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(c) Indorama Ventures PCL
21.06.2022

Indorama Ventures works with Auping and TWE Group to deliver a fully circular mattress

The sustainable collaboration and innovation between Indorama Ventures (IVL), Auping and TWE Group presented a certified cradle to cradle process for mattress components across nonwoven applications, at Techtextil, Frankfurt, 21st to 24th June 2022.

Using circular research and design, the industry partnership between IVL Mullagh (Ireland), Auping and TWE Group has resulted in a perpetual, sustainable economic business model, for manufacturers globally. The inclusion of safe raw materials within mattress manufacturing allows the materials to be easily disassembled at the product’s end of use in order to be further reused as same components or recycled into new raw material at the same quality level, to enable versatile textile applications.

The sustainable collaboration and innovation between Indorama Ventures (IVL), Auping and TWE Group presented a certified cradle to cradle process for mattress components across nonwoven applications, at Techtextil, Frankfurt, 21st to 24th June 2022.

Using circular research and design, the industry partnership between IVL Mullagh (Ireland), Auping and TWE Group has resulted in a perpetual, sustainable economic business model, for manufacturers globally. The inclusion of safe raw materials within mattress manufacturing allows the materials to be easily disassembled at the product’s end of use in order to be further reused as same components or recycled into new raw material at the same quality level, to enable versatile textile applications.

Designed for disassembly to optimize the use of existing resources, reduce carbon footprint and support customer objectives all along their customers’ supply chain. This circular industry collaboration begins with design, where the mattress is constructed using only two different base materials, 100% PET polyester textiles and steel wire pocket springs connected with Niaga®️, a non toxic reversible adhesive, making the mattress easy to disassemble and recover.

IVL, Auping and TWE’s shared vision for a better world is demonstrated through their connected and innovative circularity that helps to close the loop. Auping collects, sorts and separates the collected fabrics, which then go to IVL Mullagh for processing, melting and extrusion to form polyester staple fiber. These staple fibers are then converted by TWE Group into nonwovens for use in Auping’s Evolve mattress, a fully circular mattress. Following the end of mattress use, the material recovery process simply starts again.

Auping estimates that annually more than 40 million mattresses are disposed of in Europe alone, the majority of which are incinerated. Their take back system in the Netherlands ensures that when their new mattress is delivered, the old mattress is retrieved and recycled, irrespective of the brand, ensuring existing materials are continually optimized, diverted from landfill and kept in use to achieve a circular economy.

Source:

Indorama Ventures PCL

28.04.2022

Policy Hub: Media Masterclass on Transparency in the Apparel & Footwear Industry

Policymakers and industry stakeholders recently convened for an enlightening conversation on the challenges that the apparel and footwear industry is facing regarding the communication of reliable information to consumers and the drastic change that is needed through smart regulation. Hosted by the Policy Hub, Circularity for Apparel and Footwear, and Global Fashion Agenda, the non-profit that fosters industry collaboration on sustainability to drive impact, the masterclass presented media with views on the steps that must be taken to prevent greenwashing and empower consumers.

The Policy Hub - Circularity for Apparel and Footwear – represents more than 700 brands, retailers, manufacturers, and other stakeholders from across the globe, covering more than 50 per cent of the apparel and footwear sector. During the masterclass, Baptiste Carrière-Pradal, Chair, Policy Hub, presented its position on the EU Consumer Empowerment Initiative and the importance of Substantiating Green Claims through the new standardised methodology of the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF).

Policymakers and industry stakeholders recently convened for an enlightening conversation on the challenges that the apparel and footwear industry is facing regarding the communication of reliable information to consumers and the drastic change that is needed through smart regulation. Hosted by the Policy Hub, Circularity for Apparel and Footwear, and Global Fashion Agenda, the non-profit that fosters industry collaboration on sustainability to drive impact, the masterclass presented media with views on the steps that must be taken to prevent greenwashing and empower consumers.

The Policy Hub - Circularity for Apparel and Footwear – represents more than 700 brands, retailers, manufacturers, and other stakeholders from across the globe, covering more than 50 per cent of the apparel and footwear sector. During the masterclass, Baptiste Carrière-Pradal, Chair, Policy Hub, presented its position on the EU Consumer Empowerment Initiative and the importance of Substantiating Green Claims through the new standardised methodology of the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF).

A first panel was kicked off by the European Commission representative who provided attendees with an overview of what is new about the PEFCRs for apparel and footwear. That led to an interesting and informed discussion with brands and other organisations which showed both the benefits of the PEF and the improvements needed in its methodology for it to fully reflect the complexity of the industry.

Overall, discussions showed the need for the topic to be addressed globally, apply a clear solid method to measure the environmental impact and for much more stringent legislation to regulate and ban greenwashing. As put by Baptiste Carriere-Pradal, Chair of the Policy Hub: “There will be challenges, the journey is long but now is the time for clear and ambitious regulation that will help us change the industry.”

You can watch the Media Masterclass here.

Source:

Global Fashion Agenda

(c) Bangladesh Apparel Exchange (BAE)
25.04.2022

The Sustainable Apparel Forum brings together government representatives and industry leaders

The Sustainable Apparel Forum takes place on 10 May 2022 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, bringing together government ministers and advisors, the European Union, UN bodies, brands, global fashion campaigners, brands, manufacturers and industry leaders.

This year’s SAF, the third such event, aims to establish Bangladesh as one of the world’s most responsible apparel sourcing destinations. That’s why senior government representatives will be speaking and in attendance, listening to the needs of industry and what needs to be done to take Bangladesh garment production to the next level.

Senior representatives from globally renowned recycling and renewable energy companies will also be in attendance as well as exhibit their sustainability and green technologies, products and solutions under the same roof.

The SAF will showcase opportunities for much-needed green financing in the industry.
Issues under the spotlight will include climate action, environmental social & governance (ESG) and green finance, purchasing practices, circular economy, and regulatory reforms.

The Sustainable Apparel Forum takes place on 10 May 2022 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, bringing together government ministers and advisors, the European Union, UN bodies, brands, global fashion campaigners, brands, manufacturers and industry leaders.

This year’s SAF, the third such event, aims to establish Bangladesh as one of the world’s most responsible apparel sourcing destinations. That’s why senior government representatives will be speaking and in attendance, listening to the needs of industry and what needs to be done to take Bangladesh garment production to the next level.

Senior representatives from globally renowned recycling and renewable energy companies will also be in attendance as well as exhibit their sustainability and green technologies, products and solutions under the same roof.

The SAF will showcase opportunities for much-needed green financing in the industry.
Issues under the spotlight will include climate action, environmental social & governance (ESG) and green finance, purchasing practices, circular economy, and regulatory reforms.

Speakers of the SAF include Dr Tawfiq-e-elahi Chowdhury, Bir Bikrom, adviser to the Prime Minister of Bangladesh on power, energy and mineral resources; Salman F Rahman, MP, adviser to the Prime Minister of Bangladesh on private industry & investment; Tipu Munshi, MP, commerce minister of Bangladesh; Begum Monnujan Sufian, MP, state minister for labor and employment of Bangladesh; Saber Hossain Chowdhury, MP, chairman of parliamentary standing committee on ministry of environment, forest and climate change of Bangladesh;  Anna Athanasopoulou, head of unit for social economy & creative industries European Commission;  Barbara Bijelic, financial sector and regulatory engagement lead centre for responsible business conduct, OECD;  Lindita Xhaferi-Salihu, sectors engagement lead, UNFCCC; Gagan Bansal, global material innovation & strategy manager, H&M; Javier Santonja Olcina,  regional head, Bangladesh & Pakistan, Inditex; Faruque Hassan, president, Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers & Exporters Association (BGMEA); Dr Mark Anner, founding director, Center for Global Workers’ Rights and also professor, Penn State University, USA; Ayesha Barenblat, founder and CEO, Remake;  Najet Draper, vice president research, Better Buying; and  Tuomo Poutiainen,  country director, Bangladesh, ILO.

Source:

Bangladesh Apparel Exchange (BAE)

Photo: Pixabay
30.03.2022

EURATEX comments “Strategy for Sustainable Textile” calling for a realistic implementation

Today, March 30, the European Commission released its long-awaited Strategy for Sustainable Textile, with the ambition to move the sector towards the path of sustainability. EURATEX welcomes the EU ambitions to act on sustainable textiles and investments, in order to change how textiles are made, chosen and recovered, but calls for a smart and realistic implementation. Many European companies have already chosen this path, therefore the strategy should support them in this process, especially considering today’s energy crisis.

The strategy recognises the strategic importance of textiles, which are not only used as apparel or furniture, but applied in cars, medical equipment, agriculture, etc. It acknowledges the European Industry pro-active initiatives to tackle microplastics, to solve challenges of market surveillance and the skills needs. More cooperation is needed for re-use and recycling of textiles and to set up an EU market for secondary raw materials. On this last point, EURATEX ReHubs initiative is developing proposals to size EPR potential, to transform waste into value, and create a new capacity and jobs.

Today, March 30, the European Commission released its long-awaited Strategy for Sustainable Textile, with the ambition to move the sector towards the path of sustainability. EURATEX welcomes the EU ambitions to act on sustainable textiles and investments, in order to change how textiles are made, chosen and recovered, but calls for a smart and realistic implementation. Many European companies have already chosen this path, therefore the strategy should support them in this process, especially considering today’s energy crisis.

The strategy recognises the strategic importance of textiles, which are not only used as apparel or furniture, but applied in cars, medical equipment, agriculture, etc. It acknowledges the European Industry pro-active initiatives to tackle microplastics, to solve challenges of market surveillance and the skills needs. More cooperation is needed for re-use and recycling of textiles and to set up an EU market for secondary raw materials. On this last point, EURATEX ReHubs initiative is developing proposals to size EPR potential, to transform waste into value, and create a new capacity and jobs.

The proposed “transition pathways”, which will translate the strategy into action, will be critical in this respect: how will these sustainability targets be reached, what will the cost for SMEs be, how can companies be supported in that green transition, what about the impact on global competitiveness? These are essential questions to be addressed in the coming months.
The Textile strategy is part of much broader package, including as many as 16 new legislative actions and other policies which will directly impact on textile value chain. In particular the Sustainable Product Initiative Regulation released on March, 30 includes game-changing provisions on Digital Product Passport, Eco-Design, SMEs and Green Public Procurement.  The Regulation has an overwhelming ambition and, to be realistic, it would require a new way of joint working between institutions and business, and which builds on lessons learned on data flow across value chains, interoperability, conformity assessment and effective measures to support SMEs.

If wrongly implemented, such an unprecedented wave may cause a complete collapse of the European textile value chain under the burden of restrictions, requirements, costs and unlevel playing field. On the contrary, the changes ahead can boom the entire textile ecosystem and create a model of successful green and digital transition in manufacturing, which starts in Europe and expands globally.

Already in 2019, EURATEX asked policy makers to work together and remove barriers to circular economy, solve the market surveillance paradox in which laws are made but not checked, and to help create scale economies to make sustainable textiles affordable, hence the norm.

For example, there are 28 billion products circulating per year in EU, which is an impressive task for market surveillance authorities including customs. EURATEX has been stressing non-sufficient market surveillance and it is actively working on solutions for a fair and effective market surveillance of textile products through Reach4Textiles. EURATEX very much welcomes that the European Commission recognizes our work and the need for market surveillance by establishing more harmonised efforts in the EU.

EURATEX also welcomes the establishment of the Digital Product Passport. It has a high potential to improve every step in the textile value chain, from design and manufacturing to recycling and purchasing. At the same time, EURATEX calls the co-legislators to take into account the role of SME’s in this transition and to put forward pragmatic initiatives, supporting SME’s across the EU in a systematic approach.

Alberto Paccanelli, EURATEX President, concludes: EURATEX calls for true cooperation with all policy makers and other stakeholders across the value chains to advise, pressure-test and use this opportunity for a successful transition. Our ambition must be to reconcile sustainability, resilience and competitiveness; we know it can be done”.

Source:

EURATEX

Oerlikon Barmag celebrates its 100th anniversary (c) Oerlikon Barmag
A look at the state-of-the-art assembly of a WINGS winder
30.03.2022

Oerlikon Barmag celebrates its 100th anniversary

  • Innovation begins with creativity
  • A pioneer of the manmade fiber industry

When the manmade fiber age began a century ago, a German company was responsible for the pioneering work involved. Barmag, established in 1922, was one of the world’s first companies to construct machines for the large-scale production of synthetic staple fibers. To this day, the leading manufacturer of manmade fiber spinning systems and texturing machines in Remscheid – a brand under the aegis of the Swiss Oerlikon Group since 2007 – has shaped technological progress in this sector; in future, with ever more innovations focusing on sustainability and digitalization.

  • Innovation begins with creativity
  • A pioneer of the manmade fiber industry

When the manmade fiber age began a century ago, a German company was responsible for the pioneering work involved. Barmag, established in 1922, was one of the world’s first companies to construct machines for the large-scale production of synthetic staple fibers. To this day, the leading manufacturer of manmade fiber spinning systems and texturing machines in Remscheid – a brand under the aegis of the Swiss Oerlikon Group since 2007 – has shaped technological progress in this sector; in future, with ever more innovations focusing on sustainability and digitalization.

Barmer Maschinenfabrik Aktiengesellschaft (Barmag) is founded in Barmen, located in the Bergische Land region, on March 27, 1922. The German and Dutch founders enter unchartered technological territory, one created as the result of a groundbreaking invention: in 1884, French chemist Count Hilaire Bernigaud de Chardonnet used nitrocellulose to produce the first so-called artificial silk, later known as rayon. The following decades see rapid development focusing on the search for synthetic textile fibers and their manufacturing technologies. As one of the first machine factories, Barmag battles its way through the eventful early years of the manmade fiber industry, the ‘Roaring Twenties’ and the Great Depression – and suffers the extensive destruction of its factories at the end of World War Two. Rebuilding is successful. With the unstoppable success story of purely synthetic plastic fibers such as polyamide, the company flourishes from the 1950s through to the 1970s, establishing sites in all international, for the textile industry at the time important, industrial regions and garnering prestige across the globe in the process. In the ups and downs of expansion, global competition and crises, Barmag reaches the very pinnacle of the market and becomes the preferred technological development partner for the manmade fiber industries in China, India and Turkey. The company has been a high-impact brand under the umbrella of the Oerlikon Group since 2007.

On the wings of innovation
Today, Oerlikon Barmag is a leading supplier of manmade fiber filament spinning systems and part of the Manmade Fibers Solutions business unit of the Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions Division. And our aspirations have not diminished: “The striving towards innovation and technological leadership has been, is and will always be part of our DNA”, emphasizes Georg Stausberg, CEO of Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions. In the past, this has been observable in such trailblazing innovations as the revolutionary WINGS generation of winders for POY in 2007 and WINGS for FDY in 2012. Currently, the focus of new and further developments is very much on digitalization and sustainability. Here, Oerlikon Barmag has – as one of the world’s first systems manufacturers – been implementing fully-networked smart factories for globally-leading polyester manufacturers since the end of the last decade. Within this context, digital solutions and automation are also helping to provide greater climate and environmental compatibility. This sustainability commitment is not only evidenced by the e-save label introduced for all products back in 2004: Oerlikon is endeavoring to also make all its sites carbon-neutral by 2030 and to acquire its energy exclusively from renewable sources. An ambitious target, whose achievement could be helped by the Oerlikon Barmag anniversary, states Georg Stausberg: “Innovation begins with creativity. And remembering the past provides plenty of motivation and inspiration for the future.”

29.03.2022

Suominen launches its first carbon neutral nonwoven

Suominen launches a carbon neutral nonwoven, BIOLACE® Zero. BIOLACE® Zero is suitable for many kinds of wiping applications like baby, personal care, and household wipes. It has wet and dry strength and it’s very soft. It is made of 100% cellulosic lyocell fibers and the product is 100% biodegradable, compostable and plastic free.

BIOLACE® Zero utilizes VEOCEL™ Lyocell fibers from Suominen´s long-term partner Lenzing. BIOLACE® Zero is made of 100% carbon neutral VEOCEL™ Lyocell fibers.

“We are very excited to introduce BIOLACE® Zero, which is not just Suominen´s first carbon neutral product, but also one of the first carbon neutral nonwovens on the market. BIOLACE® Zero will be available as part of Suominen's sustainable product portfolio”, says Marika Mäkilä, Senior Manager, Category Management, Europe.

Suominen launches a carbon neutral nonwoven, BIOLACE® Zero. BIOLACE® Zero is suitable for many kinds of wiping applications like baby, personal care, and household wipes. It has wet and dry strength and it’s very soft. It is made of 100% cellulosic lyocell fibers and the product is 100% biodegradable, compostable and plastic free.

BIOLACE® Zero utilizes VEOCEL™ Lyocell fibers from Suominen´s long-term partner Lenzing. BIOLACE® Zero is made of 100% carbon neutral VEOCEL™ Lyocell fibers.

“We are very excited to introduce BIOLACE® Zero, which is not just Suominen´s first carbon neutral product, but also one of the first carbon neutral nonwovens on the market. BIOLACE® Zero will be available as part of Suominen's sustainable product portfolio”, says Marika Mäkilä, Senior Manager, Category Management, Europe.

Suominen’s BIOLACE® Zero and Lenzing’s VEOCEL™ Lyocell fibers are certified as carbon neutral products by globally recognized company, ClimatePartner. Carbon neutrality means that the greenhouse gas emissions of nonwoven have been calculated – from the raw material production to the client’s production facility – reduced and are offset through certified carbon offset projects.

“With this new carbon neutral product BIOLACE® Zero we are able to support our customers in their greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets. Innovating new products in collaboration with partners such as Lenzing by using carbon neutral VEOCEL™ Lyocell fibers is well aligned with our strategy and vision to be the frontrunner in sustainable nonwovens”, says Noora Rantanen, Manager, Sustainability & Marketing.

More information:
Suominen nonwovens Lenzing Group
Source:

Suominen

21.03.2022

OEKO-TEX® Association turns 30: Trust, Safety, Sustainability

The vision of the OEKO-TEX® Association, which was founded in March 1992 through a partnership between the Hohenstein Research Institute and the Austrian Textile Research Institute (OETI), is still reflected today in the organization's core values: trust, safety, and sustainability. For three decades, OEKO-TEX® has pursued the goal of building trust for companies and consumers and enabling them to make responsible decisions to protect people and the planet. "Our services bring transparency to the international textile and leather industry supply chains," says OEKO-TEX® Secretary General Georg Dieners. "They enable all stakeholders to make mindful decisions that help preserve our planet for future generations."

The vision of the OEKO-TEX® Association, which was founded in March 1992 through a partnership between the Hohenstein Research Institute and the Austrian Textile Research Institute (OETI), is still reflected today in the organization's core values: trust, safety, and sustainability. For three decades, OEKO-TEX® has pursued the goal of building trust for companies and consumers and enabling them to make responsible decisions to protect people and the planet. "Our services bring transparency to the international textile and leather industry supply chains," says OEKO-TEX® Secretary General Georg Dieners. "They enable all stakeholders to make mindful decisions that help preserve our planet for future generations."

OEKO-TEX® market leadership
In 1992, 20 years before the United Nations announced the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), OEKO-TEX® launched STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX®, now one of the best-known labels for product safety.
"It emerged from the Schadstoffgeprüft nach ÖTN 100(tested for harmful substances according to ÖTN 100), developed by OETI in 1989 to address increasing public interest in textile ecology and health," the Austrian Textile Research Institute reminds us. The limit values and test methods on which STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® is based were internationally standardized and are adapted to the latest scientific findings and legislation at least once a year - a principle that is applied to all OEKO-TEX® standards. Prof. Dr. Stefan Mecheels, the owner of the textile testing service provider Hohenstein, adds: "From the very beginning, we have considered the needs of all players in the textile value chain and continue to create solutions for current and future market requirements."

At least seven SDGs are firmly integrated into the OEKO-TEX® product portfolio. For example, Good Health & Well-Being (SDG 3) and Clean Water & Sanitation (SDG 6) are reflected in the STeP by OEKO-TEX® factory certification, and Responsible Consumption & Production (SDG 12) and Climate Action (SDG 13) are implemented through the comprehensive MADE IN GREEN by OEKO-TEX® product label.

Today, the international association consists of 17 independent research and testing institutes focused on textile and leather, with contact offices in over 60 countries. They are responsible for the joint development of the test methods and limit values in the OEKO-TEX® Standards and carry out laboratory tests and factory audits according to globally uniform specifications. These comprehensive product and process audits to ensure appropriate risk management, consumer and environmental protection, and legal compliance. With their wide-ranging research and development, the accredited OEKO-TEX® test institutes provide important insight for innovations within the textile and leather industry. They work in close cooperation with manufacturers and make a significant contribution to the development of high-quality textile and leather products at all stages of the value chain.

Mirror of social and political development
Being close to the market, and ideally, one step ahead is essential to supporting companies who are adapting to constantly changing conditions and meeting consumer expectations. Therefore, the development of OEKO-TEX® is not only a reflection of scientific knowledge but also of social and political trends. The focus is always on standardizing sustainable action and measures and making it easier for the industry to quickly and comprehensively implement sustainability goals.

Exchange with third parties is particularly valuable for this purpose. OEKO-TEX® participates in various international multi-stakeholder initiatives such as the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the Partnership for Sustainable Textiles, the ZHDC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals), and Greenpeace.
In addition to cooperation with external multi-stakeholder initiatives, the OEKO-TEX® International Advisory Board (IAB) meets annually. The core function of the IAB is to help review consistent and market-oriented Standards development proposals by the OEKO-TEX® Working Groups. In addition, OEKO-TEX® is conducting a public stakeholder consultation to gain further insights from all interest groups, which it will integrate into further development of the Standards.
Using three decades of experience for the future
The founding goal of enabling responsible choices that preserve our planet for future generations has become increasingly urgent over the past 30 years. So, OEKO-TEX® is even more resolute than ever in developing comprehensive solutions. We stand by industry and consumers as a trusted partner for the challenges ahead. In addition to the IMPACT CALCULATOR launched in January 2022, which helps STeP by OEKO-TEX® certified production facilities reduce their carbon emissions and water consumption, this summer, the association will launch a service to help companies transition to the upcoming Due Diligence Laws.

Source:

Oeko-Tex

RF security labels from Checkpoint Systems can be fully recycled as part of kerbside paper-based recycling collections (c) Checkpoint Systems GmbH
Checkpoint Systems PTS Sustainable Label
08.03.2022

New RF- Security Labels von Checkpoint Systems

  • Sustainability and security combined:
  • RF security labels from Checkpoint Systems can be fully recycled as part of kerbside paper-based recycling collections

To ensure that its retail customers are not negatively affecting the recyclability of product packaging by attaching security labels,Checkpoint Systems partnered with PTS – an organisation with over 70 years’experience researching the use of fibre-based solutions – to conduct a series oftechnical tests on its range of labels. The technical report concluded that consumers can safely dispose of a Checkpoint security label in a household recycling bin, without having to separate the label from the packaging, knowing that the entire pack will be recycled.

  • Sustainability and security combined:
  • RF security labels from Checkpoint Systems can be fully recycled as part of kerbside paper-based recycling collections

To ensure that its retail customers are not negatively affecting the recyclability of product packaging by attaching security labels,Checkpoint Systems partnered with PTS – an organisation with over 70 years’experience researching the use of fibre-based solutions – to conduct a series oftechnical tests on its range of labels. The technical report concluded that consumers can safely dispose of a Checkpoint security label in a household recycling bin, without having to separate the label from the packaging, knowing that the entire pack will be recycled.

The Germany-based research consultancy PTS tested a range of Checkpoint labels. PTS analysed the labels, which were different sizes and materials, to ensure that following the standard kerbside recycling process, the recycled, fibre-based material would be of acceptable quality. Each label was applied to a piece of cartonboard to simulate a real-world scenario and the results show that all are classified as being recyclable in accordance with current regulations. All labels – including the 410 RF, 2928 RF and 4210 RF labels – achieved an excellent overall recyclability rate of over 94%.

Sustainability is essential

With brands making strong commitments to sustainability – including investing in more environmentally friendly forms of packaging like cartonboard – and consumers increasingly demonstrating their preferences for sustainable packaging it is pivotal that anything applied to an item – at any point along the supply chain or in-store – does not affect the recyclability of its packaging.

Security labels play a vital role in ensuring products remain available to purchase. Retailers have been using a diverse range of labels to protect their merchandise, working with suppliers to ‘tag’ items at source or relying on store associates to apply labels in-store. As one of the largest suppliers of RF-based Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) labels globally, Checkpoint’s labels are applied to millions of products, which are packaged in different materials. Typically, when recycled, packaging labels tend to end up in a combination of different rubbish and recycling streams, depending on the packaging material and the consumer commitment to recycling.

Until today, the recyclability of these labels has been relatively unknown. It means that retailers and consumers could inadvertently be contaminating the paper-based packaging recycling stream with millions of security labels – still attached to packaging which could have otherwise been recycled up to 25 times.

“Security labels play an important role in helping retailers protect their profits, but it is vital they don’t stop packaging from being recycled. We are delighted to have achieved this accreditation from PTS that shows our labels can be recycled through the existing kerbside collections. It means that brands and retailers can be assured they are not negatively affecting a country’s recycling rate, while also knowing their customers can conveniently dispose of the entire pack, packaging material and label, in the same household recycling bin. Our labels passed all of PTS’ stringent tests meaning they have little to no impact on the recyclability of a piece of cartonboard packaging." 

Kornit Digital and Fashion-Enter Bring Fashion and Textile Production Back to the UK with Sustainable, On-Demand Digital Manufacturing (c) Kornit
Kornit Digital & Fashion Enter Innovation Centre
08.03.2022

Kornit Digital and Fashion-Enter Bring Fashion and Textile Production Back to the UK with Sustainable, On-Demand Digital Manufacturing

  • Unveil UK’s first-ever sustainable Fashtech Innovation Centre, displaying mass customization capabilities empowering designers, apparel brands, and other creatives

Kornit Digital Ltd. (NASDAQ: KRNT), a worldwide market leader in sustainable, on-demand digital fashionx and textile production technologies and Fashion-Enter - a social enteprise, which strives to be a centre of excellence for sampling, grading, production, and for learning and development of skills within the fashion and textiles industry – today announced a first-of-its-kind Fashtech Innovation Centre in London. Aimed at bringing on-demand fashion and textile mass customization back to the UK, and unveiled on March 3rd and 4th, 2022 at Fashion-Enter's state-of-the-art training and manufacturing site, the Centre is fully supported by Kornit Digital's revolutionary, direct-to-fabric and direct-to-garment digital production solutions.

  • Unveil UK’s first-ever sustainable Fashtech Innovation Centre, displaying mass customization capabilities empowering designers, apparel brands, and other creatives

Kornit Digital Ltd. (NASDAQ: KRNT), a worldwide market leader in sustainable, on-demand digital fashionx and textile production technologies and Fashion-Enter - a social enteprise, which strives to be a centre of excellence for sampling, grading, production, and for learning and development of skills within the fashion and textiles industry – today announced a first-of-its-kind Fashtech Innovation Centre in London. Aimed at bringing on-demand fashion and textile mass customization back to the UK, and unveiled on March 3rd and 4th, 2022 at Fashion-Enter's state-of-the-art training and manufacturing site, the Centre is fully supported by Kornit Digital's revolutionary, direct-to-fabric and direct-to-garment digital production solutions.

According to Kornit Digital’s Impact and Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) report, 30 percent of textile production is overproduction, while 95 percent of water waste is created as companies globally look towards more sustainable futures with customized, creative, and real-time offerings. Using proprietary streamlined, eco-friendly digital production technologies, Kornit Digital is transforming the fashion industry with more efficient and sustainable processes. According to the same report, by 2026, the Company’s systems will use up to 95 percent less water, 94 percent less energy and produce 83 percent less greenhouse gas emissions.

In addition to highlighting production capabilities that minimize carbon footprint, the Fashtech Innovation Centre serves as a prototype for brands and fulfillers seeking to mitigate logistical complexities, time-to-market, and supply chain risks by bringing production nearer to the end consumer. Eliminating overproduction and producing on demand, this nearshoring model drives profitability even in highly regulated and high-cost markets while contributing to local economies and removing transport-related waste.

Serving as a fulfilment site and academy for training production, the Centre includes both Kornit Presto direct-to-fabric and Kornit Atlas MAX direct-to-garment systems, as well as numerous graphic design and workflow tools and systems to enable cut-and-sew operations for a comprehensive “pixel to parcel to doorstep” cycle. Consolidating the process into a single location helps maintain full visibility and control of operations and products. Taking this one step further for creators and brands, visitors can experience the KornitX Global Fulfilment Network, enabling customers to create both new sales channels and accessibility to enable production on demand. Attendees can see how Kornit’s single-step digital production technology empowers unlimited graphic expression using less floor space, resources, waste, and time—all at higher margins.

“This Innovation Centre makes it possible to capture the full, end-to-end production process in one, single location,” said Jenny Holloway, Chief Executive Officer, Fashion-Enter. “The beauty of having print on demand means there are no minimums, so we can make one garment, or we can make up to 30,000 garments a week from all locations at the same fixed cost. Here, we can also train future generations on the right way of producing garments for today, responsive to demand, with minimal waste—ethical and sustainable. This is the future of fashion and textiles.”

18.02.2022

Indorama Ventures acquires 85% equity stake in UCY Polymers CZ s.r.o. (UCY)

  • New partnership will recycle over 1.6 billion PET beverage bottles in the Czech Republic by 2025

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), the world’s largest producer of recycled PET for beverage bottles, completed a deal for an 85% equity stake in Czech Republic-based PET plastic recycler, UCY Polymers CZ s.r.o. (UCY), boosting the country and Europe’s plastic collection and recycling ambitions.

As a result of the investment, IVL will recycle about 1.12 billion additional post-consumer PET (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic bottles in the Czech Republic every year by 2025, increasing the total bottles recycled by UCY across the Czech Republic, Germany and Central Europe to 1.6 billion bottles per year. IVL, a global sustainable chemicals company, is investing USD1.5 billion globally to expand recycling facilities and sustainable production, including boosting its recycling capacity to 750,000 tons per year by 2025.

  • New partnership will recycle over 1.6 billion PET beverage bottles in the Czech Republic by 2025

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), the world’s largest producer of recycled PET for beverage bottles, completed a deal for an 85% equity stake in Czech Republic-based PET plastic recycler, UCY Polymers CZ s.r.o. (UCY), boosting the country and Europe’s plastic collection and recycling ambitions.

As a result of the investment, IVL will recycle about 1.12 billion additional post-consumer PET (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic bottles in the Czech Republic every year by 2025, increasing the total bottles recycled by UCY across the Czech Republic, Germany and Central Europe to 1.6 billion bottles per year. IVL, a global sustainable chemicals company, is investing USD1.5 billion globally to expand recycling facilities and sustainable production, including boosting its recycling capacity to 750,000 tons per year by 2025.

UCY is a strategic fit for IVL as a backward integration into the company’s expanding recycled PET (rPET) footprint in Europe and across the world to secure feedstock for rPET products. UCY can produce 40,000 tonnes of recycled PET flake per year. IVL will develop UCY to serve the increasing demand for recycled PET in Europe.

UCY will work with IVL’s existing PET flake production facilities in the region. These provide the washed and shredded post-consumer bottles as PET flake feedstock to produce recycled PET resin that is suitable for food contact use. PET is fully recyclable and the most collected and recycled plastic packaging in Europe.

09.02.2022

AFRY to design sustainable textile fibre biofactory for Altri in Spain

Altri has awarded AFRY engineering, site selection and integrated environmental authorization services assignment for a greenfield textile fiber factory in Spain. In addition, AFRY will support Altri to conceive, create and implement foundations for Industry 4.0 technologies in this new plant.

The demand for sustainable textile fibres is growing quickly globally. To support this growth, the Portuguese pulp producer Altri has become the industrial partner to public-private consortium Impulsa (Society for the Development of Strategic Projects of Galicia) as the lead investor and technologist to study the wood-based textile fibers biofactory exclusively. This biofactory will use Galician wood as the primary raw material together with recycled remains from the textile industry to produce dissolving pulp and Lyocell fibre. The plant will be designed based on the best available techniques (BAT), best environmental practices, as well as cutting-edge proven technologies and the production will be fossil-fuel-free. The project is expected to benefit from the “Next Generation EU” program.

Altri has awarded AFRY engineering, site selection and integrated environmental authorization services assignment for a greenfield textile fiber factory in Spain. In addition, AFRY will support Altri to conceive, create and implement foundations for Industry 4.0 technologies in this new plant.

The demand for sustainable textile fibres is growing quickly globally. To support this growth, the Portuguese pulp producer Altri has become the industrial partner to public-private consortium Impulsa (Society for the Development of Strategic Projects of Galicia) as the lead investor and technologist to study the wood-based textile fibers biofactory exclusively. This biofactory will use Galician wood as the primary raw material together with recycled remains from the textile industry to produce dissolving pulp and Lyocell fibre. The plant will be designed based on the best available techniques (BAT), best environmental practices, as well as cutting-edge proven technologies and the production will be fossil-fuel-free. The project is expected to benefit from the “Next Generation EU” program.

Altri is responsible for designing and developing the biofactory project to transform wood into a textile fiber, evaluating site locations and exploring alliances with the entire value chain. Altri has assigned AFRY to support the project development and planned project implementation.  

The industrial biorefinery to be built from scratch will be able to provide the textile cluster of the Iberian peninsula with sustainable cellulosic fibers, contributing to the strengthening of the circular economy and decarbonisation of an important economic sector such as the textile sector.

AFRY has been involved in the project development from the very early stages. AFRY supported the project concept idea initially developed by Altri and led the preliminary feasibility study. A multi-disciplinary team of AFRY’s engineering and consulting experts is currently supporting Altri on the site selection activities, engineering and permitting processes.

More information:
AFRY Altri Fibers
Source:

Afry

01.02.2022

EURATEX: High energy costs undermine crucial transformation of the textile and clothing industry

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

The current energy crisis is impacting on the competitiveness of the European textile and clothing industry. Because there are limited alternatives to the use of gas in different parts of the production process, production costs increase sharply. EURATEX asks the European Commission and Member States to urgently support the industry to avoid company closures. At the same time, we need a long term vision to move towards climate neutrality, while keeping the T&C industry internationally competitive.

EURATEX presented ten key requirements to Kadri Simson, European Commissioner for Energy, to develop such a vision:

  1. The apparel and textile industry needs a safe supply with sufficient green energy (electricity and gas) at internationally competitive prices.
  2. The transformation of industry requires access to very significant amounts of renewable energy at competitive costs. Additional investments in infrastructure will also be needed to guarantee access to new renewable energy supplies.
  3. Until a global (or at least G 20 level) carbon price or other means for a global level playing field in climate protection are implemented, competitive prices for green energy must be granted at European or national levels (e.g. CCfDs, reduction on levies, targeted subsidies).
  4. As the European textile and clothing sector faces global competition mainly form countries/regions with less stringent climate ambitions, it is of utmost importance that the European textile and clothing companies are prevented form direct and indirect carbon leakage.
  5. EU-policy should support solutions, e.g. through targeted subsidies (for hydrogen, energy grids, R&D, technology roadmap studies etc.).
  6. A dedicated approach for SMEs might be appropriate as SMEs do not have the skills/know-how to further improve their energy efficiency and/or becoming carbon neutral.
  7. CAPEX and OPEX support will be necessary for breakthrough technologies, like hydrogen.
  8. The Fit-for-55-Package must support the European Textile and Clothing industry in decarbonization and carbon neutrality. The EU must therefore advocate a global level playing field more than before. The primary goal must be to establish an internationally uniform, binding CO2 pricing, preferably in the form of a standard at G-7 / G-20 level.
  9. EU-policy must not hinder solutions, e.g. we need reasonable state aid rules (compensating the gap between national energy or climate levies and a globally competitive energy price should not be seen as a subsidy).
  10. The European Textile and Clothing industry has made use of economically viable potentials to continuously improve energy efficiency over many years and decades. The obligation to implement further measures must be taken considering investment cycles that are in line with practice. Attention must be paid to the proportionality of costs without weakening the competitive position in the EU internal market or with competitors outside the EU.

Please see the attached position paper for more information.

Source:

EURATEX

27.01.2022

OCA, GOTS and Textile Exchange expand GM Cotton Testing Lab Initiative

Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), the Organic Cotton Accelerator (OCA) and Textile Exchange are delighted to announce the renewal of the global ISO IWA 32:2019 proficiency test for a second year in a row, under technical support from Wageningen Food Safety Research.

The initiative aims to provide the sector with an up-to-date overview of global laboratories that can currently conduct GMO testing as per the ISO IWA 32:2019 protocol – a common language among laboratories worldwide to screen for the potential presence of genetically modified (GM) cotton along the organic cotton value chain.

Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), the Organic Cotton Accelerator (OCA) and Textile Exchange are delighted to announce the renewal of the global ISO IWA 32:2019 proficiency test for a second year in a row, under technical support from Wageningen Food Safety Research.

The initiative aims to provide the sector with an up-to-date overview of global laboratories that can currently conduct GMO testing as per the ISO IWA 32:2019 protocol – a common language among laboratories worldwide to screen for the potential presence of genetically modified (GM) cotton along the organic cotton value chain.

The joint project involving three global NGOs in the textile sector, announces that it has reached a new milestone with an expanded list of twenty-one laboratories from Europe, Asia and North America who have successfully passed a new round of the proficiency test in 2021.

As qualitative GM cotton screening using the ISO IWA 32:2019 protocol is mandatory within the GOTS and OCS (Organic Content Standard) supply chain and OCA’s Farm programme, the expanded list will provide many stakeholders in Organic Cotton with the clarity they need for taking all reasonable precautions to prevent GM cotton in their organic cotton produce while supporting the rapid sector growth seen globally.

The updated overview of the laboratories that successfully passed the proficiency test in 2021 has now been jointly published by GOTS, OCA and Textile Exchange.

The initiative now in its second year, will drive greater transparency along the organic cotton supply chain in a move that the partners hope will become a fixed bi-annual initiative stemming from the positive feedback from the initial launch in 2020.

The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe (c) Mimaki EMEA
Traditionally, apparel manufacturing has centred on a production chain model of sourcing materials and producing garments in bulk, microfactories are now enabling on-demand, on-location production
12.01.2022

Mimaki Europe: The Green Revolution

  • The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe

With the all-important COP26 Climate Change Conference having taken centre stage in November, there is no time like the present for the fashion world to rally together in stepping up sustainability efforts and getting carbon emissions under control. Globally, the fashion industry is now estimated to account for around 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 20 percent of wastewater , making the pursuit of greener production methods more pertinent than ever before. Thankfully, we are seeing a new era of production enter the fashion arena, with the increasing emergence of technologically advanced, highly automated microfactories.

Along with reducing unnecessary waste through on-demand production, microfactories have a smaller ecological footprint than traditional garment production and require no water use during the production process, making it not only a faster solution, but a greener one too.

  • The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe

With the all-important COP26 Climate Change Conference having taken centre stage in November, there is no time like the present for the fashion world to rally together in stepping up sustainability efforts and getting carbon emissions under control. Globally, the fashion industry is now estimated to account for around 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 20 percent of wastewater , making the pursuit of greener production methods more pertinent than ever before. Thankfully, we are seeing a new era of production enter the fashion arena, with the increasing emergence of technologically advanced, highly automated microfactories.

Along with reducing unnecessary waste through on-demand production, microfactories have a smaller ecological footprint than traditional garment production and require no water use during the production process, making it not only a faster solution, but a greener one too.

Last year’s FESPA saw Mimaki team up with fashion designer Carolina Guzman to bring her designs to life in real time at the show, setting up its own working microfactory live on-site to take her designs from screen to garment within just a day. Guzman’s designs were created using Mimaki’s TS100-1600 Sublimation Printer, before being transferred to textile, digitally cut and finally pieced together. Devised with a string of ethical and environmental objectives threaded throughout, the microfactory also exclusively utilised eco-friendly Greentex fabric, and any remaining material was donated to Sheltersuit: a wind- and waterproof coat that can be transformed into a sleeping bag, which is provided free of charge to homeless people and refugees.

Through working with a number of strategic partners – including transfer printing expert, Klieverik; paper solutions specialist, Neenah Coldenhove; and digital cutting equipment provider, Summa – Mimaki was able to produce a collection of unique, high-quality garments live on the stand during the tradeshow, demonstrating to visitors from more than 100 countries some of the key reasons that microfactories seem set to change the future of fashion…

Unparalleled speed and versatility
Where traditionally, apparel manufacturing has centred on a production chain model of sourcing materials and producing garments in bulk, microfactories are now enabling on-demand, on-location production, making it possible to create everything from unique, one-off pieces and samples right through to entire product lines – all at unprecedented speeds. This means greater flexibility and customisation, enabling designers to modify or update designs and respond to market trends as they occur.

Simplified supply chains and minimised risk
The microfactory setup brings production in-house and on-demand, minimising the cost of not only storing stock, but also of shipping it and responsibly disposing of unsold items. Where recent geopolitical events have highlighted the fragility of global supply chains, microfactories offer a unique independence from these systems, empowering garment manufacturers to future-proof their businesses, become less reliant on external systems and suppliers, and reduce the risk of disruptions.

A boosted bottom line and a greener future
Facilitating savings in a whole line of resources, from physical storage and production space to time and energy, microfactories ultimately have the potential to significantly increase profitability for garment manufacturers, with the additional benefit of being easily scalable as production increases. Perhaps even more compelling, however, are the environmental considerations. Demonstrated on a small scale through Mimaki’s recent project, the environmental benefits inherent to microfactory production will have an even greater impact as it becomes more prolific and commonplace throughout the fashion world, with the potential to effect meaningful environmental change as adoption increases in the years to come.

06.01.2022

Indorama Ventures in the in the Global Children's Rights and Business 2021 benchmark

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a global sustainable chemical company, has been recognized as an “Achiever” in the Global Children's Rights and Business 2021 benchmark by the Global Child Forum. The company has been ranked 7th out of 28 global chemical companies and is the only Southeast Asia-based company included in the Basic Materials category this year.

This recognition demonstrates IVL's commitment to supporting children's rights and child-friendly business practices in the workplace, marketplace, and community and environment by adopting Children's Rights and Business Principles (CRBP) of UNICEF. The company has a wide range of initiatives that ensure children’s rights, in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of good health and well-being, quality education, gender equality, clean water and sanitation, and decent work and economic growth.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a global sustainable chemical company, has been recognized as an “Achiever” in the Global Children's Rights and Business 2021 benchmark by the Global Child Forum. The company has been ranked 7th out of 28 global chemical companies and is the only Southeast Asia-based company included in the Basic Materials category this year.

This recognition demonstrates IVL's commitment to supporting children's rights and child-friendly business practices in the workplace, marketplace, and community and environment by adopting Children's Rights and Business Principles (CRBP) of UNICEF. The company has a wide range of initiatives that ensure children’s rights, in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of good health and well-being, quality education, gender equality, clean water and sanitation, and decent work and economic growth.

Chief among IVL’s contributions to children’s rights is the Recycling Education program for the younger generation. The program aims at creating awareness and providing knowledge about recycling and waste separation, in which everyone can take part. By supporting youth as a priority, the program aims to educate future business and community leaders how to lead their organizations, communities, and other consumers in doing the right thing to protect our environment. During the past few years, the program has educated almost 50,000 people of which are students from more than 100 schools. Initiated in Thailand, IVL is now expanding the Recycling Education where it operates globally.

The State of Children's Rights and Business 2021 benchmark report is produced by the Global Child Forum, a leading children’s rights organization, and the Boston Consulting Group by surveying 832 large global companies in nine industries and assessing 27 standardized metrics from its Code of Conduct. This report focuses on the rights of children along with sustainability supervision based on publicly available information.

More information:
Indorama IVL SDG Global Child Forum
Source:

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited

15.12.2021

AFRY & Infinited Fiber: Bio-based textile fibers from waste

Finland-based circular fashion and textile technology group Infinited Fiber Company has selected AFRY as the main engineering partner for its new flagship factory for producing regenerated textile fibers for leading fashion and apparel brands.

More than 92 million tonnes of textile waste are produced globally every year, with much of it ending up in landfills or incinerators. At the same time, textile fiber demand is increasing rapidly. Infinited Fiber Company’s technology turns cellulose-based raw materials, like cotton-rich textile waste, into a premium regenerated textile fiber that goes by the name Infinna™. The technology, which can be licensed for both new factories and to retrofit existing pulp or viscose production units, offers a solution for eliminating waste and reducing the textile industry’s burden on limited virgin resources.

Finland-based circular fashion and textile technology group Infinited Fiber Company has selected AFRY as the main engineering partner for its new flagship factory for producing regenerated textile fibers for leading fashion and apparel brands.

More than 92 million tonnes of textile waste are produced globally every year, with much of it ending up in landfills or incinerators. At the same time, textile fiber demand is increasing rapidly. Infinited Fiber Company’s technology turns cellulose-based raw materials, like cotton-rich textile waste, into a premium regenerated textile fiber that goes by the name Infinna™. The technology, which can be licensed for both new factories and to retrofit existing pulp or viscose production units, offers a solution for eliminating waste and reducing the textile industry’s burden on limited virgin resources.

Infinited Fiber Company currently operates pilot plants in Finland and has announced plans to build a flagship factory there to meet the strong demand from international clothing brands. The flagship factory will be the first of its kind in the world and will use post-consumer textile waste as feedstock. Production is scheduled to begin in 2024. In Finland, the national-level collection of textile waste will begin in 2023, and in the EU, the collection of textile waste will become mandatory in 2025, which will facilitate raw material supply.

The annual production capacity of the plant is planned at 30,000 tonnes of Infinna fiber, which corresponds to the amount of fiber needed for about 100 million t-shirts. Infinited Fiber Company has already sold a significant portion of future production through multi-year sales deals with global fashion brands, who see its regenerated Infinna fiber as an important part of their own circular economy strategies.

AFRY’s assignment includes the basic engineering of the new factory to support the final investment decision. In this basic engineering phase, AFRY will design the combination of several technology and equipment deliveries into one viable plant. AFRY will also provide its AFRY Smart Site services for the digitalization of the factory, utilizing Industry 4.0 technologies to optimize and digitally connect all the factory's processes and operations.

(c) Indorama Ventures
18.11.2021

Indorama Ventures included in the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI)

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a global sustainable chemical company, announced its inclusion in the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index (DJSI World) and the Dow Jones Sustainability Emerging Markets Index (DJSI Emerging Markets) for the third and fifth consecutive year respectively. The successive years of DJSI inclusion reflect IVL’s strong commitment to sustainability with globally recognized industry best-in-class practices.

This year, 139 chemical companies were selected from more than 11,000 companies from 61 industries and about 5,300 companies eligible for S&P Global ESG indices. IVL ranked in the 97th percentile with full scores in the areas of environmental and social compliance, enabling policies through industry associations, human rights protections in the workplace and value chain, and sustainable water management including forecasting potential water related risks in operations.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL), a global sustainable chemical company, announced its inclusion in the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index (DJSI World) and the Dow Jones Sustainability Emerging Markets Index (DJSI Emerging Markets) for the third and fifth consecutive year respectively. The successive years of DJSI inclusion reflect IVL’s strong commitment to sustainability with globally recognized industry best-in-class practices.

This year, 139 chemical companies were selected from more than 11,000 companies from 61 industries and about 5,300 companies eligible for S&P Global ESG indices. IVL ranked in the 97th percentile with full scores in the areas of environmental and social compliance, enabling policies through industry associations, human rights protections in the workplace and value chain, and sustainable water management including forecasting potential water related risks in operations.

Yash Lohia, Chief Sustainability Officer at Indorama Ventures, said, "As a global leader, this is an important milestone in our operations as we transform the chemical industry. Our inclusion in the DJSI for the fifth year running is a tribute to how IVL’s operations are contributing to a more sustainable future. Our strategy includes focusing on climate action, aligning with the world's net zero ambitions, strengthening the circular economy and PET recycling with our ambitious targets, and enhancing shared value with our stakeholders.”

The Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI) are a global benchmark for sustainability-driven companies, evaluating material governance & economic, environmental and social factors.

Source:

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited

(c) Abu Dhabi Government Media Office
15.11.2021

Partnership between ADNOC and Borealis to expand Borouge Facility

  • ADNOC and Borealis confirm final investment agreement to build Borouge 4 in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE), which will produce 1.4 million tons of polyethylene per annum
  • Expansion project includes construction of a 1.5 million tonnes ethane cracker, two state-of-the-art Borstar® polyethylene plants and a cross-linked polyethylene plant
  • Borouge 4 will meet growing customer demand across the Middle East, Africa and Asia with differentiated polyolefin solutions in energy, infrastructure, and advanced packaging
  • New facility will benefit from industry-leading technologies to significantly improve energy efficiency and lower emissions, with carbon capture study underway
  • Upon expansion, Borouge will be the world's largest single-site polyolefin complex and will supply feedstock to TA'ZIZ Industrial Chemicals Zone Body

ADNOC and Borealis AG signed an USD 6.2 billion investment agreement to build the fourth Borouge facility – Borouge 4 – at the polyolefin manufacturing complex in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

  • ADNOC and Borealis confirm final investment agreement to build Borouge 4 in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE), which will produce 1.4 million tons of polyethylene per annum
  • Expansion project includes construction of a 1.5 million tonnes ethane cracker, two state-of-the-art Borstar® polyethylene plants and a cross-linked polyethylene plant
  • Borouge 4 will meet growing customer demand across the Middle East, Africa and Asia with differentiated polyolefin solutions in energy, infrastructure, and advanced packaging
  • New facility will benefit from industry-leading technologies to significantly improve energy efficiency and lower emissions, with carbon capture study underway
  • Upon expansion, Borouge will be the world's largest single-site polyolefin complex and will supply feedstock to TA'ZIZ Industrial Chemicals Zone Body

ADNOC and Borealis AG signed an USD 6.2 billion investment agreement to build the fourth Borouge facility – Borouge 4 – at the polyolefin manufacturing complex in Ruwais, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

The world-scale expansion confirms both partners’ commitment to the growth of Borouge and to support chemical production, and advanced manufacturing and industry in Ruwais, a key pillar of Abu Dhabi and the UAE’s technology, innovation and industrial development strategy. Borouge produces crucial industrial raw materials, which are exported to customers globally and used by local companies, boosting local industrial supply chains and enhancing In-Country Value.

Borouge 4 will capitalize on the projected growth in customer demand for polyolefins, driven by their use in manufactured products in the Middle East, Africa and Asia. The facility will also enable the next phase of growth at the Ruwais Industrial Complex by supplying feedstock to the TA’ZIZ Industrial Chemicals Zone.

Borouge 4 will have an industry-leading focus on sustainability leveraging the capabilities of both shareholders. The facility will utilize Borealis’ proprietary Borstar technology, to produce a product portfolio focused on durable applications for energy, infrastructure, advanced packaging, and agriculture sectors. This unique technology, in combination with hexene co-monomer, will enable the production of advanced packaging grades with up to 50% recycled polyethylene content.

Subject to an in-depth study, a Carbon Capture unit that would reduce CO2 emissions by 80% could also be operational in time for Borouge 4’s start-up. The facility is also designed to capitalize on ADNOC’s recent initiatives on clean energy, decarbonizing its power supply through access to Abu Dhabi’s clean power sources. These initiatives are aligned with the UAE Net Zero by 2050 Strategic Initiative.

The first Borouge facility, producing 450,000 tons of polyethylene per annum was commissioned in 2001. Borouge 2 and Borouge 3 took capacity to 2 million tons and 4.5 million tons of polyethylene and polypropylene per annum in 2010 and 2014 respectively.  Borouge 4 will boost the company’s annual polyolefin production to 6.4 million tons, making Borouge one of the world’s largest single-site polyolefin facilities.

The new Borouge 4 facility will comprise:

  • An ethane cracker, with 1.5 million tons ethylene output per annum, which will be the fourth cracker in Borouge’s integrated petrochemical complex in Ruwais
  • Two additional Borstar® polyethylene (PE) plants, each with 700 thousand tons per annum capacity, using state-of-the-art Borealis Borstar third generation (3G) technology
  • A cross-linked PE (XLPE) plant of 100 thousand tons per annum capacity.
  • A hexene-1 unit, which will produce co-monomers for certain grades of polyethylene.
Source:

Borealis

Dr. Annegret Vester (c) CHT Germany GmbH
Dr. Annegret Vester
29.10.2021

CHT Germany GmbH: Dr. Annegret Vester is Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO)

As of October 1, 2021, Dr. Annegret Vester has assumed responsibility for sustainability issues of the CHT Group. With the Doctor of Chemistry, the ideal person for the CSO position could be found in many respects.
 
Dr. Vester has many years of experience in the transformation of CHT into today's sustainability-focused chemical company in her positions as Head of Global CHT Marketing and as Head of Strategy and Business Development.

In recent years, she has been responsible for the company's excellent rating in the EcoVadis assessment with regard to corporate social responsibility activities. The realignment of the corporate strategy with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG) has been one of her tasks, as has the annually published CHT Sustainability Report documenting the measures and successes.

With the appointment of Dr. Vester, the CHT Management Board once again underlines the essential importance of sustainability for the strategic orientation of the globally operating group of companies.

As of October 1, 2021, Dr. Annegret Vester has assumed responsibility for sustainability issues of the CHT Group. With the Doctor of Chemistry, the ideal person for the CSO position could be found in many respects.
 
Dr. Vester has many years of experience in the transformation of CHT into today's sustainability-focused chemical company in her positions as Head of Global CHT Marketing and as Head of Strategy and Business Development.

In recent years, she has been responsible for the company's excellent rating in the EcoVadis assessment with regard to corporate social responsibility activities. The realignment of the corporate strategy with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG) has been one of her tasks, as has the annually published CHT Sustainability Report documenting the measures and successes.

With the appointment of Dr. Vester, the CHT Management Board once again underlines the essential importance of sustainability for the strategic orientation of the globally operating group of companies.

More information:
CHT Germany GmbH CHT Germany
Source:

CHT Germany GmbH

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres form collaboration to establish a European closed loop for fashion
Logo
20.10.2021

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres form collaboration to establish a European closed loop for fashion

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres Gmbh have signed a Letter of Intent for a long term commercial collaboration to add the crucial missing link for a circular economy for textiles in Europe. Together, the two technology leaders will collaborate on developing com mercial scale production of superior quality viscose fibers from up to 10 000 tonnes of Renewcell’s 100% textile recycled material Circulose® annually. The collaboration paves the way toward a fully European closed loop in which textile waste is collected, recycled and regenerated into new Circulose® fibers for people that want to reduce their fashion footprint significantly.

Renewcell and Kelheim Fibres Gmbh have signed a Letter of Intent for a long term commercial collaboration to add the crucial missing link for a circular economy for textiles in Europe. Together, the two technology leaders will collaborate on developing com mercial scale production of superior quality viscose fibers from up to 10 000 tonnes of Renewcell’s 100% textile recycled material Circulose® annually. The collaboration paves the way toward a fully European closed loop in which textile waste is collected, recycled and regenerated into new Circulose® fibers for people that want to reduce their fashion footprint significantly.

"European fashion consumption has great impact on climate and the environment globally. It also contributes to tremendous amounts of waste going into landfill and incinerators either in Europe or abroad after export. We will now work with Kelheim to prevent waste and reduce the need for virgin resources, while also enabling a fully regional supply of low impact circular fibers for text iles” comments Patrik Lundström, CEO of Renewcell. “We are thrilled for the opportunity to work closely with a partner like Kelheim, who is at the leading edge of innovation and sustainability in this industry” he adds.

Craig Barker, CEO at Kelheim Fibres adds: "We see an excellent fit between our two companies, not only on the technical side with Renewcell we have found a highly professional partner who shares our vision for future forward technologies that enable full circularity in the textile chain. Finding the answers to the challenges of our times is what drives us every day. Our recycled cellulose fibre solution made of Renewcell’s Circulose® and manufactured using environmentally sound processes at our Kelheim plant is an answer to the fashi on industries need for sustainable, resource and waste reducing solutions, and a more regional and reliable supply chain."

Source:

Kelheim Fibres GmbH