From the Sector

Reset
4 results
02.06.2021

Teijin: Tenax™ Carbon Fiber Prepreg Adopted for Next-Generation Aircraft Engine Nacelle

Teijin Limited announced today that its Tenax™ carbon fiber prepreg has been adopted for a part of nacelle, or streamlined housing, for next-generation aircraft engine to be used by Airbus. A prototype of the nacelle part, which Nikkiso Co., Ltd. is developing for Airbus’s Propulsion of Tomorrow project, will be delivered to Airbus by the end of 2021.

The Tenax™ prepreg used for the nacelle part was developed especially for aircraft applications using high-performance and rapid-curing epoxy resin. Notably, the Tenax™ prepreg can be molded at a lower temperature and in a shorter time than conventional prepregs for aircraft applications. In addition to general autoclave molding, the Tenax™ prepreg also is suited to press molding for mass production, achieving excellent quality required for aircraft applications. Furthermore, it is compatible with automated fiber placement (AFP) therefore can be combined with automatic laminating technology and short-time molding to maximize production efficiency. The excellent productivity and cost efficiency of the Tenax™ prepreg were key reasons why it was adopted for Nikkiso’s nacelle.

Teijin Limited announced today that its Tenax™ carbon fiber prepreg has been adopted for a part of nacelle, or streamlined housing, for next-generation aircraft engine to be used by Airbus. A prototype of the nacelle part, which Nikkiso Co., Ltd. is developing for Airbus’s Propulsion of Tomorrow project, will be delivered to Airbus by the end of 2021.

The Tenax™ prepreg used for the nacelle part was developed especially for aircraft applications using high-performance and rapid-curing epoxy resin. Notably, the Tenax™ prepreg can be molded at a lower temperature and in a shorter time than conventional prepregs for aircraft applications. In addition to general autoclave molding, the Tenax™ prepreg also is suited to press molding for mass production, achieving excellent quality required for aircraft applications. Furthermore, it is compatible with automated fiber placement (AFP) therefore can be combined with automatic laminating technology and short-time molding to maximize production efficiency. The excellent productivity and cost efficiency of the Tenax™ prepreg were key reasons why it was adopted for Nikkiso’s nacelle.

Teijin is intensively accelerating its development of mid- to downstream applications for aircraft, one of the strategic focuses of its medium-term management plan for 2020-2022. Going forward, Teijin intends to further strengthen its carbon fiber and intermediate material businesses to contribute to increasing global sustainability, aiming to become a company that supports the society of the future.

Source:

Teijin

Pump components made from zirconium oxide ceramic (c) Oerlikon
Pump components made from zirconium oxide ceramic
12.11.2020

Oerlikon: Robust pumps for sophisticated special fibers

At first glance, rowing boats, the Airbus 380, safety equipment and stadium roofing have very little on common. They receive their specific properties as a result of the use of special fibers, among other things: aramid fibers and carbon fibers are processed into special yarns that are frequently deployed as compound materials. These fibers are growing in demand as the world seeks to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels; new solutions are required to reduce weight and replace heavy metallic parts.

Aramid fibers are produced in a highly-chemical process that is extremely aggressive; the acrylic precursor used to manufacture carbon fibers is a different process, but again no less difficult. In these sophisticated processes, the gear metering pumps are not only responsible for the high-precision control of the melt transport; durability, resistance within aggressive environments and cost efficiency also play decisive roles.

At first glance, rowing boats, the Airbus 380, safety equipment and stadium roofing have very little on common. They receive their specific properties as a result of the use of special fibers, among other things: aramid fibers and carbon fibers are processed into special yarns that are frequently deployed as compound materials. These fibers are growing in demand as the world seeks to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels; new solutions are required to reduce weight and replace heavy metallic parts.

Aramid fibers are produced in a highly-chemical process that is extremely aggressive; the acrylic precursor used to manufacture carbon fibers is a different process, but again no less difficult. In these sophisticated processes, the gear metering pumps are not only responsible for the high-precision control of the melt transport; durability, resistance within aggressive environments and cost efficiency also play decisive roles.

Special materials for special tasks
The process, the expected pump lifespan and the maintenance frequency are the decisive factors for choosing the materials from which the pumps and their components are manufactured. For optimum results, Oerlikon Barmag offers solutions that intelligently combine the various materials and the latest technologies. Whether in the case of surfaces with ceramic coatings, gears and shafts featuring DLC coatings, pumps made from cobalt alloys (StelliteTM) or robust and durable Oerlikon Barmag hybrid constructions comprising zirconium oxide ceramic and duplex stainless steel – the high-precision ZP- and GM-series pumps are design-optimized depending on the intended use. Various seal systems and customized drive concepts round off the pump program.

Source:

Oerlikon

SGL Carbon und Solvay schließen Kooperation zur Entwicklung von im hohen Maße konkurrenzfähigen und fortschrittlichen Carbonfaser-Verbundwerkstoffen für Primärstrukturen in der Luftfahrt (c) SGL CARBON SE
SGL Carbon Large-Tow-IM-Carbonfaser Produktion am US-Standort Moses Lake
03.12.2019

Collaboration between SGL Carbon and Solvay

SGL Carbon and Solvay collaborate to develop highly-competitive advanced carbon fiber composites for aerospace primary structures

SGL Carbon and Solvay have entered into a joint development agreement (JDA) to bring to market the first composite materials based on large-tow intermediate modulus (IM) carbon fiber. These materials, which address the need to reduce costs and CO2 emissions, and improve the production process and fuel efficiency of next-generation commercial aircraft, will be based on SGL Carbon’s large-tow IM carbon fiber and Solvay’s primary structure resin systems.

The agreement encompasses both thermoset and thermoplastic composite technologies. It builds on Solvay’s leadership in supplying advanced materials to the aerospace industry and SGL Carbon’s expertise in high-volume carbon fiber manufacturing.

SGL Carbon and Solvay collaborate to develop highly-competitive advanced carbon fiber composites for aerospace primary structures

SGL Carbon and Solvay have entered into a joint development agreement (JDA) to bring to market the first composite materials based on large-tow intermediate modulus (IM) carbon fiber. These materials, which address the need to reduce costs and CO2 emissions, and improve the production process and fuel efficiency of next-generation commercial aircraft, will be based on SGL Carbon’s large-tow IM carbon fiber and Solvay’s primary structure resin systems.

The agreement encompasses both thermoset and thermoplastic composite technologies. It builds on Solvay’s leadership in supplying advanced materials to the aerospace industry and SGL Carbon’s expertise in high-volume carbon fiber manufacturing.

“For Solvay, this is an opportunity to lead the aerospace adoption of a composite material based on 50K IM carbon fiber. This is a highly competitive value proposition that brings more affordable high-performance solutions to our customers. We see this as the first step in a long-term partnership,” said Augusto Di Donfrancesco, member of Solvay’s executive committee.

“By combining SGL’s carbon fiber expertise in our newly developed, unique 50K IM fiber with Solvay’s resin formulation and aerospace market expertise, both partners are aiming to develop an advanced aerospace material system. This alliance supports our strategic direction and accelerates our growth in the attractive aerospace market,” said Dr. Michael Majerus, spokesman of the management board of SGL Carbon.

Composite materials for aerospace applications represent a multi-billion-dollar market that is expected to grow strongly in the coming decade. Solvay and SGL Carbon are uniquely positioned to develop solutions to address the needs of this market.

More information:
Solvay SGL Carbon Carbonfaser
Source:

SGL CARBON SE

Die Carbonfaser revolutionieren – RCCF eröffnet Technikum (c) TU Dresden
05.11.2018

Die Carbonfaser revolutionieren – RCCF eröffnet Technikum

  • Mit einem Festakt haben Dr. Eva-Maria Stange, Staatsministerin für Wissenschaft und Kunst des Freistaates Sachsen, Prof. Gerhard Rödel, Prorektor für Forschung der Technischen Universität Dresden, Prof. Hubert Jäger und Prof. Chokri Cherif am 02.11.2018 das Carbonfaser-Technikum des Research Center Carbon Fibers (RCCF) eröffnet.

Das RCCF, eine gemeinsame wissenschaftliche Einrichtung des Instituts für Leichtbau und Kunststofftechnik (ILK) und des Instituts für Textilmaschinen und Textile Hochleistungswerkstofftechnik (ITM) der TU Dresden, wurde gegründet, um die Carbonfasern vom Faserrohstoff bis zum fertigen Bauteil zu erforschen und neue Eigenschaften und Anwendungsmöglichkeiten zu entdecken.

  • Mit einem Festakt haben Dr. Eva-Maria Stange, Staatsministerin für Wissenschaft und Kunst des Freistaates Sachsen, Prof. Gerhard Rödel, Prorektor für Forschung der Technischen Universität Dresden, Prof. Hubert Jäger und Prof. Chokri Cherif am 02.11.2018 das Carbonfaser-Technikum des Research Center Carbon Fibers (RCCF) eröffnet.

Das RCCF, eine gemeinsame wissenschaftliche Einrichtung des Instituts für Leichtbau und Kunststofftechnik (ILK) und des Instituts für Textilmaschinen und Textile Hochleistungswerkstofftechnik (ITM) der TU Dresden, wurde gegründet, um die Carbonfasern vom Faserrohstoff bis zum fertigen Bauteil zu erforschen und neue Eigenschaften und Anwendungsmöglichkeiten zu entdecken.

„Sachsen verfügt in der Schlüsseltechnologie Werkstoff-, Material- und Nanowissenschaft über hervorragende Rahmenbedingungen und hoch motivierte Wissenschaftler an Hochschulen und Forschungseinrichtungen, die in dieser Spezialisierung weltweit ihresgleichen suchen“, erklärt dazu Staatsministerin Dr. Stange. „Beinahe alle Materialklassen von Metallen, Polymeren, Keramiken bis hin zu Verbund- und Naturwerkstoffen werden auf international hohem Niveau bearbeitet. Dabei greifen Grundlagen- und Angewandte Forschung in zahlreichen Feldern eng ineinander und bilden geschlossene Entwicklungsketten bis zu einem Transfer in die Wirtschaft – regional, national und international.“

Der Prorektor für Forschung der TU Dresden, Prof. Gerhard Rödel, ergänzt: „Mit dem Carbonfaser-Technikum ist im Research Center Carbon Fibers eine weltweit einzigartige Anlage entstanden, die völlig neue Möglichkeiten eröffnet. Es geht darum, Fasern mit einem möglichst hohen Individualisierungsgrad zu designen – je nach Bedarf und Einsatzbereich.“

Auf der derzeit installierten, einzigartigen Anlage erforschen Wissenschaftler des RCCF unter Reinraum-Bedingungen die Grundlagen für maßgeschneiderte Kohlenstofffasern und erschließen deren hohes Innovationspotential. Dabei greifen die Forscher auf einzelne Anlagenmodule zur Stabilisierung und Carbonisierung mit industrienahem Ofendesign und individuell einstellbaren Parameterkombinationen zurück. Durch den außerordentlichen Reinheitsgrad sind die Carbonfasern für die Anforderungen der Luft-/Raumfahrt- und der Automobilindustrie maßgeschneidert.

„Die Carbonfaser ist der Stahl des 21. Jahrhunderts“, führt Prof. Hubert Jäger, Sprecher des Instituts für Leichtbau und Kunststofftechnik (ILK), aus. „Ganze Branchen erfinden sich derzeit durch diesen Werkstoff neu und erreichen mit ihren Produkten nie gedachte Dimensionen. Das Problem ist jedoch die Verfügbarkeit. Wir werden mit dem Carbonfaser-Technikum einen Beitrag dazu leisten, dass aus Sachsen heraus dieser Werkstoff nicht nur leichter verfügbar, sondern auch besser und maßgeschneidert einsetzbar wird für Anwendungen in der Luft- und Raumfahrt, Fahrzeugbau, Architektur und Hochleistungselektronik.“

„Mit der Inbetriebnahme des Carbonfaser-Technikums unter Reinraumbedingungen am RCCF gelingt es uns, die Prozesskette zur Fertigung maßgeschneiderter Kohlenstofffasern signifikant zu erweitern. Die notwendigen Maschinentechniken des ITM einschließlich der bereits gewonnenen Erfahrungen bei Prozessoptimierungen zur Herstellung von Precursorfasern, dem Ausgangsmaterial für die neuen Stabilisierungs- und Carbonisierungslinien, stehen in künftigen Forschungsvorhaben den Wissenschaftlern des RCCF zur Verfügung. Somit geben wir am exzellenten Forschungsstandort Dresden die Initialzündung für die weiterführende Grundlagen- und anwendungsorientierte Forschung auf dem Gebiet der Kohlenstofffasern“, ergänzt Prof. Chokri Cherif, Direktor des ITM und Inhaber der Professur für Textiltechnik.

Das Carbonfaser-Technikum umfasst einen mehr als 300 m² großen Reinraum der Klasse ISO 8. Neben den beiden auf etwa 30 Metern aufgestellten Stabilisierungs- und Carbonisierungslinien sind weitere Flächen für künftige Erweiterungen der Gesamtanlage vorgesehen, zum Beispiel ein weiterer Hochtemperaturofen, in dem Carbonfasern bis zu Temperaturen über 2000°C graphitierbar sind oder unikale Beschichtungsanlagen zur Oberflächenaktivierung.

Die RCCF-Wissenschaftler ergründen die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Prozessparametern, Faserstruktur und weiteren mechanischen, thermischen und elektrischen Eigenschaften bei der Herstellung von Carbonfasern, um die Fähigkeiten des Hightech-Werkstoffes weiter zu steigern. Zusätzlich nehmen die Forscher die Entwicklung multifunktionaler Fasern mit neuartigen Eigenschaftsprofilen wie hohe Leitfähigkeit bei hoher Festigkeit oder ausgeprägter Verformbarkeit sowie die Nutzung erneuerbarer Ausgangsstoffe in den Fokus ihrer Arbeiten.

Ein weiterer Schwerpunkt der RCCF-Aktivitäten ist die tiefgreifende studentische Ausbildung im Bereich der Carbonfaser-Herstellung. Den Studierenden werden dabei fundierte Kenntnisse in Herstellung und Weiterverarbeitung von Carbonfasern vermittelt, damit sie in diesem Bereich der Zukunftstechnologien dem sächsischen und deutschen Arbeitsmarkt zur Verfügung stehen. Etwa 15 Studierende werden pro Jahr in Forschungsbereiche wie die Prozessführung, -modellierung und -überwachung sowie die Entwicklung, Fertigung und Charakterisierung neuer Carbonfasern und Verbundwerkstoffe einbezogen.

More information:
TU Dresden Carbonfaser
Source:

Technische Universität Dresden  - Fakultät Maschinenwesen   
Institut für Textilmaschinen und Textile Hochleistungswerkstofftechnik (ITM)