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Photo: Texaid
07.06.2022

TEXAID enables Textile-to-Textile Recycling

As a leading company in the collecting, sorting, reselling and recycling of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID has enabled the recycling of post-consumer textile waste into new textiles and clothing. After two years of development, the company has developed a fabric including 50 % of post-consumer textile waste from used clothing, collected and prepared for recycling by TEXAID.

Today’s linear system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced, used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID invested in the textile-to-textile recycling and product development.

As a leading company in the collecting, sorting, reselling and recycling of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID has enabled the recycling of post-consumer textile waste into new textiles and clothing. After two years of development, the company has developed a fabric including 50 % of post-consumer textile waste from used clothing, collected and prepared for recycling by TEXAID.

Today’s linear system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced, used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID invested in the textile-to-textile recycling and product development.

Collaboration enables recycling
After two years of research, product development, and most important, building partnerships in the value chain, TEXAID has been able to develop a fabric made of 100 % recycled fiber in close collaboration with our value chain partners.

The fabric is a blend of 50 % post-consumer textile waste that TEXAID has collected in Germany and Switzerland. White cotton textiles which cannot be worn, have been sorted out in a sorting facility in Apolda, Germany. The other 50% is made from ocean-bound plastic waste which is plastic with a high risk of entering the ocean which has been saved and recycled by Unifi. The fabric and bag have been produced in Italy. The cotton material has been shredded by Marchi & Fildi in Biella, IT, who then spun the recycled cotton and recycled polyester fibers into a yarn. This yarn has been woven into a fabric by Tessitura Casoni.T.F.C.

Through this proof of concept, it has been showcased that making fabrics of 100 % recycled content and with 50 % of post-consumer textiles is possible. TEXAID is looking for strong industry partners to push high-value textile to textile recycling technologies in joint projects like these.

More information:
Texaid Recycling
Source:

Texaid

(c) adidas AG
Felix Auger-Aliassime
30.05.2022

adidas commitment to end plastic waste with SS22 Tennis Collection

adidas launches its SS22 Tennis Collection, a high-performance tennis apparel line featuring graphics inspired by Paris’ botanical gardens and green spaces, garments in the collection were made either in part with Parley Ocean Plastic or in part with recycled content.

Launching ahead of the most prominent clay court tournament of the summer, the SS22 Tennis Collection is being premiered on court by adidas next-gen athletes, Elena Rybakina and Felix Auger-Aliassime, alongside Maria Sakkari, Dominic Thiem and Stefanos Tsitsipas who all share a passion for championing sustainability and working together towards a better future for our planet.

From Insight to Action
The SS22 Tennis Collection is another step adidas is taking on its journey to help end plastic waste, and its athletes are sharing this commitment. For adidas athletes, what they wear on the court is not only performance attire but an expression of their personal style and beliefs.

adidas launches its SS22 Tennis Collection, a high-performance tennis apparel line featuring graphics inspired by Paris’ botanical gardens and green spaces, garments in the collection were made either in part with Parley Ocean Plastic or in part with recycled content.

Launching ahead of the most prominent clay court tournament of the summer, the SS22 Tennis Collection is being premiered on court by adidas next-gen athletes, Elena Rybakina and Felix Auger-Aliassime, alongside Maria Sakkari, Dominic Thiem and Stefanos Tsitsipas who all share a passion for championing sustainability and working together towards a better future for our planet.

From Insight to Action
The SS22 Tennis Collection is another step adidas is taking on its journey to help end plastic waste, and its athletes are sharing this commitment. For adidas athletes, what they wear on the court is not only performance attire but an expression of their personal style and beliefs.

Felix Auger-Aliassime, elite tennis player, commented: "I'm part of a generation of players who care about having an impact on and off the court. When I think about the future, it's not just about my future as a tennis player, but also about the future of the planet. . That's why I wear the new adidas SS22 collection made in part with Parley Ocean Plastic or in part with recycled materials – to send a message that we can all do our part by helping to end plastic waste.“

Fashion-foward Performance
The SS22 Tennis Collection is designed to be bold yet fully functional on court. Each garment features HEAT.RDY technology which is designed to keep players feeling cool, dry and confident as they take on their next challenge.

The Collection features two dresses, tank tops, long sleeve tees and a match skirt for female players. For male players, the collection consists of two tees, a sleeveless tee, a polo tee, a TECHFIT long sleeve top and two different types of shorts.

It is available in a number of different bold graphic prints, all inspired by the Serres d'Auteuil botanical garden. The prominent colors of the collection are black and white.

Source:

adidas AG

(c) adidas AG
09.05.2022

adidas and Parley’s initiative "Run for the Oceans" returns for its fifth year

  • adidas x Parley’s global impact initiative, Run for the Oceans, returns for its fifth year, uniting sporting communities across the planet
  • More activities than ever will be eligible for Run for the Oceans, with the introduction of tennis, wheelchair movement, football and more
  • People across the world can take part by signing-up to the challenge from today and logging activity between May 23 – June 8

As we approach World Oceans Day on June 8, adidas and its longstanding partner Parley for the Oceans are once again encouraging the global sporting community to turn activity into action and Run for the Oceans in 2022.

  • adidas x Parley’s global impact initiative, Run for the Oceans, returns for its fifth year, uniting sporting communities across the planet
  • More activities than ever will be eligible for Run for the Oceans, with the introduction of tennis, wheelchair movement, football and more
  • People across the world can take part by signing-up to the challenge from today and logging activity between May 23 – June 8

As we approach World Oceans Day on June 8, adidas and its longstanding partner Parley for the Oceans are once again encouraging the global sporting community to turn activity into action and Run for the Oceans in 2022.

For the first time, new activities have been introduced to the challenge, making this the most inclusive Run for the Oceans yet. People from all parts of the global sporting community are invited to hit the streets, the tennis court and the football field, and unite to help protect the oceans from plastic waste. For every 10 minutes of running from select activities, such as running, tennis or football*, recorded by participants via the adidas Runtastic app, Joyrun, Codoon, Yeudongquan or Strava, Parley will clean up the equivalent weight of one plastic bottle from beaches, remote islands, and coastlines before it reaches the ocean (up to a maximum of 250,000kg).

Launching between May 23 – June 8, the event returns for its fifth year, with the ambition of mobilising a generation to help end plastic waste. Research shows that the world is at a tipping point, with it predicted that oceans will contain more plastic than fish by 2050.

Since the beginning of the partnership in 2015, adidas has made more than 50 million pairs of shoes with Parley Ocean Plastic and close to 18 million pairs in 2021 alone - this includes plastic waste intercepted from beaches and coastal communities, preventing it from polluting the oceans.

For 2022, adidas x Parley have announced the launch of Adizero X Parley and Ultraboost 22 X Parley . With a carbon footprint of just 3.5kg per pair, the Adizero X Parley is the first time adidas and Parley have combined to launch a lower footprint concept, a milestone for the partnership delivered through innovation and with no compromise on shoe performance.  

From raw material interception, processing, packaging, all the way to the end of product life, adidas calculate and communicate its carbon footprint, conforming to an internationally recognized standard: ISO 14067. The footprint results made available provide full transparency on the complete lifecycle of the product.

Source:

adidas AG

(c) ChemSec, report Not Quite 100%
28.04.2022

ChemSec' Study: Consumer brands demand clarity on recycled plastics

A new interview study from NGO ChemSec shows that there is a gap between supply and demand when it comes to recycled materials, causing confusion and bottlenecks. Among other things, suppliers go out of their way using elaborate trade schemes to reach the coveted ”100% recycled” tag, which – it turns out – is not that important to consumer product brands. Far more crucial aspects, according to several major B2C companies, are:

  • Honest communication towards customers
  • Comprehensive information from suppliers
  • Clear standards for recycled material

These are some of the conclusions from NGO ChemSec’s survey and interview study with 26 highly well-known consumer product brands. All brands responded to a survey concerning their current plastic use, as well as their needs, expectations and challenges regarding using more recycled material, to enable the shift to a circular economy for plastics.

Ten of the brands then participated in in-depth interviews on the same topics:, Essity, H&M, IKEA, Inditex , Lego, Mars,  SC Johnson, Tarkett, Unilever and Walgreens Boots Alliance.

A new interview study from NGO ChemSec shows that there is a gap between supply and demand when it comes to recycled materials, causing confusion and bottlenecks. Among other things, suppliers go out of their way using elaborate trade schemes to reach the coveted ”100% recycled” tag, which – it turns out – is not that important to consumer product brands. Far more crucial aspects, according to several major B2C companies, are:

  • Honest communication towards customers
  • Comprehensive information from suppliers
  • Clear standards for recycled material

These are some of the conclusions from NGO ChemSec’s survey and interview study with 26 highly well-known consumer product brands. All brands responded to a survey concerning their current plastic use, as well as their needs, expectations and challenges regarding using more recycled material, to enable the shift to a circular economy for plastics.

Ten of the brands then participated in in-depth interviews on the same topics:, Essity, H&M, IKEA, Inditex , Lego, Mars,  SC Johnson, Tarkett, Unilever and Walgreens Boots Alliance.

Is non-mechanical recycling the answer?
Only about ten percent of all discarded plastics is recycled today, which is of course not nearly enough to achieve a circular plastics economy. Despite ambitions and initiatives to reduce plastics use – replacing the materials with other, more sustainable ones – the “plastic tap” is not expected to be turned off anytime soon. Quite the opposite, which makes raising the recycling rates more important than ever.

Although commercially viable, traditional (mechanical) recycling is afflicted with severe flaws, such as legacy chemicals, quality and functionality issues, as well as the lack of clean and sorted waste streams. The brands cited quality and functionality issues as the main obstacles for using more recycled material in their products.

This opens up for non-mechanical recycling, sometimes referred to as chemical recycling, where the plastic is either dissolved or broken down into smaller building blocks. Harmful additives and other hazardous chemicals can be removed in the process, and a material comparable to virgin plastic can be achieved – at least in theory.

So far, however, non-mechanical recycling technologies are costly, energy-intensive, and often require the addition of a great deal of virgin plastic to work – the very material that needs to be phased out.

The chain of custody models needs to be detangled
Apart from these production issues, there is a wide range of chain of custody models surrounding non-mechanical recycling, including mass balance and book & claim, which enable trade of credits or certificates for recycled material.

This cuts the physical connection between input and output, making it possible for a supplier to sell a material as “100% recycled”, when the actual recycled content could be zero.

This is a major issue for the brands ChemSec has spoken to, who value honest and correct communication towards customers. It turns out, perhaps somewhat surprisingly, that being able to slap a “made from 100% recycled plastic” label on a product is not all that important to brands.

To the brands, a physical connection between input (the discarded plastic waste headed for recycling) and output (the product at least partially made from recycled plastics) is far more important.

A physical connection, along with correct and adequate information from suppliers, as well as clearer standards and guidelines than what is available today, is what brands require to increase the use of recycled material and move us closer to a circular economy for plastics.

More information:
ChemSec plastics Recycling
Source:

ChemSec

Photo: Erema
07.04.2022

EREMA: New R&D centre for innovative recycling technologies

Construction machinery rolls into action again. The ground-breaking ceremony at the EREMA site in Ansfelden on April, 6 signals the start of work on a new R&D centre. Two halls with a total area of 1,550 square metres and a new office building with 50 workplaces will be built. The R&D centre will offer cross-departmental and cross-company test machines and laboratory for research and development of plastics recycling technologies to further advance the circular economy. Completion is scheduled for February 2023.

Plastics recycling is currently evolving very rapidly from a niche to a trend. This is driven by the legislative targets for plastics recycling that the European Union and many countries around the world have enacted, as well as by the European Green Deal, which aims to make Europe the first climate-neutral continent and in which the circular economy plays a very central role.

Construction machinery rolls into action again. The ground-breaking ceremony at the EREMA site in Ansfelden on April, 6 signals the start of work on a new R&D centre. Two halls with a total area of 1,550 square metres and a new office building with 50 workplaces will be built. The R&D centre will offer cross-departmental and cross-company test machines and laboratory for research and development of plastics recycling technologies to further advance the circular economy. Completion is scheduled for February 2023.

Plastics recycling is currently evolving very rapidly from a niche to a trend. This is driven by the legislative targets for plastics recycling that the European Union and many countries around the world have enacted, as well as by the European Green Deal, which aims to make Europe the first climate-neutral continent and in which the circular economy plays a very central role.

However, there is not just one recycling solution for all types of plastic waste, but rather different solutions depending on the type of plastic, the product and the application intended for the recycled plastic. While some plastics processing loops, such as for PET bottles, have already been closed, many other plastic waste streams still require a great deal of R&D in cooperation with everyone involved in the value chain to produce recycled pellets that meet the very highest standards for the production of new products. More space will be available for this in the new centre.

R&D is decentralised at EREMA. In recent years, approximately 5 percent of turnover was reinvested annually in research and development. Employees from different departments handle process engineering challenges, innovations in mechanical engineering and automation technology, and special technologies with a view to further improving the quality of recycled pellets. They also focus on new recycling technologies for waste plastic materials for which there is currently no satisfactory circular economy solution. The decisive factor here is also to exploit the potential of digitalisation. By collecting and analysing machine data, not only can recycling processes and product quality be further improved, but we can also develop our digital service offering for our customers. Such offerings include customer-specific information tools that feature plant and process data, predictive maintenance and online support as well as commissioning via remote access.

For material tests, which are necessary for research and development work, an expanded machine park will be available following completion of the new R&D centre. Here, the recycling process can be evaluated end-to-end, including upstream and downstream processes such as shredding and further processing of the recycled pellets. The material tests are supported by detailed analysis in the professionally equipped laboratory, which will be relocated to the new premises and upgraded where necessary with the very latest lab equipment.

More information:
EREMA plastics recycling
Source:

EREMA Engineering Recycling Maschinen und Anlagen GmbH

01.04.2022

Carbios presents its 2021 Annual Results

  • 2021 Annual Results: First IFRS consolidated statements integrating the subsidiary Carbiolice
  • Plan to build a first industrial facility with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region: site selected in France in partnership with Indorama Ventures, world leader in the production recycled PET
  • Successful commissioning of a demonstration facility in September 2021 and confirmation of the validity of the scale-up of Carbios’ enzymatic recycling technology
  • Takeover of Carbiolice and full integration in the consolidated IFRS statements since June 4th, 2021
  • Appointment of Philippe Pouletty as Chairman of the Board of Directors on April 1st, 2022
  • Appointment of Emmanuel Ladent as CEO of the Company on December 1st, 2021
  • Strengthening of Carbios’ financial structure: capital increase of €114 million with French and International investors and €30 million loan from the European Investment Bank (EIB)
  • Group’s cash position of €105 million as of December 31, 2021, which does not include the €30 million EIB loan due to be drawn down in the first half of 2022

Carbios, a pi

  • 2021 Annual Results: First IFRS consolidated statements integrating the subsidiary Carbiolice
  • Plan to build a first industrial facility with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region: site selected in France in partnership with Indorama Ventures, world leader in the production recycled PET
  • Successful commissioning of a demonstration facility in September 2021 and confirmation of the validity of the scale-up of Carbios’ enzymatic recycling technology
  • Takeover of Carbiolice and full integration in the consolidated IFRS statements since June 4th, 2021
  • Appointment of Philippe Pouletty as Chairman of the Board of Directors on April 1st, 2022
  • Appointment of Emmanuel Ladent as CEO of the Company on December 1st, 2021
  • Strengthening of Carbios’ financial structure: capital increase of €114 million with French and International investors and €30 million loan from the European Investment Bank (EIB)
  • Group’s cash position of €105 million as of December 31, 2021, which does not include the €30 million EIB loan due to be drawn down in the first half of 2022

Carbios, a pioneer in the development of enzymatic solutions dedicated to the end-of-life of plastic, announced its operating and financial results for the year 2021. The financial statements as of December 31, 2021, were approved by the Company’s Board of Directors at their meeting on March 31, 2022.

“In 2021, Carbios achieved several technical and industrial milestones testifying of the soundness and successful execution of our strategy. The excellent results obtained from our demonstration plant confirms the industrial scale-up potential of our biological technology for the recycling of PET plastics and fibers. Together with our Consortium members, we also produced the world’s first food-grade PET sample bottles produced entirely from enzymatically recycled plastics; a world first. In addition, we have strengthened our financial structure by raising a landmark €114 million in May 2021 and we have taken full control of Carbiolice in June. In line with our objectives and with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region, we will soon enable France to host the world’s first industrial facility dedicated to the biological recycling of plastics. Carbios’ enzymatic process will make it possible to recycle more than 50,000 tons of PET plastic waste per year,” comments Emmanuel Ladent, CEO of Carbios. “Our priority for 2022 is to finalize the terms of our partnership with Indorama Ventures, which will host the world’s first industrial facility operating our biological recycling process at its French production site in Longlaville. This year will also be about optimizing our commercial strategy, while continuing our innovation efforts on the end-of-life of other polymers.”

Click here to for further information.

Source:

Carbios

(c) EREMA Group GmbH
17.03.2022

EREMA: Working together with Recycling Company Anviplas

The Spanish recycling company Anviplas has been involved in plastics recycling for more than 30 years, during which time it has built up extensive know-how that now benefits customers throughout Europe, in Africa and in Asia. Their cooperation with EREMA is almost as long. Since 1991, Anviplas has relied on the technology and service provided by the Austrian recycling machine manufacturer.

The Spanish recycling company Anviplas has been involved in plastics recycling for more than 30 years, during which time it has built up extensive know-how that now benefits customers throughout Europe, in Africa and in Asia. Their cooperation with EREMA is almost as long. Since 1991, Anviplas has relied on the technology and service provided by the Austrian recycling machine manufacturer.

Employing 64 people, Anviplas recycles post-industrial and post-consumer plastic waste, especially HD and LD-PE as well as PP, to make recycled pellets in all colour variations. The production capacity is 1,800 tonnes per month. An EREMA type INTAREMA® 1716 TVEplus® recycling machine with screen changer is in operation at the site in Navarcles (Barcelona) for processing the PP material stream. This patented extruder system was developed for handling difficult-to-process materials, such as heavily printed films as well as very moist waste. This machine is characterised by its optimised 3-stage degassing system; firstly by preheating and predrying the material in the preconditioning unit, secondly because the screw design allows reverse degassing, and thirdly in the degassing zone of the extruder.

Anviplas customers manufacture a huge bandwidth of products made using their recycled pellets. They range from various film products, such as stretch, shrink, mulch and silage films, to irrigation, corrugated and high-pressure pipes, as well as containers such as tubs, bottles, barrels and crates.

In February 2022 the Repeats Group, a pan-European platform for LDPE recycling, and Anviplas announced, that Repeats has made an investment in the Spanish recycling company. For Repeats this investment in Anviplas represents an important step in building a pan-European plastics recycling platform.

More information:
EREMA Recycling plastics Anviplas
Source:

EREMA Group GmbH

(c) adidas
25.02.2022

adidas unveils its first product with Spinnova

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is the first product created in partnership with textile material company, Spinnova
  • Part of the hoodie’s fabric is made from wood-based fibres
  • The adidas TERREX HS1 is a step on adidas’ journey to create nine out of 10 articles with a more sustainable technology, materials, design or manufacturing method by 2025

Eight months after adidas announced its partnership with Finnish textile material company Spinnova, the brand has unveiled its first product made in part with Spinnova fibres.

Composed of a minimum of 25% wood-based fibres and 75% organic cotton, the adidas TERREX HS1 is a mid-layer for hikers that sees adidas exploring a more sustainable textile solution.

adidas is committed to helping end plastic waste via a three-loop strategy that consists of using recycled materials, materials that can be remade into entirely new products, and, in the case of Made with Nature, products created in part with natural ingredients, such as the adidas TERREX HS1. Its outdoor brand, adidas TERREX , is leading the innovation of technical materials with the aim of helping drive better product solutions for adventurers in nature while ensuring there is no compromise on style or performance .

By 2025, nine out of 10 adidas articles will carry a more sustainable technology, material, design, or method of manufacturing and adidas’ partnership with Spinnova is a major part of this journey.

Indorama Ventures launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report celebrating a decade of PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones (c) Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited
10th annual Sustainability Report
27.10.2021

Indorama Ventures launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report

  • IVL is celebrating a decade of PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones
  • Over 10 years, IVL has achieved a 100x increase in recycled PET

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a world-class sustainable chemical company, launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report and a video celebrating a decade of ambitious PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones. The company is committed to intensifying its drive towards ending plastic waste and a more circular economy in the decade ahead.

Since its first Sustainability Report in 2011, IVL has grown its sustainability initiatives through the 3Ps – People, Planet and Prosperity. From the baseline in 2013, the company achieved a 10% reduction in GHG intensity, 4% in energy intensity and 7% in water intensity. It also increased total waste diverted from landfill from 48% to 84% in 2020. Moreover, IVL’s global PET recycling capacity has improved almost 100 times from 3,576 tons per year in 2011 – the first entry of IVL to the PET recycling business – to more than 330,000 tons per year in the second quarter of 2021.

  • IVL is celebrating a decade of PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones
  • Over 10 years, IVL has achieved a 100x increase in recycled PET

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a world-class sustainable chemical company, launches its 10th annual Sustainability Report and a video celebrating a decade of ambitious PET recycling and carbon reduction milestones. The company is committed to intensifying its drive towards ending plastic waste and a more circular economy in the decade ahead.

Since its first Sustainability Report in 2011, IVL has grown its sustainability initiatives through the 3Ps – People, Planet and Prosperity. From the baseline in 2013, the company achieved a 10% reduction in GHG intensity, 4% in energy intensity and 7% in water intensity. It also increased total waste diverted from landfill from 48% to 84% in 2020. Moreover, IVL’s global PET recycling capacity has improved almost 100 times from 3,576 tons per year in 2011 – the first entry of IVL to the PET recycling business – to more than 330,000 tons per year in the second quarter of 2021.

Celebrating 10 years of sustainability reporting
Throughout the decade, IVL has voluntarily adopted international standards for its sustainability reports to drive benefits for the environment, society and economy. The effort resulted in recognition by world-class sustainability ratings agencies such as the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI) and the Morgan Stanley Capital International (MSCI).

Recent Sustainability Reports have featured business cases and special situations such as COVID-19. In 2016, IVL was the first Thailand-based company to introduce an additional, shorter version of the report called the Sustainability Report Executive Summary. This year, IVL has made further improvements with an interactive approach, including links to videos and shortcuts to highlighted articles. As a global company operating in 33 countries, the report is available in 15 languages.

On track to recycle 50 billion bottles per year by 2025
In 2020 IVL recycled 10.1 billion PET bottles and is on track to recycle 50 billion bottles per year by 2025. The company’s global reach and leadership position as the world’s largest PET and recycled PET resin producer allow IVL to leverage a closed-loop system. In 2020 IVL invested in three additional recycling facilities and recently acquired CarbonLite’s recycling assets in Texas.

World-renowned marine research institute confirms biodegradability of LENZING™ fibers (c) New York Times/Alexander C. Welsh
Scripps Research Institute
27.10.2021

World-renowned marine research institute confirms biodegradability of LENZING™ fibers

  • Results of experiments conducted by the University of California’s prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego provide further scientific proof that LENZING™ fibers offer an effective substitute to synthetic fibers that are part of the pressing problem of plastic pollution in our oceans.

Lenzing/San Diego – The Lenzing Group, a world-leading provider of wood-based specialty fibers, has received further scientific proof of the biodegradability of its fibers. In a study published in October 2021 , scientists from the prestigious academic research institute Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at the University of California, San Diego confirmed that wood-based cellulosic fibers biodegrade in the ocean within a short period of time at the end of their life cycle, making them a better alternative to fossil-based fibers. The research was the result of an independent project trying to understand the “end-of-life” scenarios for textiles and nonwovens discarded in the environment.

  • Results of experiments conducted by the University of California’s prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego provide further scientific proof that LENZING™ fibers offer an effective substitute to synthetic fibers that are part of the pressing problem of plastic pollution in our oceans.

Lenzing/San Diego – The Lenzing Group, a world-leading provider of wood-based specialty fibers, has received further scientific proof of the biodegradability of its fibers. In a study published in October 2021 , scientists from the prestigious academic research institute Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at the University of California, San Diego confirmed that wood-based cellulosic fibers biodegrade in the ocean within a short period of time at the end of their life cycle, making them a better alternative to fossil-based fibers. The research was the result of an independent project trying to understand the “end-of-life” scenarios for textiles and nonwovens discarded in the environment.

SIO has a global reputation for being one of the oldest, largest and most important marine research centers worldwide. In this study, SIO compared the degradation processes of nonwovens made from fossil-based synthetic materials such as polyester with those of cellulosic materials such as Lenzing’s wood-based lyocell, modal and viscose fibers in specific scenarios – under various real oceanic conditions and controlled aquaria conditions. The results of these experiments are striking: while wood-based cellulosic fibers fully biodegraded within 30 days, the fossil-based fibers tested were practically unchanged after more than 200 days.

The biodegradability of LENZING™ fibers was also tested in the laboratory of Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in Belgium – one of the world's leading companies in biodegradability and compostability testing – which showed data confirmed by those found with the real-life measurements at Scripps. The OWS assessment was conducted in accordance with applicable international standards and reflects relevant natural and artificial conditions in which biodegradation can occur. Certificates from the certification organization TÜV Austria show that LENZING™ fibers rapidly biodegrade in all test environments (soil, industrial composting, home composting, fresh water and marine water) within the time frames set by the applicable standards.

Lenzing also welcomes the EU’s targeted measures to combat plastic waste in general, such as those relating to the single-use plastic directive (EU) 2019/9043. In its recently adopted guidelines for implementing the directive, the EU Commission stipulates the specific products that fall under this category, which is a well-needed effort to provide clarity to the EU member states for their joint campaign against environmental pollution from plastic waste. Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable cellulosic fibers can be part of a sustainable and innovative solution to this man-made problem that will continue to grow. As of July 2021, the single-use plastic directive sets out standardized labelling requirements for certain products, either on packaging or on the products themselves, which include plastic-based feminine hygiene products and wet wipes for body care or household use. This is a start to tackle the problem: educate the consumer and offer alternative materials with better circularity.

(c) adidas AG
Free Hiker Made To Be Remade FW21
21.10.2021

adidas: Journey to Circularity with FW 2021 Collection

2050 is the year when adidas plans to achieve climate neutrality. It’s also the year when it’s expected that our oceans will contain more plastic than fish, that is, if we don’t act now. Adidas' solution to help end plastic waste and achieve climate neutrality? Sustainable innovation.

Last year adidas announced the Three Loop Strategy – their roadmap to help end plastic waste. At the heart of this is Circular Loop – Made To Be Remade.

The concept behind Made To Be Remade (MTBR) is simple: when one piece of plastic has fulfilled its purpose, it must be remade to fulfil another. Their attitude is that the end of one thing equates to the beginning of the next, and that their products’ lives can be extended by remaking them into new products.

Adidas' Circular Loop creation process has come a long way since they introduced FUTURECRAFT.LOOP – their first running shoe made to be remade – in 2019. From what started as a beta program of just 200 pairs has developed into a concept within the business that spans across multiple categories and in April this year saw the first commercial launch – Ultraboost Made To Be Remade.

2050 is the year when adidas plans to achieve climate neutrality. It’s also the year when it’s expected that our oceans will contain more plastic than fish, that is, if we don’t act now. Adidas' solution to help end plastic waste and achieve climate neutrality? Sustainable innovation.

Last year adidas announced the Three Loop Strategy – their roadmap to help end plastic waste. At the heart of this is Circular Loop – Made To Be Remade.

The concept behind Made To Be Remade (MTBR) is simple: when one piece of plastic has fulfilled its purpose, it must be remade to fulfil another. Their attitude is that the end of one thing equates to the beginning of the next, and that their products’ lives can be extended by remaking them into new products.

Adidas' Circular Loop creation process has come a long way since they introduced FUTURECRAFT.LOOP – their first running shoe made to be remade – in 2019. From what started as a beta program of just 200 pairs has developed into a concept within the business that spans across multiple categories and in April this year saw the first commercial launch – Ultraboost Made To Be Remade.

Ultraboost Made To Be Remade will see the next generation released in November this year (2021). The shoe will be created in part from the previous generation. Featuring a torsion bar that contains 25% reused content from the Futurecraft Loop Gen 2.

W21 will see another adidas icon join the MTBR family - Stan Smith Made To Be Remade. Just like the Ultraboost model, Stan Smith MTBR has been created entirely from TPU – from laces to midsole and everything in between.

Adidas’s best-loved Outdoor products are also receiving the MTBR treatment. Alongside Stan Smith MTBR, October will welcome the TERREX Free Hiker Made To Be Remade, featuring a TPU knitted upper and TPU outsole, making it the first TERREX hiking shoe to use the technology. The shoe will be accompanied by the launch of the TERREX Made To Be Remade Anorak – their second-generation prototype following on from the FW20 FUTURECRAFT.LOOP Anorak, which will be commercially available in 2022.

Source:

adidas AG

18.10.2021

SABIC presents new Portfolio for Nonwovens at INDEX

SABIC has announced that the newly formed Hygiene & Healthcare segment of its Petrochemicals business will showcase its extensive portfolio of SABIC PURECARES™ polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) polymers for high-purity nonwovens and hygiene films at the upcoming INDEX™ Expo in Geneva, Switzerland, from October 19 through 22, 2021. The company will also present enabling solutions developed with partners to address the issue of plastic waste and support the transformation of the industry towards a circular economy with closed-loop initiatives and certified circular polymers under its TRUCIRCLE™ portfolio and services.

SABIC has announced that the newly formed Hygiene & Healthcare segment of its Petrochemicals business will showcase its extensive portfolio of SABIC PURECARES™ polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) polymers for high-purity nonwovens and hygiene films at the upcoming INDEX™ Expo in Geneva, Switzerland, from October 19 through 22, 2021. The company will also present enabling solutions developed with partners to address the issue of plastic waste and support the transformation of the industry towards a circular economy with closed-loop initiatives and certified circular polymers under its TRUCIRCLE™ portfolio and services.

During INDEX, SABIC will exhibit a wide range of PP polymers targeted at these needs. Highlights on display will include dedicated PP and PE grades for lightweight nonwoven fabrics using the latest spunbond and meltblown processes, and a new ultra-high melt flow PP product engineered for meltblown fibers in nonwoven fabrics. The nonwoven focus will be complemented by industry proven polyolefins for cast and blown film applications in hygiene webs and laminates, providing desirable back and top sheet properties such as water tightness, breathability and elasticity.

In addition, SABIC will also present ISCC Plus certified fiber and film polymers based on circular and renewable PP and PE polymer technology as part of the company’s TRUCIRCLE portfolio for advancing the transformation of the plastics industry from a linear to a truly circular economy. Examples of this comprehensive initiative include collaborations with various market leaders in the field. Together with Fibertex Personal Care, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of spunbond nonwovens for the hygiene industry, SABIC is creating a range of high-purity nonwovens for the hygiene market using ISCC PLUS certified circular PP polymer derived from post-consumer plastic waste. In another project, Fraunhofer Institute, SABIC and Procter & Gamble (P&G) joined forces to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of an advanced close-loop recycling process for used nonwoven facemasks.

Source:

SABIC / Marketing Solutions NV

31.08.2021

DSM and SABIC: Creating recycled-based Dyneema®

Royal DSM, a global science-based company in Nutrition, Health and Sustainable Living, and SABIC, a global leader in the chemical industry, announced a collaboration to create recycled-based Dyneema®. Through a joint pilot with multiple CirculariTeam® members, the manufacturing and usage of Dyneema® using mixed plastic waste as feedstock (via mass balance approach) will be successfully demonstrated. It is an important step toward the future goal of fully closing the loop by delivering Dyneema® made from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMwPE) waste. This collaboration underlines DSM’s and SABIC’s efforts to accelerate a circular economy for materials.

Royal DSM, a global science-based company in Nutrition, Health and Sustainable Living, and SABIC, a global leader in the chemical industry, announced a collaboration to create recycled-based Dyneema®. Through a joint pilot with multiple CirculariTeam® members, the manufacturing and usage of Dyneema® using mixed plastic waste as feedstock (via mass balance approach) will be successfully demonstrated. It is an important step toward the future goal of fully closing the loop by delivering Dyneema® made from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMwPE) waste. This collaboration underlines DSM’s and SABIC’s efforts to accelerate a circular economy for materials.

By working together with members of CirculariTeam®, DSM will produce recycled-based Dyneema® made using SABIC’s certified circular ethylene as a pilot project in both a sailing rope and a pelagic trawl net application. The circular ethylene, from SABIC’s TRUCIRCLE™ portfolio, uses mixed plastic waste as feedstock (mass balance approach), which not only contributes to preventing valuable plastic from becoming waste and the avoidance of carbon emissions compared to incineration, but it will also help preserve fossil resources. These pilots are an important early-stage milestone in the journey toward making fully circular Dyneema® from HMPE post-production and post-consumer waste.

Jon Mitchell, Managing Director at Marlow Ropes: “We’re proud to be one of the first manufacturers to integrate recycled-based Dyneema® within our products and demonstrate the material’s feasibility. By collaborating with materials science pioneers such as DSM and SABIC, we are able to create products that not only deliver superlative functional performance but also have a lower environmental impact. Our products are trialed and tested by professional offshore sailing teams including 11th Hour Racing Team, a proud partner of ours at Marlow, with whom we share a progressive approach to seeking sustainable solutions: no more business as usual."

Klaus Walther, Managing Director at Gleistein: “Warm congratulations to DSM and SABIC for pushing the boundaries of science to deliver a truly unique product. We’re proud that our ropes can be produced from what once was typical household plastic waste. This is an important stepping stone towards becoming circular. It will enable our customer Maritiem BV to further develop high-tech fishing gear whilst contributing to the circular economy. Not to forget Cornelis Vrolijk Fishing Company, who again illustrate their commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility by introducing this concept in fishery.”

More information:
DSM Dyneema SABIC plastic waste
Source:

EMG for DSM

Graphical material: Borealis
26.08.2021

Drinking cups using chemically recycled polypropylene

Swiss dairy company Emmi is partnering with Borealis and Greiner Packaging to produce iced coffed drinking cups using chemically recycled polypropylene.

The cups are produced by Greiner Packaging and the chemically recycled material comes from Borealis, one of the world’s leading providers of advanced and circular polyolefin solutions based in Vienna, Austria.

Emmi, Switzerland’s largest milk processor is committed to climate protection and the circular economy. The dairy company has the stated goal to make all of its packaging 100% recyclable and is committed to various measures to promote circularity such as packaging that contains at least 30% recyclate by 2027.

Swiss dairy company Emmi is partnering with Borealis and Greiner Packaging to produce iced coffed drinking cups using chemically recycled polypropylene.

The cups are produced by Greiner Packaging and the chemically recycled material comes from Borealis, one of the world’s leading providers of advanced and circular polyolefin solutions based in Vienna, Austria.

Emmi, Switzerland’s largest milk processor is committed to climate protection and the circular economy. The dairy company has the stated goal to make all of its packaging 100% recyclable and is committed to various measures to promote circularity such as packaging that contains at least 30% recyclate by 2027.

From September 2021 Emmi will use at least 100 tonnes of plastic based on the recycled material each year. Chemical recycling renews plastic back to plastic creating recycled materials with a level of purity equivalent to fossil-fuel based PP and hence, fit for protective, food-safe and other demanding applications. In this way, Emmi is utilizing difficult to recycle feedstock preventing plastic waste that would be likely landfilled or incinerated. In the future, depending on the availability of suitable material, the amount of recycled plastic in packaging is to be further increased.

The new technology to recover the polypropylene is currently still in its infancy, where Greiner Packaging and Borealis are leading the way. Only limited quantities of chemically recycled polypropylene are currently available, and Emmi is one of only a few food manufacturers to have secured a share of the chemically recycled polypropylene plastic through its early commitment and long-standing collaboration with the development companies.

The chemically recycled material used for the cups consists entirely and solely of ISCC (International Sustainability & Carbon Certification) material, on a mass balance basis. Mass balance is a methodology that makes it possible to track the amount and sustainability characteristics of circular and/or bio-based content in the value chain and through each step of the process. This provides transparency ultimately also to the consumers, enabling them to know that the product they are buying is based on this renewable material.

More information:
Polypropylen Borealis
Source:

Borealis

Borealis: Innovative Recycling Solutions with Renasci N.V. (c) Renasci
01.07.2021

Borealis: Innovative Recycling Solutions with Renasci N.V.

  • Borealis deepens partnership with innovative recycling solutions provider Renasci N.V., acquiring a 10% minority stake in the Belgium-based creator of the Smart Chain Processing (SCP) concept
  • Deal supports Borealis integrated approach to achieve a true circular economy of plastics in the most eco-efficient way, as defined by its circular cascade model
  • EverMinds™ in action: Game-changing collaboration to accelerate plastics circularity

Borealis announces that it has entered into a multi-dimensional partnership with Renasci N.V., a provider of innovative recycling solutions and creator of the novel Smart Chain Processing (SCP) concept. The partnership is another key enabler for Borealis to realise its ambitions to bring circular base chemicals and polyolefins to market, and to deliver on its promise to bring 350 kilotons of recycled polyolefins into circulation by 2025.

  • Borealis deepens partnership with innovative recycling solutions provider Renasci N.V., acquiring a 10% minority stake in the Belgium-based creator of the Smart Chain Processing (SCP) concept
  • Deal supports Borealis integrated approach to achieve a true circular economy of plastics in the most eco-efficient way, as defined by its circular cascade model
  • EverMinds™ in action: Game-changing collaboration to accelerate plastics circularity

Borealis announces that it has entered into a multi-dimensional partnership with Renasci N.V., a provider of innovative recycling solutions and creator of the novel Smart Chain Processing (SCP) concept. The partnership is another key enabler for Borealis to realise its ambitions to bring circular base chemicals and polyolefins to market, and to deliver on its promise to bring 350 kilotons of recycled polyolefins into circulation by 2025.

SCP concept leaves no waste behind
The SCP concept developed by Renasci is a proprietary method of maximising material recovery in order to achieve zero waste. It is unique because it enables the processing of multiple waste streams using different recycling technologies – all under one roof. At the newly-built Renasci SCP facility in Oostende, Belgium, mixed waste – plastics, metals, and biomass – is automatically selected and sorted multiple times.

After sorting, plastic waste is first mechanically recycled, and then in a second step any remaining material is chemically recycled into circular pyrolysis oil and lighter product fractions, which are used to fuel the process.

Other types of sorted waste such as metals and organic refuse are further processed using other technologies. In the end, only 5% of the original waste remains, and even this residual material is not landfilled, but used as filler in construction materials. Because of this extremely efficient way of processing, the overall CO2 footprint of these waste streams is greatly reduced – yet another advantage of the circular SCP concept.

The cascade model is Borealis’ integrated circular approach
Borealis circular cascade model sits at the heart of its ambition to achieve a truly circular economy, by combining carefully chosen technologies in a complementary and cascading way to achieve full circularity. In this way, Borealis aims to give plastic products multiple lifetimes in the most sustainable way possible. Starting with optimising product design, first for eco-efficiency, then for re-use and finally for recycling. Once a product has reached its end of life, we must close the plastics loop: first with mechanical recycling to make products with the highest possible value, quality and lowest carbon footprint; then utilising chemical recycling, as a complement to mechanical recycling, to further valorise residual streams which would otherwise go to incineration, or even worse to landfills. The valorised material from mechanical and chemical recycling is then processed with Borealis Borcycle™ recycling technology consisting of Borcycle M for mechanical recycling and Borcycle C for chemical recycling, providing high quality solutions for more sophisticated applications, such as food packaging and healthcare.

The SCP concept is aligned to Borealis’ ambition to close the loop on plastic waste as encapsulated in its circular cascade model.

Source:

Borealis

Lenzing supports school competition on circular economy and climate protection (c) Lenzing
VCÖ BRG SolarCity Linz Gruppenfoto
22.06.2021

Lenzing supports school competition on circular economy and climate protection

  • Excellent project to encourage ingenuity among young students
  • Experiment on biodegradability of textiles and nonwovens produces impressive results
  • EUR 30,000 in prize money for a total of 209 participating schools in and outside Austria
  • Lenzing views supporting these kinds of projects as part of its sustainability mission

Lenzing – The Association of Chemistry Teachers in Austria – known by its German abbreviation, VCÖ – has been holding project competitions that thrill students and take them beyond the traditional syllabus for 30 years. Every two years, it highlights a key topic for ninth- and tenth-graders to explore by conducting special experiments and learning from their observations and conclusions.

  • Excellent project to encourage ingenuity among young students
  • Experiment on biodegradability of textiles and nonwovens produces impressive results
  • EUR 30,000 in prize money for a total of 209 participating schools in and outside Austria
  • Lenzing views supporting these kinds of projects as part of its sustainability mission

Lenzing – The Association of Chemistry Teachers in Austria – known by its German abbreviation, VCÖ – has been holding project competitions that thrill students and take them beyond the traditional syllabus for 30 years. Every two years, it highlights a key topic for ninth- and tenth-graders to explore by conducting special experiments and learning from their observations and conclusions.

This year, the 16th installment of the competition is called, “Achieving a cleaner climate and a circular economy with chemistry”. These topics are also near and dear to the heart of globally active fiber manufacturer Lenzing. That’s why the company promptly announced that it was prepared to support this project competition in several different ways. First, Lenzing made a contribution toward the sponsorship fund totaling EUR 30,000. Second, it initiated a special prize on biodegradability – a topic of growing importance given the huge challenges involved in reducing plastic waste. Finally, Lenzing placed a recognized expert at the students’ disposal to provide assistance and answer questions: Michaela Kogler, Project Manager Nonwovens & Technical Products.

Teaming up with rainworms

Two teams were tasked with biodegrading different fibers – just like those used to produce textiles and nonwovens – with the active participation of worms. Students at BRG solarCity in Linz buried fiber nonwovens, a basic material used in wet wipes and other products, in soil that was populated with numerous rainworms, while students at Vöcklabruck Junior High School for Sports and Integration layered textiles into a vermicomposting bin. Both experiments intended to determine the extent to which certain materials would biodegrade quickly. As it turned out, both projects showed that wood-based fibers, like those that Lenzing manufactures for the textile and nonwoven industry, break down very rapidly into natural constituents that swiftly pass into the soil. In contrast, fossil-based plastics such as polyester or polyethylene cannot be decomposed by worms or bacteria but remain in the soil, sometimes for hundreds of years.

The prizes for this year’s competition were awarded on June 11. The competition attracted entries from no fewer than 209 schools, including 11 from outside Austria. For more information on the projects and the winners, visit www.vcoe.or.at.

Lenzing: Clear positioning of the EU Commission against plastic waste Photo: pixabay
08.06.2021

Lenzing: Clear positioning of the EU Commission against plastic waste

  • Guidelines of the EU Commission to implement the Single-Use Plastics Directive have been published
  • Uniform labelling obligation for wipes and feminine hygiene products containing plastics as of July 03, 2021
  • Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable VEOCEL™ branded fibers as a sustainable alternative to plastic

The Lenzing Group welcomes the issuance of the guidelines for the implementation of the Single-Use Plastics Directive (EU) 2019/904, which took effect on June 05, 20191. In these guidelines, the EU Commission specifies which products fall within the scope of the directive, thus providing clarity in the joint fight of the EU member states against environmental pollution from plastic waste. Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable cellulosic fibers such as those of the VEOCEL™ brand comprise a sustainable and innovative solution to this man-made problem.

  • Guidelines of the EU Commission to implement the Single-Use Plastics Directive have been published
  • Uniform labelling obligation for wipes and feminine hygiene products containing plastics as of July 03, 2021
  • Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable VEOCEL™ branded fibers as a sustainable alternative to plastic

The Lenzing Group welcomes the issuance of the guidelines for the implementation of the Single-Use Plastics Directive (EU) 2019/904, which took effect on June 05, 20191. In these guidelines, the EU Commission specifies which products fall within the scope of the directive, thus providing clarity in the joint fight of the EU member states against environmental pollution from plastic waste. Lenzing’s wood-based, biodegradable cellulosic fibers such as those of the VEOCEL™ brand comprise a sustainable and innovative solution to this man-made problem.

Uniform labelling rules for some single-use plastic products
The Commission implementing regulation (EU) 2020/2151 applying to the Single-Use Plastics Directive stipulate uniform labelling requirements for some of the single-use plastic products on the packaging or the product itself starting on July 03, 2021. They encompass feminine hygiene products and wet wipes for personal and household care containing plastic.

Consumers want sustainable hygiene products
Even before the implementation of the Single-Use Plastics Directive, Lenzing already gives consumers clear guidance in their purchasing decisions. Products bearing the VEOCEL™ brand logo on their packaging are produced in line with stringent certification criteria. As a consequence, consumers can be assured that the products contain biodegradable, cellulosic materials.

A Marketagent survey carried out in German-speaking Europe in October 20192 concluded that nine out of ten consumers would immediately change their purchasing behavior for wipes if they found out that their current product contains plastic. This would seem to imply that new market dynamics will emerge once the labelling rules for single-use plastic products takes effect. According to a Smithers Report3, about 500,000 tons of petroleum-based fibers are used each year for the production of wipes.

 

1 Directive (EU) 2019/904 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 June 2019 on the reduction of the impact of certain plastic products on the environment
2 Representative Marketagent Online survey, n = 1,005 (14 - 69 years old, from Austria and Germany). https://itsinourhands.com/
3 Smithers Report “The Future of Global Nonwoven Wipes to 2023”, published in 2018, page 23, reference year 2018

Source:

Lenzing AG

Photo: Oerlikon
28.01.2021

Oerlikon Barmag Huitong Engineering commissions first PBS system

A polybutylene succinate (PBS) polycondensation system was commissioned at Yingkou Kanghui Petrochemical Co. Ltd. in Dalian in the Chinese Liaoning Province at the beginning of January 2021. The PBS system, for which Oerlikon Barmag Huitong Engineering supplied both equipment and engineering, has a daily production capacity of 100 tons

It is used to manufacture high-viscosity chips for biodegradable films. Consequently, Yingkou Kanghui, a subsidiary of the Hengli Group, is catering to rising demand for biodegradable polymer products – demand that is increasing not just in China, but across the globe. Yingkou Kanghui Petrochemical Co., Ltd., founded in 2011, predominantly produces polyester chips and films. By expanding its portfolio to include the manufacture of PBS products, the enterprise is positioning itself as a pioneer of biopolymer production: In view of the large quantities of plastic waste not just in the oceans, biopolymers are considered the materials of the future.

A polybutylene succinate (PBS) polycondensation system was commissioned at Yingkou Kanghui Petrochemical Co. Ltd. in Dalian in the Chinese Liaoning Province at the beginning of January 2021. The PBS system, for which Oerlikon Barmag Huitong Engineering supplied both equipment and engineering, has a daily production capacity of 100 tons

It is used to manufacture high-viscosity chips for biodegradable films. Consequently, Yingkou Kanghui, a subsidiary of the Hengli Group, is catering to rising demand for biodegradable polymer products – demand that is increasing not just in China, but across the globe. Yingkou Kanghui Petrochemical Co., Ltd., founded in 2011, predominantly produces polyester chips and films. By expanding its portfolio to include the manufacture of PBS products, the enterprise is positioning itself as a pioneer of biopolymer production: In view of the large quantities of plastic waste not just in the oceans, biopolymers are considered the materials of the future.

The new plant at Yingkou Kanghui Petrochemical Co, Ltd. was production-ready with the support of Oerlikon Barmag Huitong Engineering within less than 14 months following contract signing.

Source:

Oerlikon

Borealis und TOMRA eröffnen Pilotanalage für Kunststoff-Rezyklat (c) Borealis/TOMRA
14.01.2021

Borealis and TOMRA open plant for post-consumer plastic waste sorting and mechanical recycling

  • Demo plant sorts post-consumer plastic waste and will produce ready-for-market fully formulated polymer pellets
  • Brand owners and converters will be able to access material for qualification and market validation in early 2021
  • EverMinds™ in action: Pioneering collaboration brings together expertise vital to advancing the circular economy

Borealis and TOMRA have today announced the operational start of their advanced mechanical recycling demo plant in Lahnstein, Germany, the result of a partnership that marries chemistry with technology for unsurpassed results.

The state-of-the-art plant processes both rigid and flexible plastic waste from households. And unlike many current recycling plants, it will produce the advanced solutions necessary for use in high-demanding plastic applications in various industries, including automotive and consumer products. With high purity, low odour, high product consistency and light colour fractions, these Borcycle™ M grade recycled polymers will meet customer quality requirements across the value chain.

  • Demo plant sorts post-consumer plastic waste and will produce ready-for-market fully formulated polymer pellets
  • Brand owners and converters will be able to access material for qualification and market validation in early 2021
  • EverMinds™ in action: Pioneering collaboration brings together expertise vital to advancing the circular economy

Borealis and TOMRA have today announced the operational start of their advanced mechanical recycling demo plant in Lahnstein, Germany, the result of a partnership that marries chemistry with technology for unsurpassed results.

The state-of-the-art plant processes both rigid and flexible plastic waste from households. And unlike many current recycling plants, it will produce the advanced solutions necessary for use in high-demanding plastic applications in various industries, including automotive and consumer products. With high purity, low odour, high product consistency and light colour fractions, these Borcycle™ M grade recycled polymers will meet customer quality requirements across the value chain.

The purpose of this demo plant is to generate material for brand owners and converters to qualify, validate and prove fit for use in their highly demanding applications. Technical success will set the groundwork for a commercial-scale advanced recycling plant.

“This plant is just the beginning of what’s possible when key players in the value chain come together to make a truly significant impact in the market,” says Volker Rehrmann, Executive Vice President and Head of Circular Economy at TOMRA. “Having just launched the new Circular Economy Division, it is clear what a large role waste management and pivotal projects like this have on moving towards a sustainable future. We are proud to have initiated one of the most advanced mechanical recycling plants when it comes to post-consumer polymer waste. This will become an important enabler as we accelerate the transformation to a circular economy in the years to come, and we are excited to be a part of this pioneering project.”

Operation of the plant is a joint enterprise between Borealis, TOMRA and Zimmerman. Borealis is responsible for the plant’s commercial success and contributes its expertise and knowledge in innovation, recycling and compounding. Likewise, TOMRA contributes as a provider of technology-led solutions and brings its proven expertise, established process and market knowledge, which, in turn, enable the circular economy through advanced collection and sorting systems. Zimmerman is a waste management company with experience in sorting multiple types of waste, including plastics, and is responsible for successful plant operations and product quality.

“At P&G we are making packaging with the ‘next life’ in mind to help drive a more robust circular economy.  We must increase the supply of high quality recycled plastic to enable the industry to deliver on this vision,” says Gian De Belder, Procter & Gamble (P&G) Technical Director, R&D Packaging Sustainability. “The innovative new approach that Borealis is taking shows potential to step-change both the quantity and quality of PCR available for our brands, and help us to achieve our 2030 goal to reduce our use of virgin plastic in packaging by 50%, or 300 kilotonnes annually. Early tests of the material looks very promising!”

Source:

ikp

Kelheim Fibres nominated for the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2021” award © Kelheim Fibres Gmb- Stefanie Müller
2020 FemHyPad
15.12.2020

Kelheim Fibres nominated for the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2021” award

Kelheim Fibres has been named as one of the finalists for the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2021” innovation award to be presented at the 2nd International Conference on Cellulose Fibres. With their plant-based and biodegradable fibres, the Bavarian viscose speciality fibres manufacturer presents a significant contribution to a plastic-free future for AHP (absorbent hygiene products). In contrast to other natural fibres, which are already available in fibre form and can only be treated on the surface, Kelheim’s technological flexibility offers the possibility to modify cross-sections and to introduce additives into the fibre matrix for intrinsic functionalisation. Through these modifications, Kelheim tailors its fibres specifically to the requirements of the individual nonwoven layers of the AHP and is able to achieve comparable performance values to synthetic fibres. 

Kelheim Fibres has been named as one of the finalists for the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year 2021” innovation award to be presented at the 2nd International Conference on Cellulose Fibres. With their plant-based and biodegradable fibres, the Bavarian viscose speciality fibres manufacturer presents a significant contribution to a plastic-free future for AHP (absorbent hygiene products). In contrast to other natural fibres, which are already available in fibre form and can only be treated on the surface, Kelheim’s technological flexibility offers the possibility to modify cross-sections and to introduce additives into the fibre matrix for intrinsic functionalisation. Through these modifications, Kelheim tailors its fibres specifically to the requirements of the individual nonwoven layers of the AHP and is able to achieve comparable performance values to synthetic fibres. 

In addition to this, the speciality fibres from Kelheim offer a very attractive ratio of cost to performance in comparison with other fibres of natural origin such as organic cotton. They are therefore not only able to enhance the performance of the final products more effectively than other bio-based alternatives, but are, at the same time, financially attractive. "Consumers of absorbent hygiene products are often faced with a choice between sustainable solutions made from fibres of natural origin and products with better performance and good fluid management properties produced using synthetic fibres,“ says Dominik Mayer, from Kelheim’s R&D team. „Our goal is to offer products to the consumer which combine both sustainability and performance. Our sustainable and functional fibre technologies now make this possible.“

The project is a good illustration of the central element of Kelheim Fibres‘ innovation philosophy: the identification of unsolved problems in the market and the development of solutions in close cooperation with experts along the value chain using open innovation techniques. Fibres from Kelheim also offer a significant contribution to overcoming one of the biggest global challenges of our time, by reducing the amount of plastic waste in the environment. Step by step, or in this case layer by layer – Kelheim Fibres is moving towards a vision of a plastic-free future.

Kelheim’s developments include the hydrophobized Olea fibre (for fast acquisition and efficient transfer of liquid and for better rewet values in the topsheet) as well as the Galaxy® fibre (for an efficient and optimised distribution of liquids in the Acquisition Distribution Layer (ADL) via capillary channels) and the Bramante fibre (which can store up to 260% of its own weight of liquids in chambers inside the fibre). Kelheim’s fibres can also be processed in the textile sector, to enable solutions in the field of reusable hygiene products such as menstrual underwear. All these fibres are already commercially available. Kelheim Fibres is cooperating with an innovative AHP manufacturer and an innovative nonwoven supplier to incorporate the fibres into new end products.

More information:
Kelheim Fibres cellulose fiber
Source:

Kelheim Fibres