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(c) Euratex
EU-27 Textile & Clothing Turnover
12.10.2021

EURATEX: Latest economic data confirm further recovery of the textile and clothing industry

European Textiles and Clothing (T&C) industry coming out of the Covid19-crisis, but facing new challenges ahead. This recovery may however be disrupted by the current supply chain and energy problems. Latest economic data on the European T&C industry confirm further recovery from the corona pandemic. The textile activity has now surpassed its pre-pandemic level from Q4 2019 (+3.6%); the clothing sector still remains 11.5% below, but continues to improve.

European Textiles and Clothing (T&C) industry coming out of the Covid19-crisis, but facing new challenges ahead. This recovery may however be disrupted by the current supply chain and energy problems. Latest economic data on the European T&C industry confirm further recovery from the corona pandemic. The textile activity has now surpassed its pre-pandemic level from Q4 2019 (+3.6%); the clothing sector still remains 11.5% below, but continues to improve.

In quarter-on-quarter terms, the EU turnover showed signs of improvements across the sector. The textile turnover increased by +3.3% in Q2 2021, after slightly contracting in Q1 2021. Similarly, the business activity in the clothing sector expanded by +7% in Q2 2021, after increasing by +1% in the previous quarter.
 
In the 2nd quarter 2021, the EU-27 trade balance for T&C improved, resulting mostly from an increase of export sales across third markets and a drop of textile imports. T&C Extra-EU exports boomed by +49% as compared with the same quarter of the previous year. T&C Extra-EU imports went down by -26% as compared with the same quarter of the previous year, following a decrease of imports from some main supplier countries. EU imports from China and the UK collapsed due to a combination of Brexit and weaker demand in Europe.
 
During the second quarter of 2021, job creation was slowly stabilising in the textile industry (-0.2% q-o-q), while employment in the clothing sector continued to be affected by lower levels of production activity in industry during the first part of the year (-1.2%). When compared to its pre-pandemic level in Q4 2019, EU employment in Q2 2021 was still 4.4% down in textiles and 11.8% down in clothing.

However, this fragile recovery is hampered by higher shipping costs and prices’ increase in raw materials and energy. The cost of energy, in particular gas, has increased more than 3 times since the beginning of this year. Since the announcement of the EU’s “Fit for 55” package, we have seen CO2 prices rising above €60. This inevitably has an impact on the industry’s competitiveness, especially in a global context. The future recovery is also threatened by some factors limiting production, such as shortage of labour force and equipment, which are putting additional pressure on T&C industries.

Director General Dirk Vantyghem commented on these latest figures: “Our companies have shown great resilience during the pandemic, and their latest export performance is an encouraging sign of recovery. This recovery may however be disrupted by the current supply chain and energy problems. Once again, recent developments show that this transition towards more sustainable production can only work if organised in a global context, avoiding carbon leakage and with an effective level playing field. This must be considered in the upcoming EU Textiles Strategy.”

More information:
Euratex
Source:

Euratex

05.05.2021

EURATEX comments on revised EU Industry Strategy

  • European Apparel and Textile Confederation EURATEX welcomes revamped EU Industry Strategy, but calls for consistency across EU policies

Europe’s industry is going through turbulent times as a result of the corona-pandemic; turnover in textiles and clothing sector dropped between 10 and 20%. However, even bigger challenges lie ahead: serious disruptions in supply chains, soaring energy prices and protective tendencies are threatening the competitiveness of our industry.

Against that background, the revised EU Industry Strategy – launched on May, 5 - is addressing very relevant issues, and underlines the need to think carefully about Europe’s industrial base. EURATEX welcomes the initiative, including the focus on 14 “eco-systems” and the proposal to develop privileged partnerships with trusted partners.

  • European Apparel and Textile Confederation EURATEX welcomes revamped EU Industry Strategy, but calls for consistency across EU policies

Europe’s industry is going through turbulent times as a result of the corona-pandemic; turnover in textiles and clothing sector dropped between 10 and 20%. However, even bigger challenges lie ahead: serious disruptions in supply chains, soaring energy prices and protective tendencies are threatening the competitiveness of our industry.

Against that background, the revised EU Industry Strategy – launched on May, 5 - is addressing very relevant issues, and underlines the need to think carefully about Europe’s industrial base. EURATEX welcomes the initiative, including the focus on 14 “eco-systems” and the proposal to develop privileged partnerships with trusted partners.

At the same time, EURATEX calls for more consistency by the EU across its different policy areas. Director General Dirk Vantyghem commented: “We welcome the recognition that we need a strong industrial base in Europe, but at the same time are struggling to maintain that base, as our companies face significant challenges related to over-regulation and raising energy and supply costs. It feels like one hand offering you help, while the other hand squeezes you tight”.

Looking at the global perspective, EURATEX is not calling to close the European borders; our industrial model relies on accessing global markets. But clearly, there is a need to establish global rules to ensure fair competition, and make sure these rules are properly implemented and controlled. Also today’s proposal to address distortions caused by foreign subsidies in the Single Market, should be welcomed in this context.

Dirk Vantyghem concluded: “European textiles and clothing industry went through turbulent times. Today, as part of this new EU Industry Strategy, we have an opportunity to build a new business model, based on innovation, quality, sustainability and fairness. We look forward to develop that new EU Textile strategy with all stakeholders involved.”

 

More information:
Euratex
Source:

EURATEX

Mittelstand 4.0 (c) Mittelstand 4.0 Kompetenzzentrum Textil vernetzt
10.09.2020

Wie Digitalisierung und KI die vernetzte Produktion im Mittelstand ermöglichen - Unternehmer sprechen zu Unternehmern

Seit drei Jahren unterstützt das Mittelstand 4.0-Kompetenzzentrum Textil vernetzt erfolgreich kleine und mittlere Unternehmen beim Thema Digitalisierung. Knapp 50 Praxis-Projekte hat das Kompetenzzentrum umgesetzt und weit über 3 000 KMU mit seinen Angeboten erreicht. Vielen Unternehmen hat das Netzwerk bereits beim Sprung in die Zukunft geholfen, wie die Teilnehmer der dritten Fachtagung hautnah erleben konnten.

Es war die erste Online-Fachtagung. Gastgeber und Organisator war das Sächsische Textilforschungsinstitut e. V. (STFI) in Chemnitz mit dem Thema: „Textil neu denken: Wie Digitalisierung und KI die vernetzte Produktion ermöglichen“. Die Fachtagung stand ganz im Zeichen der vernetzten Produktion, der Digitalisierung und Automatisierung von Produktionsprozessen. So ging es beispielsweise um die durchgängige digitale Auftragsabwicklung. Oder darum, welche Vorteile Bilderkennung und Barcode bei der Lagerortbestimmung haben. Der Einsatz von Sensortechnik eignet sich zum Sammeln und Auswerten großer Datenmengen: So kann die Wartung von Maschinen vorausgesagt werden. Das spart Kosten und Arbeitskraft.

Seit drei Jahren unterstützt das Mittelstand 4.0-Kompetenzzentrum Textil vernetzt erfolgreich kleine und mittlere Unternehmen beim Thema Digitalisierung. Knapp 50 Praxis-Projekte hat das Kompetenzzentrum umgesetzt und weit über 3 000 KMU mit seinen Angeboten erreicht. Vielen Unternehmen hat das Netzwerk bereits beim Sprung in die Zukunft geholfen, wie die Teilnehmer der dritten Fachtagung hautnah erleben konnten.

Es war die erste Online-Fachtagung. Gastgeber und Organisator war das Sächsische Textilforschungsinstitut e. V. (STFI) in Chemnitz mit dem Thema: „Textil neu denken: Wie Digitalisierung und KI die vernetzte Produktion ermöglichen“. Die Fachtagung stand ganz im Zeichen der vernetzten Produktion, der Digitalisierung und Automatisierung von Produktionsprozessen. So ging es beispielsweise um die durchgängige digitale Auftragsabwicklung. Oder darum, welche Vorteile Bilderkennung und Barcode bei der Lagerortbestimmung haben. Der Einsatz von Sensortechnik eignet sich zum Sammeln und Auswerten großer Datenmengen: So kann die Wartung von Maschinen vorausgesagt werden. Das spart Kosten und Arbeitskraft.

„Die Unternehmer haben sehr offen darüber geredet, vor welchen digitalen Herausforderungen sie standen, wie Textil vernetzt unterstützen konnte und welche weiteren Schritte geplant sind“, zieht Geschäftsführerin Anja Merker nach der Veranstaltung Bilanz. „Durch Corona hat die Digitalisierung einen Schub erfahren. KI-Anwendungen werden von unserem textilen Mittelstand bei den Textil vernetzt-Partnern zunehmend nachgefragt“, so Merker. Gerade unkonventionelle und KMU-orientierte Herangehensweisen sind es, die von den Unternehmern geschätzt werden, so die Quintessenz der Veranstaltung. „In unserem neu eröffneten EscapeROOM können Unternehmen spielerisch KI erleben“, resümiert Claudia Feith vom Textil vernetzt-Partner Hahn-Schickard.

An die Partner Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF), Hahn-Schickard, Institut für Textiltechnik (ITA) der RWTH Aachen sowie Sächsisches Textilforschungsinstitut (STFI) unter Leitung des Gesamtverbandes textil+mode wenden sich kleine und mittlere Firmen aus Industrie und Handwerk. Die Unternehmer kommen dabei mit individuellen Fragestellungen auf Textil vernetzt zu und werden von den Projektpartnern bei der Digitalisierung unterstützt.

Source:

Gesamtverband der deutschen Textil- und Modeindustrie e. V.

VDMA: Mask production: Nothing runs without textile machinery (c) VDMA Textilmaschinen
21.07.2020

VDMA: Mask production: Nothing runs without textile machinery

  • Protective masks, everyday masks, disinfecting wipes and surgical gowns are goods in demand in times of corona.
  • In their manufacture, textile machines are at the beginning of the production chain.

The production of the textile raw material is the first step of the usually multi-stage production processes. Members of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association are at the beginning of this technological chain.

The production of protective masks starts with the manufacture of the filter material, which for surgical masks as well as FFP2 and FFP3 respirator masks consists of fine-pored nonwoven fabric to intercept coronaviruses. In addition to the systems, machines and components used for this purpose, measurement and control technology ensures the highest quality of important parameters such as basis weight and air permeability. Nonwovens used for respiratory masks have to meet the same high-quality requirements as the masks – to ensure the protection of the mask wearer.

  • Protective masks, everyday masks, disinfecting wipes and surgical gowns are goods in demand in times of corona.
  • In their manufacture, textile machines are at the beginning of the production chain.

The production of the textile raw material is the first step of the usually multi-stage production processes. Members of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association are at the beginning of this technological chain.

The production of protective masks starts with the manufacture of the filter material, which for surgical masks as well as FFP2 and FFP3 respirator masks consists of fine-pored nonwoven fabric to intercept coronaviruses. In addition to the systems, machines and components used for this purpose, measurement and control technology ensures the highest quality of important parameters such as basis weight and air permeability. Nonwovens used for respiratory masks have to meet the same high-quality requirements as the masks – to ensure the protection of the mask wearer.

Members of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association have reacted to the new market requirements in a very short time and developed new technologies for knitted, warp knitted as well as woven mouth and nose masks that can be produced without the need for sewing. For surgical masks, FFP2 respirators and social distancing masks, a wide variety of other materials and combinations of materials are used (nonwovens, woven fabrics, knitted or warp knitted fabrics and laminates thereof). Elastic bands are required to wear the masks and several association members provide technologies for their production.

Materials for masks can be treated with textile chemicals to make them antiviral and antibacterial. For this purpose, the VDMA member companies offer application systems which apply the corresponding chemicals to fabric webs. As already mentioned, quality assurance is extremely important for medical products. For this purpose, member companies of the VDMA offer software systems with which each mask can be traced through the entire production process.

VDMA members also offer solutions for the assembly of respirator masks, some of which were developed at short notice. These solutions enable respirators to be produced that meet the relevant standards and the highest quality requirements of customers and market surveillance. This applies to systems for the production of surgical masks and FFP respirators. At the end of the production chain, machines are used to pack masks in single or multiple packs.

In pandemic times, the demand for protective gowns (so-called surgical gowns) also increases. The same applies to disinfecting wipes. For these textile products, too, VDMA members manufacture tailor-made machines for production through to packaging. The quality of the products is ensured by means of measurement and control technology.

In the wake of the corona crisis, VDMA Textile Machinery has launched a new series of web events called "Textile Machinery Webtalk". Here, experts from up to four VDMA member companies present their innovative technologies on a specific topic in a maximum of 90 minutes and are available to answer questions from participants. The presentations are held in English. Participation in the web events is free of charge.
Topics of the first two webtalks were:
"Technologies for the production of melt-blown nonwovens for respiratory protection masks (FFP masks and surgical masks)."
"Technologies for the production of respiratory protection masks (FFP masks and surgical masks)."

The format is well received. Around 180 people from more than 30 countries took part in the first two webtalks. With this format, the VDMA reaches both textile and nonwovens manufacturers who already manufacture these products and companies that want to invest in new business areas.

The next webtalk will take place on 23 July 2020 from 14.00 to 16.00 (CEST) on the current topic "Technology solutions to produce fully-fashioned community face masks." Experts from KARL MAYER, STOLL by KARL MAYER and Jakob Müller will be presenting their technologies for producing everyday textile masks to an international expert audience. Interested parties can register here.

Source:

VDMA Textilmaschinen

Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung awards ITA graduate and a project at ITA with sponsorship prizes (c) Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung
Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung sponsorship award winner picture 2020 (Ricarda Wissel: row 1, first from right, Simon Kammler, row 4, first from right)
25.06.2020

Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung awards ITA graduate and a project at ITA with sponsorship prizes

Carbon dioxide-based fibre for climate protection and interdisciplinary training with novel Smart Textiles test rig

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung, based in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, honours a project of the Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University, short ITA, and awards a sponsorship prize to the ITA graduate Ricarda Wissel on 25 June 2020. She is awarded for her outstanding bachelor thesis " Implementation of elastic yarns made from carbon dioxide based thermoplastic polyurethane in socks " with funding for a subject-specific continuation of her education. The ITA receives the project sponsorship prize for the project "Smart Textiles - an interdisciplinary training course to promote young scientists in future technologies", which was submitted to the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung by ITA´s PhD candidate Simon Kammler.

Carbon dioxide-based fibre from industrial waste contributes to climate protection

Carbon dioxide-based fibre for climate protection and interdisciplinary training with novel Smart Textiles test rig

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung, based in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, honours a project of the Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University, short ITA, and awards a sponsorship prize to the ITA graduate Ricarda Wissel on 25 June 2020. She is awarded for her outstanding bachelor thesis " Implementation of elastic yarns made from carbon dioxide based thermoplastic polyurethane in socks " with funding for a subject-specific continuation of her education. The ITA receives the project sponsorship prize for the project "Smart Textiles - an interdisciplinary training course to promote young scientists in future technologies", which was submitted to the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung by ITA´s PhD candidate Simon Kammler.

Carbon dioxide-based fibre from industrial waste contributes to climate protection

ITA scientist Dr.-Ing. Pavan Manvi has developed a melt spinning process at ITA for the production of elastic yarn from thermoplastic polyurethane, in which carbon dioxide is used as one of the raw materials. In her bachelor thesis, Ricarda Wissel successfully developed a process chain for the CO2-based yarn in a textile end product for the first time. In cooperation with the company FALKE and Dr Manvi, who supervised Ms. Wissel's work, the yarn was used to produce a sock (see figure "FALKE sock with carbon dioxide filaments").

By reusing carbon dioxide from industrial waste as a raw material for textile and clothing products, the carbon dioxide balance can be improved and thus contributes directly to climate protection. The sponsorship prize of the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung is endowed with 6,000 € for the specialist further training of Ms. Wissel.

Interdisciplinary training with development of a new type of measuring stand for the future-oriented research field "Smart Textiles

The development of textiles with additional digital functions, so-called "Smart Textiles", is considered a future-oriented field of research. In his project submission, ITA´s doctoral candidate Simon Kammler presented a concept for a lecture series on Smart Textiles at ITA and develops a new type of measuring stand for measuring the capacity and conductivity of fibres. The project is funded by the Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung with a prize money of 10,000 Euro.

Smart Textiles enable the textile to interact with the environment and the human user. Today they are therefore in demand in many areas of everyday life such as sport, health, living, life and mobility and offer completely new practical solutions. In combination with digital networked services, Smart Textiles promise support and innovation in almost all situations of daily life.

With the conception of a new lecture series, Mr. Simon Kammler is supporting ITA in its goal of providing the best possible training for young scientists. The focus is on imparting far-reaching interdisciplinary skills in order to master the challenges of current fields of research.

Background:

The Wilhelm-Lorch-Stiftung supports particularly talented young people from all areas of the textile industry. Its purpose is the promotion of subject-specific education and further education as well as the promotion of projects at universities, academic schools and vocational schools, which are characterised by the sustainable communication of innovative learning content in science and research. In total, thirteen sponsorship prizes were awarded in 2020. Due to the Corona crisis, the forum of TextilWirtschaft, which is normally the venue for the awards ceremony, unfortunately had to be cancelled in 2020.

Logo Fairfield
Fairfield produces surgical gowns
08.04.2020

Fairfield Chair Pivots from Seating Production to Surgical Gowns

Fairfield Chair Co. has retooled its production of chairs and sofas to high-in-demand surgical gowns in an effort to help rush supplies to health care companies on the frontline of the COVID-19 pandemic.

When the spread of the coronavirus impacted Fairfield and the entire U.S. manufacturing sector, Fairfield executives jumped into action.

The seating manufacturer, which essentially took a crash course on apparel patternmaking and industry specs, has switched its production to surgical gowns overnight. In just over a week, Fairfield produced its first samples of the surgical gown and immediately received approval on the prototype from Blue Ridge Healthcare in North Carolina, which has placed an initial order for 1,200 surgical gowns.
Cotswold Industries worked closely with Fairfield to help the company pivot to gown and mask manufacturing and provide the materials needed for the finished products.

Fairfield Chair Co. has retooled its production of chairs and sofas to high-in-demand surgical gowns in an effort to help rush supplies to health care companies on the frontline of the COVID-19 pandemic.

When the spread of the coronavirus impacted Fairfield and the entire U.S. manufacturing sector, Fairfield executives jumped into action.

The seating manufacturer, which essentially took a crash course on apparel patternmaking and industry specs, has switched its production to surgical gowns overnight. In just over a week, Fairfield produced its first samples of the surgical gown and immediately received approval on the prototype from Blue Ridge Healthcare in North Carolina, which has placed an initial order for 1,200 surgical gowns.
Cotswold Industries worked closely with Fairfield to help the company pivot to gown and mask manufacturing and provide the materials needed for the finished products.

Fairfield is also tapping into the experience it gained from producing seating for senior living facilities, which require certain materials with antimicrobial finishes.
“We are very accustomed to working with antimicrobial fabrics however, we have never worked with wovens that are developed to meet specifications like this material has to,” states McClurd, vice President of imports of Fairfield.

More information:
corona virus respiratory masks
Source:

NCTO

Oerlikon logo (c) Oerlikon
Oerlikon logo
17.03.2020

Oerlikon wins three large manmade fibers orders in China

Long-term project business in China remains stable 

Oerlikon has received new large orders for manmade fibers production solutions from three of the world’s leading manmade fibers manufacturers. All three companies are based in China and have been key customers of Oerlikon for many years. The orders are for Oerlikon Barmag’s world-leading filament-spinning technology for the highly efficient production of polyester fibers. The three projects have a total value of more than CHF 600 million (EUR 565 million). A very small proportion of these projects will be recognized in Oerlikon Group’s order intake in 2020, and the majority will be accounted for in 2021 and 2022. On-site delivery and installation of these systems are planned for the period from 2021 to early 2023.

Long-term project business in China remains stable 

Oerlikon has received new large orders for manmade fibers production solutions from three of the world’s leading manmade fibers manufacturers. All three companies are based in China and have been key customers of Oerlikon for many years. The orders are for Oerlikon Barmag’s world-leading filament-spinning technology for the highly efficient production of polyester fibers. The three projects have a total value of more than CHF 600 million (EUR 565 million). A very small proportion of these projects will be recognized in Oerlikon Group’s order intake in 2020, and the majority will be accounted for in 2021 and 2022. On-site delivery and installation of these systems are planned for the period from 2021 to early 2023.

The systems business in China remains largely unchanged despite the short-term interruption caused by the coronavirus epidemic following the Chinese New Year celebrations. Long-term project planning for major customers in the manmade fibers industry has resulted in new major orders being placed with Oerlikon Barmag. One of the three new orders, valued at more than CHF300million (EUR282million), is the largest order ever received by Oerlikon Barmag, based in Remscheid, Germany.

The comprehensive manmade fibers technology solutions by Oerlikon are used along the entire value chain in polyester yarn manufacturing and contain cutting-edge automation and digitalization technologies. Oerlikon’s innovative technologies will enable the three Chinese companies to increase their production capacities for polyester yarn and to remain competitive. Oerlikon Barmag will provide the entire system for WINGS POY and WINGS FDY, as well as the texturing machines from the eFK product family in phases over a period of slightly over two years.


 

Source:

Oerlikon

Logo of the National Council of Textile Organisations
NCTO supports proposals on ecomomic stimulus
11.03.2020

NCTO Supports Administration’s Proposals on Economic Stimulus

NCTO Supports Administration’s Proposals on Economic Stimulus in Coronavirus Response; Rejects Importer Attempts to Remove China 301 Tariffs on Finished Products

The National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), representing the full spectrum U.S. textiles from fiber through finished sewn products, issued a statement today welcoming the Trump administration’s proposals on an economic stimulus package to gird the economy against the impact of the coronavirus outbreak. But the organization urged officials to reject any attempts by importers to remove China 301 tariffs on finished products as part of any relief package.

“The president has outlined the need for a broad economic stimulus package that would include various tax incentives to help impacted industries and workers. We support the administration’s efforts to bolster the economy as a response to the coronavirus outbreak, while opposing add-ons to any stimulus package designed to exploit the crisis,” said NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas.

NCTO Supports Administration’s Proposals on Economic Stimulus in Coronavirus Response; Rejects Importer Attempts to Remove China 301 Tariffs on Finished Products

The National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), representing the full spectrum U.S. textiles from fiber through finished sewn products, issued a statement today welcoming the Trump administration’s proposals on an economic stimulus package to gird the economy against the impact of the coronavirus outbreak. But the organization urged officials to reject any attempts by importers to remove China 301 tariffs on finished products as part of any relief package.

“The president has outlined the need for a broad economic stimulus package that would include various tax incentives to help impacted industries and workers. We support the administration’s efforts to bolster the economy as a response to the coronavirus outbreak, while opposing add-ons to any stimulus package designed to exploit the crisis,” said NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas.

As part of a Phase One deal with China, the administration reduced duties on finished apparel and textile products implemented on Sept.1 from 15 percent to 7.5 percent.

Finished apparel, home furnishings and other made-up textile goods equate to 93.5 percent of U.S. imports from China in the sector; while fiber, yarn, and fabric imports from China only represent 6.5 percent, according to government data.

 

More information:
Coronavirus NCTO
Source:

National Council of Textile Organizations