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15.09.2021

DNFI Award Jury 2021 started its work

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) will announce the winner of the Innovation in Natural Fibre Research Award soon. The aim of the award is to raise awareness of the achievements of the natural fibers sector by recognizing innovative and progressive work by people and institutions at the level of production and use of natural fibers. The closing date for applications was September 10.

Interest in the award was high again in 2021, indicating that research in fields involving natural fibres is robust. The applications that were received reveal a fascinating array of projects, new topics, and both private and public sector funding for natural fibre research.

There are seven finalists, and final judging is underway. The winner of the 2021 Award will be announced in early October.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) will announce the winner of the Innovation in Natural Fibre Research Award soon. The aim of the award is to raise awareness of the achievements of the natural fibers sector by recognizing innovative and progressive work by people and institutions at the level of production and use of natural fibers. The closing date for applications was September 10.

Interest in the award was high again in 2021, indicating that research in fields involving natural fibres is robust. The applications that were received reveal a fascinating array of projects, new topics, and both private and public sector funding for natural fibre research.

There are seven finalists, and final judging is underway. The winner of the 2021 Award will be announced in early October.

The seven finalists for the 2021 Award fall into several broad categories, including traceability and the measurement of environmental impacts of natural fibres, the use of natural fibres in manufacturing biodegradable composites, and new or expanded uses for natural fibre materials. Researchers and institutions located in Australia, India, Republic of Korea, and Switzerland are among the finalists for the 2021 award.

More information:
DNFI DNFI award
Source:

DNFI

(c) FET
FET meltspinning system for biomedical applications
15.09.2021

FET: Further Gains in the Biomedical sector

Fibre Extrusion Technology of Leeds, UK has delivered nine meltspinning systems to clients in the biomedical sector since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, with a similar number currently on order for 2021/22. This way FET could confirm the position as an acknowledged world leader in meltspinning equipment for the production of precursor materials used in medical devices and as a default supplier for absorbable suture production systems, with orders virtually doubling year on year.

Recent installations include a multi-functional system that can produce both multifilament and monofilament pre-cursor fibres, but nonwoven systems have been particularly prominent, driven by the burgeoning demand for FFP3 masks, gowns and other medical products required during the pandemic. These have been sold to medical device manufacturing companies across the globe, including the Far East, USA and Europe. Research organisations have also invested in FET systems for biomedical applications, the most recent being the University of Leeds in a laboratory scale Spunbond system.

Fibre Extrusion Technology of Leeds, UK has delivered nine meltspinning systems to clients in the biomedical sector since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, with a similar number currently on order for 2021/22. This way FET could confirm the position as an acknowledged world leader in meltspinning equipment for the production of precursor materials used in medical devices and as a default supplier for absorbable suture production systems, with orders virtually doubling year on year.

Recent installations include a multi-functional system that can produce both multifilament and monofilament pre-cursor fibres, but nonwoven systems have been particularly prominent, driven by the burgeoning demand for FFP3 masks, gowns and other medical products required during the pandemic. These have been sold to medical device manufacturing companies across the globe, including the Far East, USA and Europe. Research organisations have also invested in FET systems for biomedical applications, the most recent being the University of Leeds in a laboratory scale Spunbond system.

The FET in-house Process Development Laboratory and ongoing collaboration with biomaterial polymer suppliers has helped to optimise the biomedical melt spinning technology. The Laboratory is at the disposal of customers for all aspects of confidential testing and evaluation. To further increase this competitive edge, FET will be opening a new Process Development Laboratory and Visitor Centre in early 2022.

More information:
meltspinning FET
Source:

Projectmarketing for FET

(c) Trevira GmbH
08.09.2021

Trevira CS – starting afresh

  • New brand Trevira CS eco

After a challenging 2020 for Trevira CS®, a year in which the coronavirus crisis put pressure on the contract market, in particular on the hotel and event sector, and also on the cruise shipping industry, the market is starting to show some signs of improvement. Numerous new developments are seizing upon the trends that have emerged since the crisis began.

  • New brand Trevira CS eco

After a challenging 2020 for Trevira CS®, a year in which the coronavirus crisis put pressure on the contract market, in particular on the hotel and event sector, and also on the cruise shipping industry, the market is starting to show some signs of improvement. Numerous new developments are seizing upon the trends that have emerged since the crisis began.

Although the coronavirus pandemic had a negative effect on individual business sectors, it also has the potential to open up new market opportunities for flame retardant Trevira CS fabrics in the long run. The increase in people working from home and the longer and more frequent stay within one’s own home have led to a change in perspective in terms of the relevance of interior design. The design of the living space has undergone a revaluation. Sustainability, durability, high quality, and the desire for safe products that contain little to no harmful substances are defining criteria for selecting a new textile interior. The colour range of the new Trevira CS developments is directed specifically towards this trend and often comes across as discreet and close to nature. After Trevira CS products have found their way more and more into private homes, the new Trevira CS collections include numerous attractive textiles not only for the contract sector but also for the residential sector.

In the contract sector, notably in the hotel industry, the trends towards sustainability and quality are likely to continue to grow. Moreover, there is an increase in awareness as far as hygiene requirements are concerned. Textiles that are easy to clean without losing their appearance or their functionality can excel here. Accordingly, products ordinarily used in the healthcare sector might start to be of interest to the hotel and catering industry, public spaces, the transport industry, and to offices. This will apply in particular to areas where there is a regular flow of visitors and where people come into direct contact with fabrics. Antimicrobial textiles provide additional protection in these situations. Besides their flame retardancy, many new Trevira CS products integrate additional functions such as noise or sun protection.

Trevira has launched the Trevira CS eco brand for flame retardant textiles that consist of recycled Trevira products.
The new Trevira CS eco brand unites sustainability and flame retardancy. Trevira offers products for this which have been manufactured through different recycling processes. The flame retardant filament yarns are based on the use of recycled PET bottles (post-consumer recycling). Textiles bearing the Trevira CS eco trademark consist of at least 50% recycled materials.

Trevira uses an agglomeration facility to recycle reusable waste materials from production to manufacture recycled fibres that, after further processing, retain the same quality and performance characteristics as the original products (pre-consumer recycling).

Source:

Trevira GmbH

07.09.2021

Kelheim Fibres to Increase Viscose Fibre Prices from 1. October 2021

Kelheim Fibres GmbH is announcing that with effect from 01. October 2021, or as contracts and agreements allow, prices for its range of viscose fibres will be increased by €0,20/kg. In addition, freight cost adjustments will be applied on an individual customer basis. In cases where energy cost adjustments are not included in contracts and agreements, a temporary energy surcharge will be applied.

“The measures we are taking are absolutely necessary to ensure that Kelheim Fibres remains in a position to supply fibres with the levels of quality and service expected by our customers,” says Matthew North, Commercial Director of Kelheim Fibres.

The year 2021 has brought extraordinary challenges for society and for industry. Alongside the Covid-19 pandemic, recovering demand, disruption in the global freight systems and dramatically increased energy costs are driving significant cost increases for raw materials and negatively influencing supply chains. Prices for energy and freight currently lie well outside their historical ranges.

Kelheim Fibres GmbH is announcing that with effect from 01. October 2021, or as contracts and agreements allow, prices for its range of viscose fibres will be increased by €0,20/kg. In addition, freight cost adjustments will be applied on an individual customer basis. In cases where energy cost adjustments are not included in contracts and agreements, a temporary energy surcharge will be applied.

“The measures we are taking are absolutely necessary to ensure that Kelheim Fibres remains in a position to supply fibres with the levels of quality and service expected by our customers,” says Matthew North, Commercial Director of Kelheim Fibres.

The year 2021 has brought extraordinary challenges for society and for industry. Alongside the Covid-19 pandemic, recovering demand, disruption in the global freight systems and dramatically increased energy costs are driving significant cost increases for raw materials and negatively influencing supply chains. Prices for energy and freight currently lie well outside their historical ranges.

Es sei der Kelheim Fibres GmbH gelungen, die Auswirkungen der Pandemie auf die Faserproduktion zu begrenzen. Aber als Unternehmen mit eigener Kraft-Wärme-Kopplungsanlage und einem hohen Exportanteil in Staaten außerhalb Europas hätten sich diese Kostenfaktoren im zweiten und dritten Quartal 2021 stark negativ auf die Margen ausgewirkt. Da die Energiekosten auf einem beispiellos hohen Niveau verharrten und im vierten Quartal möglicherweise weiter ansteigen werden, keine Entlastung bei den hohen Frachtkosten absehbar sei und auch die Rohstoffkosten auf hohem Niveau blieben, müsse das Unternehmen Maßnahmen ergreifen, um eine weitere Margenerosion zu verhindern.

Kelheim Fibres GmbH had succeeded in limiting the impact of the pandemic on fibre production. However, as a company operating its own cogeneration energy plant and with a high level of export business outside Europe, these cost factors have had a severe negative impact on margins during the second and third quarters of 2021. With energy costs set to remain at unprecedentedly high levels and potentially increase further in the fourth quarter, no relief to the high level of freight costs foreseeable, and raw material costs also remaining at a high level, the company needs to take steps to prevent further margin erosion.

Kelheim Fibres’ Business Managers will be in contact with individual customers during September with further information.

More information:
Kelheim Fibres viscose fibers
Source:

Kelheim Fibres

07.09.2021

International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022: Call for Abstracts

  • The success story of cellulose fibres continues - plastic bans drive innovation – 300 participants and 30 exhibitors are expected in-person and online
  • 2-3 February, Cologne (Germany), hybrid event

Cellulose fibres are among the winners of the European 'Single-Use Plastics Directive (SUPD)', which has been in effect since July 2021 and entails plastic bans for a variety of single-use products. Cellulose is the main component of plant cell walls and a natural polymer. As a result, disposable products made of cellulose and cellulose fibres are not labelled as plastic and are explicitly excluded from the regulation. The success story of cellulose fibres will thus continue at a rapid pace with new developments and applications.

  • The success story of cellulose fibres continues - plastic bans drive innovation – 300 participants and 30 exhibitors are expected in-person and online
  • 2-3 February, Cologne (Germany), hybrid event

Cellulose fibres are among the winners of the European 'Single-Use Plastics Directive (SUPD)', which has been in effect since July 2021 and entails plastic bans for a variety of single-use products. Cellulose is the main component of plant cell walls and a natural polymer. As a result, disposable products made of cellulose and cellulose fibres are not labelled as plastic and are explicitly excluded from the regulation. The success story of cellulose fibres will thus continue at a rapid pace with new developments and applications. Building on the success of this year's conference with 200 participants, the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022 will again cover the entire value chain, from lignocellulose, chemical pulp, cellulose fibres such as rayon, viscose, modal or lyocell and new developments to a wide range of applications: Textiles of all kinds, nonwovens such as wet wipes and new areas such as composites or nanocellulose in the food industry. All these sectors have gained considerable momentum in recent years.

Cellulose fibres have been a success story within the textile market with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) between 5 and 10 % over the last ten years and similar growth rates are expected in the coming decade. This makes cellulosic fibres the fastest growing fibre group in the textile industry and also the largest investment sector in the global bioeconomy.  The challenge now is to achieve a balance between the ongoing capacity expansion and the growing demand, to avoid overcapacity while still meeting rising demand from the major brands. These high growth rates are driven by the increased demand for natural fibres (and bottlenecks in cotton production), the microplastic issues, and bans on plastics in disposable applications. All three factors will continue to play an important role in the development of the sector in the future.

Focus of the conference

  • Impact of plastic-bans on single-use products
  • Transformation from fossil to renewable raw materials
  • Challenges in developing new value chains
  • Alternative raw materials for cellulose fibres
  • Latest technology and market trends
  • Market dynamics and stakeholders in the cellulose sector
  • New ecosystems and partnerships
  • Development of political environment
  • Improvement of sustainability in production

Companies are now invited to submit presentations as well as their latest developments for the Innovation Award.

Call for Abstracts and Posters
Abstract submission is open now. Latest products, technologies, developments or market trends are welcome.
Deadline for submission: 15 October 2021

 

Source:

nova Institute

06.09.2021

Textile and apparel industry alliance closer to an international microfibre shedding standard

A sector alliance that was formed to tackle issues relating to microplastics has completed the next phase of its project to develop a harmonised industry standard for the supply chain. The Cross Industry Agreement (CIA) has revealed the results of a fibre fragmentation trial that has been carried out in advance of establishing a CEN Standard (from the European Committee for Standardization). Once confirmed, the standard will also become an ISO standard under the Vienna Agreement, providing apparel manufacturers and policy makers with a vital tool as part of wider work to reduce microfibre shedding into the environment.

A sector alliance that was formed to tackle issues relating to microplastics has completed the next phase of its project to develop a harmonised industry standard for the supply chain. The Cross Industry Agreement (CIA) has revealed the results of a fibre fragmentation trial that has been carried out in advance of establishing a CEN Standard (from the European Committee for Standardization). Once confirmed, the standard will also become an ISO standard under the Vienna Agreement, providing apparel manufacturers and policy makers with a vital tool as part of wider work to reduce microfibre shedding into the environment.

In 2018, five industry organisations agreed to join forces to proactively tackle the issue of microplastics, and signed the Cross Industry Agreement. The initial signatories were European industry associations that represent the European and global value chains of garments and their associated maintenance – the International Association for Soaps, Detergents and Maintenance Products (A.I.S.E.), European Man-Made Fibres Association (CIRFS), European Outdoor Group (EOG), EURATEX the European apparel and textile industry confederation, and the Federation of the European Sporting goods Industry (FESI). Together, the five organisations understood that the very first step to enable global action around the topic, was to agree a harmonised test method which would allow the collection and comparison of globally generated data, to aid the identification of solutions.

The microfibre shedding test method was developed thanks to the joint efforts and cooperation of experts from 28 European, American and Asian organisations; the result was handed over to CEN in 2020. Since then, representatives from the CIA have been working with CEN to fine tune details in order to meet the requirements for a CEN Standard. To verify the reproducibility of the method, the partners have carried out a round robin trial (RRT) to determine if the method could be replicated in different laboratories and produce similar results. 10 organisations participated in the RRT, which was co-ordinated by the CIA, sending fabric samples to all of the laboratories involved and then collecting and analysing the data.

The results from the RRT show statistically significant consistency, both within and between participating laboratories, which demonstrates that the method is both repeatable in the same setting and reproducible in other laboratories.

The CIA has submitted the results of the RRT to CEN, with the intention that the CEN Standard is confirmed in the near future. Once that has happened, it will be promoted throughout the apparel industry and will become a key tool for researchers, businesses and governments as they accelerate efforts to reduce microfibre shedding associated with garment production.

Source:

Euratex

01.09.2021

International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022: Plastic bans drive innovation

  • International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022, 2-3 February in Cologne, Germany and online – Call for Abstracts and Posters – 300 participants and 30 exhibitors are expected

Cellulose fibres are among the winners of the European 'Single-Use Plastics Directive (SUPD)', which has been in effect since July 2021 and entails plastic bans for a variety of single-use products. Cellulose is the main component of plant cell walls and a natural polymer. As a result, disposable products made of cellulose and cellulose fibres are not labelled as plastic and are explicitly excluded from the regulation. The success story of cellulose fibres will thus continue at a rapid pace with new developments and applications.

  • International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022, 2-3 February in Cologne, Germany and online – Call for Abstracts and Posters – 300 participants and 30 exhibitors are expected

Cellulose fibres are among the winners of the European 'Single-Use Plastics Directive (SUPD)', which has been in effect since July 2021 and entails plastic bans for a variety of single-use products. Cellulose is the main component of plant cell walls and a natural polymer. As a result, disposable products made of cellulose and cellulose fibres are not labelled as plastic and are explicitly excluded from the regulation. The success story of cellulose fibres will thus continue at a rapid pace with new developments and applications.

Building on the success of this year's conference with 200 participants, the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022 will again cover the entire value chain, from lignocellulose, chemical pulp, cellulose fibres such as rayon, viscose, modal or lyocell and new developments to a wide range of applications: Textiles of all kinds, nonwovens such as wet wipes and new areas such as composites or nanocellulose in the food industry. All these sectors have gained considerable momentum in recent years.

Cellulose fibres have been a success story within the textile market with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) between 5 and 10 % over the last ten years and similar growth rates are expected in the coming decade. This makes cellulosic fibres the fastest growing fibre group in the textile industry and also the largest investment sector in the global bioeconomy. The challenge now is to achieve a balance between the ongoing capacity expansion and the growing demand, to avoid overcapacity while still meeting rising demand from the major brands. These high growth rates are driven by the increased demand for natural fibres (and bottlenecks in cotton production), the microplastic issues, and bans on plastics in disposable applications. All three factors will continue to play an important role in the development of the sector in the future.

Companies are now invited to submit presentations as well as their latest developments for the Innovation Award.

Main topics of the conference:

  • What is the impact of plastic bans on single-use products?
  • The avoidance of microplastics and the transformation from fossil to renewable raw materials?
  • What are the biggest challenges in developing new value chains and growing market demand?
  • Which alternative raw materials for cellulose fibres are suitable and available?
  • What are the latest technology and market trends?
  • What are the future market dynamics? Who is active and interested in the cellulose fibre sector?
  • What ecosystems and partnerships are needed to promote innovation in line with new market requirements?
  • How will the political environment develop in the future?
  • How can the sustainability of cellulose fibre production be further improved?

 
Call for Abstracts
Abstract submission is open now. You are welcome to present your latest products, technologies, developments or market trends. Submit your abstract as soon as possible.
Deadline for submission: 15 October 2021
https://cellulose-fibres.eu/call-for-abstracts

Call for Posters
Deadline for submission: 31 December 2021
https://cellulose-fibres.eu/call-for-posters

Call for Innovations
More information about the innovation award and the application can be found at
Deadline for submission: 15 November 2021
https://cellulose-fibres.eu/award-application

Sponsoring Opportunities: https://cellulose-fibres.eu/sponsoring

Source:

nova Institute

01.09.2021

CELLIANT® viscose - Kelheim Fibres and Hologenix® partnering

Kelheim Fibres, a leading manufacturer of viscose specialty fibers, and Hologenix®, creators of CELLIANT®, a responsive textile using infrared technology, partnered to create CELLIANT® viscose, a combination of nature and performance.

CELLIANT viscose in blends with cotton, regular viscose, MicroModal®, lyocell and wool offers a range of varieties. Among the many applications, it is especially suitable for performance wear, luxury loungewear, casual wear, bedding, towels and beauty.

CELLIANT viscose features natural, ethically sourced minerals embedded into plant-based fibers to create infrared products that capture and convert body heat into infrared, improving cellular oxygenation.

Kelheim’s flexible technology permits targeted interventions in the viscose fiber process and delivers this fiber that provides full functionality without the need for any additional processing steps, while impressing with a softer feel and cost and time savings compared to coated fabrics.

Kelheim Fibres, a leading manufacturer of viscose specialty fibers, and Hologenix®, creators of CELLIANT®, a responsive textile using infrared technology, partnered to create CELLIANT® viscose, a combination of nature and performance.

CELLIANT viscose in blends with cotton, regular viscose, MicroModal®, lyocell and wool offers a range of varieties. Among the many applications, it is especially suitable for performance wear, luxury loungewear, casual wear, bedding, towels and beauty.

CELLIANT viscose features natural, ethically sourced minerals embedded into plant-based fibers to create infrared products that capture and convert body heat into infrared, improving cellular oxygenation.

Kelheim’s flexible technology permits targeted interventions in the viscose fiber process and delivers this fiber that provides full functionality without the need for any additional processing steps, while impressing with a softer feel and cost and time savings compared to coated fabrics.

Dominik Mayer, Kelheim’s Project Manager for Fibre & Application Development, and Courtney OKeefe, Hologenix’s Chief Supply Officer, will share the story behind the development of CELLIANT® viscose and how this first in-fiber sustainable solution on the market was developed. They will present at a webinar during the Dornbirn Global Fiber Conference Thursday, September 16, at 5:50 pm CEST.

Source:

Kelheim Fibres

26.08.2021

Kelheim Fibres at Dornbirn GFC WEBINAR WEEK

  • Circular economy at Kelheim Fibres: Examples of innovation from raw material, product design and all the way to “end of life”

Kelheim Fibres, the world's first viscose fibre manufacturer with an EMAS-certified environmental management system, is continuously working on optimising its special fibres. These can be functionalised as needed - in many cases to save further processing steps (such as dyeing or coating) and thus energy, water and chemicals - and are completely biodegradable at the end of their product life in a short time (according to OECD Test 301 B).

Currently, the specialists in Kelheim are working on the development of alternative raw materials for the production of viscose fibres, such as recycled cellulose as well as other cellulose-containing starting materials. One approach to closing the product cycle in the textile sector is the use of pulp produced from recycled post-consumer waste materials.

  • Circular economy at Kelheim Fibres: Examples of innovation from raw material, product design and all the way to “end of life”

Kelheim Fibres, the world's first viscose fibre manufacturer with an EMAS-certified environmental management system, is continuously working on optimising its special fibres. These can be functionalised as needed - in many cases to save further processing steps (such as dyeing or coating) and thus energy, water and chemicals - and are completely biodegradable at the end of their product life in a short time (according to OECD Test 301 B).

Currently, the specialists in Kelheim are working on the development of alternative raw materials for the production of viscose fibres, such as recycled cellulose as well as other cellulose-containing starting materials. One approach to closing the product cycle in the textile sector is the use of pulp produced from recycled post-consumer waste materials.

In production, Kelheim Fibres focuses on resource conservation by minimising emissions and waste through closed-loop recovery systems, as well as through highly efficient energy generation and the corresponding operation of the plants.

Dr. Roland Scholz, Project Manager Fibre and Application Development at Kelheim Fibres, will present details of this on Wednesday, 15 September, at 5.50 p.m., in Hall B of the 60th Dornbirn GFC WEBINAR WEEK.


Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Source:

Kelheim Fibres

(c) Autefa
25.08.2021

Swiss Textile Machinery: Top Technology for Nonwovens

Originally conceived as a low-cost, high-volume alternative to knitting and weaving, nonwovens was already expanding its market boundaries by the 1970s with new applications in ‘disposables’ such as diapers, hygiene and teabags.

In the past five decades, the nonwovens business has exploded in all directions, reaching a global market worth USD 40.5 billion in 2020, projected to grow to USD 53.5 billion by 2025. This annual growth rate of 5.7% (MarketsandMarkets, Nonwoven Fabric Market Report) is based on countless new applications and expansion into durable, as well as additional disposable, products.

Major growth drivers include the hygiene sector, and filtration media for power plants and air conditioning systems. Especially during the peak of the COVID pandemic in 2020 and 2021, demand in the hygiene sector multiplied. Worldwide capacities for both meltblown and spunlace production rocketed compared to a normal business year. Swiss Autefa Solutions, for example, significantly benefited from this trend, notably with the launch of a fully-automatic machine for producing face masks.

Originally conceived as a low-cost, high-volume alternative to knitting and weaving, nonwovens was already expanding its market boundaries by the 1970s with new applications in ‘disposables’ such as diapers, hygiene and teabags.

In the past five decades, the nonwovens business has exploded in all directions, reaching a global market worth USD 40.5 billion in 2020, projected to grow to USD 53.5 billion by 2025. This annual growth rate of 5.7% (MarketsandMarkets, Nonwoven Fabric Market Report) is based on countless new applications and expansion into durable, as well as additional disposable, products.

Major growth drivers include the hygiene sector, and filtration media for power plants and air conditioning systems. Especially during the peak of the COVID pandemic in 2020 and 2021, demand in the hygiene sector multiplied. Worldwide capacities for both meltblown and spunlace production rocketed compared to a normal business year. Swiss Autefa Solutions, for example, significantly benefited from this trend, notably with the launch of a fully-automatic machine for producing face masks.

The automotive industry is the second big growth area, with many new applications being pioneered. The trend to electric and hybrid vehicles has helped this, as nonwovens reinforced with carbon fibres are widely used as battery housings.

Swiss nonwovens competence
Innovative applications across all sectors have driven the rapid evolution of sophisticated nonwovens machinery. Today’s trends demand higher productivity, sustainability and Industry 4.0 compatibility – demonstrated by the full equipment portfolio of Swiss Textile Machinery member Autefa Solutions. With V-Jet Futura, the company recently sealed the link in its product range between web forming and drying technology. This latest Hydroentanglement Machine, together with the SQ-V Square Drum Dryer, embodies advanced technology combined with significant reductions in energy consumption compared to other process solutions.

A vital contribution to nonwovens production is offered by Rieter subsidiary Graf, a leading supplier of clothing and combs for carding and combing processes in spinning and nonwovens. Graf's Hipro card clothings – suitable for any man-made fibres in the nonwovens sector – are focussing on higher productivity. Their superior performance delivers up to 10% higher throughput and greater carding efficiency compared to conventional clothings. These reliable card clothing elements also ensure a consistently reproducible high web quality, as well as 20% fewer failures in the web, thanks to the precise fibre transfer to and from the cylinder.

Another constant trend in nonwovens today is the drive for better quality. Manufacturers want to take charge of contamination levels in their processes, as well as eradicating defects which may arise during production. Uster Technologies, a leading provider of quality management solutions from fibre to fabric, offers a combined solution to achieve both these required quality standards. At the fibre preparation stage, Uster Jossi Vision Shield N ensures the best possible initial inspection and removal of contamination. Then, at the end of the production sequence, Uster EVS Fabriq Vision N handles automated detection and marking of all the main defects caused during production. This combined solution avoids material waste and takes full advantage of the potential for process optimization.

Source:

Swiss Textile Machinery Association

powerribs with inset bonnet (c) Composites Evolution
04.08.2021

Composites Evolution: New range of flax-epoxy prepreg materials

Composites Evolution Ltd has teamed up with leading natural fibre reinforcement specialists Bcomp to launch a new range of flax-epoxy prepreg materials, designed to offer enhanced sustainability without compromising on performance.

Evopreg ampliTex™ prepregs combine Composites Evolution’s high-performance Evopreg epoxy resin systems with Bcomp’s award-winning ampliTex™ flax reinforcements, to deliver a family of materials which offer outstanding performance for component applications.

To reach the full performance of natural fibres, Evopreg ampliTex™ prepregs have been tailored to be compatible with Bcomp’s powerRibs™ reinforcement grid, enabling the same stiffness and weight as thin-walled monolithic carbon fibre parts while decreasing the CO2 footprint by 85% and improving safety thanks to a blunt braking behaviour without dangerous debris or sharp edges.

Composites Evolution Ltd has teamed up with leading natural fibre reinforcement specialists Bcomp to launch a new range of flax-epoxy prepreg materials, designed to offer enhanced sustainability without compromising on performance.

Evopreg ampliTex™ prepregs combine Composites Evolution’s high-performance Evopreg epoxy resin systems with Bcomp’s award-winning ampliTex™ flax reinforcements, to deliver a family of materials which offer outstanding performance for component applications.

To reach the full performance of natural fibres, Evopreg ampliTex™ prepregs have been tailored to be compatible with Bcomp’s powerRibs™ reinforcement grid, enabling the same stiffness and weight as thin-walled monolithic carbon fibre parts while decreasing the CO2 footprint by 85% and improving safety thanks to a blunt braking behaviour without dangerous debris or sharp edges.

Composites Evolution’s Sales & Marketing Director, Ben Hargreaves, explains further.
“Sustainability is an increasingly important factor for many of our customers - particularly those involved in motorsports and high-performance automotive applications. As you’d expect in these sectors though, sustainability can’t come at the expense of performance the two must go hand-in-hand. This is something that other prepreggers can struggle with, as natural fibres behave very differently to carbon or glass, for example.”

Customers would be able to understand the strengths and weaknesses of natural fibre composites, and to show where and how they can be adopted without the need for significant changes to existing composite component production processes.

One such customer is Retrac Group, whose composites division is one of the UK’s most experienced composites engineering companies across motorsports, automotive and aerospace. It recently used Evopreg ampliTex™ + powerRibs™ to produce a demonstrator bonnet panel for a race-bred supercar. Project Manager Alan Purves explains.


“We’re seeing a growing interest in flax fibre composites, particularly in the motorsports and niche vehicle sectors. It is therefore essential that we have developed an in-depth understanding of the processing requirements and performance capabilities of these materials, and are ready to respond to our customers' requirements. Being able to tap into the combined expertise and experience of both Composites Evolution and Bcomp is proving invaluable.”

Source:

Composites Evolution

(c) EconCore
03.08.2021

Basaltex & EconCore: New composite of basalt fibres for rail carriage interiors

  • Testing and development achieve rigidity and safety milestone

Basaltex, pioneers in innovative uses of basalt fibres, has achieved a significant milestone in developing and testing a new composite material solution comprising fibres of basalt combined with EconCore’s patented honeycomb technology.

This new material development has greatly improved fire resistance and is highly rigid, as well as the usual honeycomb properties of light-weighting.

The company has tested the composite of basalt fibres, a bio resin and rPET honeycomb.

Filaments of only stone fibres are extruded at a temperature of 1450°C, similar to glass but with a number of advantages, not least the absence of boric acid in the process.

Combining this ecological fibre with EconCore’s sustainable technology using rPET, and the bioresin polyfurfuryl alcohol - 100% derived from a waste stream of sugar cane - make this a very sustainable and environmentally friendly product, unlike the majority of thermoset solutions in this type of application.

  • Testing and development achieve rigidity and safety milestone

Basaltex, pioneers in innovative uses of basalt fibres, has achieved a significant milestone in developing and testing a new composite material solution comprising fibres of basalt combined with EconCore’s patented honeycomb technology.

This new material development has greatly improved fire resistance and is highly rigid, as well as the usual honeycomb properties of light-weighting.

The company has tested the composite of basalt fibres, a bio resin and rPET honeycomb.

Filaments of only stone fibres are extruded at a temperature of 1450°C, similar to glass but with a number of advantages, not least the absence of boric acid in the process.

Combining this ecological fibre with EconCore’s sustainable technology using rPET, and the bioresin polyfurfuryl alcohol - 100% derived from a waste stream of sugar cane - make this a very sustainable and environmentally friendly product, unlike the majority of thermoset solutions in this type of application.

Railway applications require materials with enhanced fire resistance and the testing has shown that the EconCore-Basaltex solution fits these needs well, at the same time offering the perspective of drastic weight reduction against traditional monolithic GRPs used rather widely in train interiors.

Such sandwich panel could be deployed in applications such as cladding panels, partitions, tables and flooring. The thermoset skin layers give a fast cure at elevated temperature, meaning short cycle time and enabling automated production’.

As well as the railway interior application, this new material combination could be used in any application that requires fire performance combined with a low weight.

More information:
Basaltex basalt fibers EconCore
Source:

EconCore

23.07.2021

FET installs new Spunbond system at University of Leeds

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd, UK has completed the installation and commissioning of a new FET Laboratory Spunbond system for the University of Leeds.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd, UK has completed the installation and commissioning of a new FET Laboratory Spunbond system for the University of Leeds.

This FET spunbond system is now an integral part of the research facilities of the CCTMIH (Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare), led by Prof. Stephen Russell based in the School of Design, University of Leeds, who commented “The new spunbond system is perfectly suited to our academic research work, and is already proving itself to be extremely versatile and intuitive to use”.
 
This spunbond system complements existing research lab facilities at the university, which covers all areas of fibre and fabric processing, physical testing and characterisation. It forms part of a wider investment in facilities to support fundamental, academic research on ‘future manufacturing’ for medical devices, where the focus is on studying small-scale processing of unconventional polymers and additive mixes to form spunbond fabrics with multifunctional properties.
 
Key to this research is developing the underlying process-structure-performance relationships, based on the measured data, to provide detailed understanding of how final fabric performance can be controlled during processing.

As a rule, many exciting materials developed in academic research struggle to progress beyond the bench, because of compatibility issues with key manufacturing processes such as spunbond. By leveraging mono, core-sheath and island-in-the-sea bicomponent technology, the Leeds University team is working with polymer and biomaterial research scientists, engineers and clinicians to explore the incorporation of unusual materials in spunbond fabrics, potentially widening applications.
 
FET has built on its melt spinning expertise to develop a true laboratory scale spunbond system and is currently working on a number of other such projects globally with research institutions and manufacturers.

Source:

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd / Project Marketing Ltd

Azgard 9’s innovative fabric absorbs carbon dioxide while simultaneously producing oxygen. (c) Azgard 9
23.07.2021

Monforts customers at Première Vision Digital Denim Week

Denim manufacturers employing Monforts technologies showcased their latest activities, including sustainable fabric manufacturing, new advances in fibres, dyes and chemicals, as well as process and supply improvements and recycling options, at Première Vision’s Digital Denim Week, held from July 5-9.

The users of Monforts equipment included AGI Denim (Pakistan), Azgard 9 (Pakistan), Berto (Italy), Bossa (Turkey), DNM (Turkey), Kilim (Turkey) and Orta (Turkey).

The new Naveena Denim Mills (Pakistan) Holistic collection, for example, employs a suite of sustainable materials such as organic cotton and post-consumer and post-industrial waste cotton that has been shredded and recycled at its in-house unit in Pakistan.

Supply chain transparency is also becoming increasingly important, and Turkey’s Bossa is now sharing information on its dyes, energy sources and recycled content use with its customers. For organic cotton in particular, Bossa provides QR codes with which brands can identify the names of individual farms and their locations, as well as details such as the origins of specific seeds and the use of irrigation by growers.

Denim manufacturers employing Monforts technologies showcased their latest activities, including sustainable fabric manufacturing, new advances in fibres, dyes and chemicals, as well as process and supply improvements and recycling options, at Première Vision’s Digital Denim Week, held from July 5-9.

The users of Monforts equipment included AGI Denim (Pakistan), Azgard 9 (Pakistan), Berto (Italy), Bossa (Turkey), DNM (Turkey), Kilim (Turkey) and Orta (Turkey).

The new Naveena Denim Mills (Pakistan) Holistic collection, for example, employs a suite of sustainable materials such as organic cotton and post-consumer and post-industrial waste cotton that has been shredded and recycled at its in-house unit in Pakistan.

Supply chain transparency is also becoming increasingly important, and Turkey’s Bossa is now sharing information on its dyes, energy sources and recycled content use with its customers. For organic cotton in particular, Bossa provides QR codes with which brands can identify the names of individual farms and their locations, as well as details such as the origins of specific seeds and the use of irrigation by growers.

Turkey’s Orta’s new Denim Route – inspired by the historical Silk Road for trade between the East and West – is an interactive supplier map detailing the regions from which it sources cotton, dyestuff, chemicals and various fibres to complement its other transparency initiatives.

Meanwhile, a living and breathing piece of clothing that absorbs carbon dioxide while simultaneously producing oxygen was introduced at Digital Denim Week 2021 by Azgard 9 (Pakistan) .

22.07.2021

Lenzing awarded platinum status for sustainability by EcoVadis

The Lenzing Group has been awarded Platinum status in EcoVadis’ CSR rating. The assessment comprehensively covers the four main CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) practices: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, as well as ethics and sustainable procurement.

In the previous three years, Lenzing had already received outstanding ratings in all categories, and was awarded Gold status in 2018, 2019 and 2020. “We are very proud to have now achieved the step up to the Platinum level after several Gold ratings in the past few years. At Lenzing, we always think beyond fibres and take responsibility for our children and grandchildren – for whom we do our best in order to constantly improve ourselves. This attitude forms part of our strategic principles and we will continue to work hard to make a sustainable contribution to the environment and to society”, notes Stefan Doboczky, CEO of the Lenzing Group.

The Lenzing Group has been awarded Platinum status in EcoVadis’ CSR rating. The assessment comprehensively covers the four main CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) practices: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, as well as ethics and sustainable procurement.

In the previous three years, Lenzing had already received outstanding ratings in all categories, and was awarded Gold status in 2018, 2019 and 2020. “We are very proud to have now achieved the step up to the Platinum level after several Gold ratings in the past few years. At Lenzing, we always think beyond fibres and take responsibility for our children and grandchildren – for whom we do our best in order to constantly improve ourselves. This attitude forms part of our strategic principles and we will continue to work hard to make a sustainable contribution to the environment and to society”, notes Stefan Doboczky, CEO of the Lenzing Group.

The Lenzing Group’s ambitious climate targets form an essential part of its strategy and responsibility to future generations. In 2019, Lenzing became one of the world’s first fiber manufacturers to commit to reducing CO2 emissions per ton of product by 50 percent by 2030, and even becoming climate-neutral by 2050. The Science Based Targets Initiative, a recognised organisation in the area of climate-relevant target-setting, has scientifically validated Lenzing’s climate targets.

This scientific validation also forms one of the essential criteria that EcoVadis highlights in its rating. In addition, the responsible procurement of raw materials – according to social and ecological aspects – was also highlighted as a further core element in the company’s sustainability strategy, as well as support for external environmental initiatives (Sustainable Apparel Coalition, Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action) and initiatives on labour and human rights issues (Sustainable Apparel Coalition).

08.07.2021

NDC Green by Nastrificio di Cassano: Responsible and certified labels and tags

100% sustainability lives in the smallest detail, starting with the label, the only element that can tell the story of responsibility. This is exactly why, to be a truly credible 'ambassador', the label or tag must itself be responsible. This is why Nastrificio di Cassano has created NDC Green, the premium, Made in Italy and fully traceable range that guarantees the highest quality standards while respecting the planet.

NDC Green comprises 4 categories, all with influential international certifications that attest to Nastrificio di Cassano's responsible imprinting. Many new sustainability values are woven into the collection. Particular attention is given to end-of-life, but also to the choice of natural and high-tech materials with a low environmental impact.

100% sustainability lives in the smallest detail, starting with the label, the only element that can tell the story of responsibility. This is exactly why, to be a truly credible 'ambassador', the label or tag must itself be responsible. This is why Nastrificio di Cassano has created NDC Green, the premium, Made in Italy and fully traceable range that guarantees the highest quality standards while respecting the planet.

NDC Green comprises 4 categories, all with influential international certifications that attest to Nastrificio di Cassano's responsible imprinting. Many new sustainability values are woven into the collection. Particular attention is given to end-of-life, but also to the choice of natural and high-tech materials with a low environmental impact.

A wide choice that speaks of responsible innovation, beauty and functionality: characteristics that have led C.L.A.S.S. (www.classecohub.org) to integrate NDC Green into its Material Hub which "contains a selection of fibres, materials and fabrics that share a DNA linked to research that since 2007 has been raising the bar of standards in order to offer innovations in step with the demands of the contemporary consumer" says Giusy Bettoni CEO of C.L.A.S.S.
NDC Green includes:

  • LABìO ECO-SOFT®: made using compostable and biodegradable ingredients (as attested by TUV Austria), this product boasts performances and is resistant up to 10 domestic washings at 30°. The reference is produced with fifteen times less water consumption than cotton production and the resins used are GOTS certified.
  • LABìO HANGreen is the smart solution for the creation of hard tags, hangtags, shopping bags and garment covers and, as LABIO ECO-SOFT® range, it made with  compostable and biodegradable ingredients as certified by TUV Austria and the resin is compostable, too. These peculiarities make this product unique.
  • ACETATE NAIA™, the 'smart satin' that respects forests and oceans, is the NAIA™ single-ingredient solution produced by Eastman: the 100% traceable, compostable and biodegradable cellulose yarn in both soil and sea respects the natural growth rate of forests.
  • RECYCLED POLYESTER: is made from post-consumer yarn recycled from GRS-certified PET bottles. Available in both satin and resinated taffeta versions, it guarantees excellent printability for an elegant and sophisticated look.
Source:

GB Network Marketing & Communication for C.L.A.S.S.

06.07.2021

ISKO invests in Green Technology for Recycling Solution

ISKO and textile research and development company HKRITA are proud to announce a licensing agreement for HKRITA’s award-winning, revolutionary Green Machine – a one-of-a-kind technology that fully separates and recycles cotton and polyester blends at scale.

The technology is still in the pilot stage, but is an additional step in ISKO’s drive to improve and commercialize recycling technologies which will eventually enable the company to offer a 100% post-consumer recycling solution to all of its customers. In addition, ISKO and HKRITA will work together to develop related technology, further strengthening the company’s position in sustainability.

The Green Machine uses an innovative and ultra-efficient hydrothermal treatment method that decomposes cotton into cellulose powders and enables the separation of polyester fibres from blended fabrics. The process is a closed loop and uses only water, heat and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals. Crucially, this method does not damage the polyester fibres and therefore maintains their quality; the cellulose powders, which are clean and toxic-free, can be used in a variety of ways.

ISKO and textile research and development company HKRITA are proud to announce a licensing agreement for HKRITA’s award-winning, revolutionary Green Machine – a one-of-a-kind technology that fully separates and recycles cotton and polyester blends at scale.

The technology is still in the pilot stage, but is an additional step in ISKO’s drive to improve and commercialize recycling technologies which will eventually enable the company to offer a 100% post-consumer recycling solution to all of its customers. In addition, ISKO and HKRITA will work together to develop related technology, further strengthening the company’s position in sustainability.

The Green Machine uses an innovative and ultra-efficient hydrothermal treatment method that decomposes cotton into cellulose powders and enables the separation of polyester fibres from blended fabrics. The process is a closed loop and uses only water, heat and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals. Crucially, this method does not damage the polyester fibres and therefore maintains their quality; the cellulose powders, which are clean and toxic-free, can be used in a variety of ways.

The investment in this new technology is the latest in ISKO’s ongoing drive for advancements in sustainability. As part of the company’s R-TWO™ programme, it is also working to develop fabrics with a guaranteed minimum 50%+ GRS (Global Recycle Standard) recycled content blend. This will significantly reduce the carbon and water footprint of a fabric, as well as make it easy for consumers to trace a garment’s sustainable journey step-by-step from the beginning of the supply chain through to the end product they purchase.

Source:

ISKO / Menabò Group

05.07.2021

Sateri continues its collaboration with Infinited Fiber Company

Sateri, one of the world’s largest viscose producers and a member of the RGE group of companies, continues its collaboration with Infinited Fiber Company, a textile fibre technology group based out of Finland, and participated in the company’s latest EUR30 million funding round completed on 30 June 2021. In addition to existing investors like Sateri, Infinited Fiber Company has attracted new investors including adidas and BESTSELLER.

Sateri, one of the world’s largest viscose producers and a member of the RGE group of companies, continues its collaboration with Infinited Fiber Company, a textile fibre technology group based out of Finland, and participated in the company’s latest EUR30 million funding round completed on 30 June 2021. In addition to existing investors like Sateri, Infinited Fiber Company has attracted new investors including adidas and BESTSELLER.

This securement of new funding follows Infinited Fiber Company’s April announcement of plans to build a flagship factory in Finland in response to the strong growth in demand from global fashion and textile brands for its regenerated textile fibre Infinna™. The factory, which will use household textile waste as raw material, is expected to be operational in 2024 and to have an annual production capacity of 30,000 metric tons. The new funding enables Infinited Fiber Company to carry out the work needed to prepare for the flagship factory investment and to increase production at its pilot facilities in the years leading to 2024. The engineering progress supported by the additional funds also accelerates Infinited Fiber Company’s ongoing collaboration and potential technology licensing with Sateri.

Sateri strategically contributes to RGE’s commitment and strategic business direction. Sateri has developed and produced a diverse range of circular and sustainable products including Lyocell and FINEX™, which is made from recycled textile waste. The in-house R&D efforts and the investment in Infinited Fiber Company are part of RGE’s $200 million investment commitment to advance next-generation textile fibre innovation and technology.

Source:

Sateri / Omnicom Public Relations Group

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project ©Tchibo
The demand for Fairtrade organic cotton is growing rapidly and is supported by a project initiated by Dibella in India.
29.06.2021

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

"In India, it is mainly micro-farms and village cooperatives that are active in organic cotton cultivation. Conversion of additional land and sustainable management could increase yields and fibre quality of organic cotton. The Chetna Organic initiative, with which we have been working successfully for many years, advises the farmers in these processes. It supports the farmers and village communities with targeted education, training and practical assistance in organic farming, thus preparing the ground for better income and living conditions for the families," says Ralf Hellmann, Managing Director of Dibella.

Several alliance partners - Dibella, Fairtrade Germany, GIZ, Organic Cotton Accelerator (OCA) and Tchibo - have taken the exemplary initiative as an opportunity to promote the cultivation and expansion of organic cotton in India. In cooperation with Chetna Organic, they focus on supporting Indian women's cooperatives, women farmers and families in the production of organic cotton as part of the "Organic Cotton Pilot Project". Tchibo and Fairtrade subsidise micro-farms during the conversion phase of the fields (the fibres are only recognised as organic cotton four years after conversion) and contribute to the provision of GMO-free seeds, which have become a scarce commodity in India. Together with Dibella, they finance training courses that teach the optimal use of natural rainfall as well as efficient, ecological cultivation methods, which subsequently lead to improved fibre quality. In addition, they commit to purchasing Fairtrade organic cotton for many years.

Ralf Hellmann: "The pilot project enables us to expand our Dibella Good Textiles collection because it guarantees us long-term access to fair-trade organic cotton. At the same time, it improves the living conditions of the small-scale farmers and their families. We therefore hope that "Organic Cotton" will also set a precedent in other cotton growing regions and bring organic farming forward in India."

(c) German Popp. Dr. Marina Crnoja-Cosic (Kelheim Fibres) and Linda Dengler (Microbify)
28.06.2021

Kelheim Fibres presents award at “Plan B” start-up competition

For the fourth time, the international start-up competition "Plan B - Biobased.Business.Bavaria." organised by BioCampus Straubing honoured the best new business ideas in the field of biobased solutions.

Dr Crnoja-Cosic, Director New Business Development, and Matthew North, Commercial Director, represented Kelheim Fibres at the award ceremony. The manufacturer of special viscose fibres has been working with the BioCampus Straubing for many years and is a supporter of the competition, this year as prize sponsors. In this capacity, Dr. Crnoja-Cosic congratulated the newly founded team of Microbify GmbH on their third place and presented them with a cheque for 3,000 Euros. As a spin-off from the University of Regensburg, Microbify works, among other things, on the use of old natural gas storage facilities for the production of green natural gas using extremophilic microorganisms.

For the fourth time, the international start-up competition "Plan B - Biobased.Business.Bavaria." organised by BioCampus Straubing honoured the best new business ideas in the field of biobased solutions.

Dr Crnoja-Cosic, Director New Business Development, and Matthew North, Commercial Director, represented Kelheim Fibres at the award ceremony. The manufacturer of special viscose fibres has been working with the BioCampus Straubing for many years and is a supporter of the competition, this year as prize sponsors. In this capacity, Dr. Crnoja-Cosic congratulated the newly founded team of Microbify GmbH on their third place and presented them with a cheque for 3,000 Euros. As a spin-off from the University of Regensburg, Microbify works, among other things, on the use of old natural gas storage facilities for the production of green natural gas using extremophilic microorganisms.

Driving the change from a fossil-based to a bio-based economy is a declared goal of Kelheim Fibres - their speciality fibres replacing fossil materials in more and more applications. To this end, the fibre manufacturer seeks inspiration and exchange within its own industry as well as with innovation partners from outside the industry, start-ups and science in an open innovation approach.

More information:
Kelheim Fibres Microbify GmbH
Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH