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27.09.2022

Lenzing awarded by EcoVadis for sustainability

  • Lenzing has been awarded the highest CSR rating from EcoVadis for the second consecutive time
  • Global rating standard evaluates 90,000 companies: Lenzing among top 1 percent of its industry
  • enzing joins the UN Global Compact sustainability initiative

Lenzing Group has been awarded platinum status in the CSR rating from EcoVadis. This comprehensive assessment covers the four key practices of corporate social responsibility: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, ethics and sustainable procurement.

This is the second time that EcoVadis, a leading international provider of sustainability ratings for businesses, has awarded platinum status to Lenzing for its sustainability performance. As a result, Lenzing ranks among the world’s top 1 percent of companies in its sector that are rated by EcoVadis.

  • Lenzing has been awarded the highest CSR rating from EcoVadis for the second consecutive time
  • Global rating standard evaluates 90,000 companies: Lenzing among top 1 percent of its industry
  • enzing joins the UN Global Compact sustainability initiative

Lenzing Group has been awarded platinum status in the CSR rating from EcoVadis. This comprehensive assessment covers the four key practices of corporate social responsibility: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, ethics and sustainable procurement.

This is the second time that EcoVadis, a leading international provider of sustainability ratings for businesses, has awarded platinum status to Lenzing for its sustainability performance. As a result, Lenzing ranks among the world’s top 1 percent of companies in its sector that are rated by EcoVadis.

In line with its “Naturally positive” sustainability strategy, the Lenzing Group has set ambitious targets in each of its core strategic areas, aimed at bolstering its capacity to move from a linear to a circular model. Lenzing reports the corresponding implementation measures and the progress it has made in its annual sustainability report. This high level of accountability and transparency was particularly praised in the assessment by EcoVadis. The rating provider also highlighted Lenzing’s comprehensive measures to reduce air pollution, wastewater and greenhouse gases, in addition to its provision of skills development training and health care programs for staff members.

Partnerships for systemic change
Lenzing forges strategic partnerships with various stakeholders to meet its ambitious climate and sustainability targets and drive forward systemic change in the textile and nonwoven industries. This is why Lenzing, as one of 15,000 companies worldwide, joined the United Nations Global Compact. As a member, Lenzing is committed to upholding human rights, respecting the rights of employees and their representatives, protecting the environment, enabling fair competition and combating corruption.

Source:

Lenzing AG

(c) JEC Group
23.09.2022

JEC Forum DACH 2022 announces program

This year’s JEC forum DACH, taking place from November 29 to 30, 2022, is strategically located in a composites « golden triangle », between Munich, Augsburg and Ingelstadt. This dynamic area, at the heart of the Bavarian region is known to be hosting major companies such as Airbus, Faurecia, Kuka, Siemens, Voith Composites, KraussMaffei Technologies, Cevotec, Munich Composites, or Premium Aerotec, thus promising a two-days opportunity to meet with key decision makers.

The digital platform available to all participants prior to the event enables to schedule one to one business meetings between buyers and suppliers from the whole value chain of composites, as well as informal networking during breaks, lunches and evening event.

In total, 500 attendees, suppliers and buyers, from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, are expected to participate to JEC Forum DACH 2022.

Business meetings event*
DAY 1 – November 29, 2022:

This year’s JEC forum DACH, taking place from November 29 to 30, 2022, is strategically located in a composites « golden triangle », between Munich, Augsburg and Ingelstadt. This dynamic area, at the heart of the Bavarian region is known to be hosting major companies such as Airbus, Faurecia, Kuka, Siemens, Voith Composites, KraussMaffei Technologies, Cevotec, Munich Composites, or Premium Aerotec, thus promising a two-days opportunity to meet with key decision makers.

The digital platform available to all participants prior to the event enables to schedule one to one business meetings between buyers and suppliers from the whole value chain of composites, as well as informal networking during breaks, lunches and evening event.

In total, 500 attendees, suppliers and buyers, from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, are expected to participate to JEC Forum DACH 2022.

Business meetings event*
DAY 1 – November 29, 2022:

  • 10.15 – 11.45 am – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session : Market Developments
  • Moderator: Dr. Michael Effing, AVK
  • 4.0 – 5.30 pm – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session: Recycling of Composites

DAY 2 – November 30, 2022:

  • 9.00– 10.30 am – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session: Sustainability of Composites
  • 3.15 – 4.45 pm – “Keynote and Plenary Conference Session: Innovations: Raw Materials, Processes and Applications

Celebrating composites innovation through awards and startup competition

  • The AVK Innovation Awards: Goal is to promote and give prominence to new products/components and applications made from fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) and promote new processes and methods for manufacturing FRP products.
  • Startup Booster competition: The contest is open to entrepreneurs, SMEs, startups and academic spinoffs building innovative composite and advanced materials projects that are based in Germany, Austria or Switzerland (the DACH region).

*You can view the full program here.

Source:

JEC Group

Photo: Pincroft
23.09.2022

Pincroft: Innovative non-skin contact vector protection for military fabrics

Pincroft announced the adoption of an innovative precision spray technology that allows the application of many finishes for textiles, including permethrin for vector protection, to the face of the fabric to avoid contact with the skin.

The system is a more versatile and environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional application method of padding and offers the possibility of applying the chemistry on either face side or both sides of the fabric across the full width.

The benefits of this new equipment are countless not only for the end user but also for the environment. The system allows for a reduction of energy, water and wet pick up of up to 50%, while 100% of the chemistry is recycled. Thanks to the equipment’s precision application technology, less water and chemistry are needed, and its no immersion system means the fabric would require less saturation and a shorter drying time.

Pincroft announced the adoption of an innovative precision spray technology that allows the application of many finishes for textiles, including permethrin for vector protection, to the face of the fabric to avoid contact with the skin.

The system is a more versatile and environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional application method of padding and offers the possibility of applying the chemistry on either face side or both sides of the fabric across the full width.

The benefits of this new equipment are countless not only for the end user but also for the environment. The system allows for a reduction of energy, water and wet pick up of up to 50%, while 100% of the chemistry is recycled. Thanks to the equipment’s precision application technology, less water and chemistry are needed, and its no immersion system means the fabric would require less saturation and a shorter drying time.

Mike Collins, Pincroft’s Managing Director: “This innovative equipment can be used in two ways. The single sided spray finishing can be used where the full effectiveness of the finish is only required on the face side of the end item, for example, vector, fluorocarbon and antimicrobial protection. The dual spray finish may be used to simulate the traditional padding method where full effectiveness of the finish is required dependant on end use, for instance, crease recovery, fabric softening, soil release and moisture management.”

This vector protection solution provided by Pincroft is ACTIGARD®, a branded technology developed by Sanitized AG, with long lasting active ingredients that have proved highly effective against mosquitoes and ticks. This product endures a high number of washes, is suitable for military uniforms and conforms to Standard 100 by Oeko-Tex®.

Source:

Pincroft

(c) Texaid
21.09.2022

TEXAID installs intelligent sorting stations from circular.fashion

Digital Product Passports can now be processed at TEXAID’s largest sorting facility, thanks to circular.fashion’s intelligent sorting stations, which use RFID and NFC technology to improve the quality and consistency of manual sorting.

Digital Product Passports (DPP) have been recognised by the EU as an enabler for circular fashion and textiles. Technology company circular.fashion has been a leader in this effort, releasing the circularity.ID in 2018 and developing Intelligent Sorting Stations to bring ID based sorting to the textile reuse and recycling industry.

ID based sorting optimises the manual sorting process for reuse and recycling by giving sorters data to make decisions more accurately and consistently. TEXAID has, by adopting this technology, increased Europe’s capacity to process DPPs.

Digital Product Passports can now be processed at TEXAID’s largest sorting facility, thanks to circular.fashion’s intelligent sorting stations, which use RFID and NFC technology to improve the quality and consistency of manual sorting.

Digital Product Passports (DPP) have been recognised by the EU as an enabler for circular fashion and textiles. Technology company circular.fashion has been a leader in this effort, releasing the circularity.ID in 2018 and developing Intelligent Sorting Stations to bring ID based sorting to the textile reuse and recycling industry.

ID based sorting optimises the manual sorting process for reuse and recycling by giving sorters data to make decisions more accurately and consistently. TEXAID has, by adopting this technology, increased Europe’s capacity to process DPPs.

The installation and testing of TEXAID’s new Intelligent Sorting Stations was completed successfully shortly before the holiday period. Initial test results indicate that ID based sorting can make sorting decisions more reliable and more consistent. The team also sees a potential for ID based sorting to reduce training costs for new employees and maximise the value of their sorting decisions. This advancement was made through the CIRTEX project, funded through the KMU Innovativ funding programme from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

The Intelligent Sorting Stations at TEXAID are now operational, and brands and retailers have the ability to adopt the circularity.ID as a Digital Product Passport and have textile products returned to TEXAID for ID based sorting.

(c) C.L.A.S.S.
21.09.2022

WHITE and C.L.A.S.S. are back to “Unveiling the Fashion Backstage”

C.L.A.S.S. continues its path of "strategic sustainable synergies" with the aim of sharing its message of responsible innovation, and returns for the second time to Milan Fashion Week with WSM White Sustainable Milano. The objective is to represent a selected and smart path of the production chain related to materials, technologies, production, customization, finishing processes and dyes that are increasingly less impactful on the environment.
 
After debuting last February, “Unveiling the Fashion Backstage”, the educational and narrative journey of WSM | White Sustainable Milano developed in synergy with Giusy Bettoni, founder and CEO of C.L.A.S.S., returns to the VISCONTI HALL and grows in terms of attendance and thematic areas.

The exhibiting copmpanies are: Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei, Maeba International, Linificio e Canapificio Nazionale SB, Edmos, Toyoshima, Iluna Group and YKK.

C.L.A.S.S. continues its path of "strategic sustainable synergies" with the aim of sharing its message of responsible innovation, and returns for the second time to Milan Fashion Week with WSM White Sustainable Milano. The objective is to represent a selected and smart path of the production chain related to materials, technologies, production, customization, finishing processes and dyes that are increasingly less impactful on the environment.
 
After debuting last February, “Unveiling the Fashion Backstage”, the educational and narrative journey of WSM | White Sustainable Milano developed in synergy with Giusy Bettoni, founder and CEO of C.L.A.S.S., returns to the VISCONTI HALL and grows in terms of attendance and thematic areas.

The exhibiting copmpanies are: Bemberg™ by Asahi Kasei, Maeba International, Linificio e Canapificio Nazionale SB, Edmos, Toyoshima, Iluna Group and YKK.

Susan Gabler und Johannes Leis vom STFI bei Untersuchungen zum Recycling smarter Textilien. Foto: Sächsisches Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI)
Susan Gabler und Johannes Leis vom STFI bei Untersuchungen zum Recycling smarter Textilien.
20.09.2022

SmartERZ-Projekt zum Recycling von Smart Composites

Im Automobilbau, dem Schiffsbau und der Luftfahrtindustrie sowie bei Windenergieanlagen steigen die Materialanforderungen zusehends. Die verwendeten Werkstoffe sollen leicht, ressourcenschonend und gleichzeitig hochbelastbar sein. Faserverstärkte Kunststoffe (Composites) rücken immer mehr in den Vordergrund, da deren Eigenschaften in Kombination mit Glas- oder Carbonfasern metallischen Materialien oftmals überlegen sind. Mit Fokus auf die klimaneutrale Herstellung und Nutzung von Produkten wächst auch der Bedarf an Recyclinglösungen. Im SmartERZ-Projekt TRICYCLE arbeiten Unternehmen gemeinsam an geeigneten skalierbaren und wirtschaftlich tragfähigen Prozessen zum Recycling von Smart Composites. Momentan gibt es dafür keine Anbieter oder Konzepte am Markt.

Im Automobilbau, dem Schiffsbau und der Luftfahrtindustrie sowie bei Windenergieanlagen steigen die Materialanforderungen zusehends. Die verwendeten Werkstoffe sollen leicht, ressourcenschonend und gleichzeitig hochbelastbar sein. Faserverstärkte Kunststoffe (Composites) rücken immer mehr in den Vordergrund, da deren Eigenschaften in Kombination mit Glas- oder Carbonfasern metallischen Materialien oftmals überlegen sind. Mit Fokus auf die klimaneutrale Herstellung und Nutzung von Produkten wächst auch der Bedarf an Recyclinglösungen. Im SmartERZ-Projekt TRICYCLE arbeiten Unternehmen gemeinsam an geeigneten skalierbaren und wirtschaftlich tragfähigen Prozessen zum Recycling von Smart Composites. Momentan gibt es dafür keine Anbieter oder Konzepte am Markt.

Smart Composites bestehen aus Werkstoffen, deren Funktionalisierung durch die Integration oder Applikation elektrisch leitfähiger Komponenten, z. B. Sensoren oder Mikroprozessoren, erreicht wird. Dazu zählen zum Beispiel smarte Textilien, die elektronisch wärmen, Lichtsignale geben oder zur Datenübertragung genutzt werden können. Das breite Anwendungsspektrum und die vielseitigen Einsatzgebiete dieser intelligenten Verbundwerkstoffe und Multimaterialverbunde werden perspektivisch zu einem wachsenden Bedarf und einer stärkeren Nachfrage führen.

Die funktionale und vielschichtige Verbindung verschiedener Materialien wie Kunststoff, Metall und Textil wirft beim Thema Recycling Nachhaltigkeitsfragen auf. Im Erzgebirge werden dafür bereits heute Lösungen entwickelt. Im Rahmen des WIR!-Projektes SmartERZ ist das Verbundprojekt TRICYCLE entstanden. Mit dem Fokus auf den Strukturwandel im Erzgebirge haben sich acht ortsansässige Partner aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft zusammengetan, um ein Recyclingkonzept aufzustellen und die Grobplanung für ein erzgebirgisches Recycling Center zu entwickeln. Das Ende des Produktlebenszyklus und die Nachnutzung bzw. Wiederaufbereitung stehen dabei im Mittelpunkt des Entwicklungsprozesses. Im Ergebnis sollen effektive und maßgeschneiderte Maßnahmen für eine möglichst hochwertige Wiederverwendung entstehen. Diese sollen dem steigenden Aufkommen an Abfällen aus diesem wachsenden Bereich der deutschen Industrie begegnen und anwendungsbereit sein.

Klassische Herausforderungen für die Projektbeteiligten sind die irreversiblen Verbindungstechniken (z. B. Kleben, Faser-Matrix-Haftung), die Integration vieler verschiedener Materialien in geringen Mengen sowie Form und Größe der Bauteile. Eigene Untersuchungen sowie Feedback von Partnerunternehmen bestätigen die Notwendigkeit sowie den Nutzen eines passgenauen Recyclingprozesses für Smart Composites und intelligente Multimaterialverbünde. Das Projekt soll dazu beitragen, den Wirtschaftsstandort Erzgebirge attraktiver und zukunftsfähiger zu gestalten.

Am 1. September 2021 gestartet, kann TRICYCLE erste Ergebnisse vorweisen. Zunächst wurden die Bedarfe bei mittelständischen Unternehmen in der Region Erzgebirge abgefragt, um die aktuellen Gegebenheiten und den Status quo in Bezug auf technologische Recyclingkonzepte bestmöglich abzubilden. Für ein fundiertes Recyclingkonzept hat das TRICYCLE-Team drei Referenzbauteile für den vorgesehenen Prozess ermittelt, die in der erzgebirgischen Wirtschaft Verwendung finden, und folgenden Bereichen zugeordnet: Automotive, Technische Textilien mit applizierter Zusatzfunktion und Technische Textilien mit integrierter Zusatzfunktion.

Basierend auf dieser Auswahl, analysiert das Projektteam momentan die Herstellungs- und bisherigen Recyclingprozesse der Referenzbauteile. Das beinhaltet auch die Planung praktischer Versuche zum Recycling. Dabei fokussieren sich die Projektpartner auf ihr Know-how in verschiedenen chemischen, thermischen und mechanischen Prozessen zur Separierung, Rückführung und Wiederverwendung der eingesetzten Materialien. Um die Produkte den Recyclingtechnologien zugänglich zu machen, wurde die Herangehensweise innerhalb des Projekts angepasst, da insbesondere Textil aufgrund von Form und Struktur (z. B. endlose Struktur) herausfordernd sein kann.

Obwohl die Materialien selbst recycelbar sind, müssen diese dennoch für den Prozess optimal vorbereitet bzw. fachgerecht aufbereitet werden. Die Expertise und die Technologiekompetenz, die hierfür benötigt werden, ist bei den beteiligten Projektpartnern durch jahrzehntelange Erfahrung und zahlreiche Innovationen vorhanden. Das Zusammenspiel aller Beteiligten im Projekt TRICYCLE stellt bereits jetzt die Weichen für das geplante Recycling Center, um dieses später zum Drehkreuz zwischen regionalen Produktionsunternehmen und dem Recycling weiterzuentwickeln. Dieses soll als „Open Factory“ aufgebaut werden, um den Unternehmen des SmartERZ-Bündnisses bzw. perspektivisch der Region Erzgebirge eine gemeinsame Nutzung zu ermöglichen.

„Die Wiederverwendung der eingesetzten Ressourcen ist sowohl aus ökonomischer als auch aus ökologischer Sicht zwingend geboten. Momentan gibt es weder Anlagenbauer noch Dienstleistungsanbieter mit den entsprechenden Kompetenzen zum Recycling von Smart Composites oder Multimaterialverbünden am Markt,“ stellt Johannes Leis, der Verbundkoordinator vom Sächsischen Textilforschungsinstitut e.V. (STFI) in Chemnitz fest.Unter Leitung des STFI als Verbundkoordinator mit seiner über 30-jährigen Erfahrung in der Textilbranche und speziellem Know-how im Recycling von Carbonabfällen haben sich weitere Unternehmen und Forschungseinrichtungen zusammengefunden. Dazu zählen das Textilunternehmen Curt Bauer GmbH, die Professur Fabrikplanung und Fabrikbetrieb der TU Chemnitz, das Ingenieurbüro Matthias Weißflog, der Hersteller für Faserverbundbauteile Cotesa GmbH, der Spezialvlieshersteller Norafin Industries (Germany) GmbH, das Recyclingunternehmen Becker Umweltdienste GmbH und die Hörmann Rawema Engineering & Consulting GmbH. Am Ende der Projektlaufzeit sollen ein einsatzfähiges, technologisches Recyclingkonzept für die zukünftigen entstehenden smarten Produkte sowie die in der Produktion entstehenden Abfälle (bspw. durch fehlerhafte Bauteile und Randbeschnitte) und ein Konzept für den Aufbau eines Recycling Centers vorliegen, das im Erzgebirge entstehen soll.

Stahl
19.09.2022

EcoVadis Platinum rating for Stahl

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has been awarded the highest EcoVadis Platinum rating, placing it within the top 1% of companies assessed by EcoVadis. The award underlines Stahl’s commitment to collaborating with its partners to reduce its environmental impact and build a more responsible and transparent supply chain.

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has been awarded the highest EcoVadis Platinum rating, placing it within the top 1% of companies assessed by EcoVadis. The award underlines Stahl’s commitment to collaborating with its partners to reduce its environmental impact and build a more responsible and transparent supply chain.

EcoVadis is a globally recognized evidence-based assessment platform that reviews the performance of more than 90,000 organizations across key sustainability criteria. These include environmental impact, labor and human rights standards, ethics, and sustainable procurement practices. The latest report from EcoVadis highlights Stahl’s positive progress across all these areas and builds on the Gold rating achieved by the company in 2021. Stahl’s 2030 target is to maintain the EcoVadis Platinum rating by working closely with its value-chain partners to help them reduce their environmental impact – including by supporting their transition to renewable feedstocks. In 2021, 80% of Stahl’s total spend on raw materials was supplied by EcoVadis-rated suppliers.
 
The new EcoVadis rating comes as Stahl accelerates its efforts to ensure a more responsible and transparent supply chain. Recent steps toward this goal have included establishing a dedicated Supply Chain Transparency division within the company’s Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) department. The division will be tasked with coordinating a new product development framework that prioritizes the responsible sourcing of raw materials. Furthermore, in July 2022, Stahl submitted a new greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target, including a specific commitment regarding the company’s Scope 3 upstream emissions. Stahl aims to reduce these by at least 25% over the next 10 years, compared with the base year (2021). Stahl expects to achieve this reduction primarily by working with its suppliers to replace fossil-based raw materials with lower-carbon alternatives.

Source:

Stahl Holdings B.V.

(c) dullboiiiii
16.09.2022

Premium Group launches Charity Collection at The Ground event in Berlin

In cooperation with Platte Berlin, deadHYPE, Visionary Services and the Fashion Council Germany, The Ground invited to the Studio2Retail block party in Mitte. 950 guests, including creatives, influencers and the young Gen-Z Berlin fashion scene, came together for the first time since The Ground premiered in July to exchange and celebrate change.

The community had the exclusive opportunity to buy the limited pieces of the MUST-HAVE PEACE charity collection, which the Premium Group team initiated to support the people suffering from the war in Ukraine.

The collection includes 22 special items of clothing and accessories from 11 brands and designers from the Premium Group cosmos, of which 100% of the proceeds go to Be an Angel.

In cooperation with Platte Berlin, deadHYPE, Visionary Services and the Fashion Council Germany, The Ground invited to the Studio2Retail block party in Mitte. 950 guests, including creatives, influencers and the young Gen-Z Berlin fashion scene, came together for the first time since The Ground premiered in July to exchange and celebrate change.

The community had the exclusive opportunity to buy the limited pieces of the MUST-HAVE PEACE charity collection, which the Premium Group team initiated to support the people suffering from the war in Ukraine.

The collection includes 22 special items of clothing and accessories from 11 brands and designers from the Premium Group cosmos, of which 100% of the proceeds go to Be an Angel.

Be an Angel e.V. is an initiative of people from creative industries who are committed to the sustainable integration of people with a refugee background. Under the direction of Chairman Andreas Tölke, the team has been working intensively for the people from Ukraine for weeks, organising trips to Germany for refugees from Moldova, activating a nationwide network for accommodation and supplying hospitals in Odessa, Kyiv and Lemberg with medicine.

Source:

PREMIUM Exhibitions GmbH

15.09.2022

DyStar cautiously optimistic about the financial and environmental performance

  • Integrated Sustainability Report 2021 – 2022 published

DyStar, a leading specialty chemical company released its twelfth annual Sustainability Performance Report. The report is prepared in accordance with the updated GRI Standards 2021: Core option. DyStar continues to adopt the Integrated Reporting <IR> framework to communicate how the group has successfully created tangible value across multiple stakeholder groups in six major capitals.

DyStar reports that they have inched themselves closer to some of their 2025 target of reducing the environmental footprint by 30% for every ton of product, from 2011 levels. Here are some key highlights for FY2021:

  • Integrated Sustainability Report 2021 – 2022 published

DyStar, a leading specialty chemical company released its twelfth annual Sustainability Performance Report. The report is prepared in accordance with the updated GRI Standards 2021: Core option. DyStar continues to adopt the Integrated Reporting <IR> framework to communicate how the group has successfully created tangible value across multiple stakeholder groups in six major capitals.

DyStar reports that they have inched themselves closer to some of their 2025 target of reducing the environmental footprint by 30% for every ton of product, from 2011 levels. Here are some key highlights for FY2021:

  • Recorded more than 29% increase in revenue compared to 2020
  • Zero workplace fatalities, high-consequence injuries, and work-related ill health
  • 40% reduction in Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity, compared to 2011
  • 37% decrease in wastewater emission intensity, compared to 2011

The Group was able to remain resilient and steer itself toward optimistic growth and recovery from the global pandemic in FY2021. In face of recent geopolitical events and macroeconomic factors such as soaring energy costs, DyStar and the wider supply chain will continue to face challenges. As a result, the company believes it is crucial to stay committed to their 2025 Sustainability goals to continue generating value for all stakeholders in the longer term, well beyond these turbulent times.

The report communicates DyStar’s progress towards its sustainability agenda and material topics. As part of our commitment to environmental sustainability, only an e-magazine and a PDF version will be made available for download from www.DyStar.com/sustainability-reports/

More information:
DyStar Sustainability Report
Source:

DyStar

13.09.2022

New technology purifies wastewater from textile dyeing by using graphene

The substance graphene can become increasingly important as a component in textile catalysts when purifying water from textile dyeing as has been shown in a recently completed doctoral project at the University of Borås.

In his project, Milad Asadi, a new doctor in Textile Technology, has modified conventional yarn by encapsulating iron particles in graphene and developed a multifunctional smart e-textile. The focus was on developing a method for purifying wastewater from textile dyeing. The smart e-textile acts as a catalyst that causes the substance hydrogen peroxide to be formed, which is needed in order to break down pollutants in wastewater.

The project has generated a complete textile reactor for the treatment of wastewater through the so-called electro-Fenton technology, which is mainly used industrially to purify wastewater. The novelty of the technology is to use the properties of both graphene and iron, which is the main catalyst.

The substance graphene can become increasingly important as a component in textile catalysts when purifying water from textile dyeing as has been shown in a recently completed doctoral project at the University of Borås.

In his project, Milad Asadi, a new doctor in Textile Technology, has modified conventional yarn by encapsulating iron particles in graphene and developed a multifunctional smart e-textile. The focus was on developing a method for purifying wastewater from textile dyeing. The smart e-textile acts as a catalyst that causes the substance hydrogen peroxide to be formed, which is needed in order to break down pollutants in wastewater.

The project has generated a complete textile reactor for the treatment of wastewater through the so-called electro-Fenton technology, which is mainly used industrially to purify wastewater. The novelty of the technology is to use the properties of both graphene and iron, which is the main catalyst.

“Previous research has mainly been about the treatment of wastewater by using chemicals to break down the textile dyes. My project is the first where graphene, which is electrically conductive, is used to encapsulate iron. The e-textile can also be used several times, unlike when chemicals are used and which are then rinsed off. The challenge in the project was to scale up the technology so that the treated yarn can be fed into automatic knitting machines”, explained Milad Asadi.

The e-textile catalyst can be reused and hydrogen peroxide is formed internally inside the reactor, which reduces the use of biological catalysts, making the technology more sustainable compared to chemical methods.

Source:

University of Borås - The Swedish School of Textiles

13.09.2022

OEKO-TEX® Annual Report 2021/2022: Positive business development

  • Values from the past 30 years more relevant than ever and are reflected in recent growth

During its 30th anniversary, the international OEKO-TEX® Association is still seeing positive business development despite numerous global challenges. In total, OEKO-TEX® issued more than 36,000 certificates and labels in the past financial year – an increase of 14% compared to the previous year. The STeP by OEKO-TEX® facility certification recorded the strongest growth, almost doubling compared to 2020/2021. The number of labels and certificates issued increased from 31,696 to 36,084 between July 1st, 2021, and June 30th, 2022.

  • Values from the past 30 years more relevant than ever and are reflected in recent growth

During its 30th anniversary, the international OEKO-TEX® Association is still seeing positive business development despite numerous global challenges. In total, OEKO-TEX® issued more than 36,000 certificates and labels in the past financial year – an increase of 14% compared to the previous year. The STeP by OEKO-TEX® facility certification recorded the strongest growth, almost doubling compared to 2020/2021. The number of labels and certificates issued increased from 31,696 to 36,084 between July 1st, 2021, and June 30th, 2022.

"Since OEKO-TEX® was founded in 1992, our business practices have been aligned with our core values," says OEKO-TEX® Secretary General Georg Dieners. “Sustainability, trust and safety build upon each other and are the basis of transparent and sustainable action. We underpin responsible action with our independent scientific methods and are valued in the industry as an effective, solution-oriented partner.” In the past financial year, this was reflected in the new Impact Calculator, with which STeP by OEKO-TEX®-certified companies calculate their CO2 emissions and measure their water consumption to ultimately reduce both. For OEKO-TEX®, a sustainable future is inextricably linked to a transparent status quo. "By setting the highest standards and communicating them openly, we encourage companies and consumers to do the same," says Dieners.

To maintain trust and credibility, OEKO-TEX® includes external perspectives. The International Advisory Board reviews proposals of the OEKO-TEX® Working Groups and provides important impetus for continuous optimization of the standards. Additionally, a Public Stakeholder Consultation was conducted in March 2022 to gain comprehensive insights from all interest groups. These are now being integrated into the further development of the standards and services. The investments of the past financial year reflect how important quality assurance and product control are for the OEKO-TEX® Association: Almost 40% of the total expenditure flowed into these two items.

In the meantime, the basic business continues to progress successfully. The number of STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® certificates issued in the 2021/2022 financial year exceeded 25,000 for the first time. More than 15,000 chemicals, colorants and auxiliaries were certified with ECO PASSPORT by OEKO-TEX®.

In autumn 2022, OEKO-TEX® will launch a certification to help companies comply with upcoming due diligence laws. With RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS by OEKO-TEX®, OEKO-TEX® is responding to the increasing global expectations of compliance with due diligence requirements in companies. The new standard is based on the EU proposal for due diligence, the German Due Diligence Act, which will come into force from 2023, and numerous other international legislative proposals.

Source:

Oeko-Tex GmbH

(c) Borealis
08.09.2022

Borealis and Trexel develop fully recyclable lightweight bottle

  • Monomaterial solution contains renewably-sourced polypropylene from the Bornewables™ portfolio of circular polyolefins
  • Trexel employs its proprietary MuCell® technology to deliver a range of lightweighting benefits
  • EverMinds™ in action: reuse and design for recycling are focus of value chain collaboration

Borealis and Trexel, an expert in foaming injection and blow moulded parts, announce that they have co-developed a new plastic bottle based on a grade from the Bornewables™ portfolio of polyolefins made using renewable feedstocks derived 100% from waste and residue streams. The lightweight bottle – which will be showcased at the Borealis stand at the K 2022 (from 19 to 26 October 2022 in Düsseldorf) – is reusable and fully recyclable. It boasts a significantly lower overall CO2 footprint because it is composed of renewably-sourced feedstock and produced in the foaming process.

  • Monomaterial solution contains renewably-sourced polypropylene from the Bornewables™ portfolio of circular polyolefins
  • Trexel employs its proprietary MuCell® technology to deliver a range of lightweighting benefits
  • EverMinds™ in action: reuse and design for recycling are focus of value chain collaboration

Borealis and Trexel, an expert in foaming injection and blow moulded parts, announce that they have co-developed a new plastic bottle based on a grade from the Bornewables™ portfolio of polyolefins made using renewable feedstocks derived 100% from waste and residue streams. The lightweight bottle – which will be showcased at the Borealis stand at the K 2022 (from 19 to 26 October 2022 in Düsseldorf) – is reusable and fully recyclable. It boasts a significantly lower overall CO2 footprint because it is composed of renewably-sourced feedstock and produced in the foaming process.

The Bornewables™ portfolio of circular polyolefins helps reduce the carbon footprint while offering material performance equal to virgin polymers. Using Bornewables grades allows for design freedom and colour flexibility, and helps retain a premium look and feel. The grades – which are commercially available in Europe – help conserve natural resources because they are derived solely from waste and residue streams, for example from used cooking oil. Reusing waste already in circulation instead of fossil fuel-based feedstocks enhances the sustainability of applications made using the Bornewables grades.

The reusable new bottle developed by Borealis and Trexel retains its value over many life cycles thanks to the use of Trexel’s proprietary technology in tandem with Bornewables grades; as a material solution, the new bottle minimises the use of valuable raw materials. Moreover, converters consume less energy in the production process when using the MuCell® technology. The bottle thus helps close the loop on plastics circularity by way of design for recycling, the use of renewable feedstocks, and excellent material performance across multiple life cycles.

Source:

Borealis

(c) Chetna Organic / GoodTextiles Foundation
08.09.2022

GoodTextiles Foundation supports Indian village with cows

The GoodTextiles Foundation, initiated by Dibella, has implemented a new support project in India: Each family of a small village community of organic farmers received a cow from the donations received. The herd of fifty animals helps with farming, gives milk, produces sufficient natural fertilizer and should soon provide higher crop yields and a better income.

In 2016, Dibella established the GoodTextiles Foundation with the aim of making textile value chains more sustainable. It raises funds and implements its own support projects to benefit people at all stages of the textile economy. The most recent project, "One cow for every family," has now taken the first, important intermediate step: Fifty cows arrived in the small village of Aliguda Village (Utnoor Division, Adilabad, Telangana, India) at the beginning of June 2022.

The GoodTextiles Foundation, initiated by Dibella, has implemented a new support project in India: Each family of a small village community of organic farmers received a cow from the donations received. The herd of fifty animals helps with farming, gives milk, produces sufficient natural fertilizer and should soon provide higher crop yields and a better income.

In 2016, Dibella established the GoodTextiles Foundation with the aim of making textile value chains more sustainable. It raises funds and implements its own support projects to benefit people at all stages of the textile economy. The most recent project, "One cow for every family," has now taken the first, important intermediate step: Fifty cows arrived in the small village of Aliguda Village (Utnoor Division, Adilabad, Telangana, India) at the beginning of June 2022.

"Some of our organic cotton is grown on the farms of the village community managed by the smallholder organization Chetna Organic. During the filming of the German documentary "plan b", the farmers told us that they need more natural fertilizer to cultivate their fields ecologically and economically. The biggest wish of each family is therefore a cow. However, they cannot afford this because of the high price of the equivalent of 300 euros. That's how the idea for our next sponsorship project was born," reports Ralf Hellmann, managing director of Dibella and member of the foundation's board of directors.

In addition to the most important reason for purchase - the production of fertilizer - the cows also serve as livestock. They are harnessed in front of the plow and make the strenuous work of tilling the soil easier for the farmers. As draft animals they serve to transport heavier loads, and as milk suppliers they contribute to a family's food supply. Surplus milk that is not needed in the household also provides families with an important additional income through sale.

More information:
GoodTextiles Dibella donations cotton
Source:

GoodTextiles Foundation

(c) Mimaki
Talha Güldeste, Founder of Makroser Tekstil, in front of the Mimaki TS300P-1800.
08.09.2022

Makroser Tekstil uses Mimaki TS300P-1800 for carpet production

Turkish company, Makroser Tekstil specialises in manufacturing digitally printed carpets and over the years has become one of the leading suppliers in the sector. Utilising Mimaki’s high-performance TS300P-1800 sublimation transfer printer since 2020, the company has optimised their production potential to meet increasing customer expectations in this growing digital textile carpet market.

Alongside carpets, the company also offers other solutions to the carpet industry by producing backing and other materials

Turkish company, Makroser Tekstil specialises in manufacturing digitally printed carpets and over the years has become one of the leading suppliers in the sector. Utilising Mimaki’s high-performance TS300P-1800 sublimation transfer printer since 2020, the company has optimised their production potential to meet increasing customer expectations in this growing digital textile carpet market.

Alongside carpets, the company also offers other solutions to the carpet industry by producing backing and other materials

Acting as both a seller and a supplier, Makroser Tekstil has an approximate monthly output of 150,000 square meters of final product and sells about 70-80,000 square meters of intermediate goods per month. “Our market has four main pillars, including chain market groups, export, e-commerce and our own retail network. We have gained serious momentum in the sales of our final products in recent years, and we attach great importance to our sales and marketing processes, in addition to production, so to increase our profitability. We are currently exporting 35-40% of our production, and our branding and e-commerce activities show that we are making significant improvements”, says Makroser Tekstil’s co-founder, Talha Güldest.

Makroser Tekstil decided to invest in a Mimaki TS300P-1800 sublimation transfer printer back in August 2020, with the aim to strengthen their position in the digitally printed carpet market. “The investment in the TS300P-1800 has enabled us to have the capacity to respond quickly to e-commerce orders,” Güldeste commented. “Product quality is the main criterion in the supplies we provide to both online and retail outlets. We made this investment because we saw that we would increase our quality and customer satisfaction in the carpets we print. The Mimaki printer met our expectations, providing the results we wanted from the very first print after installation.” Considering the increased demand, Güldeste aims to further boost their printing capacity with investment in several more Mimaki printers.

Source:

Mimaki Europe B.V.

08.09.2022

Monforts at ITMA ASIA + CITME

Monforts will highlight its technologies for special technical textile applications at this year’s ITMA ASIA + CITME which takes place at the National Exhibition and Convention Center in Shanghai, China, from November 20-24.

One of Monforts' developments is the Montex 8500 XXL stenter system for the production of technical fabrics in widths of up to 6.8 metres. Among the products made on this system are treated nonwovens for the geotextiles and filter media markets, tarpaulins, advertising banners, black-out curtains, membranes and many more.

On Montex©Coat coating lines, meanwhile, the possibilities range from the single-sided application of finishing agents for outdoor clothing and adding functionality to home textiles, to the creation of materials for sophisticated lightweight construction and automotive and aerospace components.

Monforts will highlight its technologies for special technical textile applications at this year’s ITMA ASIA + CITME which takes place at the National Exhibition and Convention Center in Shanghai, China, from November 20-24.

One of Monforts' developments is the Montex 8500 XXL stenter system for the production of technical fabrics in widths of up to 6.8 metres. Among the products made on this system are treated nonwovens for the geotextiles and filter media markets, tarpaulins, advertising banners, black-out curtains, membranes and many more.

On Montex©Coat coating lines, meanwhile, the possibilities range from the single-sided application of finishing agents for outdoor clothing and adding functionality to home textiles, to the creation of materials for sophisticated lightweight construction and automotive and aerospace components.

“Many more applications are possible, such as the overdyeing of denim, the creation of double-face coated materials, fabrics awnings, tents and medical drapes and the pre-treatment of substrates for digital printing”, explains Gunnar Meyer, Monforts area sales manager for China. “A range of different doctor blades and their combinations can be supplied to meet individual requirements, including air knife, roller knife, foam, screen and magnetic roller coating. The latter option is recommended for lines with working widths of over 2.4 metres.”

In addition, Monforts can provide the necessary explosion-proof ranges for solvent-based coatings and high temperature processes up to 320°C, such as the PTFE coating of nonwoven filter material. These lines are equipped with special burners, stenter chains, and insulation.

Source:

 A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG / AWOL Media

(c) BTMA by AWOL Media
08.09.2022

Shelton Vision presents new fabric inspection technique

A new fabric inspection technique for accurately detecting the most subtle of defects on patterned fabrics during high speed production has been developed by BTMA member Shelton Vision, of Leicester, UK.

The patent-pending system has been integrated into the company’s WebSpector platform and validated through factory trials on a purpose-built full scale in-house demonstration system with sophisticated fabric transport capabilities. As a result, a first system has already been ordered by a manufacturer of both plain and patterned fabrics, including camouflage, in Colombia. This follows the successful conclusion of a 21-month Innovate UK project in which techniques for the resolution of complex pattern deformations were developed by machine vision and computer scientists in the company, backed up by the machine vision and robotics department at Loughborough University.

A new fabric inspection technique for accurately detecting the most subtle of defects on patterned fabrics during high speed production has been developed by BTMA member Shelton Vision, of Leicester, UK.

The patent-pending system has been integrated into the company’s WebSpector platform and validated through factory trials on a purpose-built full scale in-house demonstration system with sophisticated fabric transport capabilities. As a result, a first system has already been ordered by a manufacturer of both plain and patterned fabrics, including camouflage, in Colombia. This follows the successful conclusion of a 21-month Innovate UK project in which techniques for the resolution of complex pattern deformations were developed by machine vision and computer scientists in the company, backed up by the machine vision and robotics department at Loughborough University.

Restrictions
Traditional methods for defect detection rely on human inspection which is ineffective, with detection rates under 65%, while the Shelton WebSpector machine vision system offers a sophisticated platform for automated defect detection of over 97%, but until now has been restricted to plain textiles.

While pattern matching and neural network approaches have previously been tried for patterned textiles, they have failed to provide a practical solution due to the extreme complexity associated with pattern matching on deformable substrates like textiles, as well as the time required to train a neural network for each pattern type.

Challenges
The challenge is that fabrics are not rigid and can be creased or stretched and are also subject to local distortion,” says Shelton Vision Managing Director and CEO Mark Shelton. “As a result, inspection without the technique we have developed, would lead to thousands of false positives. Our sophisticated pattern inspection software techniques ensure a clean image, allowing the detection of faults on fabrics running at speeds of up to a hundred metres a minute.”

The full system consists of:

  • A camera and lighting system for optimum image capture at high speed and associated image processing hardware.
  • Self-training software utilising statistical analysis to automate the system configuration for new textile products.
  • An advanced suite of defect detection algorithms for the detection of all textile defect types.
  • An AI-driven defect classification system which learns and automates defect naming in real time, as well as a real time defect grading capability based on client decision rules.
  • A system for recording and retrieving complete roll map images for subsequent review and quality control.

The generation of textile roll maps with complete defect data allows for an optimised textile cut plan, improved downstream processing and quality assurance.

Source:

BTMA by AWOL Media

07.09.2022

GFA launches new international edition of Global Fashion Summit in Singapore

Global Fashion Agenda (GFA) has launched a new international edition of Global Fashion Summit. Traditionally held in Copenhagen, the new edition in Singapore will further focus on the perspectives of manufacturers and supply chain partners to deeper understand how the industry can collaborate to reduce social and environmental impact in the entire value chain. Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition will take place on 3 November 2022 at Hilton Singapore Orchard.

Global Fashion Agenda (GFA) has launched a new international edition of Global Fashion Summit. Traditionally held in Copenhagen, the new edition in Singapore will further focus on the perspectives of manufacturers and supply chain partners to deeper understand how the industry can collaborate to reduce social and environmental impact in the entire value chain. Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition will take place on 3 November 2022 at Hilton Singapore Orchard.

The theme of Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition continues GFA’s focus on ‘Alliances For a New Era’. Under this theme, the Summit will call on the industry to accelerate change - encouraging more alliances between manufacturers, suppliers, investors, brands, NGOs, policymakers and more. It will also examine cross-industry alliances, in a bid to accelerate the transition to a net positive reality.
 
By bringing the forum to Asia, the new edition will include even more manufacturer and supply chain partner voices in the programme to discuss sustainability challenges, differences, and opportunities to collaborate with brand executives on equal terms. Plenary sessions will consider topics such as:

  • Renewable energy transformation – what does concrete transformation look like from tier 1-3 perspectives and what measures are needed to implement it?
  • Better wage systems – how can the industry establish fair compensation, underpinned by fair purchasing practices that will help end poverty for millions of garment workers?
  • Performance measurement – how can the industry accurately measure sustainability performance and tackle data credibility challenges?

Half of the programme will be dedicated to educational and action-oriented business case studies with options for direct interaction and live reactions. These will include tangible learnings and concrete recommendations to mobilise guests to take immediate action following the event.
 
The event will foster further collaboration across stakeholder groups through productive roundtable sessions that create an exchange of views among key decision makers in both the public and private sectors. These meetings will be designed and set up to drive commitments and new alliances for concrete action.

Source:

Global Fashion Agenda

06.09.2022

Suominen: New energy surcharge on all products in Europe

Suominen’s energy costs have increased significantly during the recent months and continue to rise during the coming autumn and winter months.

As announced by the company, Suominen can no longer absorb the full extent of these unprecedented increases and hence will implement a new energy surcharge on all its products in Europe.

“Suominen has been preparing for energy shortages and mitigating possible energy interruptions in order to secure business continuity. Naturally this comes with additional cost, but we have decided to remain committed to serve our customers during this difficult period,“ says Markku Koivisto, SVP Europe, Suominen.

Details of the surcharge will be communicated to customers via Suominen sales organization. 

Suominen’s energy costs have increased significantly during the recent months and continue to rise during the coming autumn and winter months.

As announced by the company, Suominen can no longer absorb the full extent of these unprecedented increases and hence will implement a new energy surcharge on all its products in Europe.

“Suominen has been preparing for energy shortages and mitigating possible energy interruptions in order to secure business continuity. Naturally this comes with additional cost, but we have decided to remain committed to serve our customers during this difficult period,“ says Markku Koivisto, SVP Europe, Suominen.

Details of the surcharge will be communicated to customers via Suominen sales organization. 

More information:
Suominen nonwovens wipes
Source:

SUOMINEN CORPORATION

(c) Freudenberg Performance Materials Holding SE & Co. KG
06.09.2022

Freudenberg establishes Apparel Technical Solution Center in Asia

Freudenberg Performance Materials Apparel (Freudenberg) is pleased to announce the establishment of the Apparel Technical Solution Center – Asia at its Nantong factory in China to expand the company’s innovation capabilities. With floor space of 900 m2, the new center offers technical expertise and innovations to apparel customers from nearly all apparel segments in Asia and around the world.

New capabilities with the Apparel Technical Solution Center – Asia
Committed to bringing enhanced technical support and services tailored to customers’ needs, the dedicated Apparel Technical Solution Center – Asia (ATSC) is equipped with cutting-edge technology. This includes a wide variety of fusing and bonding machines, laser and ultrasonic cutters, specialized sewing machines for sportswear applications, fiber filling machines for insulation applications, and washing and dry-cleaning machines that meet GB and AATCC standards.

Freudenberg Performance Materials Apparel (Freudenberg) is pleased to announce the establishment of the Apparel Technical Solution Center – Asia at its Nantong factory in China to expand the company’s innovation capabilities. With floor space of 900 m2, the new center offers technical expertise and innovations to apparel customers from nearly all apparel segments in Asia and around the world.

New capabilities with the Apparel Technical Solution Center – Asia
Committed to bringing enhanced technical support and services tailored to customers’ needs, the dedicated Apparel Technical Solution Center – Asia (ATSC) is equipped with cutting-edge technology. This includes a wide variety of fusing and bonding machines, laser and ultrasonic cutters, specialized sewing machines for sportswear applications, fiber filling machines for insulation applications, and washing and dry-cleaning machines that meet GB and AATCC standards.

The ATSC offers technical know-how to help customers design complex apparel solutions. In particular, it furthers Freudenberg’s dedication to joint innovations with sportswear customers and to finding technical solutions for performance applications.

Further innovation at the Nantong factory
The factory was moved to the Nantong Economic and Technological Development Area to meet increased production demand with state-of-the-art technological capabilities. Covering an area of nearly 50,000 m2 with cotton interlining, bi-elastic fusible interlining, and preformed materials production lines, the new site went into operation in 2021.

Dedicated to continuously improving production quality, the new factory also includes an innovative online defect detection system. This system enables defect information to be captured in real time and sent to operators for immediate adjustments, increasing the rate of bi-elastic interlinings and shirt interlinings. Furthermore, the online weft density automatic adjustment system helps improve the stability of the drying process and the quality of semi-finished products.

Source:

Freudenberg Performance Materials Holding SE & Co. KG

02.09.2022

RGE: Closed-loop urban-fit textile-to-textile recycling solutions in Singapore

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings.

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings. The research centre will develop new technologies to recycle textile waste into fibre and create new, next-generation eco-friendly and sustainable textiles.

This move comes on the back of the tightening of waste import bans in countries such as China, India and Indonesia, which are among the world’s largest waste processors. The stricter import bans have left cities in need of viable local textile recycling solutions to tackle the immense textile waste generated.

RGE Executive Director, Mr Perry Lim, said, “Current textile recycling technologies, which rely primarily on a bleaching and separation process using heavy chemicals, cannot be implemented due to environmental laws. At the same time, there is an urgent need to keep textiles out of the brimming landfills.” He added, “As the world’s largest viscose producer, we aim to catalyse closed-loop, textile-to-textile recycling by developing optimal urban-fit solutions that can bring the world closer to a circular textile economy.”

Globally, an estimated 90 million tonnes of textile waste is generated and disposed of every year, with less than 1% being upcycled into new clothing or other textile materials. By 2030, the amount of global textile waste, which currently accounts for almost 10% of municipal solid waste, is expected to reach more than 134 million tonnes. The textile industry is also responsible for 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than international flights and maritime shipping combined.

At present, most of the available textile recycling technologies are open-loop, where textile waste is typically downcycled to lower-quality products (insulating materials, cleaning cloths, etc.) or be used in waste-to-heat recycling.

“Closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling processes, particularly chemical recycling, are still under development. Scaling up the technologies to industrial scale remains a challenge. A key bottleneck is that refabricating textile waste into fibre needs purity standards for feedstock. However, most of the clothes that we wear are made of a mixture of different synthetic and natural fibres, which makes separating the complex blends of materials challenging for effective recycling.

“Our aim is to address this industry pain point by developing viable solutions that use less energy, fewer chemicals and produces harmless and less effluents, and then potentially scale up across our global operations,” Mr Lim said.

To tackle the key challenges in closed-loop textile recycling, RGE-NTU SusTex is looking into four key research areas, namely cleaner and more energy efficient methods of recycling into new raw materials, automated sorting of textile waste, eco-friendly dye removal, and development of a new class of sustainable textiles that is durable for wear and, at the same time, lends itself to easier recycling.

Technologies developed by RGE-NTU SusTex will be test bedded at RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant in Singapore, which is projected for completion as early as 2024. If successful, RGE has plans to replicate the plant in other urban cities within its footprint.

 

Source:

Royal Golden Eagle