illustrates very well today’s political discussions on the future of the European industry. Many European companies have made considerable efforts to adapt their production to the pandemic, but clearly this was not enough. Whether the production cost in Europe is too high or the EU should adapt its procurement rules, the industry needs have a coherent long-term plan to become more competitive and conquer new markets.

EURATEX General Assembly highlighted the critical role of the new EU Industrial Strategy. The inclusion of textiles and clothing in the fourteen ecosystems is a step in the right direction to consolidate the industrial base but we should look also at the global challenges. European companies should continue investing in innovation, design and quality, in combination with a structural move towards more sustainable textiles. At the same time, the EU should create an environment - both inside the Single Market and globally - where everybody plays by the same rules.

Source:

Euratex

EURATEX and IAF conventions take place from 7 to 9 November 2021 (c) EURATEX
31.05.2021

EURATEX and IAF conventions take place from 7 to 9 November 2021

From 7 to 9 November 2021, the world of apparel and textiles will meet in Antwerp, Belgium, for a double convention: the 36th World Fashion Convention on 7-8 November, hosted by IAF, and the 9th European Textiles and Apparel Convention on 8-9 November, hosted by EURATEX.

Delegates can choose to register for the IAF’s 36th World Fashion Convention, for EURATEX’s 9th European Textiles and Apparel Convention or for a combination of both, which the organisers of course recommend. The IAF Convention, carrying the theme ‘Transition of the Global Fashion System’ focusses on global industry developments whereas the EURATEX convention, themed “A new paradigm for the European Textiles and Clothing Industry”, has a strong European focus. Therefore, the two conventions are perfectly complementary.

The Antwerp Convention will be the first ‘live’ meeting for the industry in nearly two years’ time. That’s why the convention will combine knowledge with social events, notably the IAF and EURATEX joint networking dinner on 8 November in the Antwerp Fashion Museum.

From 7 to 9 November 2021, the world of apparel and textiles will meet in Antwerp, Belgium, for a double convention: the 36th World Fashion Convention on 7-8 November, hosted by IAF, and the 9th European Textiles and Apparel Convention on 8-9 November, hosted by EURATEX.

Delegates can choose to register for the IAF’s 36th World Fashion Convention, for EURATEX’s 9th European Textiles and Apparel Convention or for a combination of both, which the organisers of course recommend. The IAF Convention, carrying the theme ‘Transition of the Global Fashion System’ focusses on global industry developments whereas the EURATEX convention, themed “A new paradigm for the European Textiles and Clothing Industry”, has a strong European focus. Therefore, the two conventions are perfectly complementary.

The Antwerp Convention will be the first ‘live’ meeting for the industry in nearly two years’ time. That’s why the convention will combine knowledge with social events, notably the IAF and EURATEX joint networking dinner on 8 November in the Antwerp Fashion Museum.

Previous speakers at the EURATEX and IAF conventions came from PVH, Hugo Boss, Zegna, as well as European Commission, McKinsey, OECD, and London College of Fashion. About 150 delegates at each event, from over 20 countries are expected.

For more information click here.

Source:

EURATEX

ANDRITZ receives order for a new batt forming line for stitchbonding from Pratrivero, Italy (c) ANDRITZ
ANDRITZ eXcelle crosslapper
17.05.2021

ANDRITZ receives order for a new batt forming line for stitchbonding from Pratrivero, Italy

International technology Group ANDRITZ has received an order from Pratrivero s.p.a. to supply a new eXcelle batt forming line for their production facilities in Valdilana, Italy. The line will be dedicated to the production of Maliwatt products, used in furnishing, automotive, naval, medical, geotextiles, advertising, clothing, and packaging applications. Installation and start-up are scheduled for the third quarter of 2021.

The ANDRITZ batt forming line includes an eXcelle card and eXcelle crosslapper, a ProDyn™ web profiling correction system as well as a scanning gauge with a closed loop. The ProDyn system combines actions from the card doffers with dynamic speed variation at the crosslapper. This will result in substantial fiber savings and reduction in CV%, providing improved weight evenness in the final product. The ProDyn closed loop will ensure the best possible self-regulation for the equipment and thus enable Pratrivero to produce one of the best product qualities on the market. Pratrivero will be the world’s first company to use the ProDyn technology in the Maliwatt stitchbonding process.

International technology Group ANDRITZ has received an order from Pratrivero s.p.a. to supply a new eXcelle batt forming line for their production facilities in Valdilana, Italy. The line will be dedicated to the production of Maliwatt products, used in furnishing, automotive, naval, medical, geotextiles, advertising, clothing, and packaging applications. Installation and start-up are scheduled for the third quarter of 2021.

The ANDRITZ batt forming line includes an eXcelle card and eXcelle crosslapper, a ProDyn™ web profiling correction system as well as a scanning gauge with a closed loop. The ProDyn system combines actions from the card doffers with dynamic speed variation at the crosslapper. This will result in substantial fiber savings and reduction in CV%, providing improved weight evenness in the final product. The ProDyn closed loop will ensure the best possible self-regulation for the equipment and thus enable Pratrivero to produce one of the best product qualities on the market. Pratrivero will be the world’s first company to use the ProDyn technology in the Maliwatt stitchbonding process.

Stitchbond is a nonwoven process made by mechanically interlocking fiber webs with continuous filaments, thus imitating textiles. Stitchbonded products are used in many applications due to their lower production costs compared to woven textiles. Among all the different nonwoven processes in which it operates, ANDRITZ is also a market-leading supplier of batt forming equipment for the stitchbonding processes producing Maliwatt, Malivlies and quilting.

Pratrivero is an important player in the production of nonwoven fabrics using stitchbonding technology.

06.05.2021

PERFORMANCE DAYS Fair with Topic: Still Physical – Your Success Story of 2020

Contact restrictions, home office and altered daily lives – our lives in 2020 were radically changed. This was also the case for various sectors of the economy, including the textile and clothing industry. However, with crisis come opportunities and stimuli for change. Under the motto “Still Physical”, manufacturers recount their personal success stories in 2020 – the industry can look forward to a selection of sustainable materials curated exclusively by the PERFORMANCE FORUM Jury. Areas of focus: natural fibers that highlight wellbeing aspects, plant-based materials that make us strong and excite on an emotional level, bio-nylons and bio-based finishings that rethink function. “Still Physical – Your Success Story of 2020” will be on display online as the first of its kind within a trade fair week from 17 to 21 May 2020.

Contact restrictions, home office and altered daily lives – our lives in 2020 were radically changed. This was also the case for various sectors of the economy, including the textile and clothing industry. However, with crisis come opportunities and stimuli for change. Under the motto “Still Physical”, manufacturers recount their personal success stories in 2020 – the industry can look forward to a selection of sustainable materials curated exclusively by the PERFORMANCE FORUM Jury. Areas of focus: natural fibers that highlight wellbeing aspects, plant-based materials that make us strong and excite on an emotional level, bio-nylons and bio-based finishings that rethink function. “Still Physical – Your Success Story of 2020” will be on display online as the first of its kind within a trade fair week from 17 to 21 May 2020.

Transformation: Technology first?
The pandemic has forced us into new, primarily digital forms of living and working. Our daily lives are characterised by home offices, home schooling and online meetings. The desire for real, physically perceptible experiences has grown incessantly within the last year. In the same context, people nowadays are strongly driven by technological progress – yet how far can we allow technological change to go and how do we wish to live in the future? Long before the pandemic, the trend towards self-monitoring and control of important bodily functions developed. The sports industry developed tools to measure levels of performance and monitor bodily functions with the goal of enhancing performance. Self-optimisation, body shaping and health promotion have become standard nowadays. Staying healthy and keeping fit are now social imperatives in our performance-oriented society. The pandemic has made us rethink, made us pause – with sustainable function still in focus, yet function needs to be rethought for the future, distancing ourselves from mere performance enhancement, and embracing clothing that facilitates people in feeling good.

Touch & Feel
In a visual, digital world, one sense has been forgotten: the sense of touch. Materials trigger completely different reactions, consciously or unconsciously. Moreover, the surface texture is also decisive in the functionality of a fabric, lending it its unique characteristics. In times of contact restrictions and lockdown, there is a need for a space for emotions, for regeneration and physical wellbeing. This is also reflected in the desire for appropriate apparel that leaves a pleasant sensation on the skin. Lightweight, warm and of a softer nature, plant-based fibers fulfil the desire for comfort and promote wellbeing.

We are physical – we are nature
How will we shape and adapt the post-pandemic textile and apparel industry? The Corona crisis once again reminds us of our existential bond with the natural world. While humanity fights against the spread of a deadly virus with social isolation, one thing is doing well: our planet. It is recovering from all the exhaust gases that are released into the air daily by cars and factories. There is a shift in focus towards taking time out in nature, whether in the form of a morning run, a mountain hike or a yoga session on the grass.

Your success story of 2020
What has touched them? Which experiences have shaped their latest innovations? Does the crisis also present opportunities? The chance for something new, for a rethink, on an even more sustainable, more ecological path? Which highlights, which stories are worth communicating and where did the focus lie in 2020? Various material manufacturers already started to focus on sustainability and the cautious use of resources some time ago. Innovations in the areas of materials and in processing methods are the driving forces of the development towards more sustainability. However, we need to realign all processes and structures in our supply and production chains and adapt them to the needs of a resource-conserving, responsible industry. A pioneering example of such alignment was the decision of PERFORMANCE DAYS to only present sustainable materials at the PERFORMANCE FORUM from the November 2019 trade fair event onwards. Additionally, the setting-up of the new digital sourcing platform “THE LOOP” shows how technology can be implemented aside from material and processing innovations in such a way that our procedures and structures can be adapted to difficult conditions.

Informative & up-to-date: the digital trade fair week from 17 to 21 May 2021
As usual, the highlighted fabrics from the Focus Topic “Still Physical”, which the exhibitors have defined as their personal success stories, will be available shortly on the PERFORMANCE DAYS website highlighting all details and facets.