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16.08.2022

DNFI: Cotton prices the highest in a decade during 2021/22

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative DNFI published their statistical World Natural Fibre Update this month. The world production of natural fibres is estimated at 33.7 million tonnes in 2022, a slight increase compared with a preliminary 33.3 million tonnes in 2021 and 31.6 million in 2020.

The DNFI Natural Fibre Composite Price dropped 2% in July 2022 to US 219 cents/kg, compared with US 223 cents the previous month. The DNFI Composite is an average of prices in major markets for cotton, wool, jute, silk, coir fibre, and sisal, converted to US$ per kilogram and weighted by shares of world production.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative DNFI published their statistical World Natural Fibre Update this month. The world production of natural fibres is estimated at 33.7 million tonnes in 2022, a slight increase compared with a preliminary 33.3 million tonnes in 2021 and 31.6 million in 2020.

The DNFI Natural Fibre Composite Price dropped 2% in July 2022 to US 219 cents/kg, compared with US 223 cents the previous month. The DNFI Composite is an average of prices in major markets for cotton, wool, jute, silk, coir fibre, and sisal, converted to US$ per kilogram and weighted by shares of world production.

  • The DNFI Composite was pulled downward primarily by a 9% decline in the Eastern Market Indicator of wool prices in Australia, which fell from US$ 10.27 per kilogram in June to US$9.38 in July.
  • October cotton ICE futures (the nearby contract) finished July marginally lower, closing at 228 US cents per kilogram, compared with 229 at the end of June.
  • Prices of jute fibre in India quoted by the Jute Balers Association (JBA) at the end of July were unchanged from a month earlier, but with depreciation of the Rupee versus the dollar, calculated prices fell from 84 cents to 82 cents per kilogram.
  • Prices of silk in China equalled US$29.5 per kilogram in July 2022, coconut coir fibre in India held at US cents 21 per kilogram, and sisal in Brazil finished July at US cents 41 per kilogram.

Cotton prices were the highest in a decade during 2021/22, and world cotton production is estimated by the International Cotton Advisory Committee at 25.8 million tonnes during the 2022/23 season which began August 1, up from 25.4 million in the season just completed. Extreme drought in Texas, the largest producing state in the United States, is limiting the rise in world production that would otherwise be occurring.

World production of jute and allied fibres is estimated unchanged at 3.2 million tonnes in 2022 compared with 2021. High market prices in 2021 motivated farmers to expand planted area in both Bangladesh and India, but dry weather in jute-growing areas during June and July has undermined earlier optimistic hopes for yields. Rainfall was approximately half of normal in the city of Kolkata from early June to mid-July.

Production of coir fibre rose by an average of 18,000 tonnes per year during the past decade, and production was record high at 1.12 million tonnes in 2021. Production is expected to remain high in 2022.

Flax has also been trending upward, rising by an average of 27,000 tonnes per year, and production in 2022 is estimated to remain above one million tonnes.
World wool production is forecast up by 5% in 2022 to 1.09 million tonnes (clean), the highest since 2018. Wetter weather in the Southern Hemisphere, following eight years of drought, is allowing farmers to rebuild herds.

More information:
natural fibers DNFI
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DNFI

02.08.2022

DNFI Award 2022 open for applications – Deadline 9 Sept

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.
More information:
DNFI DNFI award
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DNFI

Graphic DNFI
19.06.2022

DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award Ceremony During Heimtextil

Natural fibers are among the most important raw materials in the textile and fashion industry worldwide. For centuries, they have fed millions of people through their cultivation or breeding, and it is impossible to imagine daily life without them. Especially at the moment, natural fibers are gaining special importance due to the intense discussions about sustainable living. Even though natural fibers have accompanied mankind for a long time, they are changeable, technical, and adaptable to the challenges of the textile industry.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) is celebrating natural fibres in a program to be conducted during Heimtextil in Frankfurt on 23 June. Anyone with an interest in the role of natural fibres in the world economy, economic indicators of textile activity, innovations in natural fibre research, and updates on proposed EU legislation affecting textiles is welcome to attend.

The program will include various presentations by the previous and current award winners, presentations, and discussions:

Overview of world natural fibre production, employment, and value,

Natural fibers are among the most important raw materials in the textile and fashion industry worldwide. For centuries, they have fed millions of people through their cultivation or breeding, and it is impossible to imagine daily life without them. Especially at the moment, natural fibers are gaining special importance due to the intense discussions about sustainable living. Even though natural fibers have accompanied mankind for a long time, they are changeable, technical, and adaptable to the challenges of the textile industry.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) is celebrating natural fibres in a program to be conducted during Heimtextil in Frankfurt on 23 June. Anyone with an interest in the role of natural fibres in the world economy, economic indicators of textile activity, innovations in natural fibre research, and updates on proposed EU legislation affecting textiles is welcome to attend.

The program will include various presentations by the previous and current award winners, presentations, and discussions:

Overview of world natural fibre production, employment, and value,

  • Economic indicators and impacts of coronavirus on textile industries,
  • Updates on innovative uses of natural fibres:
  • Use of wool in automobile insulation applications for enhanced sustainability,
  • Using cellulose from cotton to produce a biodegradable plastic substitute,
  • Manufacturing waterproof fabric from a blend of cotton and jute as sustainable
  • Substitute for polypropylene tarps
  • Proposed EU textile legislation and potential impacts on natural fibres
More information:
DNFI DNFI award Heimtextil
Source:

DNFI

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge Photo: pixabay
10.12.2021

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

  • more reliant on non-renewable resources,
  • less biodegradable, and
  • increasingly prone to releasing microplastics.

The increased consumption is also discretionary, driven by consumer desire and remains unchecked. Thus, the long-term trend in the textile industry parallels the intentional addition of microplastics to products such as cosmetics. The contrast is that the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has recommended such intentional additions be restricted, whereas the over-consumption of synthetic fibres continues unchecked. One way for the EU to account for and mitigate microplastic pollution is through an EU-backed methodology measuring and reporting microplastic emissions, so that consumers and procurement officers have the information needed to minimise microplastic pollution resulting from their purchasing decisions.

There is a critical opportunity to address microplastic pollution in the fashion textile industry through the EU Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) methodology. To meet the environmental objectives of the Circular Economy Action Plan, the EU is proposing that companies substantiate their products’ environmental credentials using this harmonised methodology. However, microplastic pollution is not accounted for in the PEF methodology. This omission has the effect of assigning a zero score to microplastic pollution and would undermine the efforts of the European Green Deal, which aim “to address the unintentional release of microplastics in the environment.”

The incorporation of microplastic pollution as an indicator would increase the legitimacy of the PEF method as well as better inform consumer purchasing decisions, especially as the European Green Deal seeks to “further develop and harmonise methods for measuring unintentionally released microplastics, especially from tyres and textiles, and delivering harmonised data on microplastics concentrations in seawater.”

Whilst we continue to learn about the damage of microplastics and there is new knowledge emerging on the toxic impacts along the food chain, there is sufficient information on the rate of microplastic leakage into the environment to implement a basic, inventory level indicator in the PEF now. This is consistent with the recommendations of a review of microplastic pollution originating from the life cycle of apparel and home textiles. There are precedents in PEF for basic level (e.g., ‘resource use, fossils’) and largely untested (e.g. land occupation and toxicity indicators) indicators, and therefore an opportunity for the EU to promote research and development in the measurement and modelling of microplastic pollution by including such emissions in the PEF methodology. For such an indicator, the long and complex supply chains of the apparel and footwear industry would be a test case with high-impact and a global reach.

Source:

DNFI / IWTO – 2021

15.09.2021

DNFI Award Jury 2021 started its work

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) will announce the winner of the Innovation in Natural Fibre Research Award soon. The aim of the award is to raise awareness of the achievements of the natural fibers sector by recognizing innovative and progressive work by people and institutions at the level of production and use of natural fibers. The closing date for applications was September 10.

Interest in the award was high again in 2021, indicating that research in fields involving natural fibres is robust. The applications that were received reveal a fascinating array of projects, new topics, and both private and public sector funding for natural fibre research.

There are seven finalists, and final judging is underway. The winner of the 2021 Award will be announced in early October.

The Discover Natural Fibres Initiative (DNFI) will announce the winner of the Innovation in Natural Fibre Research Award soon. The aim of the award is to raise awareness of the achievements of the natural fibers sector by recognizing innovative and progressive work by people and institutions at the level of production and use of natural fibers. The closing date for applications was September 10.

Interest in the award was high again in 2021, indicating that research in fields involving natural fibres is robust. The applications that were received reveal a fascinating array of projects, new topics, and both private and public sector funding for natural fibre research.

There are seven finalists, and final judging is underway. The winner of the 2021 Award will be announced in early October.

The seven finalists for the 2021 Award fall into several broad categories, including traceability and the measurement of environmental impacts of natural fibres, the use of natural fibres in manufacturing biodegradable composites, and new or expanded uses for natural fibre materials. Researchers and institutions located in Australia, India, Republic of Korea, and Switzerland are among the finalists for the 2021 award.

More information:
DNFI DNFI award
Source:

DNFI