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19.04.2022

Sustainable fashion platform Manufy: Upgraded version with more functionalities

Manufy, a marketplace for sustainable fashion production, has launched a new version of their platform. The platform connects conscious brands with sustainable manufacturers in hopes to create a cleaner future for the clothing industry. Now decked out with many more functionalities, Manufy aims to facilitate sustainable business between both parties from start to finish.  

Over the course of the last year the Manufy team has been busy gathering feedback from its growing user base. The platform started out as a place where manufacturers and brands from Europe could connect and chat with each other, but the team found out both parties wanted more. “We constantly reached out to our users to listen to their needs. We’ve compiled all those ideas and implemented them in version two!” says Michiel Dicker, co-founder of Manufy.

Not only a full visual transformation, but many functionalities were added: “Users can now easily start a sampling process, organise projects from start to finish and get sustainability insights” Dicker says. “Manufy is becoming your one-stop-shop for all your sourcing needs!”

Manufy, a marketplace for sustainable fashion production, has launched a new version of their platform. The platform connects conscious brands with sustainable manufacturers in hopes to create a cleaner future for the clothing industry. Now decked out with many more functionalities, Manufy aims to facilitate sustainable business between both parties from start to finish.  

Over the course of the last year the Manufy team has been busy gathering feedback from its growing user base. The platform started out as a place where manufacturers and brands from Europe could connect and chat with each other, but the team found out both parties wanted more. “We constantly reached out to our users to listen to their needs. We’ve compiled all those ideas and implemented them in version two!” says Michiel Dicker, co-founder of Manufy.

Not only a full visual transformation, but many functionalities were added: “Users can now easily start a sampling process, organise projects from start to finish and get sustainability insights” Dicker says. “Manufy is becoming your one-stop-shop for all your sourcing needs!”

The start-up, which launched in december of 2020, has seen a sharp increase in user activity over the last year. With trade shows being canceled due to covid, lots of manufacturers and brands were looking for new ways to do business. Going digital was one of the logical steps.

The production requests being placed on the platform cover a wide range of garments. Hoodies and t-shirts are popular, but the Manufy team also sees lots of shoes, caps, bags, dresses, swimwear and lingerie requests coming in.

Another notable trend in the industry is the ever growing demand for sustainable clothing production. With reports on climate change coming out and more and more consumers asking for sustainable alternatives, brands are making an effort to source their products more responsibly. The fashion industry, being the second largest polluting industry, needs a sort of paradigm shift. “We should focus more on making lower quantity, higher quality products. Making it on demand would be best” says Dicker.

More information:
Manufy Sustainability
Source:

Manufy

(c) Manufy
25.02.2022

Sustainable fashion platform Manufy reaches first 1000 production requests

Manufy, a marketplace for sustainable fashion production has reached its thousandth production request. The platform connects conscious brands with sustainable manufacturers in hopes to create a cleaner future for the clothing industry.

The right conditions
The start-up, which launched in december of 2020, has seen a sharp increase in production requests the last couple of months. With trade shows being cancelled due to covid, lots of manufacturers and brands are looking for new ways to do business. Going digital was one of the logical steps. “We’ve seen many users that were used to more traditional ways of working join Manufy,” says co-founder Michiel Dicker. “Some of them didn’t have a website, so our platform helps them become visible online.”

An increase was also noticed on the brand side of Manufy. With most new brands being digital natives that have a strong focus on sustainability, the platform helps them to get started.

Manufy, a marketplace for sustainable fashion production has reached its thousandth production request. The platform connects conscious brands with sustainable manufacturers in hopes to create a cleaner future for the clothing industry.

The right conditions
The start-up, which launched in december of 2020, has seen a sharp increase in production requests the last couple of months. With trade shows being cancelled due to covid, lots of manufacturers and brands are looking for new ways to do business. Going digital was one of the logical steps. “We’ve seen many users that were used to more traditional ways of working join Manufy,” says co-founder Michiel Dicker. “Some of them didn’t have a website, so our platform helps them become visible online.”

An increase was also noticed on the brand side of Manufy. With most new brands being digital natives that have a strong focus on sustainability, the platform helps them to get started.

One-stop-shop
The production requests being placed on the platform cover a wide range of garments. Hoodies and t-shirts are popular, but the Manufy team also sees lots of shoes, caps, bags, dresses, swimwear and lingerie requests coming in. “This sometimes leads us to having to find manufacturers specifically for the job, but it helps us to create a better user experience!” explains Dicker.

Manufy uses feedback from its users to keep improving the platform. Aside from finding new manufacturers to fill production requests the team has been working on a lot of new functionalities based on input from users. A new version of the platform will be released very soon. “With Manufy 2.0 it will become easier to organise your projects, place re-orders and have all your production details in one place. Manufy will be your one-stop-shop for all your sourcing needs!” says Dicker.

More information:
Manufy Sustainability digital
Source:

Manufy

18.01.2022

EURATEX: BREXIT has been a “lose-lose” deal for the textile industry

Latest trade data (January-September 2021) show a dramatic drop of imports and exports of textile goods between the EU and UK, with significant losses for companies on both sides. The situation is likely to get worse, as the full customs regime between UK and EU has entered into force on 1 January 2022. EURATEX calls on the European Union and the United Kingdom to effectively cooperate to remove the issues in the EU-UK Trade agreement that prevent smooth trade flows.  

Latest trade data (January-September 2021) show a dramatic drop of imports and exports of textile goods between the EU and UK, with significant losses for companies on both sides. The situation is likely to get worse, as the full customs regime between UK and EU has entered into force on 1 January 2022. EURATEX calls on the European Union and the United Kingdom to effectively cooperate to remove the issues in the EU-UK Trade agreement that prevent smooth trade flows.  

All the sectors have been already suffering a significant loss in the past year and textiles has been no exception. Compared to the same period in 2020, between January and September the EU recorded a dramatic fall in imports (-44%, corresponding to almost € 2 billion) and in exports (-22%, corresponding to € 1.6 billion). The data show that the most impacted EU countries on the export side are Italy, Netherlands, Belgium and Germany while on the import side the most impacted countries are Germany, Ireland and France. Among the T&C sectors, clothing articles are facing the most severe drop in both imports and exports, corresponding to a total trade loss of more than € 3.4 billion over the 9 months period. Despite these alarming figures, the UK continues to be the most important export market for EU textiles and clothing.

Concerning the impact on the UK textiles sector, in May 2021 the UK Fashion and Textile Association’s (UKFT) surveyed 138 businesses, including leading UK fashion brands, UK textile manufacturers, wholesalers, fashion agencies, garment manufacturers and retailers.

The results of the survey showed that:

  • 71% currently rely on imports from the EU
  • 92% are experiencing increased freight costs  
  • 83% are experiencing increased costs and bureaucracy for customs clearance
  • 53% are experiencing cancelled orders as a result of how the EU-UK agreement is being implemented
  • 41% had been hit by double duties  
  • The vast majority of the surveyed companies declared they are looking to pass the increased costs on to consumer in the next  6-12 months

The above situation is expected to get worse. Since 1 January, full customs controls are being implemented. It means that export and import rules have become stricter: products should already have a valid declaration in place and have received customs clearance. Export from Britain to the EU must now have supplier declarations and the commodities codes changed.  

EURATEX calls on the European Union and the United Kingdom to effectively cooperate to address, solve and remove the issues in the EU-UK Trade agreement that currently prevent smooth trade flows between the two sides of the Channel. It is causing considerable losses for textile companies both in the EU as well as in the UK. 

 

More information:
Euratex textile industry Brexit
Source:

EURATEX

15.09.2021

REACH4Textiles: Better market surveillance for textile products

The REACH4texiles project just kicked off. Funded by the European Commission, it aims at exploring solutions for fair and effective market surveillance on textile products.

Every year, about 28 billion of garments circulate across Europe, 80% of which are imported from outside the EU and its jurisdiction.
 
Inevitably, such huge volumes pose enormous challenges for market surveillance authorities which are called to ensure that uncompliant dangerous products are kept away from the EU citizens.

The European Union has the world most comprehensive chemical legislation which is set to protect consumers, the environment and, theoretically, even the competitiveness  of the business.

Such EU chemical legislation evolves constantly, increasing scope and ambition. New restrictions impact authorities and sectors like the European textile value chain and generate new costs for all actors.

Evidence suggests that such advanced regulatory framework is not completed with an equally advanced or effective EU-wide control system capable of ensuring compliance, especially in the case of imported products.

The REACH4texiles project just kicked off. Funded by the European Commission, it aims at exploring solutions for fair and effective market surveillance on textile products.

Every year, about 28 billion of garments circulate across Europe, 80% of which are imported from outside the EU and its jurisdiction.
 
Inevitably, such huge volumes pose enormous challenges for market surveillance authorities which are called to ensure that uncompliant dangerous products are kept away from the EU citizens.

The European Union has the world most comprehensive chemical legislation which is set to protect consumers, the environment and, theoretically, even the competitiveness  of the business.

Such EU chemical legislation evolves constantly, increasing scope and ambition. New restrictions impact authorities and sectors like the European textile value chain and generate new costs for all actors.

Evidence suggests that such advanced regulatory framework is not completed with an equally advanced or effective EU-wide control system capable of ensuring compliance, especially in the case of imported products.

The REACH4texiles project aims at exploring solutions for fair and effective market surveillance on textile products; it pools together the key actors to address three objectives:

  • Keep non-compliant products away from the single market.
  • Increase skills and knowledge.
  • Support a Network addressing chemicals in textiles and applying the EU regulation 2019/1020

The 2 years project will share best practices, identify efficient approaches against non-compliant products, offer training and support for a more effective surveillance and for level playing field.

The project welcomes collaboration with concerned authorities across the EU Member States.

Details:

A well-functioning EU market surveillance system is an essential prerequisite to protect citizen, the environment and competitiveness of responsible business. When it comes to textiles, the broad range of products, the large set of REACH subjected chemicals used in textiles as well as industrial strategies like fast fashion make this a challenging task.

Challenges may include lack of resources, difficulties in identifying higher risk products, cost and management of chemical tests, lack of test methods and knowledge of best practices. These challenges are yet likely to increase with the upcoming REACH restrictions and the growth of e-commerce.

Because of this, products that do not comply with REACH regulations encounter today little or no barriers to enter the market. This creates not only a health risk for Europeans but also undermines the competitivity of responsible businesses that take all necessary measures to comply with these regulations.

Addressing the challenges requires more knowledge at market surveillance and stronger collaboration between these authorities, the textile and clothing industry and testing laboratories. More knowledge about the identification of risk baring textile products and REACH chemicals likely to be used in these products, suitable test methods and strategies such as fast screening on REACH chemicals, trustworthiness of labels, etc can increase the effectiveness of market surveillance considerably.

The REACH4Textiles first objective (keep non-compliant products away from the EU Market) will be pursued by increasing knowledge on market surveillance functioning by and working on a risk-based approach to identify products at higher risk.

The second objective supports a network to address the specificities of chemicals in textiles with market surveillance authorities and involving other relevant stakeholders. The third objective focuses on sharing knowledge with market surveillance actors on textile products and suitable test methodologies.

Supported by the European Commission DG Growth, the project team is coordinated by the Belgian test and research center Centexbel and include the European Textiles and Apparel industry confederation, EURATEX, the German national textile and fashion association Textile und Mode, t+m, the Italian association Tessile e Salute. Several other European industry associations and national authorities are welcomed to become involved through the project activities.   

More information:
Euratex market surveillance Import
Source:

Euratex

Key role for Kipaş in the EU’s multi-million New Cotton Project (c) Monforts
The New Cotton Project logo
30.11.2020

Key role for Kipaş in the EU’s multi-million New Cotton Project

  • Monforts customer Kipaş has been selected as the sole denim manufacturing partner in the €6.7 million European Union-funded New Cotton Project, involving the brands adidas and H&M, working in a consortium with suppliers, innovators and research institutes.

Kipaş, based in Kahramanmaraş, Turkey, is currently installing its third Monforts Montex stenter along with a third Monfortex compressive shrinkage system in a combined configuration dedicated to denim production.

This follows the successful installation and commissioning of the second Montex and Monfortex lines at the Kahramanmaraş plant in 2018, which Kipaş Vice Chairman of the Board Ahmet Öksüz said had immediately exceeded expectations.

  • Monforts customer Kipaş has been selected as the sole denim manufacturing partner in the €6.7 million European Union-funded New Cotton Project, involving the brands adidas and H&M, working in a consortium with suppliers, innovators and research institutes.

Kipaş, based in Kahramanmaraş, Turkey, is currently installing its third Monforts Montex stenter along with a third Monfortex compressive shrinkage system in a combined configuration dedicated to denim production.

This follows the successful installation and commissioning of the second Montex and Monfortex lines at the Kahramanmaraş plant in 2018, which Kipaş Vice Chairman of the Board Ahmet Öksüz said had immediately exceeded expectations.

“We performed a very thorough technical investigation based on the latest Industry 4.0 analysis before the purchase, to determine what we needed, and the Monforts technology met all our requirements,” he said, in an interview with Textilegence magazine. “The Monfortex is equipped with a variety of features not found on classical shrinkage machines and the production can be monitored from beginning to end. It also exceeded our expectations in energy cost savings.”

Kipaş subsequently received a special certificate from Monforts in recognition of its exceptional utilisation of the technology to its full potential.

The latest Montex stenter now being installed at Kipaş is a 12-chamber unit with a working width of 2 metres featuring all of the latest automation features. The Monfortex unit, also with a working width of 2 metres, is in a ‘double rubber’ configuration, comprising two compressive shrinkage units and two felt calenders in line. This allows the heat setting of elastane fibres and the residual shrinkage of the denim to be carried out simultaneously, for a significant increase in production speeds.

“Around 90-95% of denim fabric production now contains elastane fibres and the Monforts system has allowed us to simultaneously increase our production and quality in this respect,” Mr Öksüz said.

Regenerated cotton
For the next three years within the New Cotton Project, Kipaş will manufacture denim fabrics based on the cellulose-based fibres of Infinited Fiber Company of Finland, made from post-consumer textile waste that has been collected, sorted and regenerated.

The patented technology of Infinited, which is leading the consortium of 12 companies, turns cellulose-rich textile waste into fibres that look and feel like cotton.

“We are very excited and proud to lead this project which is breaking new ground when it comes to making circularity in the textile industry a reality,” said Infinited co-founder and CEO Petri Alava. “The enthusiasm and commitment with which the entire consortium has come together to work towards a cleaner, more sustainable future for fashion is truly inspiring.”

Take-back programmes
Adidas and H&M will establish take-back programmes to collect the clothing that is produced, to determine the next phase in their lifecycle. Clothing that can no longer be worn will be returned to Infinited, for regeneration into new fibres, further contributing to a circular economy in which textiles never go to waste, but instead are reused, recycled or turned into new garments.

The aim is to prove that circular, sustainable fashion can be achieved today, and to act as an inspiration and stepping stone to further, even bigger circular initiatives by the industry going forward.

The EU has identified the high potential for circularity within the textile industry, while simultaneously highlighting the urgent need for the development of technologies to produce and design sustainable and circular bio-based materials. Making sustainable products commonplace, reducing waste and leading global efforts on circularity are outlined in the European Commission’s Circular Economy Action Plan.

Fashion brands produce nearly twice as many clothes today as they did 20 years ago and demand is expected to continue growing. At the same time, the equivalent of one garbage truck of textiles is landfilled or burned every second. Most of the textile industry’s environmental problems relate to the raw materials used by the industry – cotton, fossil-based fibres such as polyester, and viscose as the most common man-made cellulosic fibre, are all associated with serious environmental concerns.

World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy (c) pixabay
Cotton
07.10.2020

October, 7th: World Cotton Day

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

According to the WTO, the aim of World Cotton Day is to highlight the global economic importance of cotton and to raise awareness of the raw material by recognising the work of everyone involved in its cultivation, processing and trade. At the same time, within the framework of international cooperation, it is hoped that supporters and investors can be found to aid with technological and economic progress within the cotton value chain.

This time, the entire world cotton community will be involved in World Cotton Day on Wednesday, 7 October 2020. A wide variety of campaigns and events are taking place everywhere to draw attention to the importance of cotton and its possible uses.

Cotton is one of the most relevant agricultural raw materials in the world. Around 26 million tonnes of it are harvested annually. Approximately 150 million people in almost 80 countries around the world live from the cultivation of the natural fibre. A large number of these live in developing countries, where cotton cultivation is of particular importance as a cash crop.

Cotton is known as an agricultural product that is turned into a textile. The raw material is indispensable in fashion and clothing – and has been for thousands of years. But the use of cotton now goes far beyond textiles. For example, cosmetic products such as hand creams and hair shampoo are made from the oil of cotton seeds. The raw material is also used in the manufacture of banknotes, furniture and technical textiles, as well as in medical technology.

Against the background of the current discussion on sustainability and sustainable consumption, the role of natural fibres is becoming even more important. Cotton is biodegradable and a renewable resource. It can be grown again and again in agriculture through cultivation in crop rotation. This secures incomes and enables efficient value creation within the global production and processing chain.

The Bremen Cotton Exchange will actively support World Cotton Day with cross-media coverage. In addition, in time for World Cotton Day, three thematically different, emotionally appealing short films about cotton will be launched. They are aimed at consumers as customers of the textile and clothing trade and provide information about the benefits and properties of cotton and answer questions about its sustainability. In keeping with the times, they will be published via virtual media.

16.01.2020

NCTO Welcomes Senate Passage of USMCA

The National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) lauded Senate passage today of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

“We are pleased the Senate voted swiftly to approve USMCA--a trade deal that we expect to significantly bolster textile exports to Mexico and the Western Hemisphere,” said NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas.

Mexico and Canada are the two largest export markets for the U.S. textile and apparel industry, totaling nearly $11.5 billion for the year ending Nov. 30, 2019, according to government data.

“USMCA is a win for the textile industry,” Glas said. “The improvements it makes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) will only serve to generate more business for domestic producers and create more jobs and investment in the U.S.”
NCTO worked with the administration during negotiations on USMCA and secured several provisions in the trade deal including stronger rules of origin for certain textile inputs and increased U.S. customs enforcement.

The National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) lauded Senate passage today of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

“We are pleased the Senate voted swiftly to approve USMCA--a trade deal that we expect to significantly bolster textile exports to Mexico and the Western Hemisphere,” said NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas.

Mexico and Canada are the two largest export markets for the U.S. textile and apparel industry, totaling nearly $11.5 billion for the year ending Nov. 30, 2019, according to government data.

“USMCA is a win for the textile industry,” Glas said. “The improvements it makes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) will only serve to generate more business for domestic producers and create more jobs and investment in the U.S.”
NCTO worked with the administration during negotiations on USMCA and secured several provisions in the trade deal including stronger rules of origin for certain textile inputs and increased U.S. customs enforcement.

U.S. textile executives are ramping up to take advantage of the modifications in USMCA and some plan to build new business or expand existing business in areas such as pocketing, sewing thread and narrow elastics.

“Our member companies, making some of the most advanced textiles in the world, have long supported USMCA and are eagerly awaiting implementation of the trade deal,” Glas added. “We urge quick implementation of USMCA and thank the administration and Congress for their hard work to get the deal across the finish line.”

The USMCA updates and modifies the NAFTA and makes significant improvements, including:

  • Creation of a separate chapter for textiles and apparel rules of origin with strong customs enforcement language.
  • Stronger rules of origin for sewing thread, pocketing, narrow elastics and certain coated fabrics.  Under the current NAFTA, these items can be sourced from outside the region – USMCA modernizes this loophole and ensures these secondary components are originating to the region.
  • Fixes the Kissell Amendment Buy American loophole, ensuring that a significant amount the Department of Homeland Security spends annually on clothing and textiles for the Transportation Security Administration is spent on domestically produced products.
More information:
NCTO
Source:

NCTO

27.06.2018

ROICA™ Infuses Eco-Smart Technology into High Performance Stretch at EUROBIKE on July 9th 2018

EUROBIKE, the world’s leading trade fair for the cycling industry, will include ROICA™ smart innovations into the race. Cycle retailers, brands and manufacturers will discover ROICA™ premium stretch that provides comfort and movement as it energizes.

ROICA™ will go the distance as they join this year’s EUROBIKE Academy line-up and host an interactive panel focused on sustainability as an added value for the cycling market. Whether an expert or newcomer, the must attend panel titled; What is Smart Innovation in the Biking Market? will be held on Monday, July 9th from 12:00-12:45 in Conference Center East, Room London. Moderated by Giusy Bettoni, CEO, C.L.A.S.S. (Creativity Lifestyle And Sustainable Synergy), a Milan based company generating global strategies and identifying new values essential for today’s knowledgeable conscious consumer. The panel will lead the way, as they share their expertise and discuss what they are doing to push the boundaries of innovation. They will highlight responsible dimensions and processes currently available. The all-star lineup includes:

EUROBIKE, the world’s leading trade fair for the cycling industry, will include ROICA™ smart innovations into the race. Cycle retailers, brands and manufacturers will discover ROICA™ premium stretch that provides comfort and movement as it energizes.

ROICA™ will go the distance as they join this year’s EUROBIKE Academy line-up and host an interactive panel focused on sustainability as an added value for the cycling market. Whether an expert or newcomer, the must attend panel titled; What is Smart Innovation in the Biking Market? will be held on Monday, July 9th from 12:00-12:45 in Conference Center East, Room London. Moderated by Giusy Bettoni, CEO, C.L.A.S.S. (Creativity Lifestyle And Sustainable Synergy), a Milan based company generating global strategies and identifying new values essential for today’s knowledgeable conscious consumer. The panel will lead the way, as they share their expertise and discuss what they are doing to push the boundaries of innovation. They will highlight responsible dimensions and processes currently available. The all-star lineup includes:

Uwe Schmidt, Asahi Kasei’s ROICA™, Managing Director introduces cycle enthusiasts, brands, retailers and manufacturers to the world’s first premium sustainable stretch yarn: ROICA™ Eco-Smart and the ROICA™ Feel Good family dedicated to well-being.
 
Laura Gambarini, marketing and communication manager at M.I.T.I. S.p.A.: M.I.T.I. Since 1931, M.I.T.I. develops and creates premium and innovative stretch warp knitted fabrics for all the high performance sports. Cycling brands recognize M.I.T.I. as the market leader for the outstanding features of their innovative fabrics. Green soul is their ultimate creation, the first fully sustainable stretch warp knitted range of fabrics in the world, created with ROICA™ Eco-Smart family for the new generation sustainable performance garments.
 
Sven Koehler, Head of production Maloja Clothing GmbH: Maloja, an outdoor specialty brand with its roots in nature and wellbeing have developed new amazing biking sets constructed of M.I.T.I. SpA fabrics using certified yarns belonging to ROICA™ Eco-Smart family.
 
Sergio Alibrandi, Executive Marketing Director Sitip S.p.A.: SITIP creates high-tech innovative sports fabrics that are made in Italy and optimize the latest technology. Committed to smart innovation, learn how they developed their ground-breaking multi-panel thermal bib tights able to generate heat for riders that want to conquer cold winter training. Made from BeHOT fabric constructed with ROICA™ StretchEnergy™, the next level of well-being providing a new dimension to active performance.  The audience will learn how leading international cycling brand Santini is using BeHOT with ROICA™ on select products to generate additional heat – up to 2 degrees C as the cyclist moves their body, thanks to ground-breaking heat generating technology as certified by CeRism, Outdoor Sport Research Centre at Verona University.
 
Spearheading the premium stretch market, ROICA™ partners’ materials elevate new standards for high-tech performance that can enhance cycling products to compete responsibly. ROICA™ partners excite you as they show a fantastic range of stretch essentials for cycling clothing, gear, and apparel that offer solid performance perks. Most importantly, visit ROICA™ partners at EUROBIKE to learn about their ongoing commitment to responsible innovation and creativity.

More information:
EUROBIKE cycling industry ROICA™
Source:

GB Network

26.06.2018

Archroma to showcase innovative denim solutions at DenimsandJeans Vietnam 2018

Archroma, a global leader in color and specialty chemicals, will be presenting its innovative and sustainable denim solutions for manufacturers and brands at DenimsandJeans Vietnam 2018, on June 27 and 28.
From fiber to finish, Archroma offers a scope of possibilities for effects and colors, from the authentic roots of indigo to the most innovative and eco-advanced solutions. Archroma is a recognized leader in integrated solutions, offering best-in-class auxiliaries for bespoke process packages.
Visitors will be able to discover solutions designed to make denim in a more sustainable and responsible way, in particular:
DENISOL®, BRINGING INDIGO BACK TO ITS ROOTS - NOW ANILINE-FREE*
Archroma’s Denisol® range is a newly developed pre-reduced liquid indigo solution that is manufactured in Archroma’s award winning ‘zero liquid discharge’ manufacturing plant in Pakistan.

Archroma, a global leader in color and specialty chemicals, will be presenting its innovative and sustainable denim solutions for manufacturers and brands at DenimsandJeans Vietnam 2018, on June 27 and 28.
From fiber to finish, Archroma offers a scope of possibilities for effects and colors, from the authentic roots of indigo to the most innovative and eco-advanced solutions. Archroma is a recognized leader in integrated solutions, offering best-in-class auxiliaries for bespoke process packages.
Visitors will be able to discover solutions designed to make denim in a more sustainable and responsible way, in particular:
DENISOL®, BRINGING INDIGO BACK TO ITS ROOTS - NOW ANILINE-FREE*
Archroma’s Denisol® range is a newly developed pre-reduced liquid indigo solution that is manufactured in Archroma’s award winning ‘zero liquid discharge’ manufacturing plant in Pakistan.

  • Denisol® Indigo 30 liq is compliant with major official eco-standards and requirements from retailers, brands and fashion leading companies and helps to produce fabrics suitable for current eco-labeling such as bluesign® and GOTS.
  • Responding to demands for a non-toxic alternative to the dyes that are used for the iconic and traditional indigo blue that consumers associate with denim and jeans, Archroma just announced the upcoming new Denisol® Pure Indigo 30.

ADVANCED DENIM, TOWARDS WATERLESS DENIM DYEING
Consider this: The water needed to produce one pair of jeans is said to be ~ 11'000 liters(1). With approximately 167 million pairs of jeans produced monthly(2), that is 1,837,000,000,000 liters of water consumed every month in the process! Based on the Denim-Ox and Pad/Sizing-Ox dyeing processes, Archroma’s multi-awarded ADVANCED DENIM, dyeing technology allows savings of up to 92% in water, 87% in cotton waste and 30% in energy, compared to a conventional denim dyeing process.
The technology has been adopted by brands like Patagonia and received the prestigious 2012 ICIS Innovation Award and Innovation with Best Environmental Benefit Award.

  • Optisul® C, “soft colors” made easy
    Colors other than blue have been tricky to achieve in the past. With Optisul® C dyes, denim manufacturers can expand their color horizons with this range of six dyes especially designed to produce soft denim colors in continuous dyeing processes, as well as on coating and printing. Optisul® C affinity-free, sulfide-free dyes can easily be combined with each other to create garments suitable for wash-down treatments in a wide array of easily achievable and reproducible soft colors. They are suitable for GOTS and bluesign® approval.
  • Diresul® RDT Ocean Blues, ocean-themed bright sulfur blue dyes
    Archroma’s Diresul® RDT Ocean Blues are a collection of vibrant, ocean-themed bright sulfur blue dyes. These best-in-class dyes and their auxiliaries bring out the best of indigo, improve workability, dyeing consistency and process safety.
    They can be combined with Denisol® Indigo 30 liq in bottoming/topping manufacturing routes for avant-garde blue styles. At the booth, Archroma will display an “illustration collection” of exciting indigo casts.
  • Diresul® blacks & greys, a universe of greys and deep black and navies.
    Archroma’s dye portfolio of conventional and black Diresul® specialties allow to create a universe of greys and deep black and navies. From superficial to solid blacks for both extreme wash-down and stay black effects.

EARTHCOLORS, TRACEABLE FROM NATURE TO FASHION
As consumers increasingly aspire to functional, beautiful and meaningful clothing, brands and manufacturers are increasingly interested in the environmental impact of the denim industry. Archroma has placed sustainability at the heart of its innovation process to create products and processes that improve the industry’s sustainability.
The EarthColors patented range of “biosynthetic” dyes for cotton and cellulose-based fabrics, which are made from waste left over by the agricultural and herbal industry after extraction, such as almond shells, saw palmetto, or rosemary leaves. The latest NFC technology used on the end-product hangtags enables transparency and traceability through the supply chain to consumers.
The EarthColors allow to produce the earth tones that are coming strong: red, brown and green colors. They have been adopted by brands such as Patagonia, Kathmandu and G-Star, and won an OutDoor Industry Award 2017.

SOLUTION PACKAGES FOR SUSTAINABILITY
Brand owners and retailers around the world are taking action to evaluate the environmental impact of textile treatment, dyeing and finishing processes in response to consumer concerns.

Archroma recently introduced the ONE WAY Process Simulator, the last update of a calculation tool that supports its ONE WAY Sustainability Service introduced back in 2012. The new, online software can be used to mimic and compare products and processes, and thus calculate the ecological and economical profile of the final end-product.
Archroma’s portfolio of ZDHC MRSL-compliant chemicals and dyes is integrated into the ONE WAY calculation tool since 2013.
“Innovation and sustainability go hand in hand,” says Paul O’Prey, Head of Sales, Brand & Performance Textile Specialties, Archroma, Vietnam. “While developing new products and services, we always consider the environmental impact so they are as sustainable as possible. This can be seen in our innovative and eco-advance products, such as the water-saving ADVANCED DENIM and the aniline-free* Denisol® Pure Indigo.”

Customer data heralds new opportunities for fashion industry © Lectra
Lectra ESCP Europe Round Table
16.11.2017

Customer data heralds new opportunities for fashion industry

  • Amazon, EasySize, Evo Pricing and Lectra explored diverse uses for customer data during a round table event organized by the ESCP Europe - Lectra ‘Fashion & Technology’ Chair Paris

Lectra, the world leader in integrated technology solutions dedicated to industries using fabrics, leather, technical textiles and composite materials, the French business school ESCP Europe and their joint ‘Fashion & Technology’ Chair examined the multiple ways the fashion industry’s ecosystem can use customer data, during a recent round table event at the start of the fifth Fashion Tech Week in Paris.

Elise Beuriot, senior category leader, EU Luggage, Amazon, Olivier Dancot, VP of data, Lectra, Fabrizio Fantini, founder and CEO, Evo Pricing, and Gulnaz Khusainova, founder and CEO, Easysize, agreed straight away on one key point: the analysis of customer data lends itself to limitless applications along the entire fashion value chain. Its impact is immense, whether in terms of customer satisfaction, competitiveness, revenues or waste limitation.

  • Amazon, EasySize, Evo Pricing and Lectra explored diverse uses for customer data during a round table event organized by the ESCP Europe - Lectra ‘Fashion & Technology’ Chair Paris

Lectra, the world leader in integrated technology solutions dedicated to industries using fabrics, leather, technical textiles and composite materials, the French business school ESCP Europe and their joint ‘Fashion & Technology’ Chair examined the multiple ways the fashion industry’s ecosystem can use customer data, during a recent round table event at the start of the fifth Fashion Tech Week in Paris.

Elise Beuriot, senior category leader, EU Luggage, Amazon, Olivier Dancot, VP of data, Lectra, Fabrizio Fantini, founder and CEO, Evo Pricing, and Gulnaz Khusainova, founder and CEO, Easysize, agreed straight away on one key point: the analysis of customer data lends itself to limitless applications along the entire fashion value chain. Its impact is immense, whether in terms of customer satisfaction, competitiveness, revenues or waste limitation.

As early as the design phase, a wealth of data offers many sources of inspiration for stylists. For teams in charge of collections, “complex models allow the analysis of data like online traffic and purchase history in order to design and offer the products that consumers expect, which is a priority for a company obsessed by the customer, like Amazon,” stated Elise Beuriot. For sales, “decisions based on data trigger millions of orders. The impact on the inventory is enormous,” she added.

“Fashion is an industry where unsold items generate a lot of waste. Algorithms and big data analysis can reduce left-overs by anticipating demand several weeks ahead in order to optimize the price and replenishment,” observed Fabrizio Fantini. “Fashion companies who exploit data to inform their decisions become more efficient. They are better armed to protect their margins, but can also sell for less, and potentially reach a larger number of consumers.”

Other IT models aggregate customer data in real time ‘to determine, among hundreds of factors, those which have the biggest influence on buying decisions. Value doesn’t necessarily lie in the volume of data but in the depth of the analyses,’ claimed Gulnaz Khusainova. Easysize is careful that collected data is anonymous, she underlined, because ‘consumers need to keep control of their data, and know how it is used’.
For editors of software dedicated to fashion businesses, and suppliers of cutting machines designed for the clothing industry, “analyzing usage data from our solutions enables the offer to evolve, making each step in the value chain more efficient and perfectly adapted to the needs of the brands, retailers and manufacturers. What is at stake is better quality products, placed on the market as quickly as possible and at a reduced cost,” explained Olivier Dancot.

“It is easy to collect data, but difficult to extract actionable information. Everything hinges on data analysis,” concluded Céline Abecassis-Moedas, professor and co-scientific director of the ‘Fashion & Technology’ Chair and moderator of the round table. “Due to its emotional dimension—from the stylist’s inspiration to the consumer’s desire to buy—fashion is not an industry like others. However, all the components that make up its ecosystem can truly benefit from the judicious exploitation of customer data. Examples discussed this evening illustrate the diversity of what is possible.

More information:
Lectra
Source:

Lectra

Jinfa Labi chooses Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0 © Lectra
Jinfa Labi chooses Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0
07.11.2017

Jinfa Labi chooses Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0

  • Lectra’s latest PLM solution selected by Jinfa Labi to improve its product development process through supply chain digitization

Paris – Lectra, the world leader in integrated technology solutions dedicated to industries using fabrics, leather, technical textiles and composite materials, is pleased to announce that Jinfa Labi, one of the first publicly listed maternity and infant clothing companies in China, has chosen Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0 to help digitally transform their supply chain, making it more efficient, integrated and connected.

  • Lectra’s latest PLM solution selected by Jinfa Labi to improve its product development process through supply chain digitization

Paris – Lectra, the world leader in integrated technology solutions dedicated to industries using fabrics, leather, technical textiles and composite materials, is pleased to announce that Jinfa Labi, one of the first publicly listed maternity and infant clothing companies in China, has chosen Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0 to help digitally transform their supply chain, making it more efficient, integrated and connected.

Spurred by the continued growth of the Chinese economy, young Chinese parents are now demanding maternity and baby products that are more personalized and sophisticated in terms of material and design. To meet these new market needs, Jinfa Labi has chosen to implement Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0 after researching on all PLM vendors in the market. With the help of this solution, the company aims to further improve their product development process by digitizing their entire supply chain, from design to production, enhancing business agility and collaboration. By embracing digitalization, the company hopes to make progress in adopting the government initiative “Made in China 2025”.

Lectra’s ultimate collaborative platform—Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0—gives fashion and apparel companies the extra speed and agility they need to tackle the challenges of Industry 4.0 head on. With the widest functional scope on the market, this technology serves as the intelligent backbone for the digital supply chain, facilitating the entire design-to-production process. This ensures a consistent flow of error-free data between process, technology and people, thus enabling organizations to quickly adapt to different business models and keep pace with the latest trends.

“As one of the first domestic companies to engage in R&D, design, production and distribution of baby clothing, Jinfa Labi is now growing exponentially. We are looking for a partner with a worldwide perspective and in-depth knowledge on the industry’s best practices,” said Lin Ruowen, General Manager, Jinfa Labi. “And Lectra fits the bill. Their latest PLM solution connects CAD, industry-standard software, company IT systems and external suppliers together, allowing us to fully digitize our supply chain by covering all production stages. We can then focus on improving our core competencies.”

“We are confident that Lectra will help Jinfa Labi make their mark for “Made in China 2025”. This Industry 4.0-based initiative will not only revolutionize the way in which manufacturers operate but also change the way in which the brands and retailers run their businesses. Lectra is committed to providing the technology and support that our customers need to thrive in this new digital era,” said Andreas A. Kim, Managing Director, Lectra, Greater China. “Lectra Fashion PLM 4.0 is the only PLM solution purpose-designed for the fashion industry that covers the entire value chain. We hope to leverage our 44 years of experience in the fashion industry to help Jinfa Labi succeed through operational excellence.”
 

Patagonia’s Clean Color Collection Archroma
Patagonia’s Clean Color Collection
15.05.2017

Archroma’s EarthColors selected in Patagonia’s newest Clean Color Collection

 Patagonia’s Clean Color Collection is a new capsule collection that Patagonia has just released in the last days of April. The products in the collection have been colored with dyes made from natural sources, including, along with other supply sources, EarthColors by Archroma, a range of dyes synthesized from agricultural waste.
Many of Patagonia’s synthetic dyes use less water, energy and CO2 when compared with conventional processes, however Patagonia is always looking for ways to do less environmental harm. The company, who already collaborates with Archroma for the Patagonia Denim collection based on Archroma’s Advanced Denim, therefore contacted Archroma to have a closer look at Archroma’s EarthColors dyes. The selected EarthColors dyes are the gorgeous Palmetto Green and Citrus Brown colors made respectively from non-edible palmetto green parts and bitter orange peels left over from agriculture industry or pharmaceutical extraction.

 Patagonia’s Clean Color Collection is a new capsule collection that Patagonia has just released in the last days of April. The products in the collection have been colored with dyes made from natural sources, including, along with other supply sources, EarthColors by Archroma, a range of dyes synthesized from agricultural waste.
Many of Patagonia’s synthetic dyes use less water, energy and CO2 when compared with conventional processes, however Patagonia is always looking for ways to do less environmental harm. The company, who already collaborates with Archroma for the Patagonia Denim collection based on Archroma’s Advanced Denim, therefore contacted Archroma to have a closer look at Archroma’s EarthColors dyes. The selected EarthColors dyes are the gorgeous Palmetto Green and Citrus Brown colors made respectively from non-edible palmetto green parts and bitter orange peels left over from agriculture industry or pharmaceutical extraction.


EarthColors is a line of plant-based dyes, sourced from up to 100 percent renewable resources. The colors change and fade over time, which is part of what makes these dyes unique.
“We are so proud that, once again, Patagonia has chosen Archroma’s eco-advanced dyeing technologies for their newest sustainable clothing endeavor,” comments Paul Cowell, Head of Brand Marketing in Archroma’s Brand & Performance Textile Specialties business. “We at Archroma are committed to challenge the status quo in the deep belief that we can make our industry sustainable. Because it’s our nature! Trail blazers like Patagonia bring us invaluable support in accelerating sustainable concepts in the textile value chain. Together we are showing the apparel industry the way to go, one collection at a time.”

Source:

Archroma

Schoeller Textil AG Schoeller Textil AG
Schoeller Textil AG
27.04.2017

Closing the textile loop: European industrial partnership for 100 percent recycled, recyclable and PFC-free functional fabrics

The sustainable wear2wear concept is synonymous with high-quality, responsible clothing. In Europe, textile fibres from used garments will be used to produce new functional fabrics. Depending on the area of intended use, they also meet strict waterproofing, breathability, protection and comfort requirements. To ensure that the raw material cycle comes full circle, these textiles can be recycled again when they reach the end of their service life. As a result, there is no waste, and they go on to be used in the production of additional garments. All wear2wear partner companies guarantee that – from the quality of the raw materials to the guaranteed recycling end process– these are 100 percent recyclable, functional fabrics made of recycled textile fibres. Water- and dirt-repelling technologies based on renewable raw materials, along with the most advanced membrane technology, will ensure that the textiles are developed and manufactured entirely without the use of PFC in the future too.

The sustainable wear2wear concept is synonymous with high-quality, responsible clothing. In Europe, textile fibres from used garments will be used to produce new functional fabrics. Depending on the area of intended use, they also meet strict waterproofing, breathability, protection and comfort requirements. To ensure that the raw material cycle comes full circle, these textiles can be recycled again when they reach the end of their service life. As a result, there is no waste, and they go on to be used in the production of additional garments. All wear2wear partner companies guarantee that – from the quality of the raw materials to the guaranteed recycling end process– these are 100 percent recyclable, functional fabrics made of recycled textile fibres. Water- and dirt-repelling technologies based on renewable raw materials, along with the most advanced membrane technology, will ensure that the textiles are developed and manufactured entirely without the use of PFC in the future too.

Source:

Schoeller Textil AG