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Advances in automation from Svegea at Texprocess 2022 (c) Svegea
With Svegea bias cutters, circular woven technical fabrics are fed via a revolving winder and slit at angles.
18.05.2022

Advances in automation from Svegea at Texprocess 2022

  • Svegea, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machine association, is marking a company milestone this year at Texprocess in Frankfurt from June 21-24  – the 70th anniversary of its automatic collarette cutter.

 On its introduction back in 1952, this machine – used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements – caused a sensation with its then-unprecedented output of 300 metres per hour.

Time doesn’t stand still, however, and the latest EC 300 machine Svegea will demonstrate at Texprocess 2022 has a slightly improved output – of around 20,000 metres per hour.

  • Svegea, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machine association, is marking a company milestone this year at Texprocess in Frankfurt from June 21-24  – the 70th anniversary of its automatic collarette cutter.

 On its introduction back in 1952, this machine – used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements – caused a sensation with its then-unprecedented output of 300 metres per hour.

Time doesn’t stand still, however, and the latest EC 300 machine Svegea will demonstrate at Texprocess 2022 has a slightly improved output – of around 20,000 metres per hour.

“Advances in automation are only making the specialised, bespoke machines we engineer even more efficient and we are expecting a very busy show in Frankfurt and a busy year,” says Svegea Managing Director Håkan Steene. “The garment components our collarette cutters produce make it logical for them to be integrated into the operations of making-up operations wherever they are, and at the moment we’re seeing a lot of interest in the reshoring of operations by our customers, to bring final-stage manufacturing closer to the key European and US markets.”

E-Drive 2
The EC 300 collarette cutter on show in Frankfurt is equipped with the latest E-Drive 2 system providing the operator with a very user-friendly touchscreen, providing full control of the cutting process.

The integrated, fully automatic FA500 roll slitter accommodates diameters up to 400mm and is equipped with three separately adjustable settings enabling three different band widths to be cut within the same cutting cycle. Automatic tube sewing units are provided for sewn tubes in optional rolled or flat folded forms, depending on customer preference.

Niche applications
Svegea supplies many other bespoke machines for applications in the production of both garment components and technical textiles, including rewinding, measuring, inspection and band knife machines.

The ability to produce tubular fabric which is cut on the bias allows customers to provide textiles which not only have improved drape and elasticity properties for complex and intricate shapes, but also offer ways to reduce production costs by eliminating unnecessary wastage from the manufacturing process. Pre-cutting the fabric to a specific bias reduces extra handling of the fabric in further processes, saving customers both valuable production time and costs.

Source:

AWOL Media on behalf of TMAS

Grafik: © Gesamtmasche
13.05.2022

Gesamtmasche e.V.: Maschenindustrie unter Druck

  • Beschaffungsprobleme, Überregulierung und Inflation belasten die Branche

Die Hersteller der deutschen Maschenindustrie blicken zum zweiten Quartal des Jahres sorgenvoll in die Zukunft.  Die wirtschaftlichen Folgen des Kriegs in der Ukraine und die anhaltenden Störungen in den Lieferketten lassen die Erträge trotz befriedigender Auftragslage einbrechen. „Immer höheren Beschaffungspreise belasten die Margen“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin des Gesamtverbands der deutschen Maschenindustrie. „Dazu kommt die Kaufzurückhaltung der Konsumenten, die durch die politische Lage und die hohe Inflation verunsichert sind.“

Mit den Umsätzen im In- und Ausland und den aktuellen Auftragseingängen sind gut 95 Prozent der Maschenfirmen zufrieden. Dadurch ist der Geschäftsklimaindex der Maschenindustrie zum 2. Quartal 2022 mit 9,28 zwar noch deutlich positiv, doch verzeichnet er im Vergleich zum 1. Quartal (17,96 Indexpunkte) einen drastischen Rückgang. Die Branche erwartet in den nächsten Monaten Nachfrageeinbrüche und weiter steigende Produktionskosten.  60 Prozent der Hersteller rechnen mit einer weiteren Verschlechterung der Ertragslage.

  • Beschaffungsprobleme, Überregulierung und Inflation belasten die Branche

Die Hersteller der deutschen Maschenindustrie blicken zum zweiten Quartal des Jahres sorgenvoll in die Zukunft.  Die wirtschaftlichen Folgen des Kriegs in der Ukraine und die anhaltenden Störungen in den Lieferketten lassen die Erträge trotz befriedigender Auftragslage einbrechen. „Immer höheren Beschaffungspreise belasten die Margen“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin des Gesamtverbands der deutschen Maschenindustrie. „Dazu kommt die Kaufzurückhaltung der Konsumenten, die durch die politische Lage und die hohe Inflation verunsichert sind.“

Mit den Umsätzen im In- und Ausland und den aktuellen Auftragseingängen sind gut 95 Prozent der Maschenfirmen zufrieden. Dadurch ist der Geschäftsklimaindex der Maschenindustrie zum 2. Quartal 2022 mit 9,28 zwar noch deutlich positiv, doch verzeichnet er im Vergleich zum 1. Quartal (17,96 Indexpunkte) einen drastischen Rückgang. Die Branche erwartet in den nächsten Monaten Nachfrageeinbrüche und weiter steigende Produktionskosten.  60 Prozent der Hersteller rechnen mit einer weiteren Verschlechterung der Ertragslage.

„Wirtschaft und Verbraucher brauchen jetzt dringend Entlastung. Aber Berlin und Brüssel nehmen allen Alarmsignalen zum Trotz weiter Kurs auf noch mehr Bürokratie und Vorschriften“, kritisiert die Familienunternehmerin Bandte. „Teure und ideologisch motivierte Regulierung in der Umwelt- und Energiepolitik und eine Wohlführpolitik auf Pump ziehen uns den Boden unter den Füßen weg. Die Politik scheint sich nicht mehr für ein innovationsfreundliches und dynamisches Wirtschaftsklima in Europa zu interessieren. Das ist Gift für Wachstum und Innovation.“

 

(c) Eton
22.04.2022

More localised and automated textile manufacturing with TMAS technologies

At the forthcoming Texprocess, Techtextil and Heimtextil shows taking place in Frankfurt from June 21-24 – members of the Swedish Textile Machinery Association TMAS will be showcasing a range of solutions aligning with the growing trend for more localised and automated textile manufacturing.

Digitalisation and the push for more sustainable, shorter and less expensive supply chains are currently making manufacturing in high-cost countries within Europe more attractive and there have been many other contributing factors to this over the past two years.

The Covid-19 pandemic exposed the vulnerability of many countries to shortages of essential items like PPE while at the same time making the full exploitation of new digital options essential during national lock-downs and long periods of restricted travel. The escalating cost of global transportation, as well as the growth of online retailing and the associated benefits of on-demand digital manufacturing, are further reinforcing the many benefits of short-run and near-shore new operations.

At the forthcoming Texprocess, Techtextil and Heimtextil shows taking place in Frankfurt from June 21-24 – members of the Swedish Textile Machinery Association TMAS will be showcasing a range of solutions aligning with the growing trend for more localised and automated textile manufacturing.

Digitalisation and the push for more sustainable, shorter and less expensive supply chains are currently making manufacturing in high-cost countries within Europe more attractive and there have been many other contributing factors to this over the past two years.

The Covid-19 pandemic exposed the vulnerability of many countries to shortages of essential items like PPE while at the same time making the full exploitation of new digital options essential during national lock-downs and long periods of restricted travel. The escalating cost of global transportation, as well as the growth of online retailing and the associated benefits of on-demand digital manufacturing, are further reinforcing the many benefits of short-run and near-shore new operations.

Secure supply
At Texprocess, for example, Eton Systems will be unveiling its latest Ingenious software solution which further enhances the company’s Opta Unit Production System (UPS) introduced in 2021.

“Our automated technology has already had a great impact on the productivity of thousands of garment production lines,” says Eton’s Managing Director Jerker Krabbe. “Our systems help producers across the world to reduce repetitive manual tasks and increase efficiency, which evens out some of the differences between production in high and low-cost countries, making reshoring a feasible option. Creating a diversified production portfolio with a mix of production facilities, some closer to home, makes for a more secure product supply.”

Flexibility
Imogo meanwhile recently installed the first industrial scale dyeing system in Sweden for many years. The Dye-Max spray dyeing line has the potential to slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems. It is capable of carrying out the application of a wide range of fabric pre-treatments and finishing processes, providing users with unbeatable flexibility in production.

“Here in Scandinavia, we are currently seeing an explosion of companies developing sustainable new cellulosic fibres – many from waste clothing – but a problem is that all of the environmental benefits they deliver can potentially be lost in the further processing, and especially in conventional dyeing,” observes the company’s Founding Partner Per Stenflo. “The Dye-Max system positively addresses this, but interest in it has not just been confined to Europe. We are currently seeing a lot of activity in Turkey – largely as a near-shore partner to European brands – but also in Bangladesh.”

Robotics at Heimtextil
ACG Kinna Automatic specialises in automation solutions for filled products such as quilts, pillows and mattresses and its live demonstrations of robotics in action have proved a magnet for visitors to Heimtextil. This year’s show will be no exception.

“The use of robotics is now standard across many industries dealing in solid goods, but the handling of soft materials such as textiles is a little more complex,” says Managing Director Christian Moore. “Nevertheless, it’s something we have successfully mastered, and our robotic systems are proving highly beneficial to their users. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution when it comes to automation and our approach is always to carefully examine where it will make the difference in each bespoke system. A focus is on identifying and eliminating bottlenecks which will increase product flows.”

During the Covid-19 pandemic, ACG Kinna drew on all of its automation know-how and extensive network of contacts to build a new nonwovens fabric converting and single-use garment making-up plant in a matter of weeks, in order to supply the Swedish authorities with urgently-needed medical gowns.

Instant colour
Localised textile production is also booming in the USA, where Coloreel has recently secured multiple orders for its instant thread colouration technology via its US partner Hirsch.

“Coloreel technology enables the high-quality and instant colouring of a textile thread while it is actually being used in production and can be paired with any existing embroidery machine without modification, while also making it possible to produce gradients in an embroidery for the first time,” explains VP of Sales Sven Öquist.

“Advanced rapid colour formulation software and high-speed drive technology allow a single needle to carry out what it previously required many multiples of them to do – and with much more consistent stitch quality. By instantly colouring a recycled white base thread during production, our system enables complete freedom to create unique embroideries without any limitations. Colour changes along the thread can either be made rapidly from one solid colour to another, or gradually, to make smooth transitions or any colouring effect desired. This provides big benefits when it comes to sustainability and design creativity.”

Milestone
Svegea will be promoting its latest EC 300 collarette cutting machine at Texprocess 2022. This machine is used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as waistbands, cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements. With its E-Drive 2 system and fully automatic FA500 roll slitter, the EC 300 has an output of around 20,000 metres per hour.

“Advances in automation are only making the specialised, bespoke machines we engineer even more efficient and we are expecting a very busy year,” says Managing Director Håkan Steene. “The garment components our collarette cutters produce make it logical for them to be integrated into the operations of making-up operations, wherever they are.”

Sensors
The advanced yarn tension monitoring technologies of Eltex of Sweden meanwhile play an essential role in rectifying defects in  weaving, tufting and composite reinforcement operations.

“A correct tension of the warp and weft threads ensures proper machine operation,” explains Eltex Global Marketing and Sales Manager Anoop K. Sharma “The constant tension monitoring and automatic control of the tension of the thread help to overcome unnecessary problems.

“We continue to make advances in both the hardware and software of our tension monitoring systems, such as the EyE™ for the warping process. With the EyE™, the yarn tension values from all yarns are continuously updated and displayed on screen. In addition, tension values outside the warning level are indicated both on the sensor’s LEDs and on the screen for complete quality control. No fabric can be woven without the appropriate and correct tension.”

Source:

AWOL Media

16.03.2022

TMAS: TEXO AB sees Demand for Compfelt Weaving Looms

TEXO AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, is currently seeing a surge in demand for its Compfelt weaving looms for press felt base fabrics.

“These are far from standard machines,” explains TEXO President Anders Svensson. “Off-the-shelf industrial weaving machines generally range in their working widths from 1.9 to 3.2 metres, with those purpose-built for technical applications such as geotextiles extending to wider widths of six metres and beyond. Meanwhile, one of the machines we have recently successfully delivered and commissioned has a working width of 23 metres and is not even the widest of the many such machines the company has engineered and delivered worldwide since its formation.”

A second recently-delivered line has a more modest working width – in relative terms – of 13 metres.

TEXO AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, is currently seeing a surge in demand for its Compfelt weaving looms for press felt base fabrics.

“These are far from standard machines,” explains TEXO President Anders Svensson. “Off-the-shelf industrial weaving machines generally range in their working widths from 1.9 to 3.2 metres, with those purpose-built for technical applications such as geotextiles extending to wider widths of six metres and beyond. Meanwhile, one of the machines we have recently successfully delivered and commissioned has a working width of 23 metres and is not even the widest of the many such machines the company has engineered and delivered worldwide since its formation.”

A second recently-delivered line has a more modest working width – in relative terms – of 13 metres.

Paper machines
The demand for such machines comes from the suppliers of paper machine clothing (PMC) to paper mills, who in turn operate colossal machines for paper manufacturing.
On of the largest paper making machines is currently believed to be located on Hainan Island off the southern coast of China and is 428 metres long – roughly the length of four football pitches. Naturally, such machines require equally large-scale components, which is where TEXO comes in. All paper machines require a regular supply of PMC fabrics which are employed in three separate areas of the paper machine – the forming section, the press section and the drying section.

Press felts
TEXO Compfelt weaving machines are specifically employed for the production of endless (tubular) woven base fabrics for the press section of paper machines, where water is mechanically removed from the newly formed sheet of fibres. In the simplest press, the sheet is carried by the PMC fabric between two rolls, where water is squeezed out by the application of load and pressure. This can also be assisted by the use of vacuum and heat. The PMC fabrics here need to be replaced regularly, with a maximum lifespan of six months.

Press felts have become increasingly sophisticated over the years, consisting of complex woven base structures which are subsequently combined with nonwovens via needlepunching on equally huge machines. The woven base fabrics are primarily made from polyamide for its strength and hygroscopic and elastic properties.

Dobby harness
“A major refinement of the machine has been the ability to equip it with up to 24 dobby harness frames to meet the demand for sophisticated structures from the PMC manufacturers. Although the PMC business represents a small proportion of the total cost of manufacturing paper, it can have a significant impact on the quality of the paper, the efficiency of a machine and machine production rates.”

Another significant development has been that of a self supporting base pre-filled with concrete, which has eliminated the need to dig out foundations in a plant to support the machine.

Retrofits
TEXO’s looms are built to last, but technology moves forward, and the company is also currently active in the retrofitting of existing machines built as far back as the 1970s.

Integration
TEXO has also just integrated its offices and production centre at its base in Älmhult, Sweden, to create a unified 5,000 square metre site.

Source:

TMAS / AWOL Media

Foto Pixabay
13.03.2022

Cotton Campaign beendet Boykott-Aufruf: Usbekische Baumwollernte frei von Kinder- und Zwangsarbeit

Usbekische Baumwolle ist rehabilitiert: Die Cotton Campaign lässt ihren langjährigen Boykottaufruf fallen. „Wir freuen uns über diesen längst überfälligen Schritt“, sagt Silvia Jungbauer, Hauptgeschäftsführerin von Gesamtmasche. „Die Internationale Arbeitsorganisation (ILO) berichtet schon seit mehreren Jahren positiv zur usbekischen Baumwollernte: Kinder- und Zwangsarbeit gehören dort der Vergangenheit an.“ Die EU gewährt dem Land seit 2021 sogar zollfreien Marktzugang und honoriert damit Usbekistans besondere Anstrengungen im Sozial- und Umweltbereich.

Für die deutsche Textilbranche ist das Ende des Boykotts eine gute Nachricht. Der Handel mit usbekischen Baumwollprodukten war zwar nie sanktioniert, doch seit 2009 hatten insgesamt 331 international tätige Marken und Einzelhändler ein „Baumwollversprechen“ der NGO unterzeichnet. „Der Boykott-Aufruf der Cotton Campaign vergrößerte Usbekistans Abhängigkeit von Russland und China“, meint Silvia Jungbauer. „Diese Entwicklung können wir jetzt aufhalten.“

Usbekische Baumwolle ist rehabilitiert: Die Cotton Campaign lässt ihren langjährigen Boykottaufruf fallen. „Wir freuen uns über diesen längst überfälligen Schritt“, sagt Silvia Jungbauer, Hauptgeschäftsführerin von Gesamtmasche. „Die Internationale Arbeitsorganisation (ILO) berichtet schon seit mehreren Jahren positiv zur usbekischen Baumwollernte: Kinder- und Zwangsarbeit gehören dort der Vergangenheit an.“ Die EU gewährt dem Land seit 2021 sogar zollfreien Marktzugang und honoriert damit Usbekistans besondere Anstrengungen im Sozial- und Umweltbereich.

Für die deutsche Textilbranche ist das Ende des Boykotts eine gute Nachricht. Der Handel mit usbekischen Baumwollprodukten war zwar nie sanktioniert, doch seit 2009 hatten insgesamt 331 international tätige Marken und Einzelhändler ein „Baumwollversprechen“ der NGO unterzeichnet. „Der Boykott-Aufruf der Cotton Campaign vergrößerte Usbekistans Abhängigkeit von Russland und China“, meint Silvia Jungbauer. „Diese Entwicklung können wir jetzt aufhalten.“

Die ILO spornt indessen internationale Hersteller an, sich in dem Land zu engagieren, denn inzwischen gilt Usbekistan als nachhaltige Beschaffungsalternative zu China. Die ILO attestiert Usbekistan in ihrem aktuellen Monitoringbericht, dass die Baumwollernte frei von Kinder- und Zwangsarbeit abläuft. Seit April 2021 gewährt die Europäische Union Usbekistan zollfreien Marktzugang durch den Sonderstatus “GSP+”. Diesen erhalten nur Entwicklungsländer, die erwiesenermaßen 27 internationale Konventionen in den Bereichen Arbeit, Soziales, Umwelt und Menschenrechte umgesetzt haben und auch einhalten.

Seit 2021 arbeitet GESAMTMASCHE mit dem usbekischen Textilverband UZTEKSTILPROM in einem Partnerschaftsprojekt zusammen, das vom Bundesministerium für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung gefördert wird. Das Projekt bietet Unternehmen in Deutschland und Usbekistan eine Plattform für wirtschaftliche Kooperation und soll den nachhaltigen Handel zwischen beiden Ländern stärken.

Source:

Gesamtmasche e.V.

(c) Automatex / TMAS
03.03.2022

Automatex: Full automation from the roll to the finished product

Automatex, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, has recently supplied a number of its latest Industry 4.0-enabled automatic fitted sheet systems to customers in Europe.

The Automatex model FDC-77735-B90D-EC system enables the full production and folding of six fully-fitted sheets per minute – approaching 3,000 an average shift – overseen by a single operator and eliminating many of the repetitive cut and sew operations of the past. Elastics insertion –  usually a highly complex labour-intensive task – can be on all four sides of the sheet, two, or simply within the corners, depending on customer specifications.

Fabric is fed directly from the roll, with precise edge guiding and tension control, into a length-wise hemming and elastics insertion section with adjustable tension devices, before being measured and cross cut in an accumulator. It is then transferred to the cross hemming section, again with elastics insertion.

Automatex, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, has recently supplied a number of its latest Industry 4.0-enabled automatic fitted sheet systems to customers in Europe.

The Automatex model FDC-77735-B90D-EC system enables the full production and folding of six fully-fitted sheets per minute – approaching 3,000 an average shift – overseen by a single operator and eliminating many of the repetitive cut and sew operations of the past. Elastics insertion –  usually a highly complex labour-intensive task – can be on all four sides of the sheet, two, or simply within the corners, depending on customer specifications.

Fabric is fed directly from the roll, with precise edge guiding and tension control, into a length-wise hemming and elastics insertion section with adjustable tension devices, before being measured and cross cut in an accumulator. It is then transferred to the cross hemming section, again with elastics insertion.

A side drop forming unit pre-forms the sheet before it is transported by a multi-axis clamp conveyor system to the corner sewing section, consisting of left and right overlock sewing heads. Here, the corners are robotically sewn at 90 degrees and labels are also attached when specified.

Further customised systems for folding are also supplied as required.

Source:

TMAS / AWOL Media

Grafik: Gesamtmasche e.V.
Seit 2019 haben sich die internationalen Frachtraten vervielfacht. Besonders betroffen ist die Route Ostasien-Nordeuropa. Auch die Laufzeiten haben sich um 50 Prozent und mehr verlängert. Über die Hälfte der deutschen Textil- und Bekleidungsimporte stammt aus Asien, alleine auf China ca. 25 Prozent.
02.02.2022

Maschenbranche kritisiert wachsende Abgabenlast

  • „Zölle auf Fracht und Rohstoffe müssen weg“

Die Preise für textile Rohstoffe und internationale Transporte sind binnen Jahresfrist extrem gestiegen. Der Gesamtverband der deutschen Maschenindustrie fordert daher Zollerleichterungen für Rohmaterial und Fracht. „Mit dem rasanten Anstieg der Beschaffungskosten wachsen die Zollkosten im selben Tempo“, sagt Silvia Jungbauer, Geschäftsführerin von Gesamtmasche. „Steigende Abgaben in schwieriger Zeit – das muss aufhören.“

Störungen in den internationalen Lieferketten haben die Frachtraten bis auf das Zehnfache ansteigen lassen. Weil in der EU die Transportkosten mit dem Einfuhrgut mitverzollt werden müssen, erhöht sich die Abgabenlast mit steigenden Frachtpreisen. Das trifft grundsätzlich alle Branchen, doch besonders hart die Textilwirtschaft. „Im Herbst war die Lage nicht mehr kalkulierbar. Wir haben unseren Dachverband und die europäischen Schwesterverbände alarmiert.“ Inzwischen machen auch der BDI und der europäische Spitzenverband BusinessEurope mobil.  

  • „Zölle auf Fracht und Rohstoffe müssen weg“

Die Preise für textile Rohstoffe und internationale Transporte sind binnen Jahresfrist extrem gestiegen. Der Gesamtverband der deutschen Maschenindustrie fordert daher Zollerleichterungen für Rohmaterial und Fracht. „Mit dem rasanten Anstieg der Beschaffungskosten wachsen die Zollkosten im selben Tempo“, sagt Silvia Jungbauer, Geschäftsführerin von Gesamtmasche. „Steigende Abgaben in schwieriger Zeit – das muss aufhören.“

Störungen in den internationalen Lieferketten haben die Frachtraten bis auf das Zehnfache ansteigen lassen. Weil in der EU die Transportkosten mit dem Einfuhrgut mitverzollt werden müssen, erhöht sich die Abgabenlast mit steigenden Frachtpreisen. Das trifft grundsätzlich alle Branchen, doch besonders hart die Textilwirtschaft. „Im Herbst war die Lage nicht mehr kalkulierbar. Wir haben unseren Dachverband und die europäischen Schwesterverbände alarmiert.“ Inzwischen machen auch der BDI und der europäische Spitzenverband BusinessEurope mobil.  

„Textil- und Bekleidungsprodukte sind ein Hochzollbereich. Die Branche zahlt daher einen überdurchschnittlichen Zollaufschlag auf die Fracht“, erklärt Silvia Jungbauer. Auf Bekleidung sind 12 Prozent Zoll fällig. Doch auch Rohstoffe und Halbwaren sind betroffen. Immerhin 4 Prozent Zoll gelten für zahlreiche Fasern. Dabei können viele Qualitäten nur im Ausland in ausreichender Menge beschafft werden. „Am besten wäre daher eine grundsätzliche Abgabenbefreiung für Rohstoffe. Für eine bezahlbare und sichere Rohstoffversorgung brauchen wir aber unbedingt wieder mehr Rohstoffquellen am Standort. Das gilt für Natur- wie Chemiefasern gleichermaßen.“

Martina Bandte © Gesamtmasche
19.01.2022

Gesamtmasche: „Mittelstand im Wettbewerb künstlich schlechter gestellt“

  • Skepsis trotz guter Auftragslage
  • Hersteller kämpfen mit Überregulierung und anhaltend hohen Beschaffungspreisen

Zum Jahresauftakt sorgt eine gute Auftragslage bei den deutschen Maschenherstellern für stabile Geschäfte. Doch die Ruhe trügt: „Optimistisch ist die Branche nicht“, betont Martina Bandte, Präsidentin des Gesamtverbands der deutschen Maschenindustrie. „Die Lage im stationären Modeeinzelhandel ist katastrophal, und praktisch alle Hersteller haben mit einem immensen Kostenschub zu kämpfen.“ Die Folgen der Corona-Krise, überschießende Beschaffungspreise, Rohstoffknappheit und Chaos bei der Fracht belasten die Branche enorm. „Doch statt uns in dieser angespannten Lage zu entlasten, bürdet uns die Politik ständig weitere Regulierungen auf“, kritisiert die Familienunternehmerin.

  • Skepsis trotz guter Auftragslage
  • Hersteller kämpfen mit Überregulierung und anhaltend hohen Beschaffungspreisen

Zum Jahresauftakt sorgt eine gute Auftragslage bei den deutschen Maschenherstellern für stabile Geschäfte. Doch die Ruhe trügt: „Optimistisch ist die Branche nicht“, betont Martina Bandte, Präsidentin des Gesamtverbands der deutschen Maschenindustrie. „Die Lage im stationären Modeeinzelhandel ist katastrophal, und praktisch alle Hersteller haben mit einem immensen Kostenschub zu kämpfen.“ Die Folgen der Corona-Krise, überschießende Beschaffungspreise, Rohstoffknappheit und Chaos bei der Fracht belasten die Branche enorm. „Doch statt uns in dieser angespannten Lage zu entlasten, bürdet uns die Politik ständig weitere Regulierungen auf“, kritisiert die Familienunternehmerin.

Angesichts der positiven Umsatzentwicklung im Inland und steigender Auftragseingänge bewegt sich der Geschäftsklimaindex der Maschenindustrie zum 1. Quartal 2022 mit 17,96 im deutlich positiven Bereich (Indexwert zum 4. Quartal 2021: 14,54). Allerdings klagen viele Hersteller über rückläufige Erträge. Über ein Viertel beklagt, dass die zu erzielenden Preise nicht mehr auskömmlich sind. Verbandspräsidentin Martina Bandte: „Im Handel und bei großen industriellen Abnehmern lassen sich die Kostensteigerungen nur schwer weitergeben. Die Endverbraucher sind bei Textilwaren eher noch sparsamer geworden als vor der Corona-Pandemie.“

Auch die Verschiebungen der internationalen Kräfteverhältnisse machten der Branche Sorgen. Die abnehmende Bedeutung Europas im globalen Wirtschaftskontext erschwere und verteuere vor allem für kleine und mittlere Unternehmen die Beschaffung. „Statt Unternehmen mit geeigneten Strategien zu unterstützen, stellt die Politik vor allem den Mittelstand im Wettbewerb künstlich schlechter. Paradebeispiele sind das neue Lieferkettengesetz und eine ideologisierte Energiepolitik. Teuer, wirkungslos, wohlstandsmindernd – das ist das Etikett, das man getrost auf verschiedene aktuelle Politiken kleben kann.“

06.01.2022

Messe Frankfurt cancels consumer goods fairs in January and February 2022

In view of the exponential worsening of the pandemic situation worldwide and the accompanying tightened travel and contact regulations, the consumer goods fairs Christmasworld, Paperworld, and Creativeworld are cancelled for January 2022 and Ambiente for mid-February 2022. The regionally-oriented trade fair Nordstil from 15 to 17 January 2022 in Hamburg will take place at the present time.

The easing of the pandemic situation that was still hoped for in December is no longer in sight. Instead, the situation is deteriorating worldwide with an enormous, unforeseeable dynamic. This extreme deterioration due to the spread of the Omicron virus in Europe and Germany currently makes it impossible for Messe Frankfurt, as organiser of the leading international trade fairs Christmasworld, Paperworld, and Creativeworld, as well as Ambiente, to keep their dates in Frankfurt at the end of January and in mid-February 2022.

In view of the exponential worsening of the pandemic situation worldwide and the accompanying tightened travel and contact regulations, the consumer goods fairs Christmasworld, Paperworld, and Creativeworld are cancelled for January 2022 and Ambiente for mid-February 2022. The regionally-oriented trade fair Nordstil from 15 to 17 January 2022 in Hamburg will take place at the present time.

The easing of the pandemic situation that was still hoped for in December is no longer in sight. Instead, the situation is deteriorating worldwide with an enormous, unforeseeable dynamic. This extreme deterioration due to the spread of the Omicron virus in Europe and Germany currently makes it impossible for Messe Frankfurt, as organiser of the leading international trade fairs Christmasworld, Paperworld, and Creativeworld, as well as Ambiente, to keep their dates in Frankfurt at the end of January and in mid-February 2022.

The four events, consisting of Christmasworld with its focus on seasonal and festive decorations, Paperworld and Creativeworld with their product ranges for paper, office supplies, stationery and hobby, craft and artists' requisites and Ambiente with its cross-sector range of products for the table, kitchen and housewares, furnishing and decorative accessories, home furnishing concepts, gifts and fashion accessories, are the recognised leading trade fairs in their sectors and open the trading year in their respective segments. Even in a reduced numerical form, the four trade fairs would still have been the leading events worldwide for their respective product segments.

However, the exponential increase in the number of infections worldwide in a very short period of time and the accompanying multitude of developments and decisions that are clearly outside the organiser's sphere of influence have led to a significant deterioration in the general conditions and necessary prerequisites for holding the four leading trade fairs as major events of international relevance at the end of January and in mid-February 2022 respectively. These developments include the classification of Germany as a high-risk area and the associated travel warnings and international and intercontinental travel restrictions in countries such as India, Japan and the United States, as well as the corresponding quarantine obligations. Equally important are the steadily rising infection figures and the accompanying urgent appeal, among others by the Robert Koch Institute and the expert council of the German Federal Government, to continue to reduce contacts to a minimum and to cancel all major events. At present, there are even further international fears that the critical infrastructure will not be maintained due to the highly contagious Omicron variant. The majority of exhibiting and visiting companies at Christmasworld, Paperworld, and Creativeworld as well as Ambiente are currently reacting to this overall situation with travel and trade fair attendance bans for reasons of duty of care towards their employees to protect them from health risks. The global willingness to travel is dropping enormously at the moment.

There are no plans to postpone the event. Detlef Braun, Member of the Executive Board of Messe Frankfurt, explains: "Since the trend-oriented order cycles of the international consumer goods industry require an annual event at the beginning of the year, a shift to the second half of the year would not meet the needs of the exhibiting companies and visitors."

Nordstil to be held in Hamburg from 15 to 17 January 2022
In the interests of the sectors involved, the planning and implementation of Nordstil from 15 to 17 January 2022 is not affected. This trade fair will take place in the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg at this time due to other general conditions for local implementation. However, the extremely volatile situation is continuously reviewed and assessed in close exchange with the relevant local authorities and industry partners.

Messe Frankfurt's digital platforms for business success
Messe Frankfurt has already been actively helping retailers to help themselves since 2019 with Nextrade, the first order and data management platform for the home and living sector, and Conzoom Solutions, an information platform for the global consumer goods sector. "A second year without appropriate ordering, inspiration and networking formats poses considerable and in some cases existentially threatening challenges for retailers worldwide," Braun explains. "With our digital offers, we are specifically supporting our partners in industry and trade in this volatile situation. In addition, we will continue to put all our energy and optimism into safe and promising trade fairs. Because there is no substitute for meeting in real life."

Information on the planning of the Frankfurt consumer goods fairs for 2023 will be announced at the beginning of February 2022.

Source:

Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH

13.12.2021

TMAS: Digitalisation demands streamlined solutions

Fully integrated production lines from single source suppliers have increasingly become the norm in the textile industry and make complete sense in meeting today’s complex supply chain needs, according to TMAS – the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

“Over the past few decades, textile mills have transitioned from consisting of collections of individual machines serviced and maintained largely by in-house mechanics as well as separate supplier companies for each part of the production line,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Those in-house engineering service teams have diminished over the years, while the introduction of electronic drive systems in the 1980s and 90s also put an increased emphasis on the need for third party electrical engineers, operating separately to the machine builders.

“Subsequently, mechanical machines and electronic drive systems became much more integrated, and more recently, with the advent of digitalisation, entire production lines are becoming centrally controlled with remote, instantaneous connections to their suppliers for service and maintenance.

Fully integrated production lines from single source suppliers have increasingly become the norm in the textile industry and make complete sense in meeting today’s complex supply chain needs, according to TMAS – the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

“Over the past few decades, textile mills have transitioned from consisting of collections of individual machines serviced and maintained largely by in-house mechanics as well as separate supplier companies for each part of the production line,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “Those in-house engineering service teams have diminished over the years, while the introduction of electronic drive systems in the 1980s and 90s also put an increased emphasis on the need for third party electrical engineers, operating separately to the machine builders.

“Subsequently, mechanical machines and electronic drive systems became much more integrated, and more recently, with the advent of digitalisation, entire production lines are becoming centrally controlled with remote, instantaneous connections to their suppliers for service and maintenance.

“In this context, the integration of machinery and automation specialists as single-source suppliers makes perfect sense, while partnerships between machine builders and their customers have never been more important.”

The recent acquisition of Nowo textile machinery from its previous owner, Brandstones Ab Oy, by TMAS member ACG Kinna, she adds, is a good example of this general trend.

Nowo, headquartered in Turku, Finland, designs, manufactures and exports high-end textile production machinery mainly for the fibre processing industry. At the end of the 1980s it introduced the highly successful Nowo Vac pillow filling system, which has been its best-selling system, alongside the Noworoll ball fibre machine, introduced in the 1990s.

Nowo’s machine range covers the entire production process from bale opening to weighing and filling, and complete production lines are tailored to the specific needs of customers. The company can also deliver individual machines such as bale openers, cards, cross-lappers, pickers, mixing devices, material silos, sucking devices, anti-static units etc. Seven patents cover the company’s technologies.

Founded in 1977, ACG Kinna Automatic, based in Skene in Sweden, specialises in customised and cost-efficient solutions for the production of pillows and quilts. All of its design, manufacturing and final line testing is carried out in Sweden and the reliability and longevity of its machines has earned it the trust of the world’s largest furniture and home decoration retailers and Europe’s largest manufacturer of pillows and duvets, among many customers.

Source:

TMAS / AWOL Media

03.12.2021

Heimtextil from 11 - 14 January 2022 is cancelled

Against the background of the worsening pandemic situation in Germany over the past two weeks and the associated restrictions, Heimtextil, scheduled to take place in the second week of January, is cancelled. Messe Frankfurt is working with the industry to determine whether and in what form a new offering in the summer of 2022 can be organised to run parallel to the Techtextil/Texprocess trade fair duo. Later events such as Ambiente, Christmasworld, Creativeworld, Paperworld and Frankfurt Fashion Week are still planning to take place at the present time.

Against the background of the worsening pandemic situation in Germany over the past two weeks and the associated restrictions, Heimtextil, scheduled to take place in the second week of January, is cancelled. Messe Frankfurt is working with the industry to determine whether and in what form a new offering in the summer of 2022 can be organised to run parallel to the Techtextil/Texprocess trade fair duo. Later events such as Ambiente, Christmasworld, Creativeworld, Paperworld and Frankfurt Fashion Week are still planning to take place at the present time.

Due to the unforeseeable dynamics in the development of the pandemic, the reciprocal and cumulative effects of the relevant factors, as well as the extreme escalation and deterioration of the pandemic situation in Germany within a very short period of time, including the decisions taken at the Conference of Minister Presidents on 02.12.2021, the date of Heimtextil right at the beginning of the year, in the second week of January, cannot be kept. Heimtextil, the leading international trade fair for home and contract textiles, will be cancelled. Messe Frankfurt is working closely with all industry partners to find out whether and within what framework Heimtextil can be held parallel to Techtextil and Texprocess from 21 to 24 June 2022.

Heimtextil as an international trade fair has always kicked off the spring trade fair season and is the first major international trade fair in Germany directly after Christmas and New Year with exhibitors and visitors from over 135 countries. The exponential increase in the number of infections in a very short period of time and the accompanying multitude of developments and resolutions that are clearly outside the realm of influence of the organizer have led to a significant deterioration in the general conditions and necessary requirements for holding Heimtextil as a major trade fair of international relevance at this early stage. These developments include in particular the classification of Germany as a high-risk area and the associated travel warnings, international and intercontinental travel restrictions in India, Japan, the United States and Great Britain, as well as the quarantine obligation and “2G” (only with vaccinated and recovered status) requirements without recognition of the WHO vaccine list in Germany. Equally important are the steadily rising infection figures and the accompanying urgent appeal, including by the Robert Koch Institute, to reduce contacts to a minimum and to cancel all major events.

A large number of the exhibiting and visiting companies at Heimtextil are currently reacting to this with travel and trade fair attendance bans out of an obligation of concern towards their employees to protect them from health risks. The global willingness to travel is continuing to fall rapidly.

The planning and staging of the other spring trade fairs Ambiente, Christmasworld, Creativeworld and Paperworld is not affected. Due to their later dates in the year, at the end of January and mid-February respectively, these fairs are still planning to take place at the present time. Compared to Heimtextil, which is the most international trade fair at the Frankfurt location, Frankfurt Fashion Week currently has a much lower international profile and from this perspective can therefore still take place. The extremely volatile situation is continuously reviewed and evaluated in close exchange with the relevant authorities and industry partners.

Source:

Messe Frankfurt

(c) TMAS
The new TMAS board members (left to right) Sven Öquist, Jerker Krabbe and Semir Pavlica.
08.11.2021

TMAS has appointed three new members to its board

Jerker Krabbe of Eton Systems, Semir Paclica of Baldwin Technology and Sven Öquist of Coloreel will contribute a wealth of experience from a wide range of industries to the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

Jerker Krabbe joined Eton Systems, one of the leaders in intelligent overhead conveyor systems, as CEO six months ago, and has more than 25 years of commercial, operational and international experience within several well-known companies such as Electrolux, Husqvarna, Gunnebo and Assa Abloy, and most recently as CEO of Sector Alarm AB.

Semir Pavlica has a master’s in finance and started his career at the SEB banking group before joining Baldwin Technology five ago. He is now managing the company’s process improvement and performance.

Sven Öquist joined Coloreel as Vice President of Sales in April this year. He has an international background with previous positions as Managing Director/CEO for a number of Swedish companies. He has also led the global sales team at Polestar, the electrified brand of Volvo Cars.

 

Jerker Krabbe of Eton Systems, Semir Paclica of Baldwin Technology and Sven Öquist of Coloreel will contribute a wealth of experience from a wide range of industries to the Swedish Textile Machinery Association.

Jerker Krabbe joined Eton Systems, one of the leaders in intelligent overhead conveyor systems, as CEO six months ago, and has more than 25 years of commercial, operational and international experience within several well-known companies such as Electrolux, Husqvarna, Gunnebo and Assa Abloy, and most recently as CEO of Sector Alarm AB.

Semir Pavlica has a master’s in finance and started his career at the SEB banking group before joining Baldwin Technology five ago. He is now managing the company’s process improvement and performance.

Sven Öquist joined Coloreel as Vice President of Sales in April this year. He has an international background with previous positions as Managing Director/CEO for a number of Swedish companies. He has also led the global sales team at Polestar, the electrified brand of Volvo Cars.

 

(c) Gesamtverband der deutschen Maschenindustrie – GESAMTMASCHE e. V.
29.10.2021

Gesamtmasche: Erholung mit Hindernissen

  • Gestörte Lieferketten und sinkende Margen bremsen das Wachstum  

Nach zaghafter Erholung im Sommer befindet sich die deutsche Maschenindustrie weiter im Aufwärtstrend.  Doch Probleme in der internationalen Logistik und stark gestiegene Rohstoffpreise behindern das Wachstum. „Lieferengpässe und hohe Beschaffungskosten gefährden den Aufschwung. Dazu kommt eine regelrechte Kostenlawine bei den Energiepreisen“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin von Gesamtmasche. „Dabei haben wir die Belastungen durch den Lockdown noch längst nicht aufgeholt.“

  • Gestörte Lieferketten und sinkende Margen bremsen das Wachstum  

Nach zaghafter Erholung im Sommer befindet sich die deutsche Maschenindustrie weiter im Aufwärtstrend.  Doch Probleme in der internationalen Logistik und stark gestiegene Rohstoffpreise behindern das Wachstum. „Lieferengpässe und hohe Beschaffungskosten gefährden den Aufschwung. Dazu kommt eine regelrechte Kostenlawine bei den Energiepreisen“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin von Gesamtmasche. „Dabei haben wir die Belastungen durch den Lockdown noch längst nicht aufgeholt.“

Angesichts der Erholung von Umsätzen und Auftragseingängen bleibt der Geschäftsklimaindex der Maschenindustrie zum 4. Quartal mit 14,54 Indexpunkten weiter im positiven Bereich (Indexwert zum 3. Quartal: 16,93). Vor allem aus dem Ausland erwartet die Branche in den kommenden Monaten Impulse. Allerdings klagen die meisten Hersteller über schrumpfende Margen. Über 13 Prozent der Befragten wollen daher, trotz guter Auftragslage, Personal abbauen.
 
Verbandspräsidentin Martina Bandte warnte vor einem Abwürgen der Wirtschaft durch weitere Kostenbelastungen: „Das Wachstum flacht bereits wieder ab, denn die Produktionskosten am Standort und verteuerte Auslandsbeschaffung erodieren die Margen. Nicht nur die international verschobenen Kräfteverhältnisse stellen uns vor immense Herausforderungen. Die neue Regierungskoalition steht vor einem riesigen Reformstau. Der lässt sich nur mit einer wachstumsfreundlichen Politik anpacken. Dazu muss Deutschland aufhören, mit nationalen Maßnahmen globale Fragen lösen zu wollen.“

 

Source:

Gesamtverband der deutschen Maschenindustrie – GESAMTMASCHE e. V.

25.10.2021

TMAS members showcase sustainable finishing technologies

Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – are proving instrumental in pioneering new sustainable processes for the dyeing, finishing and decoration of textiles.

The wasteful processes involved in these manufacturing stages are only one component in the development of viable circular supply chains for textiles that are now being established in Sweden.

At the recent Conference on Sustainable Finishing of Textiles, held across three separate afternoons on September 30th, October 1st and October 7th, delegates heard that Sweden will introduce extended producer responsibility (EPR) for waste textiles and clothing at the beginning of 2022, ahead of the adoption of a similar European Union-wide EPR system in 2025.

New fibers
Swedish companies are also active in the development of new fibers derived from waste clothing, building on the country’s legacy leadership in pulp and paper production.

Members of TMAS – the Swedish textile machinery association – are proving instrumental in pioneering new sustainable processes for the dyeing, finishing and decoration of textiles.

The wasteful processes involved in these manufacturing stages are only one component in the development of viable circular supply chains for textiles that are now being established in Sweden.

At the recent Conference on Sustainable Finishing of Textiles, held across three separate afternoons on September 30th, October 1st and October 7th, delegates heard that Sweden will introduce extended producer responsibility (EPR) for waste textiles and clothing at the beginning of 2022, ahead of the adoption of a similar European Union-wide EPR system in 2025.

New fibers
Swedish companies are also active in the development of new fibers derived from waste clothing, building on the country’s legacy leadership in pulp and paper production.

At the Sustainable Finishing of Textiles Conference, however, it was said that all of the environmental gains made by such sustainable new fibers can potentially be cancelled out in the further processing they are subjected to – and especially in resource-intensive conventional dyeing, finishing and decoration.

TMAS members Baldwin Technology and Coloreel have both developed solutions to address this issue.

TexCoat G4
During the conference, Baldwin’s VP of Global Business Development Rick Stanford explained that his company’s TexCoat G4 non-contact spray technology significantly reduces water, chemistry and energy consumption in the finishing process. It consistently and uniformly sprays chemistry across a fabric surface and applies it only where needed, on one or both sides.

Instant coloring
Coloreel’s CEO Mattias Nordin outlined the benefits of his company’s technology which enables the high-quality and instant coloring of a textile thread on-demand and can be paired with any existing embroidery machine without modification. This enables unique effects like shades and gradient to be achieved in an embroidery for the first time.

TMAS: Swedish Group ACG turns 100 (c) Ismail Abdelkareem, ACG Goup
ACG’s Reimar Westerlind and Thomas Arvidsson at the company’s head office in Borås, Sweden
16.08.2021

TMAS: Swedish Group ACG turns 100

It is exactly 100 years ago on August 17th this year that Carl Axel Gustafsson returned from the USA to Sweden with a significant agency agreement from the Boston-based sewing machine leader Reece.

Back in 1921, Reece, along with its competitor Singer, entirely dominated the buttonhole machine market and were the world’s only manufacturers of these machines for jackets, trousers and coats.

Gustafsson’s license enabled his new company A C Gustafsson to become one of Europe’s first leasing organisations, hiring out Reece buttonhole machines and receiving payment per sewn buttonhole stitch.

This business thrived for many decades and formed the basis for the entire ACG Group as it exists today.

Forty years later, on September 2nd 1961 to be precise, Reimar Westerlind walked out of a restaurant after a long and enjoyable lunch with someone he’d never met before, having signed his intention to buy a company he knew nothing about on an improvised contract written on the back of a menu.

It is exactly 100 years ago on August 17th this year that Carl Axel Gustafsson returned from the USA to Sweden with a significant agency agreement from the Boston-based sewing machine leader Reece.

Back in 1921, Reece, along with its competitor Singer, entirely dominated the buttonhole machine market and were the world’s only manufacturers of these machines for jackets, trousers and coats.

Gustafsson’s license enabled his new company A C Gustafsson to become one of Europe’s first leasing organisations, hiring out Reece buttonhole machines and receiving payment per sewn buttonhole stitch.

This business thrived for many decades and formed the basis for the entire ACG Group as it exists today.

Forty years later, on September 2nd 1961 to be precise, Reimar Westerlind walked out of a restaurant after a long and enjoyable lunch with someone he’d never met before, having signed his intention to buy a company he knew nothing about on an improvised contract written on the back of a menu.

“What I didn’t know then was that my dining partner was the family lawyer of Carl Axel Gustafsson,” Reimar explains. “I had no money and knew nothing about the textile industry and I also quickly discovered the business was not doing so well at that time and tried to get out of the agreement, but he insisted I honour it. He told me he had money and would back me, but I’d have to work hard and pay him back in full.”

Reimar certainly took that advice, and at the age of 92 still travels to his office every day to oversee the operations of the diverse companies now operating under the ACG umbrella.

Although textiles remain the bedrock of the business, under Reimar Westerlind’s management, ACG Group has branched out into many other fields of activity over the past 60 years, and its diversity has also led to some highly unexpected developments.

Like many other European manufacturers, ACG also began to expand beyond its traditional borders from the 1970s onwards – initially into the former Soviet Union and subsequently establishing subsidiaries in Estonia, Lithuania, Finland, the Ukraine and Denmark.

(c) Gesamtmasche
26.07.2021

Maschenbranche leicht erholt

  • Lockdown-Folgen und kühles Konsumklima belasten das Geschäft  

Nach einem halben Jahr im Lockdown befindet sich die deutsche Maschenindustrie auf vorsichtigem Erholungskurs. Der Geschäftsklimaindex der Branche tendiert zum 3. Quartal 2021 nach dramatischen Einbrüchen der letzten neun Monate wieder positiv.

„Die wirtschaftlichen Schäden durch die langen Schließungen sind enorm. Das wird uns für Jahre belasten“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin von Gesamtmasche. „Der Konsum entwickelt sich nur zaghaft. Gleichzeitig stellen uns die überschießenden Rohstoff- und Frachtpreise vor große Herausforderungen.“   

  • Lockdown-Folgen und kühles Konsumklima belasten das Geschäft  

Nach einem halben Jahr im Lockdown befindet sich die deutsche Maschenindustrie auf vorsichtigem Erholungskurs. Der Geschäftsklimaindex der Branche tendiert zum 3. Quartal 2021 nach dramatischen Einbrüchen der letzten neun Monate wieder positiv.

„Die wirtschaftlichen Schäden durch die langen Schließungen sind enorm. Das wird uns für Jahre belasten“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin von Gesamtmasche. „Der Konsum entwickelt sich nur zaghaft. Gleichzeitig stellen uns die überschießenden Rohstoff- und Frachtpreise vor große Herausforderungen.“   

Der Geschäftsklimaindex zum 3. Quartal spiegelt mit 16,93 Indexpunkten den Erholungskurs wider (Indexwert zum 2. Quartal: -19,3) Der Erwartungsindex für die kommenden drei Monate unterstreicht mit 23,13 Punkten die Hoffnung auf weitere Stabilisierung. Rund ein Drittel der Hersteller vermeldet wieder gute bis befriedigende Kapazitätsauslastungen. Allerdings vermeldet ein Drittel der Firmen fallende Erträge. Jedes zehnte Unternehmen erwartet, in den kommenden Monaten Personal reduzieren zu müssen. Das vermeldeten im letzten Quartal noch über 30 Prozent der Betriebe.

Verbandspräsidentin Martina Bandte sieht die Gefahr, dass steigende Kosten für Beschaffung und Energie die Margen drücken könnten. „Diese Kosten lassen sich derzeit kaum weiterreichen. Viele Verbraucher machen sich Sorgen um die Zukunft und sind deswegen noch sparsamer in ihren Ausgaben. Qualitätsprodukte und nachhaltig hergestellte Textilien, für die der textile Mittelstand in Deutschland steht, haben es in diesem Umfeld schwer.“

Daneben machen der Branche neue bürokratische Auflagen durch das im Juni beschlossene Lieferkettensorgfaltspflichtengesetz zu schaffen, das Anfang 2023 in Kraft tritt. „Viele Unternehmen starten jetzt in die Entwicklung der Frühjahr-/Sommerkollektion 2023. Große Kunden verlangen bereits jetzt ein umfassendes Reporting ihrer Lieferanten zu den Sorgfaltspflichten.“ Die Konsumenten sind hinsichtlich der Auswirkungen auf die Kostenstruktur für nachhaltige Produkte aber immer noch wenig sensibilisiert. Laut einer Umfrage des Gesamtverbandes textil+mode im Juni schätzen ca. zwei Drittel der Textil- und Modeunternehmen die Zahlungsbereitschaft der Endkunden in Bezug auf Nachhaltigkeitsaspekte als „eher niedrig“ ein.

Source:

Gesamtverband der deutschen Maschenindustrie e.V.

14.06.2021

Swedish automation boosts Tritex sewing operations

Founded in 1952, Svegea of Sweden – a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association – has over 60 years of experience in exclusively designing, manufacturing and installing high quality collarette band cutting machines worldwide.

These are used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as waistbands, cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements, such as Triteks Trejd.

Founded in 1994, this family-owned business employs over 280 people at its plant in Prilep, North Macedonia, where high quality cotton fabrics are expertly converted into the products of the Tritex Underwear brand.

The Prilep operation encompasses the processing of fabrics, design, cutting, sewing, quality control and packing in a fully integrated workflow.

With around 200 sewing machinists, the Tritex product range encompasses briefs, boxers, slips, t-shirts, pyjamas and body slips which are primarily sold to countries within the European Union, as well as the domestic market.

Founded in 1952, Svegea of Sweden – a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association – has over 60 years of experience in exclusively designing, manufacturing and installing high quality collarette band cutting machines worldwide.

These are used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as waistbands, cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements, such as Triteks Trejd.

Founded in 1994, this family-owned business employs over 280 people at its plant in Prilep, North Macedonia, where high quality cotton fabrics are expertly converted into the products of the Tritex Underwear brand.

The Prilep operation encompasses the processing of fabrics, design, cutting, sewing, quality control and packing in a fully integrated workflow.

With around 200 sewing machinists, the Tritex product range encompasses briefs, boxers, slips, t-shirts, pyjamas and body slips which are primarily sold to countries within the European Union, as well as the domestic market.

The company has also just completed the digitalisation of its full production via the in-house DPC-SYS system, installing around 200 industrial PCs linking each of its workstations and departments.

Triteks Trejd currently operates three of the latest Svegea collarette cutting machines and is highly satisfied with their performance, as well as the service provided by the Swedish company.

12.05.2021

Gesamtmasche erweitert das Präsidium

  • Ulrike Neubauer und Gerald Rosner einstimmig kooptiert

Die Mitgliederversammlung von Gesamtmasche hat Dr. Ulrike Neubauer, CFO und Vorstandsvorsitzende der Dr. Zwissler Holding AG (Gerstetten), und Gerald Rosner, Geschäftsführer der strickchic GmbH (Apolda), einstimmig ins Präsidium kooptiert.

Der Beschluss der Mitgliederversammlung, die bereits im April online tagte, wurde nun auch im schriftlichen Verfahren bestätigt: Das Präsidium des Gesamtverbandes der deutschen Maschenindustrie wird um zwei Mitglieder erweitert.

Dr. Ulrike Neubauer ist Vorstandsvorsitzende und Finanzvorstand der Dr. Zwissler Holding AG. Die promovierte Betriebswirtin und gebürtige Berlinerin kam nach Stationen in der Unternehmensberatung, der Chemie-, Maschinenbau und der Automobilzulieferindustrie zur Zwissler-Gruppe.

Gerald Rosner ist Geschäftsführer der strickchic GmbH. Er studierte technische Kybernetik und stieg nach der Reprivatisierung des elterlichen Traditionsbetriebes in Apolda ins Textilgeschäft ein. Neben Mode entwickelt der technikaffine Stricker smarte Textilien.

  • Ulrike Neubauer und Gerald Rosner einstimmig kooptiert

Die Mitgliederversammlung von Gesamtmasche hat Dr. Ulrike Neubauer, CFO und Vorstandsvorsitzende der Dr. Zwissler Holding AG (Gerstetten), und Gerald Rosner, Geschäftsführer der strickchic GmbH (Apolda), einstimmig ins Präsidium kooptiert.

Der Beschluss der Mitgliederversammlung, die bereits im April online tagte, wurde nun auch im schriftlichen Verfahren bestätigt: Das Präsidium des Gesamtverbandes der deutschen Maschenindustrie wird um zwei Mitglieder erweitert.

Dr. Ulrike Neubauer ist Vorstandsvorsitzende und Finanzvorstand der Dr. Zwissler Holding AG. Die promovierte Betriebswirtin und gebürtige Berlinerin kam nach Stationen in der Unternehmensberatung, der Chemie-, Maschinenbau und der Automobilzulieferindustrie zur Zwissler-Gruppe.

Gerald Rosner ist Geschäftsführer der strickchic GmbH. Er studierte technische Kybernetik und stieg nach der Reprivatisierung des elterlichen Traditionsbetriebes in Apolda ins Textilgeschäft ein. Neben Mode entwickelt der technikaffine Stricker smarte Textilien.

Gesamtmasche-Präsidentin Martina Bandte freut sich über die Unterstützung im Präsidium: „Frau Dr. Neubauer und Herrn Rosner bereichern unser Gremium hervorragend. Sie vertreten ganz unterschiedliche Bereiche der Maschenbranche und repräsentieren doch gleichermaßen textile Innovationskraft, Qualität und Wertschöpfung am Standort Deutschland.“

Geschäftsklimaindex Maschenindustrie Grafik: © Gesamtmasche
25.03.2021

Maschenindustrie in historischem Tief nach Lockdown

  • Maschenbranche beklagt erschreckende Lockdown-Schäden: „Umsatzvernichtung im großen Stil„

Nach drei Monaten im harten Lockdown ist die Stimmung in der Maschenindustrie weit unter dem Nullpunkt angelangt. „In der Branche herrschen Verzweiflung und Zorn“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin von Gesamtmasche. „Die Politik lässt uns mittelständische Hersteller im Stich.“

Der Geschäftsklimaindex zum 2. Quartal sackte steil auf -19,3 Punkte ab (Jahresanfang: -5,17) Die Erwartungsindex für die kommenden drei Monate liegt mit -16,54 Punkten weiter im extrem negativen Bereich – dabei wurde die verbandliche Geschäftsklimaumfrage vor der aktuellen Lockdown-Verlängerung bis 18. April durchgeführt. Verbandspräsidentin Martina Bandte kritisiert die unkoordinierten und wenig effektiven Corona-Maßnahmen der Regierung: „Entscheidungen einiger weniger Politiker vernichten jeden Tag Existenzen und verursachen einen drastischen Anstieg der Arbeitslosigkeit.“

  • Maschenbranche beklagt erschreckende Lockdown-Schäden: „Umsatzvernichtung im großen Stil„

Nach drei Monaten im harten Lockdown ist die Stimmung in der Maschenindustrie weit unter dem Nullpunkt angelangt. „In der Branche herrschen Verzweiflung und Zorn“, sagt Martina Bandte, Präsidentin von Gesamtmasche. „Die Politik lässt uns mittelständische Hersteller im Stich.“

Der Geschäftsklimaindex zum 2. Quartal sackte steil auf -19,3 Punkte ab (Jahresanfang: -5,17) Die Erwartungsindex für die kommenden drei Monate liegt mit -16,54 Punkten weiter im extrem negativen Bereich – dabei wurde die verbandliche Geschäftsklimaumfrage vor der aktuellen Lockdown-Verlängerung bis 18. April durchgeführt. Verbandspräsidentin Martina Bandte kritisiert die unkoordinierten und wenig effektiven Corona-Maßnahmen der Regierung: „Entscheidungen einiger weniger Politiker vernichten jeden Tag Existenzen und verursachen einen drastischen Anstieg der Arbeitslosigkeit.“

Martina Bandte zieht daraus das Fazit: „Unsere Industrie hat das Vertrauen in die wirtschaftliche und sozialpolitische Kompetenz der Regierung verloren. Konstruktive Vorschläge werden konsequent ignoriert. Und bei staatlichen Hilfen wie der Überbrückungshilfe III werden wir sogar wissentlich diskriminiert. Als Korrektiv bleibt uns nur noch der Rechtsweg.“

Die Umsatzeinbrüche in der Textil- und Bekleidungsindustrie waren bereits im Jahr 2020 beispiellos. Die Modebranche trifft es besonders hart: Nach Umsatzverlusten von gut 20 Prozent hat sie bereits knapp 9 Prozent ihrer Beschäftigten entlassen müssen. „Richtig bitter wird es aber erst im laufenden Jahr“, sagt Martina Bandte. Im nächsten Quartal muss fast ein Fünftel der Hersteller Personal abbauen. Kaufkraft und Konsumlaune dürften sich angesichts der desolaten Zustände in vielen Teilen der Wirtschaft in Grenzen halten.

Source:

Gesamtverband der deutschen Maschenindustrie - Gesamtmasche e. V.

Swedish machine builders set for Scandinavia’s Textiles 4.0 circular revolution (c) TMAS
Coloreel’s advanced rapid color formulation software and high-speed drive technology allow a single needle to carry out what previously required many multiples of them to do.
09.03.2021

Swedish machine builders set for Scandinavia’s Textiles 4.0 circular revolution

  • Several members of TMAS – the Swedish Textile Machinery Association – are actively advancing new coloration technologies as part of a wave of innovation that is currently sweeping out from Scandinavia.

New manufacturers of regenerated cellulosic fibers as alternatives to cotton and synthetics, for example, have been gaining a lot of attention recently, as they scale up to meet demands for a circular approach to the manufacturing of textiles and garments.

These companies have, in turn, been embraced by major Scandinavian brands such as the Danish clothing company Bestseller, Finnish fashion house Marimekko, Norwegian outdoor brand Bergans and Sweden’s own H&M Group.

Fiber journey
From the field or the forest to the retail shelves, however, the journey of every single textile fiber is currently a long one, in which it passes through many hands and moves around the world. The good news is that many of these individual stages are now being greatly simplified by digitalization.

  • Several members of TMAS – the Swedish Textile Machinery Association – are actively advancing new coloration technologies as part of a wave of innovation that is currently sweeping out from Scandinavia.

New manufacturers of regenerated cellulosic fibers as alternatives to cotton and synthetics, for example, have been gaining a lot of attention recently, as they scale up to meet demands for a circular approach to the manufacturing of textiles and garments.

These companies have, in turn, been embraced by major Scandinavian brands such as the Danish clothing company Bestseller, Finnish fashion house Marimekko, Norwegian outdoor brand Bergans and Sweden’s own H&M Group.

Fiber journey
From the field or the forest to the retail shelves, however, the journey of every single textile fiber is currently a long one, in which it passes through many hands and moves around the world. The good news is that many of these individual stages are now being greatly simplified by digitalization.

“Digitalization will lead to a significant reduction in garments that for one reason or another are never sold and end up in landfill,” says Therese Premler-Andersson, Secretary General of TMAS. “There will of course, be a huge ecological benefit.”

At the very center of any fiber’s journey, once it has become part of a knitted or woven fabric, are the dyeing and finishing stages of textile production. Dyeing and finishing currently involves many washing and drying process steps which add a huge burden to the overall carbon footprint of finished garments and textile products.

Coloreel expansion
Here is where the latest fully digital technologies of TMAS member companies are making a dramatic difference, such as the instant thread coloration technology, of Coloreel, which has just raised SEK 100 in new financing to support its market expansion and growth.

Initially targeting the embroidery market, Coloreel technology enables the high-quality and instant coloring of a textile thread while it is actually being used in production and can be paired with any existing embroidery machine without modification, while also making it possible to produce gradients in an embroidery for the first time.

Based on a CMYK ink system, Coloreel’s advanced rapid color formulation software and high-speed drive technology allow a single needle to carry out what previously required many multiples of them to do – and with much more consistent stitch quality,

In addition, existing thread dyeing plants can add a single solid color to a thread, but by instantly coloring a white base thread during production, Coloreel enables complete freedom to create unique embroideries without any limitations in the use of colors. Color changes along the thread can either be made rapidly from one solid color to another, or gradually, to make smooth transitions or any coloring effect desired.

This provides big benefits when it comes to sustainability. There is a significant reduction in wasted inks, while water usage is minimized, and production speeds are increased. The technology allows set-up and lead times to be reduced as well as significant flexibility in production schedules, while eliminating the need for large thread inventories.

“Our system is allowing customers to achieve color effects that have never been seen before – and at a new level of efficiency,” says VP of Sales and Marketing at Coloreel, Mats Sjögren. “We are setting the new benchmark for the embroidery industry.”

Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, Coloreel, has recently successfully delivered units to companies in Europe, the United States and Asia, and has also partnered with the world’s largest distributor of embroidery machines, American Hirsch Solutions, which has already installed the technology at a number of customers in the USA.

imogo
Another TMAS member achieving rapid progress is imogo, which is currently installing its first industrial scale Dye-Max spray dyeing line at the plant close to Borås of Swedish commission dyeing company 7H Färgeri – the Nordic region’s most complete dyeing and processing plant.

The new line has a working width of 1.8 meters with an operating speed of up to 50 meters for the reactive dyeing of cellulosic fiber-based fabrics. In addition, it can carry out the application of a wide range of fabric pre-treatments and finishing processes, providing the company with unbeatable flexibility in production.

A proven Mini-Max laboratory unit for pre-determining application volumes and color matching has also been installed at the 7H plant.

With the potential to slash the use of fresh water, wastewater, energy, and chemicals by as much as 90% compared to conventional jet dyeing systems, the DyeMax has gained considerable attention since the concept was outlined and a prototype machine constructed in 2019.

The application unit of the Dye-Max consists of a closed chamber containing a series of spray cassettes with precision nozzles for accurate and consistent coverage, in combination with the patented imogo Pro Speed valve that controls the volume to be applied.

“We are achieving an extremely low liquor ratio of around 0.5-1 liters per kilo of fabric and we fully control the pickup, applying precisely what is required to the specific fabric,” says imogo founding partner Per Stenflo. “Compared to traditional padders there is no contamination of the dyebath or dilution of the dye liquor to worry about.”
Fast changeovers with virtually no waste, together with a high production speed, enable a high productivity and unmatched production flexibility.

“The Dye-Max will be implemented in 7H daily production and producers and brands are welcome to visit when the Covid-19 situation allows. They are also welcome to do test productions at 7H to verify the performance on their fabrics.”

Perfect bridge
“Such new digital technologies from TMAS members represent the perfect bridge for sustainable new fibers on their route to the finished garments of responsible brands on the retail shelves,” concludes Therese Premler-Andersson. “There is now a real momentum building industry-wide for new circular manufacturing, and TMAS companies intend to be very much a part of it.”