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(c) EconCore
03.08.2021

Basaltex & EconCore: New composite of basalt fibres for rail carriage interiors

  • Testing and development achieve rigidity and safety milestone

Basaltex, pioneers in innovative uses of basalt fibres, has achieved a significant milestone in developing and testing a new composite material solution comprising fibres of basalt combined with EconCore’s patented honeycomb technology.

This new material development has greatly improved fire resistance and is highly rigid, as well as the usual honeycomb properties of light-weighting.

The company has tested the composite of basalt fibres, a bio resin and rPET honeycomb.

Filaments of only stone fibres are extruded at a temperature of 1450°C, similar to glass but with a number of advantages, not least the absence of boric acid in the process.

Combining this ecological fibre with EconCore’s sustainable technology using rPET, and the bioresin polyfurfuryl alcohol - 100% derived from a waste stream of sugar cane - make this a very sustainable and environmentally friendly product, unlike the majority of thermoset solutions in this type of application.

  • Testing and development achieve rigidity and safety milestone

Basaltex, pioneers in innovative uses of basalt fibres, has achieved a significant milestone in developing and testing a new composite material solution comprising fibres of basalt combined with EconCore’s patented honeycomb technology.

This new material development has greatly improved fire resistance and is highly rigid, as well as the usual honeycomb properties of light-weighting.

The company has tested the composite of basalt fibres, a bio resin and rPET honeycomb.

Filaments of only stone fibres are extruded at a temperature of 1450°C, similar to glass but with a number of advantages, not least the absence of boric acid in the process.

Combining this ecological fibre with EconCore’s sustainable technology using rPET, and the bioresin polyfurfuryl alcohol - 100% derived from a waste stream of sugar cane - make this a very sustainable and environmentally friendly product, unlike the majority of thermoset solutions in this type of application.

Railway applications require materials with enhanced fire resistance and the testing has shown that the EconCore-Basaltex solution fits these needs well, at the same time offering the perspective of drastic weight reduction against traditional monolithic GRPs used rather widely in train interiors.

Such sandwich panel could be deployed in applications such as cladding panels, partitions, tables and flooring. The thermoset skin layers give a fast cure at elevated temperature, meaning short cycle time and enabling automated production’.

As well as the railway interior application, this new material combination could be used in any application that requires fire performance combined with a low weight.

More information:
Basaltex basalt fibers EconCore
Source:

EconCore

Azgard 9’s innovative fabric absorbs carbon dioxide while simultaneously producing oxygen. (c) Azgard 9
23.07.2021

Monforts customers at Première Vision Digital Denim Week

Denim manufacturers employing Monforts technologies showcased their latest activities, including sustainable fabric manufacturing, new advances in fibres, dyes and chemicals, as well as process and supply improvements and recycling options, at Première Vision’s Digital Denim Week, held from July 5-9.

The users of Monforts equipment included AGI Denim (Pakistan), Azgard 9 (Pakistan), Berto (Italy), Bossa (Turkey), DNM (Turkey), Kilim (Turkey) and Orta (Turkey).

The new Naveena Denim Mills (Pakistan) Holistic collection, for example, employs a suite of sustainable materials such as organic cotton and post-consumer and post-industrial waste cotton that has been shredded and recycled at its in-house unit in Pakistan.

Supply chain transparency is also becoming increasingly important, and Turkey’s Bossa is now sharing information on its dyes, energy sources and recycled content use with its customers. For organic cotton in particular, Bossa provides QR codes with which brands can identify the names of individual farms and their locations, as well as details such as the origins of specific seeds and the use of irrigation by growers.

Denim manufacturers employing Monforts technologies showcased their latest activities, including sustainable fabric manufacturing, new advances in fibres, dyes and chemicals, as well as process and supply improvements and recycling options, at Première Vision’s Digital Denim Week, held from July 5-9.

The users of Monforts equipment included AGI Denim (Pakistan), Azgard 9 (Pakistan), Berto (Italy), Bossa (Turkey), DNM (Turkey), Kilim (Turkey) and Orta (Turkey).

The new Naveena Denim Mills (Pakistan) Holistic collection, for example, employs a suite of sustainable materials such as organic cotton and post-consumer and post-industrial waste cotton that has been shredded and recycled at its in-house unit in Pakistan.

Supply chain transparency is also becoming increasingly important, and Turkey’s Bossa is now sharing information on its dyes, energy sources and recycled content use with its customers. For organic cotton in particular, Bossa provides QR codes with which brands can identify the names of individual farms and their locations, as well as details such as the origins of specific seeds and the use of irrigation by growers.

Turkey’s Orta’s new Denim Route – inspired by the historical Silk Road for trade between the East and West – is an interactive supplier map detailing the regions from which it sources cotton, dyestuff, chemicals and various fibres to complement its other transparency initiatives.

Meanwhile, a living and breathing piece of clothing that absorbs carbon dioxide while simultaneously producing oxygen was introduced at Digital Denim Week 2021 by Azgard 9 (Pakistan) .

22.07.2021

Lenzing awarded platinum status for sustainability by EcoVadis

The Lenzing Group has been awarded Platinum status in EcoVadis’ CSR rating. The assessment comprehensively covers the four main CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) practices: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, as well as ethics and sustainable procurement.

In the previous three years, Lenzing had already received outstanding ratings in all categories, and was awarded Gold status in 2018, 2019 and 2020. “We are very proud to have now achieved the step up to the Platinum level after several Gold ratings in the past few years. At Lenzing, we always think beyond fibres and take responsibility for our children and grandchildren – for whom we do our best in order to constantly improve ourselves. This attitude forms part of our strategic principles and we will continue to work hard to make a sustainable contribution to the environment and to society”, notes Stefan Doboczky, CEO of the Lenzing Group.

The Lenzing Group has been awarded Platinum status in EcoVadis’ CSR rating. The assessment comprehensively covers the four main CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) practices: the environment, fair working conditions and human rights, as well as ethics and sustainable procurement.

In the previous three years, Lenzing had already received outstanding ratings in all categories, and was awarded Gold status in 2018, 2019 and 2020. “We are very proud to have now achieved the step up to the Platinum level after several Gold ratings in the past few years. At Lenzing, we always think beyond fibres and take responsibility for our children and grandchildren – for whom we do our best in order to constantly improve ourselves. This attitude forms part of our strategic principles and we will continue to work hard to make a sustainable contribution to the environment and to society”, notes Stefan Doboczky, CEO of the Lenzing Group.

The Lenzing Group’s ambitious climate targets form an essential part of its strategy and responsibility to future generations. In 2019, Lenzing became one of the world’s first fiber manufacturers to commit to reducing CO2 emissions per ton of product by 50 percent by 2030, and even becoming climate-neutral by 2050. The Science Based Targets Initiative, a recognised organisation in the area of climate-relevant target-setting, has scientifically validated Lenzing’s climate targets.

This scientific validation also forms one of the essential criteria that EcoVadis highlights in its rating. In addition, the responsible procurement of raw materials – according to social and ecological aspects – was also highlighted as a further core element in the company’s sustainability strategy, as well as support for external environmental initiatives (Sustainable Apparel Coalition, Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action) and initiatives on labour and human rights issues (Sustainable Apparel Coalition).

08.07.2021

NDC Green by Nastrificio di Cassano: Responsible and certified labels and tags

100% sustainability lives in the smallest detail, starting with the label, the only element that can tell the story of responsibility. This is exactly why, to be a truly credible 'ambassador', the label or tag must itself be responsible. This is why Nastrificio di Cassano has created NDC Green, the premium, Made in Italy and fully traceable range that guarantees the highest quality standards while respecting the planet.

NDC Green comprises 4 categories, all with influential international certifications that attest to Nastrificio di Cassano's responsible imprinting. Many new sustainability values are woven into the collection. Particular attention is given to end-of-life, but also to the choice of natural and high-tech materials with a low environmental impact.

100% sustainability lives in the smallest detail, starting with the label, the only element that can tell the story of responsibility. This is exactly why, to be a truly credible 'ambassador', the label or tag must itself be responsible. This is why Nastrificio di Cassano has created NDC Green, the premium, Made in Italy and fully traceable range that guarantees the highest quality standards while respecting the planet.

NDC Green comprises 4 categories, all with influential international certifications that attest to Nastrificio di Cassano's responsible imprinting. Many new sustainability values are woven into the collection. Particular attention is given to end-of-life, but also to the choice of natural and high-tech materials with a low environmental impact.

A wide choice that speaks of responsible innovation, beauty and functionality: characteristics that have led C.L.A.S.S. (www.classecohub.org) to integrate NDC Green into its Material Hub which "contains a selection of fibres, materials and fabrics that share a DNA linked to research that since 2007 has been raising the bar of standards in order to offer innovations in step with the demands of the contemporary consumer" says Giusy Bettoni CEO of C.L.A.S.S.
NDC Green includes:

  • LABìO ECO-SOFT®: made using compostable and biodegradable ingredients (as attested by TUV Austria), this product boasts performances and is resistant up to 10 domestic washings at 30°. The reference is produced with fifteen times less water consumption than cotton production and the resins used are GOTS certified.
  • LABìO HANGreen is the smart solution for the creation of hard tags, hangtags, shopping bags and garment covers and, as LABIO ECO-SOFT® range, it made with  compostable and biodegradable ingredients as certified by TUV Austria and the resin is compostable, too. These peculiarities make this product unique.
  • ACETATE NAIA™, the 'smart satin' that respects forests and oceans, is the NAIA™ single-ingredient solution produced by Eastman: the 100% traceable, compostable and biodegradable cellulose yarn in both soil and sea respects the natural growth rate of forests.
  • RECYCLED POLYESTER: is made from post-consumer yarn recycled from GRS-certified PET bottles. Available in both satin and resinated taffeta versions, it guarantees excellent printability for an elegant and sophisticated look.
Source:

GB Network Marketing & Communication for C.L.A.S.S.

06.07.2021

ISKO invests in Green Technology for Recycling Solution

ISKO and textile research and development company HKRITA are proud to announce a licensing agreement for HKRITA’s award-winning, revolutionary Green Machine – a one-of-a-kind technology that fully separates and recycles cotton and polyester blends at scale.

The technology is still in the pilot stage, but is an additional step in ISKO’s drive to improve and commercialize recycling technologies which will eventually enable the company to offer a 100% post-consumer recycling solution to all of its customers. In addition, ISKO and HKRITA will work together to develop related technology, further strengthening the company’s position in sustainability.

The Green Machine uses an innovative and ultra-efficient hydrothermal treatment method that decomposes cotton into cellulose powders and enables the separation of polyester fibres from blended fabrics. The process is a closed loop and uses only water, heat and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals. Crucially, this method does not damage the polyester fibres and therefore maintains their quality; the cellulose powders, which are clean and toxic-free, can be used in a variety of ways.

ISKO and textile research and development company HKRITA are proud to announce a licensing agreement for HKRITA’s award-winning, revolutionary Green Machine – a one-of-a-kind technology that fully separates and recycles cotton and polyester blends at scale.

The technology is still in the pilot stage, but is an additional step in ISKO’s drive to improve and commercialize recycling technologies which will eventually enable the company to offer a 100% post-consumer recycling solution to all of its customers. In addition, ISKO and HKRITA will work together to develop related technology, further strengthening the company’s position in sustainability.

The Green Machine uses an innovative and ultra-efficient hydrothermal treatment method that decomposes cotton into cellulose powders and enables the separation of polyester fibres from blended fabrics. The process is a closed loop and uses only water, heat and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals. Crucially, this method does not damage the polyester fibres and therefore maintains their quality; the cellulose powders, which are clean and toxic-free, can be used in a variety of ways.

The investment in this new technology is the latest in ISKO’s ongoing drive for advancements in sustainability. As part of the company’s R-TWO™ programme, it is also working to develop fabrics with a guaranteed minimum 50%+ GRS (Global Recycle Standard) recycled content blend. This will significantly reduce the carbon and water footprint of a fabric, as well as make it easy for consumers to trace a garment’s sustainable journey step-by-step from the beginning of the supply chain through to the end product they purchase.

Source:

ISKO / Menabò Group

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project ©Tchibo
The demand for Fairtrade organic cotton is growing rapidly and is supported by a project initiated by Dibella in India.
29.06.2021

Dibella is the initiator of the "Organic Cotton" pilot project

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

  • Organic cotton project with thriving prospects

Dibella is participating in a joint project to promote organic cotton cultivation in India. The project aims to protect organic cultivation through targeted training measures and by paying premiums to small farmers, to support the conversion from conventional to organic cotton, to increase crop yields and at the same time to achieve better fibre quality.

The demand for organically grown organic cotton is growing rapidly, but crop yields are lagging well behind global demand. The Alliance for Sustainable Textiles (Berlin), initiated by Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller, therefore wants to increase organic cotton volumes for its member companies with practical solutions. In cooperation with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), it is now promoting a forward-looking project for which Dibella provided the impetus.

"In India, it is mainly micro-farms and village cooperatives that are active in organic cotton cultivation. Conversion of additional land and sustainable management could increase yields and fibre quality of organic cotton. The Chetna Organic initiative, with which we have been working successfully for many years, advises the farmers in these processes. It supports the farmers and village communities with targeted education, training and practical assistance in organic farming, thus preparing the ground for better income and living conditions for the families," says Ralf Hellmann, Managing Director of Dibella.

Several alliance partners - Dibella, Fairtrade Germany, GIZ, Organic Cotton Accelerator (OCA) and Tchibo - have taken the exemplary initiative as an opportunity to promote the cultivation and expansion of organic cotton in India. In cooperation with Chetna Organic, they focus on supporting Indian women's cooperatives, women farmers and families in the production of organic cotton as part of the "Organic Cotton Pilot Project". Tchibo and Fairtrade subsidise micro-farms during the conversion phase of the fields (the fibres are only recognised as organic cotton four years after conversion) and contribute to the provision of GMO-free seeds, which have become a scarce commodity in India. Together with Dibella, they finance training courses that teach the optimal use of natural rainfall as well as efficient, ecological cultivation methods, which subsequently lead to improved fibre quality. In addition, they commit to purchasing Fairtrade organic cotton for many years.

Ralf Hellmann: "The pilot project enables us to expand our Dibella Good Textiles collection because it guarantees us long-term access to fair-trade organic cotton. At the same time, it improves the living conditions of the small-scale farmers and their families. We therefore hope that "Organic Cotton" will also set a precedent in other cotton growing regions and bring organic farming forward in India."

(c) German Popp. Dr. Marina Crnoja-Cosic (Kelheim Fibres) and Linda Dengler (Microbify)
28.06.2021

Kelheim Fibres presents award at “Plan B” start-up competition

For the fourth time, the international start-up competition "Plan B - Biobased.Business.Bavaria." organised by BioCampus Straubing honoured the best new business ideas in the field of biobased solutions.

Dr Crnoja-Cosic, Director New Business Development, and Matthew North, Commercial Director, represented Kelheim Fibres at the award ceremony. The manufacturer of special viscose fibres has been working with the BioCampus Straubing for many years and is a supporter of the competition, this year as prize sponsors. In this capacity, Dr. Crnoja-Cosic congratulated the newly founded team of Microbify GmbH on their third place and presented them with a cheque for 3,000 Euros. As a spin-off from the University of Regensburg, Microbify works, among other things, on the use of old natural gas storage facilities for the production of green natural gas using extremophilic microorganisms.

For the fourth time, the international start-up competition "Plan B - Biobased.Business.Bavaria." organised by BioCampus Straubing honoured the best new business ideas in the field of biobased solutions.

Dr Crnoja-Cosic, Director New Business Development, and Matthew North, Commercial Director, represented Kelheim Fibres at the award ceremony. The manufacturer of special viscose fibres has been working with the BioCampus Straubing for many years and is a supporter of the competition, this year as prize sponsors. In this capacity, Dr. Crnoja-Cosic congratulated the newly founded team of Microbify GmbH on their third place and presented them with a cheque for 3,000 Euros. As a spin-off from the University of Regensburg, Microbify works, among other things, on the use of old natural gas storage facilities for the production of green natural gas using extremophilic microorganisms.

Driving the change from a fossil-based to a bio-based economy is a declared goal of Kelheim Fibres - their speciality fibres replacing fossil materials in more and more applications. To this end, the fibre manufacturer seeks inspiration and exchange within its own industry as well as with innovation partners from outside the industry, start-ups and science in an open innovation approach.

More information:
Kelheim Fibres Microbify GmbH
Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH

14.06.2021

Asahi Kasei renews membership by the United Nations BCtA programme

Asahi Kasei's ongoing commitment to strengthen the Bemberg™ fibre value chain from raw materials to final products textile industry and support local people, institutes, and the environment, has been recognized by the United Nations BCtA programme, who has renewed its membership for India. Starting from the company and including the material, Bemberg™ integrates new generations of values such as innovation and responsibility together with design. This important breakthrough showcases how the smart fibre is globally recognized for its innovation, responsibility and ability to deliver high-quality and sustainable ingredients at the same time committed to support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Objectives of this initiative include:  

Asahi Kasei's ongoing commitment to strengthen the Bemberg™ fibre value chain from raw materials to final products textile industry and support local people, institutes, and the environment, has been recognized by the United Nations BCtA programme, who has renewed its membership for India. Starting from the company and including the material, Bemberg™ integrates new generations of values such as innovation and responsibility together with design. This important breakthrough showcases how the smart fibre is globally recognized for its innovation, responsibility and ability to deliver high-quality and sustainable ingredients at the same time committed to support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Objectives of this initiative include:  

  • By 2023, enhance skills of 1,671 employees in the Bemberg fiber industry and advance production efficiency of 55 small to medium scale de-linting, weaving and dyeing manufacturers, through employee training, capital investment and technical support.
  • By 2023, develop capacity of 575 young people, especially women, who will lead the Indian textile industry, by providing vocational training opportunities and institutional support for the three schools.
  • By 2023 cumulative amount of 40,000m3/day textile dyeing effluent will be treated and recycled back to their own textile dyeing process, which is equivalent to saving daily water access to natural water resources for approx. 25,000 households.
Source:

Asahi Kasei Corp. / GB Network Marketing Communications Srl

Lenzing: Clear positioning of the EU Commission against plastic waste Photo: pixabay
08.06.2021

Lenzing: Clear positioning of the EU Commission against plastic waste

  • Guidelines of the EU Commission to implement the Single-Use Plastics Directive have been published
  • Uniform labelling obligation for wipes and feminine hygiene products containing plastics as of July 03, 2021
  • Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable VEOCEL™ branded fibers as a sustainable alternative to plastic

The Lenzing Group welcomes the issuance of the guidelines for the implementation of the Single-Use Plastics Directive (EU) 2019/904, which took effect on June 05, 20191. In these guidelines, the EU Commission specifies which products fall within the scope of the directive, thus providing clarity in the joint fight of the EU member states against environmental pollution from plastic waste. Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable cellulosic fibers such as those of the VEOCEL™ brand comprise a sustainable and innovative solution to this man-made problem.

  • Guidelines of the EU Commission to implement the Single-Use Plastics Directive have been published
  • Uniform labelling obligation for wipes and feminine hygiene products containing plastics as of July 03, 2021
  • Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable VEOCEL™ branded fibers as a sustainable alternative to plastic

The Lenzing Group welcomes the issuance of the guidelines for the implementation of the Single-Use Plastics Directive (EU) 2019/904, which took effect on June 05, 20191. In these guidelines, the EU Commission specifies which products fall within the scope of the directive, thus providing clarity in the joint fight of the EU member states against environmental pollution from plastic waste. Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable cellulosic fibers such as those of the VEOCEL™ brand comprise a sustainable and innovative solution to this man-made problem.

Uniform labelling rules for some single-use plastic products
The Commission implementing regulation (EU) 2020/2151 applying to the Single-Use Plastics Directive stipulate uniform labelling requirements for some of the single-use plastic products on the packaging or the product itself starting on July 03, 2021. They encompass feminine hygiene products and wet wipes for personal and household care containing plastic.

Consumers want sustainable hygiene products
Even before the implementation of the Single-Use Plastics Directive, Lenzing already gives consumers clear guidance in their purchasing decisions. Products bearing the VEOCEL™ brand logo on their packaging are produced in line with stringent certification criteria. As a consequence, consumers can be assured that the products contain biodegradable, cellulosic materials.

A Marketagent survey carried out in German-speaking Europe in October 20192 concluded that nine out of ten consumers would immediately change their purchasing behavior for wipes if they found out that their current product contains plastic. This would seem to imply that new market dynamics will emerge once the labelling rules for single-use plastic products takes effect. According to a Smithers Report3, about 500,000 tons of petroleum-based fibers are used each year for the production of wipes.

 

1 Directive (EU) 2019/904 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 June 2019 on the reduction of the impact of certain plastic products on the environment
2 Representative Marketagent Online survey, n = 1,005 (14 - 69 years old, from Austria and Germany). https://itsinourhands.com/
3 Smithers Report “The Future of Global Nonwoven Wipes to 2023”, published in 2018, page 23, reference year 2018

Source:

Lenzing AG

Heimtextil launches digital materials library (c) Messe Frankfurt
02.06.2021

Heimtextil launches digital materials library

Progressive material innovations presented digitally: following the cancellation of this year’s fair due to the corona pandemic, Heimtextil is extending its range of digital services and launching a new online materials library entitled ‘Future Materials Library’. 24 future-oriented materials for interior applications can now be found at www.heimtextil.messefrankfurt.com/future.

The curators of the new materials library are London-based futures-research agency, FranklinTill. “We are transitioning to a materials revolution that will help restore the balance in our relationship to our planet. As part of the Heimtextil Trends 21/22, we present a new selection of materials for interior applications with exciting innovations from all over the world”, says Caroline Till of FranklinTill.

A mix of commercially viable products and developments in an early stage

Progressive material innovations presented digitally: following the cancellation of this year’s fair due to the corona pandemic, Heimtextil is extending its range of digital services and launching a new online materials library entitled ‘Future Materials Library’. 24 future-oriented materials for interior applications can now be found at www.heimtextil.messefrankfurt.com/future.

The curators of the new materials library are London-based futures-research agency, FranklinTill. “We are transitioning to a materials revolution that will help restore the balance in our relationship to our planet. As part of the Heimtextil Trends 21/22, we present a new selection of materials for interior applications with exciting innovations from all over the world”, says Caroline Till of FranklinTill.

A mix of commercially viable products and developments in an early stage

Imaginative designers and environmentally-aware manufacturers: the Future Materials Library 2021 offers materials pioneers a platform and presents a first-class mix of economically proven and revolutionary developments. FranklinTill has organised the materials in four themes: REGENERATIVE CROPS, REMADE FIBRES, HARVESTING WASTE STREAMS and SUSTAINABLE COLOUR.

Resources are running low

Thus, the new Heimtextil materials library tackles one of the main problems of the modern age: the shortage of resources on earth. In particular, textile production creates huge and continuously growing quantities of waste. And, over past decades, the design business has developed a ‘take, make and discard’ model of consumption that is incredibly harmful for our planet. In the climate-emergency era, however, future-oriented designers are learning from nature and working together with it. They endeavour to make use of the power of highly efficient natural circular systems to create textiles and materials that are better for both humans and the planet.

Heimtextil Trends: a guide for the international sector

The ‘Future Materials Library’ is part of the Heimtextil Trends that, for almost three decades, have been offering orientation for the sector by revealing design tendencies for the coming season. Even in the crisis, the Heimtextil Trends remain a vital part of the overall concept of the fair and provide important content for all target groups involved within the worldwide sector. Accordingly, Heimtextil aims to spotlight style-defining design developments taking place within the larger context of lifestyle trends. At the same time, the Heimtextil trend experts scan the exhibitors’ product world and identify unequivocal trends in the sector. In this connection, particular attention is paid to sustainable aspects along the entire value chain – in both the new digital library and live during the fair next January. 

Source:

Heimtextil - Messe Frankfurt

Lenzing is on the path to climate-neutral production (c) Lenzing AG
27.05.2021

Lenzing is on the path to climate-neutral production

  • New air purification and sulfur recovery plant up and running at the Lenzing facility
  • Another step closer to meeting sustainability and climate targets
  • Self-sufficiency in raw materials further enhanced

Lenzing Group is continuing to make great strides toward achieving carbon neutrality across the Group. The successful completion and commissioning of an air purification and sulfur recovery plant at the Lenzing facility marks another milestone in the Group’s ambitious strategy. Lenzing has invested some EUR 40 mn in this project since construction began in 2019.

Using state-of-the-art technology, the plant will enable carbon emissions to be reduced by 15,000 metric tons at the Lenzing facility. This will also make the group more self-sufficient in securing vital raw materials for processing, which will bolster the site’s competitive standing in terms of sustainability.

  • New air purification and sulfur recovery plant up and running at the Lenzing facility
  • Another step closer to meeting sustainability and climate targets
  • Self-sufficiency in raw materials further enhanced

Lenzing Group is continuing to make great strides toward achieving carbon neutrality across the Group. The successful completion and commissioning of an air purification and sulfur recovery plant at the Lenzing facility marks another milestone in the Group’s ambitious strategy. Lenzing has invested some EUR 40 mn in this project since construction began in 2019.

Using state-of-the-art technology, the plant will enable carbon emissions to be reduced by 15,000 metric tons at the Lenzing facility. This will also make the group more self-sufficient in securing vital raw materials for processing, which will bolster the site’s competitive standing in terms of sustainability.

“As a result of this investment, Lenzing has made further progress towards implementing its climate targets, while achieving much greater autonomy with regard to one of its core raw materials”, says Christian Skilich, Member of the Managing Board at Lenzing Group.

In 2019, Lenzing set the strategic target of halving its group-wide greenhouse gas emissions per ton of product by 2030. Its goal for 2050 is to achieve climate neutrality.

Source:

Lenzing AG

Spinnova and KT Trading create new circular textile made from leather waste (c) Spinnova
20.05.2021

Spinnova and KT Trading create new circular textile made from leather waste

The textile industry is constantly searching for new, sustainable, and circular materials. Following thorough research and testing, Spinnova and KT Trading have developed a natural leather fabric made from leather waste without harmful chemicals.

"Leather is an amazing high-quality material with unique properties. With this new textile, we have taken yet another step towards completing the circular economy for leather," says Kristian Geert Jensen, CEO of KT Trading, who now has a joint venture with Spinnova.

Spinnova CEO: Sustainable innovation
Together with KT Trading, ECCO’s key leather provider, Spinnova has established the Respin company - a new joint venture. The partners are already constructing a leather fibre production pilot plant in Finland.

ECCO’s Applied Research division and Spinnova have been in a R&D collaboration since 2018 and have made successful trials with spinning the protein biomass into fibre. Processing leather raw material does not require further technology development from Spinnova. The company already has proof of concept from using the method on wood-based raw material.

The textile industry is constantly searching for new, sustainable, and circular materials. Following thorough research and testing, Spinnova and KT Trading have developed a natural leather fabric made from leather waste without harmful chemicals.

"Leather is an amazing high-quality material with unique properties. With this new textile, we have taken yet another step towards completing the circular economy for leather," says Kristian Geert Jensen, CEO of KT Trading, who now has a joint venture with Spinnova.

Spinnova CEO: Sustainable innovation
Together with KT Trading, ECCO’s key leather provider, Spinnova has established the Respin company - a new joint venture. The partners are already constructing a leather fibre production pilot plant in Finland.

ECCO’s Applied Research division and Spinnova have been in a R&D collaboration since 2018 and have made successful trials with spinning the protein biomass into fibre. Processing leather raw material does not require further technology development from Spinnova. The company already has proof of concept from using the method on wood-based raw material.

More information:
Spinnova Leather textile waste fibres
Source:

Spinnova / Cision

11.05.2021

Devan launches bio-based softener and quick-dry finish

Devan Chemicals recently added two more products to its range of bio-based textile finishes. One being a softener, the other one a quick-dry finish. Both are derived from vegetable oils and are in line with the company’s latest innovations on bio-based chemistry.

Due to the Covid-pandemic, serving as an accelerator for a worldwide green economy, the textile industry is increasingly seeking more sustainable and products fit-for-circular programs. According to McKinsey & Company, the textile industry will experience innovation surrounding sustainably sourced raw materials and bio-based chemical additives to accommodate increasing consumer demand.

Devan Chemicals recently added two more products to its range of bio-based textile finishes. One being a softener, the other one a quick-dry finish. Both are derived from vegetable oils and are in line with the company’s latest innovations on bio-based chemistry.

Due to the Covid-pandemic, serving as an accelerator for a worldwide green economy, the textile industry is increasingly seeking more sustainable and products fit-for-circular programs. According to McKinsey & Company, the textile industry will experience innovation surrounding sustainably sourced raw materials and bio-based chemical additives to accommodate increasing consumer demand.

Devan launched its first bio-based technology in 2019 and is fully committed to making bio-based versions of their existing textile finishes. ‘We have put ourselves on a mission to be able to extend our Bio-Based range further”, says Sven Ghyselinck, CEO of Devan. “We wanted to make an even bigger impact on circularity than before, therefore we looked into what fabric producers use a lot: softeners and moisture management systems. Only by focusing more on the large volume products, can we support the industry to have a bigger impact on sustainability. After the growing success of our natural antimicrobial BI-OME NTL, we are proud to now introduce our new natural Passerelle line”.

Passerelle Soft NTL is a durable softness technology based on vegetable ingredients. The technology is wash durable and can be used with natural fibres like hemp, cotton, but is also fit for synthetic fibres like rPES, PA. The bio content of the technology is above 85% (ASTM D6866-20).

Passerelle Quick-Dry NTL is a moisture management technology also based on vegetable ingredients. This bio-based finish enables high wicking and evaporation capability which helps to evaporate water/sweat easier and faster. The technology is also > 60% (28 days) biodegradable according to OECD 301B.

ITA
04.05.2021

2021 Aachen Reinforced! Symposium free of charge for all attendees

Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University has changed the format of the 2021 Aachen Reinforced! Symposium to an online only format. The programme was shortened to suit the new format, with presentations taking place on Monday 10th May and Tuesday 11th May.

Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University has changed the format of the 2021 Aachen Reinforced! Symposium to an online only format. The programme was shortened to suit the new format, with presentations taking place on Monday 10th May and Tuesday 11th May.

The conference program for Monday, 10th May:
The programme will begin with exciting presentations on glass chemistry and fibres. A talk by Dr Anne Berthereau (Owens Corning Composites) on the race for always higher modulus glass fibres will be followed by a talk from Dr Hong Li (Nippon Electric Glass) on the potential of new high-strength and high-modulus glass fibres.
After two further presentations on high modulus and bioactive glass fibres from Muawia Dafir and Julia Eichhorn (TU Bergakademie Freiberg), we will learn about furnace efficiency as well as process monitoring and digitalisation in glass fibre production from René Meulemann (CelSian), Hans Gedon (Gedonsoft) and Julius Golovatchev (Incotelogy) respectively.
A presentation by Felix Quintero Martínez (Universidade de Vigo) will explore a novel method to produce ultra-flexible glass nanofibers.
The afternoon will continue with two presentations by Dr Christina Scheffler (Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V. (IPF)) and Professor James Thomason (University of Strathclyde) in the field of glass fibre sizings and fibre-matrix interfaces. Finally, a closing presentation by Steve Bassetti (Michelman) will conclude the first day of the Symposium.

The entire conference programme is available on the website https://aachen-fibres.com/aachen-reinforced/general-information.
To register for the Symposium, use the following link: https://aachen-fibres.com/aachen-reinforced/registration

22.04.2021

Lenzing Group: Sustainability Report 2020

  • Successful measures to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic with a focus on the safety and health of employees, customers and partners and securing sustainable business development
  • Implementation of strategic investment projects and climate targets progressing on schedule – launch of first TENCEL™ branded carbon-zero fibers
  • New level of transparency in the textile industry: introduction of blockchain technology
  • Target setting: Lenzing raises the bar even higher and sets new sustainability goals

The Lenzing Group presented its Sustainability Report 2020 on April 22, 2021, World Earth Day. Featuring the title “Stand up for future generations”, Lenzing once again emphasized its commitment to taking responsibility beyond the products it makes.

  • Successful measures to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic with a focus on the safety and health of employees, customers and partners and securing sustainable business development
  • Implementation of strategic investment projects and climate targets progressing on schedule – launch of first TENCEL™ branded carbon-zero fibers
  • New level of transparency in the textile industry: introduction of blockchain technology
  • Target setting: Lenzing raises the bar even higher and sets new sustainability goals

The Lenzing Group presented its Sustainability Report 2020 on April 22, 2021, World Earth Day. Featuring the title “Stand up for future generations”, Lenzing once again emphasized its commitment to taking responsibility beyond the products it makes. The non-financial report, prepared in accordance with the reporting standards of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and the Austrian Sustainability and Diversity Improvement Act (NaDiVeG) and reviewed by KPMG Austria GmbH Wirtschaftsprüfungs- und Steuerberatungsgesellschaft, illustrates how the company is responding to the global challenges of our time.

The 2020 financial year of the Lenzing Group was largely dominated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Lenzing took short-term measures to safeguard its business operations and mitigate the effects of fiber prices and fiber demand which came under increasing pressure. The priority was to protect employees and strengthen long-term partnerships with suppliers and customers. Following the current fight against the coronavirus and its consequences, the company continues to move ahead determinedly to achieve its sustainability targets, also against the backdrop of such a difficult market environment.

With the implementation of its science-based targets, the Lenzing Group actively contributes to mastering the problems caused by climate change. In 2019, Lenzing made a strategic commitment to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent per ton of product by 2030. The overriding target is to be climate-neutral by 2050.*

The launch of the first carbon-zero TENCEL™ fibers certified as CarbonNeutral® products in accordance with The CarbonNeutral Protocol – the leading global framework for carbon neutrality – represents another important milestone from the reporting year. As of June 2021, Lenzing will also market the first VEOCEL™ branded lyocell fibers as certified CarbonNeutral® products.

Promoting the circular economy
Lenzing also sets standards for the entire fiber, textile and clothing industry with respect to the circular economy which is of such crucial importance in climate and resource protection. In order to enhance resource efficiency and offer a solution for the global problem of textile waste, the company developed the REFIBRA™ recycling technology. REFIBRA™ is the only technology in the world enabling the production of new lyocell fibers on a commercial scale from cotton scraps derived from manufacturing cotton clothing as well as from used garments. In this way, an important contribution is made to promoting circularity in the textile industry.*

New level of transparency in the textile industry
In addition to environmental protection, the issue of transparency along the supply chain poses a major challenge to the textile industry. Working in cooperation with TextileGenesis™, Lenzing offers an innovative solution to ensure greater transparency on the basis of blockchain technology. Following several successful pilot projects with renowned fashion brands, this digital platform was ultimately launched in 2020 to enable the traceability of textiles, from the fiber to all stages of production and distribution. Thanks to the innovative Fibercoin™ technology of the TextileGenesis™ platform, Lenzing and its partners are able to issue so-called “blockchain assets” in direct proportion to the physical fiber deliveries of the brands TENCEL™ and LENZING™ ECOVERO™. These digital assets function like a “fingerprint” and thus prevent adulteration.*

Target setting: Lenzing raises the bar even higher
The Lenzing Group operates in line with three strategic principles within the context of its “Naturally positive” sustainability strategy: partnering for change, advancing circularity and greening the value chain.*

 

*See attached document for more information..

15.04.2021

Kelheim Fibres joins the ZDHC "Roadmap to Zero" Programme

The viscose speciality fibre manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has joined the ZDHC programme "Roadmap to Zero".

The non-profit organisation with more than 160 contributors worldwide has set itself the goal of completely eliminating harmful substances from the textile value chain. The ZDHC guidelines provide producers of Man-made Cellulosic Fibres (MMCF) with uniform criteria for measuring indicators such as wastewater, air emissions and other process-related parameters. The measured data is independently monitored and published.

Kelheim Fibres sees its ZDHC contributorship as another building block on the road to even more sustainable fibre production:
"We want to develop our industry with our know-how towards a greener future. Sustainability is an integral part of our corporate philosophy and strategy. We fully support ZDHC's vision of a widespread implementation of sustainably chemistry, driving innovations and best practices in textile, apparel and footwear industries to protect consumers workers and the environment," says Craig Barker, CEO at Kelheim Fibres.

The viscose speciality fibre manufacturer Kelheim Fibres has joined the ZDHC programme "Roadmap to Zero".

The non-profit organisation with more than 160 contributors worldwide has set itself the goal of completely eliminating harmful substances from the textile value chain. The ZDHC guidelines provide producers of Man-made Cellulosic Fibres (MMCF) with uniform criteria for measuring indicators such as wastewater, air emissions and other process-related parameters. The measured data is independently monitored and published.

Kelheim Fibres sees its ZDHC contributorship as another building block on the road to even more sustainable fibre production:
"We want to develop our industry with our know-how towards a greener future. Sustainability is an integral part of our corporate philosophy and strategy. We fully support ZDHC's vision of a widespread implementation of sustainably chemistry, driving innovations and best practices in textile, apparel and footwear industries to protect consumers workers and the environment," says Craig Barker, CEO at Kelheim Fibres.

"ZDHC provides us with access to a range of best practices in chemical management and gives us the opportunity to network and learn from each other with like-minded industry partners. ZDHC's collaborative approach will accelerate the shift to a more responsible industry and we want to contribute to that."

Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH

13.04.2021

Origin Materials and PrimaLoft develop Carbon-Negative Insulating Fiber

  • PrimaLoft and Origin Materials have launched a program to develop high-performance, carbon-negative insulating fibers for diverse apparel applications, including for leading outdoor, fashion, and lifestyle brands, as well as home goods applications such as hypoallergenic insulated bedding.
  • PrimaLoft, an advanced material technology company and a world leader in the development of high-performance insulations and fabrics, will develop the fibers with Origin Materials to address demand for sustainable, high-performance materials from its over 900 global brand partners. PrimaLoft iconic brand partners include Patagonia, Stone Island, L.L. Bean, Lululemon, adidas and Nike.
  • The program will focus on carbon-negative PET and next-generation polymers produced by the Origin Materials patented technology platform, which turns sustainable wood residue into cost-advantaged, carbon-negative materials that reduce the need for fossil resources.

Origin Materials, Inc.

  • PrimaLoft and Origin Materials have launched a program to develop high-performance, carbon-negative insulating fibers for diverse apparel applications, including for leading outdoor, fashion, and lifestyle brands, as well as home goods applications such as hypoallergenic insulated bedding.
  • PrimaLoft, an advanced material technology company and a world leader in the development of high-performance insulations and fabrics, will develop the fibers with Origin Materials to address demand for sustainable, high-performance materials from its over 900 global brand partners. PrimaLoft iconic brand partners include Patagonia, Stone Island, L.L. Bean, Lululemon, adidas and Nike.
  • The program will focus on carbon-negative PET and next-generation polymers produced by the Origin Materials patented technology platform, which turns sustainable wood residue into cost-advantaged, carbon-negative materials that reduce the need for fossil resources.

Origin Materials, Inc. (“Origin Materials”), a leading carbon negative materials company, and PrimaLoft, an advanced material technology company and a leader in the development of high-performance insulations and fabrics, announced a new program to develop carbon-negative, insulating, high-performance fibers. The fibers will be used across a diverse array of end products, including insulating fiber for leading outdoor, fashion, and lifestyle brands, as well as home goods applications such as hypoallergenic insulated bedding.

The companies will work to rapidly develop and commercialize new products derived from Origin Materials’ platform. The collaboration will leverage the leadership position of PrimaLoft as a specialty producer of insulating fibers and filaments with over 900 global brand partners, as well as a large global network of manufacturers that employ a wide array of textile processes to make its products, including extrusion, carding, spinning, finishing, weaving, knitting, dyeing, airlaid, meltblown, and other technologies.

The collaboration builds on PrimaLoft’s “Relentlessly Responsible™” mission to elevate both performance and sustainability, through innovation. The platform includes PrimaLoft® Bio™, which was developed and launched into the market in late 2018 as an effort to battle microplastics in the ocean; PrimaLoft® P.U.R.E.™, which provides materials manufactured with greater than 50% CO2 savings; and PrimaLoft’s post-consumer recycling initiative. The next frontier for the company is non-petroleum based raw materials, including products that biodegrade and other circular economy solutions.

Source:

crystal communications

29.03.2021

Flocus™ produces and enhances Kapok Fibers

Flocus™ offers a range of kapok textile materials such as fibers, yarns, textiles and nonwovens, which provide the textile industry with a naturally sustainable and regenerative alternative which has not been available before.

Kapok is a natural fiber, traditionally used by local population for fillings but with no large scale applications until Flocus™ founding. Beside kapok several interesting properties, there were some limits that had been inhibiting the possibility to use it at a larger scale and build a supply chain on textile products based on it: kapok fibers are short stapled ones (2-4 cm length), very light and empty inside: for this reason they incorporate air and made the spinning attempts unsuccessful.

Flocus™ pioneers sustainable and regenerative textile solutions based on kapok fiber, and it is creating a responsible supply chain for kapok.

With one of the most advanced technologies in the market, FLOCUS™ can spin the highest kapok percentage, offer yarns in the thinnest counts with the possibility of low minimum order quantity per blend.

Flocus™ offers a range of kapok textile materials such as fibers, yarns, textiles and nonwovens, which provide the textile industry with a naturally sustainable and regenerative alternative which has not been available before.

Kapok is a natural fiber, traditionally used by local population for fillings but with no large scale applications until Flocus™ founding. Beside kapok several interesting properties, there were some limits that had been inhibiting the possibility to use it at a larger scale and build a supply chain on textile products based on it: kapok fibers are short stapled ones (2-4 cm length), very light and empty inside: for this reason they incorporate air and made the spinning attempts unsuccessful.

Flocus™ pioneers sustainable and regenerative textile solutions based on kapok fiber, and it is creating a responsible supply chain for kapok.

With one of the most advanced technologies in the market, FLOCUS™ can spin the highest kapok percentage, offer yarns in the thinnest counts with the possibility of low minimum order quantity per blend.

Flocus™ Kapok offers products which can reduce the presence of animal and synthetic products in the market, utilizing a completely natural alternative without abandoning functionality.

The Flocus™ team works in partnership with companies who want to investigate the use of the eco-responsible fibers and is testing the wide range of applications of Flocus™ kapok stuffing, yarns, fabrics, nonwovens for thermo and sound insulation, waddings, foam replacement, medical, automotive and technical uses and others.

Source:

Flocus

(c) Dibella GmbH
22.03.2021

Dibella launches 2nd upcycling project: napkins become jeans

After starting the first "Dibella up" circular-flow concept in August 2020, thousands of high-quality bags have already been made from used hotel textiles. Now the company is presenting another upcycling project: As part of a feasibility study, organic Fairtrade napkins that could no longer be rented out by the company were turned into jeans.

The second "Dibella up" project promises successful recycling of used object textiles. Within the framework of a feasibility study, almost 5,000 discarded napkins were used for jeans production in Pakistan. The special feature of the process is the traceability of the raw materials through all processing stages.

The napkins made of pure organic Fairtrade cotton originated in India. There, the fibres were grown and harvested by micro-farmers of the Chetna cooperative and then processed into durable textiles by a certified company. From Dibella, the napkins went to Lamme Textile Management, where they went through the use process in laundry and catering for many years. All stages were traceable by means of a "Respect Code" with which each piece was marked.

After starting the first "Dibella up" circular-flow concept in August 2020, thousands of high-quality bags have already been made from used hotel textiles. Now the company is presenting another upcycling project: As part of a feasibility study, organic Fairtrade napkins that could no longer be rented out by the company were turned into jeans.

The second "Dibella up" project promises successful recycling of used object textiles. Within the framework of a feasibility study, almost 5,000 discarded napkins were used for jeans production in Pakistan. The special feature of the process is the traceability of the raw materials through all processing stages.

The napkins made of pure organic Fairtrade cotton originated in India. There, the fibres were grown and harvested by micro-farmers of the Chetna cooperative and then processed into durable textiles by a certified company. From Dibella, the napkins went to Lamme Textile Management, where they went through the use process in laundry and catering for many years. All stages were traceable by means of a "Respect Code" with which each piece was marked.

In the recycling project, the original supply chain was reversed: Dibella transported the organic Fairtrade napkins discarded by Lamme Textile Management to Pakistan. There, the goods were shredded and the organic Fairtrade cotton fibres recovered in a full-scale textile plant specialising in sustainability. In the next step, they were mixed with "fresh fibres", spun into yarns for denim production, woven, finished with sustainable processes, subjected to quality tests and then made up into jeans.

More information:
Dibella
Source:

Dibella GmbH

How to do more with less explored at Kingpins24 Flash (c) Monfords
Monforts has a leading position in the field of denim finishing with its well proven Thermex continuous dyeing systems, Montex stenter dryers and other lines for resource-efficient and economical processing.
09.03.2021

How to do more with less explored at Kingpins24 Flash

  • Major Monforts denim customers continue to pioneer new initiatives that are pushing the boundaries of sustainable production.

Recycling their cotton waste has become one way these companies can do more with less, and at the recent Kingpins24 Flash online event, Sedef Uncu Aki, director of Orta, headquartered in Istanbul, Turkey, announced a new partnership with leading recycling operation Gama Recycle.

Traceable
“Through this local partnership we will supply the waste from our spinning mills and return around 3,000 tons of premium quality cotton back to them,” she said. “We have established a truly controlled and traceable system and partnering with a domestic recycling centre is important because a lot the carbon emissions associated with recycling usually come from transportation.”

  • Major Monforts denim customers continue to pioneer new initiatives that are pushing the boundaries of sustainable production.

Recycling their cotton waste has become one way these companies can do more with less, and at the recent Kingpins24 Flash online event, Sedef Uncu Aki, director of Orta, headquartered in Istanbul, Turkey, announced a new partnership with leading recycling operation Gama Recycle.

Traceable
“Through this local partnership we will supply the waste from our spinning mills and return around 3,000 tons of premium quality cotton back to them,” she said. “We have established a truly controlled and traceable system and partnering with a domestic recycling centre is important because a lot the carbon emissions associated with recycling usually come from transportation.”

Orta’s ZeroMax range meanwhile uses no cotton at all, being based on Lenzing’s Tencel cellulosic fibre, while the company’s involvement in denim production for a recent launch by Levi Strauss, of jeans made with organic cotton and Circulose – a breakthrough material developed by re:newcell of Sweden and partners – was hailed as a further step forward.

To make Circulose, re:newcell repurposes discarded cotton textiles, such as worn-out denim jeans, through a process akin to recycling paper. The incoming waste fabrics are broken down using water. The colour is then stripped from these materials using an eco-friendly bleach and after any synthetic fibres are removed from the mix, the slurry-like mixture is dried and the excess water is extracted, leaving behind a sheet of Circulose. This sheet is then made into viscose fibre which is combined with cotton and woven into new fabrics.

Circular Park
Omer Ahmed, CEO of Artistic Milliners also announced plans for his company’s new 70,000 square-foot Circular Park in Karachi, Pakistan, at Kingpins24 Flash.

Once complete, this will add three million square metres of additional denim capacity a month to the company’s production and take its total recycled output to a monthly five million metres.
Ahmed observed that there is currently a lack of sustainable fibres that are readily available to use for denim production at scale.

“Organic cotton is too expensive, and in my opinion always will be,” he said. “Cottonised hemp is also not cheap and it’s hard to mix with cotton, while the new regenerated cellulose fibres that are now emerging are promising, but currently in short supply. Recycled polyester is meanwhile still based on petroleum resources which we want to move away from. As a consequence, there are only a few other options for us as a manufacturer and this new project will help us minimise our own waste while significantly lowering our carbon footprint.”

Other Monforts denim customers to introduce cotton fibre recycling operations at their plants recently include AGI Denim, Bossa and Soorty.

Vertical savings
Refresh is the name of the latest collection from AGI Denim – reflecting the company’s significant reduction in water consumption.

The company has just opened new fibre spinning and denim mills at its complex in Karachi, Pakistan.

“Over the years we’ve gone through a series of backward integration steps to become fully vertical,” said AGI Denim executive director Ahmed Javed, at Kingpins24 Flash. “In our latest expansion, we revisited every step of the production processes in order to make resource savings.”

Innovations have included the installation of proprietary robotics for garment finishing, but the most attention has been paid to water savings.

“Pakistan is one of the largest cotton-producing companies in the world and we’re fortunate that the type of cotton that is grown here is well suited to denim production and also helps us lower our carbon footprint, with everything done in close proximity,” Javed said. “In the lifecycle of a pair of denim jeans, however, cotton fibre production contributes 68% of water consumption. While we cannot control how much water cotton needs for it to grow, we can rethink the way we use it in our factory.”

Refresh-branded denims are washed from 100% recycled water as a result of the company’s new wastewater treatment plant, which puts production wastewater through a series of steps beginning with equalisation, followed by aeration and concluding with sedimentation. The water travels through filtration and ultrafiltration systems before being subjected to an activated carbon system and finally a reverse osmosis system to reduce any dissolved salts.

AGI now recycles 4.4 million gallons of water each month – enough to wash a million pairs of jeans.

Sustainable
Monforts has a leading position in the field of denim finishing with its well proven Thermex continuous dyeing systems, Montex stenter dryers and other lines for resource-efficient and economical processing.

“Our denim partners are constantly setting themselves new goals in respect of sustainable production – and more importantly, achieving them,” says Hans Wroblowski, Monforts Head of Denim. “We work closely with them with the aim of constantly optimising processing parameters and achieving further savings in energy, water and raw materials throughout the dyeing and finishing stages of production.”

The latest Monforts innovation for denim is the CYD yarn dyeing system. This technology is based on the effective and established dyeing process for denim fabrics that is now being applied for yarn dyeing. The CYD system integrates new functions and processes into the weaving preparation processes to increase quality, flexibility, economic viability and productivity. A full CYD line is now available for trials at the company’s Advanced Technology Centre in Mönchengladbach, Germany.”