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27.09.2022

Lenzing awarded by EcoVadis for sustainability

  • Lenzing has been awarded the highest CSR rating from EcoVadis for the second consecutive time
  • Global rating standard evaluates 90,000 companies: Lenzing among top 1 percent of its industry
  • enzing joins the UN Global Compact sustainability initiative

Lenzing Group has been awarded platinum status in the CSR rating from EcoVadis. This comprehensive assessment covers the four key practices of corporate social responsibility: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, ethics and sustainable procurement.

This is the second time that EcoVadis, a leading international provider of sustainability ratings for businesses, has awarded platinum status to Lenzing for its sustainability performance. As a result, Lenzing ranks among the world’s top 1 percent of companies in its sector that are rated by EcoVadis.

  • Lenzing has been awarded the highest CSR rating from EcoVadis for the second consecutive time
  • Global rating standard evaluates 90,000 companies: Lenzing among top 1 percent of its industry
  • enzing joins the UN Global Compact sustainability initiative

Lenzing Group has been awarded platinum status in the CSR rating from EcoVadis. This comprehensive assessment covers the four key practices of corporate social responsibility: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, ethics and sustainable procurement.

This is the second time that EcoVadis, a leading international provider of sustainability ratings for businesses, has awarded platinum status to Lenzing for its sustainability performance. As a result, Lenzing ranks among the world’s top 1 percent of companies in its sector that are rated by EcoVadis.

In line with its “Naturally positive” sustainability strategy, the Lenzing Group has set ambitious targets in each of its core strategic areas, aimed at bolstering its capacity to move from a linear to a circular model. Lenzing reports the corresponding implementation measures and the progress it has made in its annual sustainability report. This high level of accountability and transparency was particularly praised in the assessment by EcoVadis. The rating provider also highlighted Lenzing’s comprehensive measures to reduce air pollution, wastewater and greenhouse gases, in addition to its provision of skills development training and health care programs for staff members.

Partnerships for systemic change
Lenzing forges strategic partnerships with various stakeholders to meet its ambitious climate and sustainability targets and drive forward systemic change in the textile and nonwoven industries. This is why Lenzing, as one of 15,000 companies worldwide, joined the United Nations Global Compact. As a member, Lenzing is committed to upholding human rights, respecting the rights of employees and their representatives, protecting the environment, enabling fair competition and combating corruption.

Source:

Lenzing AG

Photo: Pincroft
23.09.2022

Pincroft: Innovative non-skin contact vector protection for military fabrics

Pincroft announced the adoption of an innovative precision spray technology that allows the application of many finishes for textiles, including permethrin for vector protection, to the face of the fabric to avoid contact with the skin.

The system is a more versatile and environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional application method of padding and offers the possibility of applying the chemistry on either face side or both sides of the fabric across the full width.

The benefits of this new equipment are countless not only for the end user but also for the environment. The system allows for a reduction of energy, water and wet pick up of up to 50%, while 100% of the chemistry is recycled. Thanks to the equipment’s precision application technology, less water and chemistry are needed, and its no immersion system means the fabric would require less saturation and a shorter drying time.

Pincroft announced the adoption of an innovative precision spray technology that allows the application of many finishes for textiles, including permethrin for vector protection, to the face of the fabric to avoid contact with the skin.

The system is a more versatile and environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional application method of padding and offers the possibility of applying the chemistry on either face side or both sides of the fabric across the full width.

The benefits of this new equipment are countless not only for the end user but also for the environment. The system allows for a reduction of energy, water and wet pick up of up to 50%, while 100% of the chemistry is recycled. Thanks to the equipment’s precision application technology, less water and chemistry are needed, and its no immersion system means the fabric would require less saturation and a shorter drying time.

Mike Collins, Pincroft’s Managing Director: “This innovative equipment can be used in two ways. The single sided spray finishing can be used where the full effectiveness of the finish is only required on the face side of the end item, for example, vector, fluorocarbon and antimicrobial protection. The dual spray finish may be used to simulate the traditional padding method where full effectiveness of the finish is required dependant on end use, for instance, crease recovery, fabric softening, soil release and moisture management.”

This vector protection solution provided by Pincroft is ACTIGARD®, a branded technology developed by Sanitized AG, with long lasting active ingredients that have proved highly effective against mosquitoes and ticks. This product endures a high number of washes, is suitable for military uniforms and conforms to Standard 100 by Oeko-Tex®.

Source:

Pincroft

(c) C.L.A.S.S.
21.09.2022

WHITE and C.L.A.S.S. are back to “Unveiling the Fashion Backstage”

C.L.A.S.S. continues its path of "strategic sustainable synergies" with the aim of sharing its message of responsible innovation, and returns for the second time to Milan Fashion Week with WSM White Sustainable Milano. The objective is to represent a selected and smart path of the production chain related to materials, technologies, production, customization, finishing processes and dyes that are increasingly less impactful on the environment.
 
After debuting last February, “Unveiling the Fashion Backstage”, the educational and narrative journey of WSM | White Sustainable Milano developed in synergy with Giusy Bettoni, founder and CEO of C.L.A.S.S., returns to the VISCONTI HALL and grows in terms of attendance and thematic areas.

The exhibiting copmpanies are: Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei, Maeba International, Linificio e Canapificio Nazionale SB, Edmos, Toyoshima, Iluna Group and YKK.

C.L.A.S.S. continues its path of "strategic sustainable synergies" with the aim of sharing its message of responsible innovation, and returns for the second time to Milan Fashion Week with WSM White Sustainable Milano. The objective is to represent a selected and smart path of the production chain related to materials, technologies, production, customization, finishing processes and dyes that are increasingly less impactful on the environment.
 
After debuting last February, “Unveiling the Fashion Backstage”, the educational and narrative journey of WSM | White Sustainable Milano developed in synergy with Giusy Bettoni, founder and CEO of C.L.A.S.S., returns to the VISCONTI HALL and grows in terms of attendance and thematic areas.

The exhibiting copmpanies are: Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei, Maeba International, Linificio e Canapificio Nazionale SB, Edmos, Toyoshima, Iluna Group and YKK.

19.09.2022

Lenzing suspends guidance for 2022

In view of the drastic deterioration of the market environment in the current quarter, the Lenzing Group suspends its guidance for the development of earnings in the 2022 financial year.

The further course of the 2022 financial year can only be estimated to a limited extent due to the extremely low visibility on the demand side and the high volatility of energy and raw material costs.

In view of the drastic deterioration of the market environment in the current quarter, the Lenzing Group suspends its guidance for the development of earnings in the 2022 financial year.

The further course of the 2022 financial year can only be estimated to a limited extent due to the extremely low visibility on the demand side and the high volatility of energy and raw material costs.

More information:
prognosis Inflation Ukraine
Source:

Lenzing Group

Stahl
19.09.2022

EcoVadis Platinum rating for Stahl

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has been awarded the highest EcoVadis Platinum rating, placing it within the top 1% of companies assessed by EcoVadis. The award underlines Stahl’s commitment to collaborating with its partners to reduce its environmental impact and build a more responsible and transparent supply chain.

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has been awarded the highest EcoVadis Platinum rating, placing it within the top 1% of companies assessed by EcoVadis. The award underlines Stahl’s commitment to collaborating with its partners to reduce its environmental impact and build a more responsible and transparent supply chain.

EcoVadis is a globally recognized evidence-based assessment platform that reviews the performance of more than 90,000 organizations across key sustainability criteria. These include environmental impact, labor and human rights standards, ethics, and sustainable procurement practices. The latest report from EcoVadis highlights Stahl’s positive progress across all these areas and builds on the Gold rating achieved by the company in 2021. Stahl’s 2030 target is to maintain the EcoVadis Platinum rating by working closely with its value-chain partners to help them reduce their environmental impact – including by supporting their transition to renewable feedstocks. In 2021, 80% of Stahl’s total spend on raw materials was supplied by EcoVadis-rated suppliers.
 
The new EcoVadis rating comes as Stahl accelerates its efforts to ensure a more responsible and transparent supply chain. Recent steps toward this goal have included establishing a dedicated Supply Chain Transparency division within the company’s Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) department. The division will be tasked with coordinating a new product development framework that prioritizes the responsible sourcing of raw materials. Furthermore, in July 2022, Stahl submitted a new greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target, including a specific commitment regarding the company’s Scope 3 upstream emissions. Stahl aims to reduce these by at least 25% over the next 10 years, compared with the base year (2021). Stahl expects to achieve this reduction primarily by working with its suppliers to replace fossil-based raw materials with lower-carbon alternatives.

Source:

Stahl Holdings B.V.

15.09.2022

DyStar cautiously optimistic about the financial and environmental performance

  • Integrated Sustainability Report 2021 – 2022 published

DyStar, a leading specialty chemical company released its twelfth annual Sustainability Performance Report. The report is prepared in accordance with the updated GRI Standards 2021: Core option. DyStar continues to adopt the Integrated Reporting <IR> framework to communicate how the group has successfully created tangible value across multiple stakeholder groups in six major capitals.

DyStar reports that they have inched themselves closer to some of their 2025 target of reducing the environmental footprint by 30% for every ton of product, from 2011 levels. Here are some key highlights for FY2021:

  • Integrated Sustainability Report 2021 – 2022 published

DyStar, a leading specialty chemical company released its twelfth annual Sustainability Performance Report. The report is prepared in accordance with the updated GRI Standards 2021: Core option. DyStar continues to adopt the Integrated Reporting <IR> framework to communicate how the group has successfully created tangible value across multiple stakeholder groups in six major capitals.

DyStar reports that they have inched themselves closer to some of their 2025 target of reducing the environmental footprint by 30% for every ton of product, from 2011 levels. Here are some key highlights for FY2021:

  • Recorded more than 29% increase in revenue compared to 2020
  • Zero workplace fatalities, high-consequence injuries, and work-related ill health
  • 40% reduction in Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity, compared to 2011
  • 37% decrease in wastewater emission intensity, compared to 2011

The Group was able to remain resilient and steer itself toward optimistic growth and recovery from the global pandemic in FY2021. In face of recent geopolitical events and macroeconomic factors such as soaring energy costs, DyStar and the wider supply chain will continue to face challenges. As a result, the company believes it is crucial to stay committed to their 2025 Sustainability goals to continue generating value for all stakeholders in the longer term, well beyond these turbulent times.

The report communicates DyStar’s progress towards its sustainability agenda and material topics. As part of our commitment to environmental sustainability, only an e-magazine and a PDF version will be made available for download from www.DyStar.com/sustainability-reports/

More information:
DyStar Sustainability Report
Source:

DyStar

07.09.2022

GFA launches new international edition of Global Fashion Summit in Singapore

Global Fashion Agenda (GFA) has launched a new international edition of Global Fashion Summit. Traditionally held in Copenhagen, the new edition in Singapore will further focus on the perspectives of manufacturers and supply chain partners to deeper understand how the industry can collaborate to reduce social and environmental impact in the entire value chain. Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition will take place on 3 November 2022 at Hilton Singapore Orchard.

Global Fashion Agenda (GFA) has launched a new international edition of Global Fashion Summit. Traditionally held in Copenhagen, the new edition in Singapore will further focus on the perspectives of manufacturers and supply chain partners to deeper understand how the industry can collaborate to reduce social and environmental impact in the entire value chain. Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition will take place on 3 November 2022 at Hilton Singapore Orchard.

The theme of Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition continues GFA’s focus on ‘Alliances For a New Era’. Under this theme, the Summit will call on the industry to accelerate change - encouraging more alliances between manufacturers, suppliers, investors, brands, NGOs, policymakers and more. It will also examine cross-industry alliances, in a bid to accelerate the transition to a net positive reality.
 
By bringing the forum to Asia, the new edition will include even more manufacturer and supply chain partner voices in the programme to discuss sustainability challenges, differences, and opportunities to collaborate with brand executives on equal terms. Plenary sessions will consider topics such as:

  • Renewable energy transformation – what does concrete transformation look like from tier 1-3 perspectives and what measures are needed to implement it?
  • Better wage systems – how can the industry establish fair compensation, underpinned by fair purchasing practices that will help end poverty for millions of garment workers?
  • Performance measurement – how can the industry accurately measure sustainability performance and tackle data credibility challenges?

Half of the programme will be dedicated to educational and action-oriented business case studies with options for direct interaction and live reactions. These will include tangible learnings and concrete recommendations to mobilise guests to take immediate action following the event.
 
The event will foster further collaboration across stakeholder groups through productive roundtable sessions that create an exchange of views among key decision makers in both the public and private sectors. These meetings will be designed and set up to drive commitments and new alliances for concrete action.

Source:

Global Fashion Agenda

02.09.2022

RGE: Closed-loop urban-fit textile-to-textile recycling solutions in Singapore

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings.

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings. The research centre will develop new technologies to recycle textile waste into fibre and create new, next-generation eco-friendly and sustainable textiles.

This move comes on the back of the tightening of waste import bans in countries such as China, India and Indonesia, which are among the world’s largest waste processors. The stricter import bans have left cities in need of viable local textile recycling solutions to tackle the immense textile waste generated.

RGE Executive Director, Mr Perry Lim, said, “Current textile recycling technologies, which rely primarily on a bleaching and separation process using heavy chemicals, cannot be implemented due to environmental laws. At the same time, there is an urgent need to keep textiles out of the brimming landfills.” He added, “As the world’s largest viscose producer, we aim to catalyse closed-loop, textile-to-textile recycling by developing optimal urban-fit solutions that can bring the world closer to a circular textile economy.”

Globally, an estimated 90 million tonnes of textile waste is generated and disposed of every year, with less than 1% being upcycled into new clothing or other textile materials. By 2030, the amount of global textile waste, which currently accounts for almost 10% of municipal solid waste, is expected to reach more than 134 million tonnes. The textile industry is also responsible for 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than international flights and maritime shipping combined.

At present, most of the available textile recycling technologies are open-loop, where textile waste is typically downcycled to lower-quality products (insulating materials, cleaning cloths, etc.) or be used in waste-to-heat recycling.

“Closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling processes, particularly chemical recycling, are still under development. Scaling up the technologies to industrial scale remains a challenge. A key bottleneck is that refabricating textile waste into fibre needs purity standards for feedstock. However, most of the clothes that we wear are made of a mixture of different synthetic and natural fibres, which makes separating the complex blends of materials challenging for effective recycling.

“Our aim is to address this industry pain point by developing viable solutions that use less energy, fewer chemicals and produces harmless and less effluents, and then potentially scale up across our global operations,” Mr Lim said.

To tackle the key challenges in closed-loop textile recycling, RGE-NTU SusTex is looking into four key research areas, namely cleaner and more energy efficient methods of recycling into new raw materials, automated sorting of textile waste, eco-friendly dye removal, and development of a new class of sustainable textiles that is durable for wear and, at the same time, lends itself to easier recycling.

Technologies developed by RGE-NTU SusTex will be test bedded at RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant in Singapore, which is projected for completion as early as 2024. If successful, RGE has plans to replicate the plant in other urban cities within its footprint.

 

Source:

Royal Golden Eagle

(c) Adient
As a symbol for a sustainable cooperation, Michel Berthelin (Executive Vice President EMEA, 2nd from left) and Henrik Henriksson (CEO H2 Green Steel, 1st from right) planted a ginkgo tree together with their teams in front of the Adient EMEA headquarters in Burscheid, Germany.
01.09.2022

Adient: Cooperation with H2 Green Steel to reduce carbon footprint

Adient, a supplier of seating systems for the automotive industry, has entered into a cooperation with Swedish steelmaker H2 Green Steel (H2GS) to reduce the carbon footprint in its value chain.
 
On 1st September Michel Berthelin, Executive Vice President Adient EMEA, and Henrik Henriksson, CEO of H2 Green Steel, have mutually signed an agreement to supply fossil-free steel with low carbon footprint from 2026 on and subsequently use it in Adient's metal products.

Adient, a supplier of seating systems for the automotive industry, has entered into a cooperation with Swedish steelmaker H2 Green Steel (H2GS) to reduce the carbon footprint in its value chain.
 
On 1st September Michel Berthelin, Executive Vice President Adient EMEA, and Henrik Henriksson, CEO of H2 Green Steel, have mutually signed an agreement to supply fossil-free steel with low carbon footprint from 2026 on and subsequently use it in Adient's metal products.

Michel Berthelin explains the background to the cooperation: “As a company, we are committed to the Science Based Targets Initiative, a collaboration between leading global institutions to set a science-based climate target. We also support the Carbon Disclosure Project, which helps companies and cities to understand and disclose their environmental impacts. The decision to shift parts of the steel volume sourced for our production to a steel with low carbon footprint is part of our sustainability strategy. It is our goal to reduce emissions at our production sites that are caused directly by our own sources or indirectly by our energy suppliers by 75% by 2030. In parallel, we aim to reduce emissions along our supply chains by 35% over the same period. In doing so, Adient actively fosters the industry's transformation towards a more responsible use of natural resources.”

Steel from H2 Green Steel is produced with up to 95% less CO2 emissions compared to conventional steel production. The company achieves this by replacing coal with green hydrogen in production and by the use of electricity from non-fossil sources. In this way, mainly water and heat are produced as waste products.

Source:

Adient

26.08.2022

EURATEX: Future of the European textile & clothing industry is at stake

  • European Textile Industry calls for immediate action to tackle the energy crisis;

The European textile & fashion in Europe, represented by EURATEX, calls for a single European strategy to tackle this energy crisis. To safeguard the future of the industry, a revision of the electricity price mechanism is necessary and an EU wide cap on gas prices at 80€/MWh. Special company support needs to be granted to avoid bankruptcy and relocation of textile production outside Europe.

Gas and electricity prices have reached unprecedented levels in Europe. Due to severe global competition in the market that characterizes the European textile & clothing industry, these cost increases are impossible to pass on to customers. This has already led to capacity reductions and production stops. Closures and the shift of production outside Europe are being forecasted should the current situation persist, leading to further de-industrialization of our continent and increased dependency on external suppliers.

  • European Textile Industry calls for immediate action to tackle the energy crisis;

The European textile & fashion in Europe, represented by EURATEX, calls for a single European strategy to tackle this energy crisis. To safeguard the future of the industry, a revision of the electricity price mechanism is necessary and an EU wide cap on gas prices at 80€/MWh. Special company support needs to be granted to avoid bankruptcy and relocation of textile production outside Europe.

Gas and electricity prices have reached unprecedented levels in Europe. Due to severe global competition in the market that characterizes the European textile & clothing industry, these cost increases are impossible to pass on to customers. This has already led to capacity reductions and production stops. Closures and the shift of production outside Europe are being forecasted should the current situation persist, leading to further de-industrialization of our continent and increased dependency on external suppliers.

Specific segments of the textile industry are particularly vulnerable. The man-made fibres (MMF), synthetic and cellulose-based fibres, industry for instance is an energy intensive sector and a major consumer of natural gas in the manufacturing of its fibres. The disappearance of European fibre products would have immediate consequences for the textile industry and for society at large. The activities of textile dyeing and finishing are also relatively intensive in energy. These activities are essential in the textile value chain in order to give the textile products and garments added value through colour and special functionalities (e.g. for medical applications).

The European textile industry calls for an EU-wide cap on gas prices at €80/Mwh, and a revision of the price mechanism for the electricity market, to reduce the huge price gaps with our foreign competitors.

Governments should ensure that critical industries, such textiles and all its segments, are able to ensure gas and electricity contracts towards the end of the year at an affordable price. Stable and predictable energy supply is of the utmost importance. Gas restrictions and rationing must only be used as a last resort. No mandatory consumption cuts should be foreseen.

In addition to these measures under discussion, currently a proliferation of contradictory, uncoordinated national initiatives to tackle the energy crisis is observed. This has led to a de facto fragmentation of the Single Market, resulting in a chaotic policy and regulatory environment that adds a further strain on our supply chain, which is fully integrated at European level. Measures that guarantee a level playing field in the EU are utmost important.

EURATEX President Alberto Paccanelli explained: “Given the current situation, a scenario where entire segments of the textiles industry will disappear can no longer be excluded. This would lead to the loss of thousands of companies and tens of thousands of European jobs and would further aggravate the dependency of Europe to foreign sources of essential goods. This applies specifically to SMEs who need temporary support measures (e.g. state aids, tax relieves, energy price cap) to survive the current crisis and to prepare for the green transition in the longer run.”

More information:
Euratex energy supplies crisis
Source:

Euratex

Fashion Revolution
19.08.2022

Results of the FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2022

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

  • As new and proposed legislation focuses on greenwashing claims, almost half of major brands (45%) publish targets on sustainable materials yet only 37% provide information on what constitutes a sustainable material.
  • Only 24% of major brands disclose how they minimise the impacts of microfibres despite textiles being the largest source of microplastics in the ocean.
  • The vast majority of major brands and retailers (94%) do not disclose the number of workers in their supply chains who are paying recruitment fees. This paints an unclear picture of the risks of forced labour as workers may be getting into crippling debt to accept jobs paying poverty wages.
  • While many brands use their channels to talk about social justice, they need to go beyond lip service. Just 8% of brands publish their actions on racial and ethnic equality in their supply chains.

Despite these results, Fashion Revolution is encouraged by increasing supply chain transparency among many major brands, primarily with first-tier manufacturers where the final stage of production occurs, e.g. cutting, sewing, finishing and packing. Nine brands have disclosed their first-tier manufacturers for the first time this year. It is encouraging to see significant progress across market segments including luxury, sportswear, footwear and accessories and across different geographies.

Fashion Revolution’s co-founder and Global Operations Director Carry Somers says: “In 2016, only 5 out of 40 major brands (12.5%) disclosed their suppliers. Seven years later, 121 out of 250 major brands (48%) disclose their suppliers. This clearly demonstrates how the Index incentivises transparency but it also shows that brands really are listening to the millions of people around the world who keep asking them #WhoMadeMyClothes? Our power is in our persistence.”

More key findings from the Fashion Transparency Index 2022:

Progress on transparency in the global fashion industry is still too slow among 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers, with brands achieving an overall average score of just 24%, up 1% from last year
For another year, the initiative has seen major brands and retailers publicly disclose the most information about their policies, commitments and processes on human rights and environmental topics and significantly less about the results, outcomes and impacts of their efforts.

Most (85%) major brands still do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of overproduction and clothing waste
Thousands of tonnes of clothing waste are found globally. However, brands have disclosed more information about the circular solutions they are developing (28%) than on the actual volumes of pre- (10%) and post-production waste they produce (8%). Brands have sat by as waste importing countries foot the bill, resulting in serious human rights and environmental implications.

Just 11% of brands publish a responsible purchasing code of conduct indicating that most are still reluctant to disclose how their purchasing practices could be affecting suppliers and workers
Greater transparency on how brands interact with their suppliers ought to be a first step towards eliminating harmful practices and promoting fair purchasing practices. The poor performance on transparency in this vital area is a missed opportunity for brands to demonstrate they are serious about addressing the root causes of harmful working conditions, including the instances where they themselves are the key driver.

Despite the urgency of the climate crisis, less than a third of major brands disclose a decarbonisation target covering their entire supply chain which is verified by the Science-Based Targets Initiative
Many brands and retailers rely heavily on garment producing countries that are vulnerable to the impacts of the climate crisis, yet our research shows that only 29% of major brands and retailers publish a decarbonisation target covering their operations and supply chain which is verified by the Science Based Targets Initiative.

Only 11% of brands publish their supplier wastewater test results, despite the textile industry being a leading contributor to water pollution
The fashion industry is a major contributor to water pollution and one of the most water intensive industries on the planet. Only 11% of major brands publish their wastewater test result, and only 25% of brands disclose the process of conducting water-related risk assessments in their supply chain. Transparency on wastewater test results is key to ensuring that brands are held accountable for their potentially devastating impacts on local biodiversity, garment workers and their communities.

Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage nor do they disclose if they isolate labour costs
Insufficient progress is being made by most brands towards ensuring that the workers in their supply chain are paid enough to cover their basic needs and put aside some discretionary income. Just 27% of brands disclose their approach to achieving living wages for supply chain workers and 96% do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage. In response, we have joined forces with allies across civil society to launch Good Clothes, Fair Pay. The campaign demands groundbreaking living wage legislation across the garment, textile and footwear sector.

 

Source:

Fashion Revolution

Photo: Pixabay
15.08.2022

Cotton prices outlook

Cotton Incorporated published its monthly economic letter of August and shared new insights of the cotton prices:

Cotton prices continue to be caught between the two competing storylines that have been in play for the past several months.
On one side, there is the deteriorating global macroeconomic situation.  The International Monetary Fund (IMF) lowered its projection for global economic growth in both 2022 (3.2%) and 2023 (2.9%) in the updates released in late July.  Current IMF forecasts are significantly beneath those from January (called for 4.4% growth in 2022 and 3.8% growth in 2023) and April (called for 3.6% growth in 2022 and 3.6% growth in 2023).  The evolution in the macroeconomy was a likely factor contributing to the shift in investors’ outlook on the commodity sector, which led to a collapse in prices for cotton and a range of other commodities in June and July.

Cotton Incorporated published its monthly economic letter of August and shared new insights of the cotton prices:

Cotton prices continue to be caught between the two competing storylines that have been in play for the past several months.
On one side, there is the deteriorating global macroeconomic situation.  The International Monetary Fund (IMF) lowered its projection for global economic growth in both 2022 (3.2%) and 2023 (2.9%) in the updates released in late July.  Current IMF forecasts are significantly beneath those from January (called for 4.4% growth in 2022 and 3.8% growth in 2023) and April (called for 3.6% growth in 2022 and 3.6% growth in 2023).  The evolution in the macroeconomy was a likely factor contributing to the shift in investors’ outlook on the commodity sector, which led to a collapse in prices for cotton and a range of other commodities in June and July.

Beyond the weakening macroeconomic environment, there also may be factors associated with cotton supply chains that could affect demand during the 2022/23 crop year.  Downstream consumer markets for cotton can be viewed as more discretionary than other spending categories, such as food, energy, and lodging, that experienced some of the sharpest effects of inflation.  Given price increases for necessities, consumers may have less income to devote to apparel and home furnishings.

In the U.S., consumer spending on clothing has been flat for the past year.  However, it has been holding at levels that are 25% higher than they were in 2019.  If U.S. consumers pull back on clothing purchases, it may hit the market just as retailers have caught up with consumer demand after the onset of the shipping crisis.  In weight volume, the cotton contained in U.S. apparel imports was up 22% year-over-year in the first half of 2022.  Relative to 2019 (pre-COVID and pre-shipping crisis), the volume in the first half of 2022 was up 23%.  Given strong import volumes, if there is a dip in consumer demand, inventory could build both at retail and upstream in supply chains.  This could lead to cancelations, potentially all the way back to the fiber level, where contracts signed at prices higher than current values could be particularly susceptible.

Tight U.S. supply is on the other side of price direction arguments.  Cotton is drought tolerant, and that is why it can be viably grown in perennially dry locations like West Texas.  However, cotton requires some moisture to germinate and generate healthy yields.  West Texas has had very little rain over the past year, and drought conditions have been extreme.  As a result, abandonment is forecast to be widespread.  It remains to be seen exactly how small the U.S. crop will be, but the current USDA forecast predicts only 12.6 million bales in 2022/23 (-5.0 million fewer bales than in 2021/22).

Meanwhile, demand for U.S. cotton has been relatively consistent, near 18 million bales over the past five crop years (an average of 15.5 million bales of exports and 2.7 million bales of domestic mill-use).  A harvest of only 12.6 million falls well short of the recent average for exports alone, and U.S. stocks were near multi-decade lows coming into 2022/23.  All these statistics suggest shipments from the world’s largest exporter may have to be rationed in 2022/23.  If cotton is not readily available from other sources, the scarcity of supply from the U.S. could support prices globally.

Simultaneously, there is weakness from the demand side.  The market has struggled to find the balance between the weakened demand environment and limited exportable supply in recent months.  The conflict between these two influences makes it difficult to discern a clear direction for prices and suggests continued volatility.

More information:
Cotton Inc. cotton
Source:

Cotton Inc.

(c) Fraunhofer UMSICHT/Mike Henning
Prof. Christian Doetsch (l.) and Prof. Manfred Renner (r.)
09.08.2022

Fraunhofer UMSICHT: New institute directors

Prof. Manfred Renner and Prof. Christian Doetsch will take joint leadership of the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT from August 2022. As renowned scientists, they have most recently shaped the direction of the institute as heads of the Products division and Energy division respectively, and will now follow in the footsteps of Prof. Eckhard Weidner, who has entered retirement.

This is the first time in its history that Fraunhofer UMSICHT is led by two directors. Both institute directors began their professional careers at the institute and from August they will have a joint hand in its future.

Prof. Manfred Renner and Prof. Christian Doetsch will take joint leadership of the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT from August 2022. As renowned scientists, they have most recently shaped the direction of the institute as heads of the Products division and Energy division respectively, and will now follow in the footsteps of Prof. Eckhard Weidner, who has entered retirement.

This is the first time in its history that Fraunhofer UMSICHT is led by two directors. Both institute directors began their professional careers at the institute and from August they will have a joint hand in its future.

Prof. Manfred Renner holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering, specializing in process engineering and business development. Since 2006, he has held various roles at Fraunhofer UMSICHT, most recently heading up the Products division and overseeing its 126 employees and its budget of 14.8 million euros. He has set international standards through his award-winning research into a free of water tanning leather tanning process that uses compressed carbon dioxide. With the development of innovative aerogel-based insulation materials for building facades, he has made a significant contribution to environmentally friendly, circular applications in the construction industry and initiated a number of industrial projects. One of the notable technological breakthroughs made by his team was the development of a new type of fire-resistant glass, which can withstand even the most extreme heat. This won his development team the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize in October 2020.

Alongside becoming institute director, Prof. Renner will also take over the leadership of the Fraunhofer Cluster of Excellence Circular Plastics Economy CCPE in August 2022. In this role, he will represent the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft on a national and international level with regard to the transformation of industry and society to a circular economy. In addition, he will start his professorship in Responsible Process Engineering at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum. Over the course of his professorship, he will shape the systemic development of the circular economy at a corporate, regional and European level.

Prof. Christian Doetsch has worked in energy research for more than 25 years, spending most of this time at Fraunhofer UMSICHT. As head of the Energy division, he managed a team of around 145 employees and was responsible for a budget of approximately 10.4 million euros. His technological focal points are energy storage, Power-to-X technologies including hydrogen electrolysis and chemical conversion, catalysts, and energy system modeling and optimization. His overarching aim is the integration of renewable energies into a cross-sectoral, resilient energy system.

In 2015, Doetsch co-founded the award-winning start-up Volterion GmbH & Co. KG, which develops redox flow batteries. He attained high visibility on a global scale by redesigning stacks, one of the main components of redox flow batteries, an achievement for which he, his team and Volterion representatives were awarded the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize in May 2021. The energy expert also acts as deputy spokesperson for the Fraunhofer Energy Alliance and task manager for the energy storage group at the International Energy Agency (IEA). He also co-founded the “Open District Hub e. V.,” an association that promotes the energy transition in the sector by means of energy systems integration.

Since January 2020, he has been Professor of Cross Energy Systems at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum. In this role, he conducts research into ecological evaluation and resilience of cross-sectoral energy systems.

Source:

Fraunhofer UMSICHT

04.08.2022

adidas with strong growth in Western markets in Q2

  • Currency-neutral sales up 4%, despite more than € 300 million negative impact from macroeconomic constraints
  • Markets representing more than 85% of the business grow 14% overall
  • Gross margin down 1.5pp to 50.3% reflecting significantly higher supply chain costs
  • Operating profit reaches € 392 million
  • Net income from continuing operations amounts to € 360 million
  • FY 2022 outlook reflects double-digit growth during the second half of the year

“Our Western markets continued to show strong momentum in the second quarter amid heightened macroeconomic uncertainty. With Asia-Pacific returning to growth, markets combined representing more than 85% of our business grew at a double-digit rate,” said adidas CEO Kasper Rorsted. “With sports back at center stage this summer, revenues in our strategic growth categories Football, Running and Outdoor all increased by double digits. However, the macroeconomic environment, particularly in China, remains challenging. The recovery in this market is – due to continued covid-19-related restrictions – slower than expected.

  • Currency-neutral sales up 4%, despite more than € 300 million negative impact from macroeconomic constraints
  • Markets representing more than 85% of the business grow 14% overall
  • Gross margin down 1.5pp to 50.3% reflecting significantly higher supply chain costs
  • Operating profit reaches € 392 million
  • Net income from continuing operations amounts to € 360 million
  • FY 2022 outlook reflects double-digit growth during the second half of the year

“Our Western markets continued to show strong momentum in the second quarter amid heightened macroeconomic uncertainty. With Asia-Pacific returning to growth, markets combined representing more than 85% of our business grew at a double-digit rate,” said adidas CEO Kasper Rorsted. “With sports back at center stage this summer, revenues in our strategic growth categories Football, Running and Outdoor all increased by double digits. However, the macroeconomic environment, particularly in China, remains challenging. The recovery in this market is – due to continued covid-19-related restrictions – slower than expected. And we have to take into account a potential slowdown in consumer spending in all other markets for the remainder of the year.”

Currency-neutral revenues increase 4% despite macroeconomic constraints
In the second quarter, currency-neutral revenues increased 4% as adidas continued to see strong momentum in Western markets. This growth was achieved despite continued challenges on both supply and demand. Supply chain constraints as a result of last year’s lockdowns in Vietnam reduced top-line growth by around € 200 million in Q2 2022. In addition, the company’s decision to suspend its operations in Russia reduced revenues by more than € 100 million during the quarter. Continued covid-19-related lockdowns in Greater China also weighed on the top-line development in Q2. From a channel perspective, the top-line increase was to a similar extent driven by the company’s own direct-to-consumer (DTC) activities as well as increases in wholesale. Within DTC, e-commerce, which now represents more than 20% of the company’s total business, showed double-digit growth reflecting strong product sell-through. From a category perspective, revenue development was strongest in the company’s strategic growth categories Football, Running and Outdoor, which all grew at strong double-digit rates. In euro terms, revenues grew 10% to € 5.596 billion in the second quarter (2021: € 5.077 billion).

Strong demand in Western markets
Revenue growth in the second quarter was driven by Western markets despite last year’s lockdowns in Vietnam still reducing sales, particularly in EMEA and North America, by
€ 200 million in total. In addition, the top-line development in EMEA was also impacted by the loss of revenue in Russia/CIS of more than € 100 million. Nevertheless, currency-neutral sales grew 7% in the region. Revenues in North America increased 21% during the quarter driven by growth of more than 20% in both DTC and wholesale. Revenues in Latin America increased 37%, while Asia-Pacific returned to growth. Currency-neutral revenues increased 3% in this market despite still being impacted by limited tourism activity in the region. In contrast, the company continued to face a challenging market environment in Greater China, mainly related to the continued broad-based covid-19-related restrictions. As a result, currency-neutral revenues in the market declined 35% during the three-months period, in line with previous expectations. Excluding Greater China, currency-neutral revenues in the company’s other markets combined grew 14% in Q2.

Operating profit of € 392 million reflects operating margin of 7.0%
The company’s gross margin declined 1.5 percentage points to 50.3% (2021: 51.8%). Significantly higher supply chain costs and a less favorable market mix due to the significant sales decline in Greater China weighed on the gross margin development. This could only be partly offset by a higher share of full price sales, first price increases and the benefits from currency fluctuations. Other operating expenses were up 19% to € 2.501 billion (2021: € 2.107 billion). As a percentage of sales, other operating expenses increased 3.2 percentage points to 44.7% (2021: 41.5%). Marketing and point-of-sale expenses grew 8% to € 663 million (2021: € 616 million). The company continued to prioritize investments into the launch of new products such as adidas’ new Sportswear collection, the next iteration of its successful Supernova running franchise and first drops related to the Gucci collaboration as well as campaigns around major events like ‘Run for the Oceans.’ As a percentage of sales, marketing and point-of-sale expenses were down 0.3 percentage points to 11.8% (2021: 12.1%). Operating overhead expenses increased by 23% to a level of € 1.838 billion (2021:
€ 1.492 billion). This increase was driven by adidas’ continuous investments into DTC, its digital capabilities and the company’s logistics infrastructure as well as by unfavorable currency fluctuations. As a percentage of sales, operating overhead expenses increased 3.5 percentage points to 32.8% (2021: 29.4%). The company’s operating profit reached a level of € 392 million (2021: € 543 million), resulting in an operating margin of 7.0% (2021: 10.7%).

Net income from continuing operations reaches € 360 million
The company’s net income from continuing operations slightly declined to € 360 million (2021: € 387 million). This result was supported by a one-time tax benefit of more than € 100 million due to the reversal of a prior year provision. Consequently, basic EPS from continuing operations reached € 1.88 (2021: € 1.93) during the quarter.

Currency-neutral revenues on prior year level in the first half of 2022
In the first half of 2022, currency-neutral revenues were flat versus the prior year period. In euro terms, revenues grew 5% to € 10.897 billion in the first six months of 2022 (2021:
€ 10.345 billion). The company’s gross margin declined 1.7 percentage points to 50.1% (2021: 51.8%) during the first half of the year. While price increases as well as positive exchange rate effects benefited the gross margin, these developments were more than offset by the less favorable market mix and significantly higher supply chain costs. Other operating expenses increased to € 4.759 billion (2021: € 4.154 billion) in the first half of the year and were up 3.5 percentage points to 43.7% (2021: 40.2%) as a percentage of sales. adidas generated an operating profit of € 828 million (2021: € 1.248 billion) during the first six months of the year, resulting in an operating margin of 7.6% (2021: 12.1%). Net income from continuing operations reached € 671 million, reflecting a decline of € 219 million compared to the prior year level (2021: € 890 million). Accordingly, basic earnings per share from continuing operations declined to € 3.47 (2021: € 4.52).

Average operating working capital as a percentage of sales slightly decreases
Inventories increased 35% to € 5.483 billion (2021: € 4.054 billion) at June 30, 2022 in anticipation of strong revenue growth during the second half of the year. Longer lead times as well as the challenging market environment in Greater China also contributed to the increase. On a currency-neutral basis, inventories were up 28%. Operating working capital increased 23% to € 5.191 billion (2021: € 4.213 billion). On a currency-neutral basis, operating working capital was up 14%. Average operating working capital as a percentage of sales decreased 0.4 percentage points to 21.0% (2021: 21.4%), reflecting an overproportional increase in accounts payable due to higher sourcing volumes and product costs.

Adjusted net borrowings at € 5.301 billion
Adjusted net borrowings amounted to € 5.301 billion at June 30, 2022, representing a year-over-year increase of € 2.155 billion (June 30, 2021: € 3.146 billion). This development was mainly due to the significant decrease in cash and cash equivalents.

FY 2022 outlook reflects double-digit growth during the second half of the year
On July 26, adidas adjusted its guidance for FY 2022 due to the slower-than-expected recovery in Greater China since the start of the third quarter resulting from continued widespread covid-19-related restrictions. adidas now expects currency-neutral revenues for the total company to grow at a mid- to high-single-digit rate in 2022 (previously: at the lower end of the 11% to 13% range), reflecting a double-digit decline in Greater China (previously: significant decline). While so far the company did not experience a meaningful slowdown in the sell-through of its products or significant cancellations of wholesale orders in any market other than Greater China, the adjusted guidance also accounts for a potential slowdown of consumer spending in those markets during the second half of the year as a result of the more challenging macroeconomic conditions. Therefore, growth in EMEA is now expected to be in the low teens (previously: mid-teens growth), while revenues in Asia-Pacific are projected to grow at a high-single-digit rate (previously: mid-teens growth). Despite the more conservative view on the development of consumer spending in the second half of the year, adidas has increased its forecasts for North America and Latin America reflecting the strong momentum the brand is enjoying in these markets. In North America, currency-neutral revenues are now expected to increase in the high teens. Sales in Latin America are projected to grow between 30% and 40% (both previously: mid- to high-teens growth).   

Due to the less favorable market mix and the impacts from initiatives to clear excess inventories in Greater China until the end of the year, gross margin is now expected to reach a level of around 49.0% (previously: around 50.7%) in 2022. Consequently, the company’s operating margin is now forecast to be around 7.0% (previously: around 9.4%) and net income from continuing operations is expected to reach a level of around € 1.3 billion (previously: at the lower end of the € 1.8 billion to € 1.9 billion range).

More information:
adidas financial year 2022
Source:

adidas

04.08.2022

EU-India Free Trade negotiations

  • Opportunity to rebalance trade relations and promote a global sustainable textile industry

Today’s trade relations between the EU and India in textiles and clothing are characterised by a large and systemic trade deficit for the EU; annual imports from India exceed €6 bln (2021) – making it the 4th supplier – while EU exports to India reached just half a billion – the 20th place in our export markets.

Against this background, the free trade negotiations are an opportunity to rebalance that relationship; European textile and clothing companies can offer high quality and innovative products for the Indian market, but they can also offer solutions to reduce the environmental footprint of the textile industry.

EURATEX, as the voice of textiles and apparel manufacturers in Europe, supports an ambitious EU trade agenda, that puts reciprocity, transparency, fair competition and equal rules at the centre of its action. The FTA is an opportunity to establish a more sustainable and fair trading system, based on rules, global environmental and social standards, which are effectively respected by all.

  • Opportunity to rebalance trade relations and promote a global sustainable textile industry

Today’s trade relations between the EU and India in textiles and clothing are characterised by a large and systemic trade deficit for the EU; annual imports from India exceed €6 bln (2021) – making it the 4th supplier – while EU exports to India reached just half a billion – the 20th place in our export markets.

Against this background, the free trade negotiations are an opportunity to rebalance that relationship; European textile and clothing companies can offer high quality and innovative products for the Indian market, but they can also offer solutions to reduce the environmental footprint of the textile industry.

EURATEX, as the voice of textiles and apparel manufacturers in Europe, supports an ambitious EU trade agenda, that puts reciprocity, transparency, fair competition and equal rules at the centre of its action. The FTA is an opportunity to establish a more sustainable and fair trading system, based on rules, global environmental and social standards, which are effectively respected by all.

In this context, EURATEX highlights that the sector needs open and efficient markets, but combined with effective controls where necessary, thus ensuring level playing field for European companies. It is clearly essential that the same level of market access to India – both in terms of tariff and non-tariff barriers – is available to EU producers as vice versa.

India today benefits from reduced customs duties due to GSP. For European companies instead, market access to India is challenging, facing non-tariff barriers (related to proof of origin, quality control procedures, etc.) as well as national or state-level support programmes which distort the level playing field between EU and Indian companies.

That level playing field should also apply to our sustainability targets. As the EU will roll out its EU Textile Strategy, setting ambitious standards and restrictions (e.g. on chemicals), we must ensure the FTA is fully aligned with that strategy.

Director General Dirk Vantyghem commented: “We look to these negotiations with great interest. The FTA is an opportunity to develop a shared ambition between the European and Indian industry to make sustainable textiles the norm, and to create a regulatory framework where our companies can compete in a free and fair environment.”

Source:

EURATEX

27.07.2022

Autoneum: Half Year Results 2022

Lower volumes due to geopolitical developments and the sharp rise in inflation impacted the result in the first half of 2022. In a slightly declining market, Autoneum increased revenue in local currencies by 0.5%. At CHF 888.7 million, revenue in Swiss francs reached the previous year's level. Despite the challenging environment, Autoneum achieved a positive operating result of CHF 6.4 million (EBIT margin: 0.7%). The net result decreased to CHF –12.8 million. On the other hand, Autoneum was able to generate a solid free cash flow of CHF 45.2 million. A high demand for sustainable products for electric vehicles confirms that Autoneum is well positioned for this growing market of the future.

Lower volumes due to geopolitical developments and the sharp rise in inflation impacted the result in the first half of 2022. In a slightly declining market, Autoneum increased revenue in local currencies by 0.5%. At CHF 888.7 million, revenue in Swiss francs reached the previous year's level. Despite the challenging environment, Autoneum achieved a positive operating result of CHF 6.4 million (EBIT margin: 0.7%). The net result decreased to CHF –12.8 million. On the other hand, Autoneum was able to generate a solid free cash flow of CHF 45.2 million. A high demand for sustainable products for electric vehicles confirms that Autoneum is well positioned for this growing market of the future.

Current geopolitical developments substantially affected business performance in the first half of 2022. They are accompanied by accelerating inflation and significant price increases in the commodities markets, which the war in Ukraine has further exacerbated. These developments are also delaying market recovery in the automotive industry. Autoneum does everything it can to minimize the impact on the Group. Despite the present challenges, we will continue to implement our strategy, focusing on innovative and sustainable technologies for growing markets of the future.

  • Revenue development influenced by the war in Ukraine and supply chain bottlenecks*
  • Low production volumes and high inflation impact profitability*
  • Solid free cash flow enables further reduction in net debt*
  • Business Groups*
  • Well positioned for e-mobility and sustainability*
  • Expanding the product portfolio for electric vehicles*
  • Autoneum joins the Science Based Targets initiative*

Outlook
According to global market forecasts1, automobile production will pick up again in the second half of the year with growth of 8.8% compared with the first half-year 2022. For full-year 2022, global automobile production is projected to reach 80.8 million vehicles, which is equivalent to a 4.7% increase on 2021. Based on the market forecasts, Autoneum expects to improve the operating result for the second half of the year. This will be supported by ongoing customer negotiations with a view to fair sharing of costs, the accompanying contribution of vehicle manufacturers to shouldering the sharp increases in material, energy and transport costs and the foreseeable normalization of production after the easing of lockdown measures in China. On this basis, Autoneum expects substantially enhanced results for full-year 2022, as well as an improvement in the EBIT margin to 2.0% to 3.0%. Free cash flow is expected to be in the mid to high double-digit million range for the full year 2022.

*For more information see attached document

1Source: IHS “Light Vehicle Production Forecasts” – July 15, 2022

More information:
Autoneum supply chain acoustic
Source:

Autoneum Management AG

15.07.2022

ANDRITZ at CINTE 2022 in China

ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative nonwovens production solutions at CINTE 2022 in Shanghai, China (September 6–8). ANDRITZ will show its broad product portfolio covering state-of-the-art nonwovens and textile production technologies such as air-through bonding, airlay, needlepunch, spunlace, spunbond, wetlaid/WetlaceTM, converting, textile finishing, recycling, and natural fiber processing.

SUSTAINABILITY IS KEY
ANDRITZ supports nonwovens producers in the move to sustainability with the aim of reducing or eliminating plastic components while maintaining the high quality of the desired product properties. This applies to all types of sustainable wipes, such as flushable, biodegradable, bio-sourced, carded pulp or standard carded wipes. The latest development in this field is the ANDRITZ neXline wetlace CP line, which integrates the carded-pulp (CP) process. This is a fully engineered production line combining the benefits of drylaid and wetlaid technologies to produce a new generation of biodegradable wipes.

ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative nonwovens production solutions at CINTE 2022 in Shanghai, China (September 6–8). ANDRITZ will show its broad product portfolio covering state-of-the-art nonwovens and textile production technologies such as air-through bonding, airlay, needlepunch, spunlace, spunbond, wetlaid/WetlaceTM, converting, textile finishing, recycling, and natural fiber processing.

SUSTAINABILITY IS KEY
ANDRITZ supports nonwovens producers in the move to sustainability with the aim of reducing or eliminating plastic components while maintaining the high quality of the desired product properties. This applies to all types of sustainable wipes, such as flushable, biodegradable, bio-sourced, carded pulp or standard carded wipes. The latest development in this field is the ANDRITZ neXline wetlace CP line, which integrates the carded-pulp (CP) process. This is a fully engineered production line combining the benefits of drylaid and wetlaid technologies to produce a new generation of biodegradable wipes.

NEXLINE WETLAID AXCESS TARGETS SMALLER AND MEDIUM PRODUCTION VOLUMES
The neXline wetlaid aXcess targets smaller and medium production volumes and has been devised for new and existing lines. The compact line provides an entrance to the growing wetlaid market, with a variety of final applications and options.

ANDRITZ AXCESS DEVELOPED FOR MEDIUM CAPACITIES IN WUXI, CHINA
The aXcess range was specially developed at ANDRITZ (China) Ltd. Wuxi Branch to handle medium capacities. The facility in Wuxi has an experienced platform for production and service specially geared to serve the Asian nonwovens industry. It designs and manufactures cutting-edge lines to complement the ANDRITZ aXcess product range, which includes complete lines and individual machines for air-through bonding, needlepunch and spunlace processes. With the aXcess range, ANDRITZ has developed a hybrid line combining European and Chinese machines, which is the ideal combination to obtain the best added value from each component in the line and be very flexible to accommodate different business cases.

The service organization was set up to provide prompt delivery and excellent customer support, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. A team of technicians and process experts can be deployed quickly to customer sites requiring full-range assistance. The ANDRITZ facilities include a roll service center with state of-the-art grinding equipment and a test stand for various types of rolls.

In addition, our aXcess range manufactured in Europe also offers technologies for spunlaid and wetlaid processes. Increasing production speeds and widths, compact and reliable design, and affordable investment costs are what customers look for in a competitive market environment. To meet these requirements ideally, we recently enhanced our nonwoven calender and dryer ranges.

13.07.2022

Cotton Market Fundamentals & Price Outlook – July 22

SUPPLY, DEMAND, & TRADE
The latest USDA report featured reductions to figures for both world production and mill-use for both the 2021/22 and 2022/23 crop years.  For 2021/22, the global production estimate was lowered -0.7 million bales (to 116.2 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.9 million bales (to 119.8 million).  For 2022/23, the global production forecast was lowered -1.2 million bales (to 120.7 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.6 million bales (to 119.9 million).

With the decreases in use exceeding the declines in production, figures for global ending stocks increased.  For 2021/22, the projection rose +1.1 million bales (to 84.0 million).  For 2022/23, the forecast increased +1.6 million bales (to 84.3 million).

At the country-level, the largest changes to 2021/22 production were for Brazil (-400,000 bales to 12.3 million) and Uzbekistan (-100,00 bales to 2.7 million).  The largest changes for the 2022/23 harvest were for the U.S. (-1.0 million bales to 15.5 million) and Brazil (-200,000 bales to 13.0 million).

SUPPLY, DEMAND, & TRADE
The latest USDA report featured reductions to figures for both world production and mill-use for both the 2021/22 and 2022/23 crop years.  For 2021/22, the global production estimate was lowered -0.7 million bales (to 116.2 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.9 million bales (to 119.8 million).  For 2022/23, the global production forecast was lowered -1.2 million bales (to 120.7 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.6 million bales (to 119.9 million).

With the decreases in use exceeding the declines in production, figures for global ending stocks increased.  For 2021/22, the projection rose +1.1 million bales (to 84.0 million).  For 2022/23, the forecast increased +1.6 million bales (to 84.3 million).

At the country-level, the largest changes to 2021/22 production were for Brazil (-400,000 bales to 12.3 million) and Uzbekistan (-100,00 bales to 2.7 million).  The largest changes for the 2022/23 harvest were for the U.S. (-1.0 million bales to 15.5 million) and Brazil (-200,000 bales to 13.0 million).

It may be notable that there were no upward country-level revisions for mill-use in either 2021/22 or 2022/23.  The largest revisions for 2021/22 included those for China (-1.0 million to 37.0 million), Vietnam (-400,000 bales to 6.9 million), Bangladesh (-300,000 to 8.0 million), Pakistan (-100,000 bales to 10.9 million), and Uzbekistan (-100,000 bales to 2.7 million).  For 2022/23, consumption estimates were lowered for China (-500,000 bales to 37.5 million), India (-500,000 bales to 25.0 million), Bangladesh (-300,000 bales to 8.6 million), and Vietnam (-300,000 bales to 7.1 million).
The global trade forecast for 2022/23 was lowered -1.1 million bales (to 46.4 million).  The most significant changes on the import side included those for China (-500,000 bales to 10.0 million), Bangladesh (-300,000 bales to 8.5 million), and Vietnam (-300,000 bales to 7.2 million).  On the export side, the largest updates included those for the U.S. (-500,000 bales to 14.0 million) and Australia (+300,000 bales to 6.0 million).
 
PRICE OUTLOOK
Recent volatility was not limited to the cotton market.  A wide range of commodities lost significant value in June.  Between June 9th and July 5th (dates chosen unsystematically to describe the magnitude of declines), cotton fell -25% (NY/ICE December futures), corn fell -19% (Chicago Board of Trade, December contract), soybeans fell -17% (Chicago Board of Trade, November contract), wheat fell -25% (Chicago Board of Trade, December contract), copper fell -20% (London Metal Exchange, nearby), and Brent crude oil fell -12% (ICE, nearby).

The breadth of losses throughout the commodity sector suggests a sea change in investor sentiment for the entire category.  The effects of inflation, the withdrawal of stimulus, rising interest rates, and concerns about a possible recession could all be reasons explaining a reversal of speculative bets, and all could be contributors to the losses.  While the macroeconomic environment can be expected to continue to weigh on prices, there are also supportive forces for the market that are specific to cotton.

The current USDA forecast for U.S. cotton production is 15.5 million bales, and it may get smaller over time because of the severe drought in West Texas.  The current harvest figure is two million bales lower than the 2021/22 number and is equal to the five-year average for U.S. cotton exports (2017/18-2021/22).  On top of exports, the U.S. will need to supply domestic mills with 2.5 million bales.  The last time the U.S. had a severely drought-impacted crop (2020/21), the harvest was only 14.6 million bales.  In that crop year, the U.S. was able to export more than it grew because it had accumulated stocks in the previous year.  The U.S. is coming into the 2022/23 crop year with low stocks.  This suggests U.S. shipments may have been rationed.  Since the U.S. is the world’s largest exporter, this may lend some support to prices internationally.

More information:
cotton Cotton USA Cotton Inc.
Source:

Cotton Incorporated

(c) AkzoNobel
12.07.2022

AkzoNobel announces €20 million investment and creates new jobs in France

A €20 million investment has been announced by AkzoNobel to increase and improve production at two of its sites in France. Around 30 new jobs will be created.

A total of €15 million will be spent on the company’s aerospace coatings facility in Pamiers, which was taken over following the Mapaero acquisition in 2019. Production capacity is being boosted by 50%, while the funds will also be used to reduce environmental impact and improve safety processes and working conditions.

The other €5 million will be spent on improving production flexibility at the decorative paints site in Montataire, which is one of the company’s most important manufacturing locations for wall paints in Europe.

The plans for Pamiers include the construction of two extensions, one for storage and one for cleaning and waste treatment. The project will also enable the company to relocate the production of exterior polyurethane paints for aircraft widely used in Europe from its Waukegan plant in the US.

Building work is expected to start by the end of 2023, with the new installations at both locations due to be operational in early 2025.

A €20 million investment has been announced by AkzoNobel to increase and improve production at two of its sites in France. Around 30 new jobs will be created.

A total of €15 million will be spent on the company’s aerospace coatings facility in Pamiers, which was taken over following the Mapaero acquisition in 2019. Production capacity is being boosted by 50%, while the funds will also be used to reduce environmental impact and improve safety processes and working conditions.

The other €5 million will be spent on improving production flexibility at the decorative paints site in Montataire, which is one of the company’s most important manufacturing locations for wall paints in Europe.

The plans for Pamiers include the construction of two extensions, one for storage and one for cleaning and waste treatment. The project will also enable the company to relocate the production of exterior polyurethane paints for aircraft widely used in Europe from its Waukegan plant in the US.

Building work is expected to start by the end of 2023, with the new installations at both locations due to be operational in early 2025.

AkzoNobel employs nearly 1,500 people in France and operates four production facilities, in Montataire (decorative paints), Dourdan (powder coatings), Limoges (adhesive markings) and Pamiers (aerospace coatings).

More information:
AkzoNobel Coatings aerospace
Source:

AkzoNobel

05.07.2022

Iluna Group at Première Vision AW 23

Iluna Group is exhibiting at the upcoming Première Vision, from July 5-7, with the aim of promoting a new fashion that combines aesthetic research and environmental responsibility.
 
The key word of this new collection is “experimentation”: the search for new solutions that can offer consumers style, sustainability and well-being translates into innovative blends, natural dyes and smart prints.

This season, the Iluna team is introducing for the first time GOTS-certified organic cotton inside its gallons and allovers, to add a natural touch to its Green Label line. Among the smart ingredients chosen by Iluna Group are Renycle® and Q-Nova, both GRS-certified pre-consumer recycled polyamide yarns, in addition to premium recycled stretch ROICA™ EF by Asahi Kasei. The result is a comfortable and ultralight product that remains true to a high value of creativity and responsibility.

In terms of aesthetic innovation, explorations continue with a yarn blend of FSC-certified viscose and polyamide, resulting in striking new Textronic designs. The 3D effect embossed designs create a cloud effect that, combined with Lurex, shows unexpected glows.

Iluna Group is exhibiting at the upcoming Première Vision, from July 5-7, with the aim of promoting a new fashion that combines aesthetic research and environmental responsibility.
 
The key word of this new collection is “experimentation”: the search for new solutions that can offer consumers style, sustainability and well-being translates into innovative blends, natural dyes and smart prints.

This season, the Iluna team is introducing for the first time GOTS-certified organic cotton inside its gallons and allovers, to add a natural touch to its Green Label line. Among the smart ingredients chosen by Iluna Group are Renycle® and Q-Nova, both GRS-certified pre-consumer recycled polyamide yarns, in addition to premium recycled stretch ROICA™ EF by Asahi Kasei. The result is a comfortable and ultralight product that remains true to a high value of creativity and responsibility.

In terms of aesthetic innovation, explorations continue with a yarn blend of FSC-certified viscose and polyamide, resulting in striking new Textronic designs. The 3D effect embossed designs create a cloud effect that, combined with Lurex, shows unexpected glows.

Moreover, the continuous path through the new dimension of responsibility continues in several directions: developments in GRS (Global Recycled Standard) certified recycled yarns aimed at unprecedented effects in both look, performance and hands; experiments with 16 different natural dyestuffs; and continued investment in technologies that can ensure significant savings in water and energy consumption, including GREENDROP, the new GOTS-certified digital pigment printing system.

More information:
ILUNA Group Première Vision GOTS
Source:

Iluna Group / C.L.A.S.S.