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Oerlikon Barmag celebrates its 100th anniversary (c) Oerlikon Barmag
A look at the state-of-the-art assembly of a WINGS winder
30.03.2022

Oerlikon Barmag celebrates its 100th anniversary

  • Innovation begins with creativity
  • A pioneer of the manmade fiber industry

When the manmade fiber age began a century ago, a German company was responsible for the pioneering work involved. Barmag, established in 1922, was one of the world’s first companies to construct machines for the large-scale production of synthetic staple fibers. To this day, the leading manufacturer of manmade fiber spinning systems and texturing machines in Remscheid – a brand under the aegis of the Swiss Oerlikon Group since 2007 – has shaped technological progress in this sector; in future, with ever more innovations focusing on sustainability and digitalization.

  • Innovation begins with creativity
  • A pioneer of the manmade fiber industry

When the manmade fiber age began a century ago, a German company was responsible for the pioneering work involved. Barmag, established in 1922, was one of the world’s first companies to construct machines for the large-scale production of synthetic staple fibers. To this day, the leading manufacturer of manmade fiber spinning systems and texturing machines in Remscheid – a brand under the aegis of the Swiss Oerlikon Group since 2007 – has shaped technological progress in this sector; in future, with ever more innovations focusing on sustainability and digitalization.

Barmer Maschinenfabrik Aktiengesellschaft (Barmag) is founded in Barmen, located in the Bergische Land region, on March 27, 1922. The German and Dutch founders enter unchartered technological territory, one created as the result of a groundbreaking invention: in 1884, French chemist Count Hilaire Bernigaud de Chardonnet used nitrocellulose to produce the first so-called artificial silk, later known as rayon. The following decades see rapid development focusing on the search for synthetic textile fibers and their manufacturing technologies. As one of the first machine factories, Barmag battles its way through the eventful early years of the manmade fiber industry, the ‘Roaring Twenties’ and the Great Depression – and suffers the extensive destruction of its factories at the end of World War Two. Rebuilding is successful. With the unstoppable success story of purely synthetic plastic fibers such as polyamide, the company flourishes from the 1950s through to the 1970s, establishing sites in all international, for the textile industry at the time important, industrial regions and garnering prestige across the globe in the process. In the ups and downs of expansion, global competition and crises, Barmag reaches the very pinnacle of the market and becomes the preferred technological development partner for the manmade fiber industries in China, India and Turkey. The company has been a high-impact brand under the umbrella of the Oerlikon Group since 2007.

On the wings of innovation
Today, Oerlikon Barmag is a leading supplier of manmade fiber filament spinning systems and part of the Manmade Fibers Solutions business unit of the Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions Division. And our aspirations have not diminished: “The striving towards innovation and technological leadership has been, is and will always be part of our DNA”, emphasizes Georg Stausberg, CEO of Oerlikon Polymer Processing Solutions. In the past, this has been observable in such trailblazing innovations as the revolutionary WINGS generation of winders for POY in 2007 and WINGS for FDY in 2012. Currently, the focus of new and further developments is very much on digitalization and sustainability. Here, Oerlikon Barmag has – as one of the world’s first systems manufacturers – been implementing fully-networked smart factories for globally-leading polyester manufacturers since the end of the last decade. Within this context, digital solutions and automation are also helping to provide greater climate and environmental compatibility. This sustainability commitment is not only evidenced by the e-save label introduced for all products back in 2004: Oerlikon is endeavoring to also make all its sites carbon-neutral by 2030 and to acquire its energy exclusively from renewable sources. An ambitious target, whose achievement could be helped by the Oerlikon Barmag anniversary, states Georg Stausberg: “Innovation begins with creativity. And remembering the past provides plenty of motivation and inspiration for the future.”

Mimaki to launch the 330 Printer Series (c) Mimaki
The CG-AR Series offers improved entry-level plotting cutters to accomplish shorter delivery times
02.03.2022

Mimaki to launch the 330 Printer Series

  • Mimaki’s Newest Product Series to Transform the Sign Graphics and Textile Markets with Improved Efficiency and Quality 
  • Mimaki to launch the 330 Printer Series and the new entry-level cutting plotter series, the CG-AR

Mimaki Europe today announces a brand-new large format inkjet printer series, the 330 Series, including the JV330-160, CJV330-160 and TS330-1600, as well as a new range of CG-AR cutting plotters. Launched during the company’s Global Innovation Days event, the 330 Series leverages Mimaki’s cross-platform strategy, to offer a high-end yet cost effective printing solution across several sectors. Similarly, the CG-AR Series offers users new workflow enhancing, entry-level cutting plotter technologies available in three sizes. Both launches align with Mimaki’s objective to grow both its high-end and entry-level product range, to further encourage and support customers expanding and improving upon their printing services and product offering.

Introducing Mimaki’s latest printers – the 330 Series

  • Mimaki’s Newest Product Series to Transform the Sign Graphics and Textile Markets with Improved Efficiency and Quality 
  • Mimaki to launch the 330 Printer Series and the new entry-level cutting plotter series, the CG-AR

Mimaki Europe today announces a brand-new large format inkjet printer series, the 330 Series, including the JV330-160, CJV330-160 and TS330-1600, as well as a new range of CG-AR cutting plotters. Launched during the company’s Global Innovation Days event, the 330 Series leverages Mimaki’s cross-platform strategy, to offer a high-end yet cost effective printing solution across several sectors. Similarly, the CG-AR Series offers users new workflow enhancing, entry-level cutting plotter technologies available in three sizes. Both launches align with Mimaki’s objective to grow both its high-end and entry-level product range, to further encourage and support customers expanding and improving upon their printing services and product offering.

Introducing Mimaki’s latest printers – the 330 Series

Following on from the success of the 100 and 300 Plus Series, the 330 Series was developed to offer mid- to high-end printing models, focusing on high image quality and productivity. As a company renowned for its high-colour range, Mimaki’s newest printers can achieve high resolution, durable prints for both the Sign Graphic and Textile industries. 

The eco-solvent inkjet printers, the JV330-160 and CJV330-160, deliver the high-standard of colour required for indoor and outdoor sign graphics through the new “Deep Color Natural” input profile, offering eye-catching and vivid solid colours, natural skin tones as well as deep reds and neutral greys. With printing speeds of 21.0m2/h during standard mode while using 4 colours, this printer is ideal for print jobs that require quick delivery. The in-built cleaning mechanisms and monitoring features ensure an efficient workflow and allow for longer running times.

Both models feature a newly designed unwinding system that allows three rolls of media to be loaded simultaneously, greatly reducing the time and manpower required to change print media. One operator can bring the desired media into position simply by turning the media changer. Another standard feature is an “XY slitter” - a highly precise cutting technology, which provides in-line X-axis and Y-axis sheet-fed cutting. This eliminates the unwinding and rough cutting from the workflow, helping printers to significantly speed up and streamline the post-process, with less interference needed.

The print-only model JV330-160 as well as the integrated printer and cutter CJV330-160 will be available globally in April 2022.

In addition to the Sign Graphics solutions, Mimaki has also released the TS330-1600, a sublimation transfer inkjet printer, for the textile industry. Enabling both high production and high image quality, and equipped with new functions to improve stable operation, the TS330-1600 can achieve a printing speed of 69m2/h in Draft mode with a 4-colour ink set, with the fastest mode reaching up to 135m2/h. The newest cleaning mechanism applies a cloth wiper that removes unwanted ink from the nozzle surface, reducing ink splatter and improving the overall upkeep of the machine.

Increasing efficiency with entry-level CG-AR plotting cutter series

Alongside the 330 Series, Mimaki has also launched the CG-AR Series plotting cutters. Available in three different sizes (CG-60AR, CG-100AR and CG-130AR), these plotters go above and beyond current entry-level options available today. Recognising customer demand of shorter delivery times, these cutters provide increased speed and accuracy, all with user-friendly operability. In addition, the cutters have the ability to handle a diverse range of materials, such as PVC, fluorescent and reflective sheets.

More information:
Mimaki Europe textile printing
Source:


Mimaki Europe BV

The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe (c) Mimaki EMEA
Traditionally, apparel manufacturing has centred on a production chain model of sourcing materials and producing garments in bulk, microfactories are now enabling on-demand, on-location production
12.01.2022

Mimaki Europe: The Green Revolution

  • The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe

With the all-important COP26 Climate Change Conference having taken centre stage in November, there is no time like the present for the fashion world to rally together in stepping up sustainability efforts and getting carbon emissions under control. Globally, the fashion industry is now estimated to account for around 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 20 percent of wastewater , making the pursuit of greener production methods more pertinent than ever before. Thankfully, we are seeing a new era of production enter the fashion arena, with the increasing emergence of technologically advanced, highly automated microfactories.

Along with reducing unnecessary waste through on-demand production, microfactories have a smaller ecological footprint than traditional garment production and require no water use during the production process, making it not only a faster solution, but a greener one too.

  • The Green Revolution: How Microfactories Can Change the Face of Fashion by Mark Sollman, Product Manager EMEA, Mimaki Europe

With the all-important COP26 Climate Change Conference having taken centre stage in November, there is no time like the present for the fashion world to rally together in stepping up sustainability efforts and getting carbon emissions under control. Globally, the fashion industry is now estimated to account for around 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 20 percent of wastewater , making the pursuit of greener production methods more pertinent than ever before. Thankfully, we are seeing a new era of production enter the fashion arena, with the increasing emergence of technologically advanced, highly automated microfactories.

Along with reducing unnecessary waste through on-demand production, microfactories have a smaller ecological footprint than traditional garment production and require no water use during the production process, making it not only a faster solution, but a greener one too.

Last year’s FESPA saw Mimaki team up with fashion designer Carolina Guzman to bring her designs to life in real time at the show, setting up its own working microfactory live on-site to take her designs from screen to garment within just a day. Guzman’s designs were created using Mimaki’s TS100-1600 Sublimation Printer, before being transferred to textile, digitally cut and finally pieced together. Devised with a string of ethical and environmental objectives threaded throughout, the microfactory also exclusively utilised eco-friendly Greentex fabric, and any remaining material was donated to Sheltersuit: a wind- and waterproof coat that can be transformed into a sleeping bag, which is provided free of charge to homeless people and refugees.

Through working with a number of strategic partners – including transfer printing expert, Klieverik; paper solutions specialist, Neenah Coldenhove; and digital cutting equipment provider, Summa – Mimaki was able to produce a collection of unique, high-quality garments live on the stand during the tradeshow, demonstrating to visitors from more than 100 countries some of the key reasons that microfactories seem set to change the future of fashion…

Unparalleled speed and versatility
Where traditionally, apparel manufacturing has centred on a production chain model of sourcing materials and producing garments in bulk, microfactories are now enabling on-demand, on-location production, making it possible to create everything from unique, one-off pieces and samples right through to entire product lines – all at unprecedented speeds. This means greater flexibility and customisation, enabling designers to modify or update designs and respond to market trends as they occur.

Simplified supply chains and minimised risk
The microfactory setup brings production in-house and on-demand, minimising the cost of not only storing stock, but also of shipping it and responsibly disposing of unsold items. Where recent geopolitical events have highlighted the fragility of global supply chains, microfactories offer a unique independence from these systems, empowering garment manufacturers to future-proof their businesses, become less reliant on external systems and suppliers, and reduce the risk of disruptions.

A boosted bottom line and a greener future
Facilitating savings in a whole line of resources, from physical storage and production space to time and energy, microfactories ultimately have the potential to significantly increase profitability for garment manufacturers, with the additional benefit of being easily scalable as production increases. Perhaps even more compelling, however, are the environmental considerations. Demonstrated on a small scale through Mimaki’s recent project, the environmental benefits inherent to microfactory production will have an even greater impact as it becomes more prolific and commonplace throughout the fashion world, with the potential to effect meaningful environmental change as adoption increases in the years to come.

Reifenhäuser Enka Tecnica mit High-End-Komponenten auf der INDEX (c) Reifenhäuser
19.10.2021

Reifenhäuser Enka Tecnica exhibits high-end components at INDEX

Reifenhäuser Enka Tecnica will exhibit its wide range of replacement components for spunbond, meltblown, and composite lines at the world's leading nonwovens trade show INDEX in Geneva from October 19 to 22, 2021. The highly specialized custom manufacturer offers high-end technology "Made in Germany" that is 100% compatible with all globally installed lines.

Producers of nonwovens worldwide rely on Enka Tecnica components to manufacture products for complex applications in hygiene, medical or filtration to provide them with access to new profitable markets. Trade-show visitors will gain a detailed insight into the entire range of products, from meltblown and spunbond spinnerets to meltblown cassettes and complete meltblown spinning beams designed with an energy concept optimized for sustainability. The tips and capillaries assure consistent product quality and precision, allowing producers to meet their tolerance specifications reliably and avoid scrap at the same time..

Reifenhäuser Enka Tecnica will exhibit its wide range of replacement components for spunbond, meltblown, and composite lines at the world's leading nonwovens trade show INDEX in Geneva from October 19 to 22, 2021. The highly specialized custom manufacturer offers high-end technology "Made in Germany" that is 100% compatible with all globally installed lines.

Producers of nonwovens worldwide rely on Enka Tecnica components to manufacture products for complex applications in hygiene, medical or filtration to provide them with access to new profitable markets. Trade-show visitors will gain a detailed insight into the entire range of products, from meltblown and spunbond spinnerets to meltblown cassettes and complete meltblown spinning beams designed with an energy concept optimized for sustainability. The tips and capillaries assure consistent product quality and precision, allowing producers to meet their tolerance specifications reliably and avoid scrap at the same time..

With its refresh service for refurbishing used components, Enka Tecnica not only offers a cost-efficient alternative to new parts, but also extremely fast delivery times, a factor that is often decisive to maintain daily production targets. Visitors to Geneva will be able to see the quality of refresh components displayed at the booth - a meltblown and a spunbond spinneret, half of which has been refurbished. They will be able to see the condition of the capillary holes before and after the refresh through a microscope.

Another trade show highlight includes jet strips for hydroentangling nonwovens. Depending on the application, they are offered in Smart, Advanced, and Premium versions and have a special unique selling point – the strips are fully hardened, whereas competitor products usually only have a hardened surface. This quality advantage results in significantly longer service lives, which is why they are also known on the market as "The World's Hardest Strips”.

Source:

Reifenhäuser GmbH & Co. KG Maschinenfabrik

16.09.2021

Tufropes is partnering with Truetzschler Nonwovens and Voith for pentamerous technology

Indian Tufropes is partnering with Truetzschler Nonwovens and Voith to install its unique pentamerous technology. The company’s first nonwovens production line will be capable to produce 5 different eco-friendly, hydroentangled products.

Truetzschler Nonwovens and Voith are thrilled to be the technology partner for Tufropes’ (patent pending) unique nonwoven line based on pentamerous technology. The new installation relies heavily on Truetzschler/Voith core components for wet-laying, carding and hydroentangling. Proprietary refinements will allow Tufropes to produce any possible hydroentangled nonwoven material, including bio-degradable, natural fibre, eco-friendly high-performance nonwovens. Globally this would be a first industrial-scale pentamerous technology-based nonwoven project. Based in Gujarat, India, the line is expected to be commissioned next year.

Indian Tufropes is partnering with Truetzschler Nonwovens and Voith to install its unique pentamerous technology. The company’s first nonwovens production line will be capable to produce 5 different eco-friendly, hydroentangled products.

Truetzschler Nonwovens and Voith are thrilled to be the technology partner for Tufropes’ (patent pending) unique nonwoven line based on pentamerous technology. The new installation relies heavily on Truetzschler/Voith core components for wet-laying, carding and hydroentangling. Proprietary refinements will allow Tufropes to produce any possible hydroentangled nonwoven material, including bio-degradable, natural fibre, eco-friendly high-performance nonwovens. Globally this would be a first industrial-scale pentamerous technology-based nonwoven project. Based in Gujarat, India, the line is expected to be commissioned next year.

Source:

Truetzschler Nonwovens & Man Made Fibers GmbH

14.09.2021

Kornit Digital: 2020 Impact and Environmental, Social, and Governance Report released

Kornit Digital Ltd., a worldwide market leader in digital textile production technologies, released its 2020 Impact and Environmental, Social, and Governance (“ESG”) Report. This inaugural report affirms Kornit’s commitment to achieving specific ESG goals. This includes the way Kornit conducts business, creates meaningful impact in local communities, and achieves environmental sustainability, in addition to how Kornit will continue to build a diverse and inclusive company culture, foster employee growth and development, and empower fair and safe labor practices globally.
 

Kornit Digital Ltd., a worldwide market leader in digital textile production technologies, released its 2020 Impact and Environmental, Social, and Governance (“ESG”) Report. This inaugural report affirms Kornit’s commitment to achieving specific ESG goals. This includes the way Kornit conducts business, creates meaningful impact in local communities, and achieves environmental sustainability, in addition to how Kornit will continue to build a diverse and inclusive company culture, foster employee growth and development, and empower fair and safe labor practices globally.
 
In addition to enabling eco-friendly production processes with technology and consumables that use less water, reduce waste, and minimize the carbon footprint, Kornit technology solutions enable sustainable production on demand, which eliminates overproduction of apparel and other textile goods. A 2021 Life Cycle Assessment conducted on two flagship products, the Kornit Atlas MAX and Kornit Presto S, demonstrated that relative to traditional analog processes, Kornit’s digital production systems used up to 95% less water and 94% less energy, and produced up to 83% less greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the Presto S system and up to 93% less water and 66% less energy, and produced up to 82% less greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the Atlas MAX system.


Based on this study, in addition to past sustainability performance results and strategic projections for business growth and market expansion, by 2026 Kornit Digital’s sustainable on-demand solutions are expected to enable the production of approximately 2.5 billion apparel items in a responsible manner to deliver:

  • Zero overproduction: By moving the industry to on-demand manufacturing, Kornit will help eliminate the estimated 1.1 billion apparel items overproduced using traditional production methods, based on an industry average of 30% overproduction. This is about 1 apparel item for each and every person living in Europe and North America – saved.
  • Zero water waste: In addition to eliminating overstocks, Kornit-enabled production on demand will support saving an estimated 4.3 trillion liters (1.1 trillion gallons) of water. This is the estimated amount of drinking water needed for the entire U.S. population for 11 years.
  • Reduced CO2 emissions: By enabling sustainable on-demand production, consuming less energy, and generating less waste, Kornit will prevent an estimated 17.2 billion kilograms (37.9 billion pounds) of greenhouse gas emissions, compared to traditional manufacturing methods. This is equivalent to the estimated amount of carbon dioxide emitted from circumnavigating the entire planet with a car nearly 2,400 times.

Furthermore, the report outlines Kornit’s commitment to achieving KPIs that address waste, chemicals, GHG emissions, energy, product development, employee training, diversity and inclusion, and the company’s supply chain.

Source:

pr4u

MS establishes new business unit "Nonwovens" (c) MS Ultraschall Technologie GmbH
MS UTG Kampagnenmotiv
11.08.2021

MS establishes new business unit "Nonwovens"

The MS Ultrasonic Technology Group is a globally recognized technology and innovation leader in ultrasonic joining technology and develops and builds flexible special machines, pioneering series machines, modular systems and efficient components for high-performance complete solutions.

This enables optimal welding, punching, sealing, cut-off welding and riveting of thermoplastics, textiles and nonwovens as well as cutting of food and other products.

To ensure sustainable growth, MS is focusing on expanding its application portfolio and entering new market segments. MS Ultrasonic Technology Group is part of the listed MS Industrie AG with internationally active companies.

In addition to the company's previous activities, MS is now placing a new focus on the continuous welding of nonwovens and other materials.

The MS Ultrasonic Technology Group is a globally recognized technology and innovation leader in ultrasonic joining technology and develops and builds flexible special machines, pioneering series machines, modular systems and efficient components for high-performance complete solutions.

This enables optimal welding, punching, sealing, cut-off welding and riveting of thermoplastics, textiles and nonwovens as well as cutting of food and other products.

To ensure sustainable growth, MS is focusing on expanding its application portfolio and entering new market segments. MS Ultrasonic Technology Group is part of the listed MS Industrie AG with internationally active companies.

In addition to the company's previous activities, MS is now placing a new focus on the continuous welding of nonwovens and other materials.

More than 30 years of experience in the development and production of high-quality and innovative ultrasonic components, coupled with know-how in drive and control technology, will be incorporated into the new business segment. This means that customers receive ready-to-integrate systems with maximum precision from a single source. With the new MS Competence Center in Ettlingen (Germany), MS is fulfilling the wish of many customers to expand its application portfolio to include continuous joining, embossing and perforating of nonwovens and sealing of packaging.

MS is thus adding an innovative and specialized site, while maintaining a high level of vertical integration and support for all specialist areas through its main site in Spaichingen (Germany). In two application laboratories and a measurement and analysis laboratory, tests, evaluations and optimizations of various welding tasks are just as much a part of the service as the in-house production of engraving rollers through to complete systems.

  • Application engineering consulting for your welding task
  • Support in the design of the engraving roll
  • Execution of feasibility studies
  • Welding tests to determine the process parameters
  • Individualized process optimization
  • Finding solutions for problematic welding applications
  • Testing of quality-describing characteristics (tightness, porosity, strength)
  • Microscopic analysis of the welded joint in 3D
  • Sample creation and pre-series production
Source:

MS Ultraschall Technologie GmbH

23.07.2021

FET installs new Spunbond system at University of Leeds

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd, UK has completed the installation and commissioning of a new FET Laboratory Spunbond system for the University of Leeds.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd, UK has completed the installation and commissioning of a new FET Laboratory Spunbond system for the University of Leeds.

This FET spunbond system is now an integral part of the research facilities of the CCTMIH (Clothworkers’ Centre for Textile Materials Innovation for Healthcare), led by Prof. Stephen Russell based in the School of Design, University of Leeds, who commented “The new spunbond system is perfectly suited to our academic research work, and is already proving itself to be extremely versatile and intuitive to use”.
 
This spunbond system complements existing research lab facilities at the university, which covers all areas of fibre and fabric processing, physical testing and characterisation. It forms part of a wider investment in facilities to support fundamental, academic research on ‘future manufacturing’ for medical devices, where the focus is on studying small-scale processing of unconventional polymers and additive mixes to form spunbond fabrics with multifunctional properties.
 
Key to this research is developing the underlying process-structure-performance relationships, based on the measured data, to provide detailed understanding of how final fabric performance can be controlled during processing.

As a rule, many exciting materials developed in academic research struggle to progress beyond the bench, because of compatibility issues with key manufacturing processes such as spunbond. By leveraging mono, core-sheath and island-in-the-sea bicomponent technology, the Leeds University team is working with polymer and biomaterial research scientists, engineers and clinicians to explore the incorporation of unusual materials in spunbond fabrics, potentially widening applications.
 
FET has built on its melt spinning expertise to develop a true laboratory scale spunbond system and is currently working on a number of other such projects globally with research institutions and manufacturers.

Source:

Fibre Extrusion Technology Ltd / Project Marketing Ltd