From the Sector

Reset
6 results
21.07.2021

Green fashion community to meet at INNATEX

The 48th INNATEX is opening its doors at the Messecenter Rhein-Main in Hofheim-Wallau from 31 July to 2 August 2021. More than 200 labels are poised to appear at the international trade fair for sustainable textiles. Following a long string of industry gatherings being cancelled due to COVID-19, the summer trade fair is a first opportunity for the sector to get together. All visitors are required to register digitally  in advance of the fair.

The pandemic has presented an opportunity to launch new projects. They include a special zone created in collaboration with GIZ GmbH, the German society for international development, which will shine a light on African designers. 13 labels from Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda will present their ideas for sustainable textiles and fashion products.

The starting point for the special area is a virtual trade fair, commissioned by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development. GIZ GmbH has realised the joint project in cooperation with several partners; its physical extension can be visited at INNATEX.

The 48th INNATEX is opening its doors at the Messecenter Rhein-Main in Hofheim-Wallau from 31 July to 2 August 2021. More than 200 labels are poised to appear at the international trade fair for sustainable textiles. Following a long string of industry gatherings being cancelled due to COVID-19, the summer trade fair is a first opportunity for the sector to get together. All visitors are required to register digitally  in advance of the fair.

The pandemic has presented an opportunity to launch new projects. They include a special zone created in collaboration with GIZ GmbH, the German society for international development, which will shine a light on African designers. 13 labels from Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda will present their ideas for sustainable textiles and fashion products.

The starting point for the special area is a virtual trade fair, commissioned by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development. GIZ GmbH has realised the joint project in cooperation with several partners; its physical extension can be visited at INNATEX.

Exhibitors include well-known pioneers and young newcomers
The IVN (International Association of Natural Textile Industry), which sponsors INNATEX, is staging its own pop-up showroom. In doing so, the association is creating its own curated space, showcasing the diversity and special features of its members. The future objective is to expand this space with the organiser to create a growing Concept Area that introduces visitors to different ways of presenting green fashion.

Besides the IVN, the Global Organic Textile Standard, the Green Button and Fairtrade are among the other standardisation bodies represented at the fair. In addition, a special exhibition entitled “Fashion in the Hood” (Fashion im Kiez) and delivered by the young interest group “Frankfurt Fashion Movement”, helps visitors join the dots in the fashion industry. Among the labels exhibiting at the fair for the first time are Active Wear by Klitmøller Collective from Denmark, Organic Fashion by Bibico from the UK and Italian sneaker brand ACBC.

More information:
INNATEX
Source:

UBERMUT GbR für INNATEX

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project ©Tchibo
The demand for Fairtrade organic cotton is growing rapidly and is supported by a project initiated by Dibella in India.
29.06.2021

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

"In India, it is mainly micro-farms and village cooperatives that are active in organic cotton cultivation. Conversion of additional land and sustainable management could increase yields and fibre quality of organic cotton. The Chetna Organic initiative, with which we have been working successfully for many years, advises the farmers in these processes. It supports the farmers and village communities with targeted education, training and practical assistance in organic farming, thus preparing the ground for better income and living conditions for the families," says Ralf Hellmann, Managing Director of Dibella.

Several alliance partners - Dibella, Fairtrade Germany, GIZ, Organic Cotton Accelerator (OCA) and Tchibo - have taken the exemplary initiative as an opportunity to promote the cultivation and expansion of organic cotton in India. In cooperation with Chetna Organic, they focus on supporting Indian women's cooperatives, women farmers and families in the production of organic cotton as part of the "Organic Cotton Pilot Project". Tchibo and Fairtrade subsidise micro-farms during the conversion phase of the fields (the fibres are only recognised as organic cotton four years after conversion) and contribute to the provision of GMO-free seeds, which have become a scarce commodity in India. Together with Dibella, they finance training courses that teach the optimal use of natural rainfall as well as efficient, ecological cultivation methods, which subsequently lead to improved fibre quality. In addition, they commit to purchasing Fairtrade organic cotton for many years.

Ralf Hellmann: "The pilot project enables us to expand our Dibella Good Textiles collection because it guarantees us long-term access to fair-trade organic cotton. At the same time, it improves the living conditions of the small-scale farmers and their families. We therefore hope that "Organic Cotton" will also set a precedent in other cotton growing regions and bring organic farming forward in India."

(c) Weitblick GmbH & Co. KG
21.06.2021

WEITBLICK: Handwerkerkollektion mit Fairtrade-Baumwolle

Mit der Supporting Fairtrade Cotton Zertifizierung der erfolgreichsten Kollektion MyCore Force will Weitblick nun vor allem ein starkes Commitment in Richtung Fairtrade setzen: die extra robusten Stücke sind größtenteils aus Geweben mit hohem Stoffgewicht gefertigt – gleichbedeutend mit hohen Volumina bei der Abnahme fair gehandelter Baumwolle.

Künftig werden zahlreiche Stücke aus der umfangreichen Kollektion mit dem Supporting Fairtrade Cotton Siegel gekennzeichnet sein - und damit nachweislich aus fair angebauten und gehandelten Rohstoffen entlang der gesamten textilen Wertschöpfungskette im Mengenausgleich produziert.

Der Mengenausgleich beschreibt, dass die zur Herstellung dieses Produkts benötigte Baumwollmenge unter Fairtrade-Bedingungen hergestellt und gehandelt wurde, damit Baumwollbäuerinnen und -bauern von stabilen Mindestpreisen und Prämien für die Gemeinschaft profitieren. Unter Umständen wird sie im Verarbeitungsprozess mit nicht-zertifizierter Baumwolle vermischt. Die entsprechende Gesamtmenge der in diesem Produkt enthaltenen Baumwolle wurde aber als Fairtrade-Baumwolle eingekauft.

Mit der Supporting Fairtrade Cotton Zertifizierung der erfolgreichsten Kollektion MyCore Force will Weitblick nun vor allem ein starkes Commitment in Richtung Fairtrade setzen: die extra robusten Stücke sind größtenteils aus Geweben mit hohem Stoffgewicht gefertigt – gleichbedeutend mit hohen Volumina bei der Abnahme fair gehandelter Baumwolle.

Künftig werden zahlreiche Stücke aus der umfangreichen Kollektion mit dem Supporting Fairtrade Cotton Siegel gekennzeichnet sein - und damit nachweislich aus fair angebauten und gehandelten Rohstoffen entlang der gesamten textilen Wertschöpfungskette im Mengenausgleich produziert.

Der Mengenausgleich beschreibt, dass die zur Herstellung dieses Produkts benötigte Baumwollmenge unter Fairtrade-Bedingungen hergestellt und gehandelt wurde, damit Baumwollbäuerinnen und -bauern von stabilen Mindestpreisen und Prämien für die Gemeinschaft profitieren. Unter Umständen wird sie im Verarbeitungsprozess mit nicht-zertifizierter Baumwolle vermischt. Die entsprechende Gesamtmenge der in diesem Produkt enthaltenen Baumwolle wurde aber als Fairtrade-Baumwolle eingekauft.

Bereits seit 2019 setzt das Unternehmen auf faire Workwear. Angefangen mit dem Projekt „Supporting Fairtrade Cotton“, das gemeinsam mit drei weiteren Workwear-Herstellern sowie dem Gewebeproduzenten Klopman International gestartet wurde, um den Anteil an fair gehandelter Baumwolle in der Berufsbekleidungsbranche deutlich zu steigern. Zunächst lag der Fokus dabei auf der Zielgruppe des Lebensmitteleinzelhandels. Heute ist der Nachhaltigkeitsprozess soweit ausgereift und verankert, dass auch eine komplexe und in der Herstellung technisch anspruchsvolle Kollektion, wie die MyCore Force, auf die Herstellung mit Fairtrade-Baumwolle umgestellt werden kann.

(c) Dibella GmbH
22.03.2021

Dibella launches 2nd upcycling project: napkins become jeans

After starting the first "Dibella up" circular-flow concept in August 2020, thousands of high-quality bags have already been made from used hotel textiles. Now the company is presenting another upcycling project: As part of a feasibility study, organic Fairtrade napkins that could no longer be rented out by the company were turned into jeans.

The second "Dibella up" project promises successful recycling of used object textiles. Within the framework of a feasibility study, almost 5,000 discarded napkins were used for jeans production in Pakistan. The special feature of the process is the traceability of the raw materials through all processing stages.

The napkins made of pure organic Fairtrade cotton originated in India. There, the fibres were grown and harvested by micro-farmers of the Chetna cooperative and then processed into durable textiles by a certified company. From Dibella, the napkins went to Lamme Textile Management, where they went through the use process in laundry and catering for many years. All stages were traceable by means of a "Respect Code" with which each piece was marked.

After starting the first "Dibella up" circular-flow concept in August 2020, thousands of high-quality bags have already been made from used hotel textiles. Now the company is presenting another upcycling project: As part of a feasibility study, organic Fairtrade napkins that could no longer be rented out by the company were turned into jeans.

The second "Dibella up" project promises successful recycling of used object textiles. Within the framework of a feasibility study, almost 5,000 discarded napkins were used for jeans production in Pakistan. The special feature of the process is the traceability of the raw materials through all processing stages.

The napkins made of pure organic Fairtrade cotton originated in India. There, the fibres were grown and harvested by micro-farmers of the Chetna cooperative and then processed into durable textiles by a certified company. From Dibella, the napkins went to Lamme Textile Management, where they went through the use process in laundry and catering for many years. All stages were traceable by means of a "Respect Code" with which each piece was marked.

In the recycling project, the original supply chain was reversed: Dibella transported the organic Fairtrade napkins discarded by Lamme Textile Management to Pakistan. There, the goods were shredded and the organic Fairtrade cotton fibres recovered in a full-scale textile plant specialising in sustainability. In the next step, they were mixed with "fresh fibres", spun into yarns for denim production, woven, finished with sustainable processes, subjected to quality tests and then made up into jeans.

More information:
Dibella
Source:

Dibella GmbH

Weitblick: immer schön fair WEITBLICK® | Gottfried Schmidt OHG
Naturkind trägt nachhaltige Workwear von Weitblick
29.07.2020

Naturkind trägt nachhaltige Workwear von Weitblick

IMMER SCHÖN FAIR

Bereits im Jahr 2019 hat Weitblick mit der Fairtrade-Lizenzierung und dem Projekt „Supporting Fairtrade Cotton“ Verantwortung übernommen und sich klar zu fairem Handel und nachhaltiger Textilproduktion positioniert. Nun hat der Kleinostheimer Workwear-Hersteller gemeinsam mit dem Bio-Lebensmittelhändler Naturkind aus dem EDEKA-Konzern eine erste Kollektion mit Fairtrade- Baumwolle für den Bio-Supermarkt umgesetzt. Ein Beispiel, das auch weitere Unternehmen ermutigen soll, zukünftig auf faire Workwear zu setzen.

BIO? NATÜRLICH!

IMMER SCHÖN FAIR

Bereits im Jahr 2019 hat Weitblick mit der Fairtrade-Lizenzierung und dem Projekt „Supporting Fairtrade Cotton“ Verantwortung übernommen und sich klar zu fairem Handel und nachhaltiger Textilproduktion positioniert. Nun hat der Kleinostheimer Workwear-Hersteller gemeinsam mit dem Bio-Lebensmittelhändler Naturkind aus dem EDEKA-Konzern eine erste Kollektion mit Fairtrade- Baumwolle für den Bio-Supermarkt umgesetzt. Ein Beispiel, das auch weitere Unternehmen ermutigen soll, zukünftig auf faire Workwear zu setzen.

BIO? NATÜRLICH!

Naturkind steht für Artikel in ausschließlicher Bio-Qualität, bevorzugt regional und lokal erzeugt – eben mit dem reinen Geschmack der Natur. Ökologischer Landbau, artgerechte Tierhaltung und eine kooperative Zusammenarbeit mit Erzeugern sind die Grundpfeiler der Lebensmittelherstellung, wie sie bei Naturkind als wertvoll und schützenswert verstanden und gelebt werden. Für Naturkind ist dieses Engagement selbstverständlich, vielmehr kommt es von innen heraus. Und genau deshalb passen Naturkind und Weitblick auch so gut zusammen. „Wir glauben, dass bewusster Genuss der Schlüssel zu einer besseren Welt und einem nachhaltigen Leben ist. Denn er verbindet die Freude an wertvollen und gesunden Lebensmitteln mit der Achtung vor der Umwelt und der menschlichen Arbeit. Weitblick produziert Kleidung aus fairer Baumwolle und teilt unsere Werte hinsichtlich des Nachhaltigkeitsgedankens. Jedes Unternehmen ist auf seinem Gebiet ein Weltverbesserer – das ergibt für Naturkind eine wertvolle  Partnerschaft auf Augenhöhe“, erläutert Rüdiger Ammon, Naturkind-Inhaber, die Entscheidung für die Workwear mit Fairtrade- Baumwolle von Weitblick.

STEP BY STEP

Jeder kleine Beitrag zu einem nachhaltigeren, umweltbewussteren Leben zählt. Ob es nun die Reduzierung von Fleisch oder tierischen Produkten, die Einsparung von Plastikverpackungen oder eben der Kauf von Kleidung mit verarbeitender Baumwolle zu Fairtrade-Bedigungen ist: jeder Einzelne kann und sollte das tun, wozu er sich imstande fühlt. Denn der Weg zum Ziel beginnt doch mit dem ersten Schritt. Zweifelsohne sind momentan besonders viele dieser kleinen, ersten Schritte auch bitter nötig. In Indien, das zu den wichtigsten Textilproduzenten der Welt gehört, wurde am 24. März der Lockdown beschlossen – mit weitreichenden Folgen für die vielen Wanderarbeiter und Kleinbauern. Auch in Kenia und  Äthiopien wurden unzählige Menschen entlang der Textilproduktionskette ihrer Erwerbsgrundlage beraubt. Gerade jetzt braucht es verantwortungsvolle Unternehmen, die gemeinsam mit allen Beteiligten nach Lösungen suchen – eben ein partnerschaftliches Miteinander. Durch das Support Fairtrade Cotton
Programm leistet Weitblick hier einen aktiven Beitrag, um eine verbesserte Einkommenssituation und finanzielle Stabilität der Kleinbauern zu erwirken und dauerhaft verbesserten Gesundheitsschutz sowie geregelte Arbeitsbedingungen zu schaffen – auch und besonders in der Corona-Krise.

„Wir nehmen hier gerne eine Vorbildfunktion ein, denn es geht momentan nicht nur um die Einkommen, sondern schlichtweg um die Existenz der Menschen. In den Herkunftsländern fair gehandelter Baumwolle trifft das Virus nicht nur auf fragile Gesundheitssysteme, sondern zugleich auf eine exportabhängige Wirtschaft und fehlende soziale Absicherung. Es liegt an uns, hier zu handeln und aktiv zu werden“, fasst Felix Blumenauer, Geschäftsführer von Weitblick, entschlossen zusammen.

FAIRER MUNDSCHUTZ

Dass neben der ersten Kollektion mit dem Supporting Cotton Siegel auch die kurzerhand in die Produktion aufgenommenen Hygiene-Masken aus dem Hause Weitblick faire Stücke sind, versteht sich da fast von selbst. Die Stoffe aus Geweberückständen und fairer Baumwolle werden über das Supporting Fairtrade Cotton Projekt bezogen. Genäht wird in den europäischen Produktionsstätten. Mit jedem Kauf einer Maske aus dieser Produktion werden Baumwollproduzenten im angeschlagenen, globalen Süden unterstützt – und wichtige Arbeitsplätze erhalten: zahlreiche Unternehmen haben nämlich ihre bereits platzierten Aufträge storniert und sorgen so für eine zusätzliche Verschärfung der Lage.

 

 

WEITBLICK® | Gottfried Schmidt OHG

Photo: Frank Oudeman
04.09.2019

EuroShop: From clicks to bricks: Why online brands are getting physical

For years, media headlines have declared the death of the high street at the hands of e-commerce. But, while several well-known retailers have indeed shut up shop or cut back on store numbers, a growing number of digitally native brands are investing in bricks-and-mortar spaces to complement and support their online offer.

At the last EuroShop, the World´s No. 1Retail Trade Fairtrade, were already first signs that Pure Player and online start-ups are also increasingly looking offline. 3 years later, at EuroShop 2020 from 16 to 20 February in Düsseldorf, Germany, this will now be one of the major topics of the industry.

In fact, a report published by property firm JLL towards the end of 2018 predicts that online retailers in the U.S. will open 850 stores over the next five years, demonstrating the value these brands place on having a physical presence. “Everyone is saying that physical retail is dying, but online brands are opening at a pretty fast and aggressive rate,” says Taylor Coyne, Research Manager of Retail for JLL, in the report.

For years, media headlines have declared the death of the high street at the hands of e-commerce. But, while several well-known retailers have indeed shut up shop or cut back on store numbers, a growing number of digitally native brands are investing in bricks-and-mortar spaces to complement and support their online offer.

At the last EuroShop, the World´s No. 1Retail Trade Fairtrade, were already first signs that Pure Player and online start-ups are also increasingly looking offline. 3 years later, at EuroShop 2020 from 16 to 20 February in Düsseldorf, Germany, this will now be one of the major topics of the industry.

In fact, a report published by property firm JLL towards the end of 2018 predicts that online retailers in the U.S. will open 850 stores over the next five years, demonstrating the value these brands place on having a physical presence. “Everyone is saying that physical retail is dying, but online brands are opening at a pretty fast and aggressive rate,” says Taylor Coyne, Research Manager of Retail for JLL, in the report.

Despite the continuing growth in online sales, the majority of consumers still prefer the experience of shopping in-store, and more and more digitally native brands are using physical retail to their advantage.

Source:

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH