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25.08.2022

PICANOL GROUP: Strong first HY22, but …

In comparison to HY 21 revenue went up by 26% to 1,707.3 million EUR, the profit reached 123.9 million EUR (+6%).

Machines & Technologies revenue increased by +10%. The revenue of Agro increased by +46%, Bio-valorization revenue increased by +27%, the revenue of Industrial Solutions increased by +21%, and the revenue of T-Power increased by 4%. This revenue increase could be mainly realized thanks to higher sales prices, implemented to compensate the increase of raw material, energy and transportation costs in most segments.

In comparison to HY 21 revenue went up by 26% to 1,707.3 million EUR, the profit reached 123.9 million EUR (+6%).

Machines & Technologies revenue increased by +10%. The revenue of Agro increased by +46%, Bio-valorization revenue increased by +27%, the revenue of Industrial Solutions increased by +21%, and the revenue of T-Power increased by 4%. This revenue increase could be mainly realized thanks to higher sales prices, implemented to compensate the increase of raw material, energy and transportation costs in most segments.

In the first half of 2022, revenue increased by +10% for the segment Machines & Technologies. This increase in revenue took place both in weaving machines (Picanol) and other industrial activities (Proferro, PsiControl). Picanol launched the OmniPlus-i TC Connect weaving machine into the Machines & Technologies segment in early 2022. This model, which was specifically made for weaving tire cord, has been upgraded with the latest airjet technology and equipped with the features of the new generation Connect weaving machines. However, HY22 Adjusted EBITDA decreased by 64% compared to last year due to the negative impact of rising raw material prices, transportation costs and costs of late deliveries, which could not be translated into higher selling prices, partly due to the large order book.

The group anticipates a continued high level of uncertainty in the second half of 2022, as well as in 2023, due to the current conflict in Eastern Europe, the difficult supply chain circumstances, and other challenges following the coronavirus pandemic. The development of customer demand and sales margin could therefore come under pressure. However, based on currently available information, Picanol Group expects that the 2022 Adjusted EBITDA will be higher than the 2021 Adjusted EBITDA (430.3 million EUR). This revised outlook for the 2022 financial year reflects the strong first half of the year, while the result for the second half is expected to be in line with the same period in the previous year.

More information:
Picanol Group
Source:

Picanol Group

(c) Lindauer DORNIER GmbH
Maja Dornier (lhs) and Prof. Dr. Wolf Mutschler (rhs) hand over the Peter Dornier Foundation Award, endowed with 5,000 euros, to the award winner Dipl.-Ing. Mathis Bruns
26.07.2022

Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 honours textile research on woven heart valve

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease is one of the most common natural causes of death. Every year, it is the cause of death of around 17 million people worldwide. The Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 has now awarded a research work that is to improve the medical care of people with insufficient heart valve function in the future and prolong the patients' lives.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease is one of the most common natural causes of death. Every year, it is the cause of death of around 17 million people worldwide. The Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 has now awarded a research work that is to improve the medical care of people with insufficient heart valve function in the future and prolong the patients' lives.

The human heart is a high-performance machine: over the course of a person's life, it beats almost three billion times, pumping around 200 million litres of blood through the body. Enormous stresses that can sometimes lead to life-threatening signs of wear and tear. If a heart valve gets out of step, patients usually get artificial-mechanical or biological valves as a replacement. However, mechanical solutions imply patients to take blood-thinning medication for the rest of their lives. In addition, there may be audible closing noises. For example, almost a quarter of patients with mechanical heart valves complain of sleep disturbances. Biological heart valves, on the other hand, such as those made from animal tissue, require a great deal of manual work and have a shorter lifetime.

Potential of weaving for medical products demonstrated
For this reason, Graduate Engineer Mathis Bruns at the Institute for Textile Machinery and High-Performance Textile Materials Technology (ITM) at the TU Dresden is researching an implant alternative made of fabric. As part of a research project that also involved heart surgeons from the Dresden Heart Centre and the University Hospital in Würzburg, Mr. Bruns provided important findings for weaving an artificial heart valve in his diploma thesis. For his work entitled "Development of tubular structures with integrated valve function", Mathis Bruns has now received the Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022, endowed with 5,000 euros. In his laudation, Dr. Adnan Wahhoud, former head of the development department of air-jet weaving machines at DORNIER in Lindau, said: "With his work, the winner of the award demonstrates very clearly the potential of weaving technology to produce fabrics of complex form, geometry and structure with the aim of prolonging and improving people's lives." The award-winning thesis enriches research into three-dimensional tissues for use in medicine.

Weaving replacement heart valves without seams
"A particular advantage of our approach is the integral production method", says foundation prize winner Mathis Bruns. “The geometry and function of a heart valve is that complex that woven heart valves could not be produced in this form previously. Through the combined use of a rigid rapier weaving machine with bobbin shield and a Jacquard machine, it is possible to weave the replacement heart valve in such a way that it no longer has be sewn together. Even the tubular structures for the blood vessels and the integrated valve function are ‘all of one piece’. Seams are always a weak point in textile medical products," Mr. Bruns adds. “Another advantage of the woven heart valve is the possibility to insert it by the help of minimally invasive surgery. Hence, the folded valve which is about the size of a tea light is to be pushed with a catheter via the bloodstream to the target position in the heart and unfolded there. The patient's chest and heart would then no longer have to be cut open”, explains prize winner Mr. Bruns.

Textile structure is similar to human tissue
A wide variety of medical products have always been produced on DORNIER weaving machines. Customers use them to produce fabrics for bandages, prostheses, blood filters and orthoses among other things. For Mathis Bruns, it is only evident that implants such as heart valves will more and more be woven on the machines from Lindau in the future. "Textile tissue is very similar to human tissue," he says. The human body consists largely of thread-like materials, just as a textile fabric is made up of thousands of individual threads. "Muscle fibres convey force impulses, nerve tracts send stimuli such as pain and brain cells convey information via thread-like dendrites and axons." Because of their ‘thread-like properties’, woven implants are therefore particularly suitable for medical applications.

Photo: © 2022, Steiger Participations
11.07.2022

Swiss Textile Machinery technology and innovations for technical textiles

New ideas were exchanged, brainstormed, and discussed freely at members’ booths at the Swiss Textile Machinery Pavilion during the recent Techtextil in Frankfurt. “Customers and researchers met Swiss textile machinery companies to explore the possibility of the not-yet-invented. “We regard our Pavilion as the place where future innovations catch a spark,” says Cornelia Buchwalder, Secretary General of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association. Further developments in the field of hybrid yarns were a hot topic. One example of this involves producing a yarn which has all the typical characteristics and advantages of carbon – but which also prioritizes careful use of resources, combining carbon fibres with thermoplastics.

Technical textiles cover a vast range of applications, and it’s still growing thanks to intensive research by specialist institutes and universities. Many members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association maintain long-standing partnership with such bodies. Innovations are often joint efforts.

New ideas were exchanged, brainstormed, and discussed freely at members’ booths at the Swiss Textile Machinery Pavilion during the recent Techtextil in Frankfurt. “Customers and researchers met Swiss textile machinery companies to explore the possibility of the not-yet-invented. “We regard our Pavilion as the place where future innovations catch a spark,” says Cornelia Buchwalder, Secretary General of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association. Further developments in the field of hybrid yarns were a hot topic. One example of this involves producing a yarn which has all the typical characteristics and advantages of carbon – but which also prioritizes careful use of resources, combining carbon fibres with thermoplastics.

Technical textiles cover a vast range of applications, and it’s still growing thanks to intensive research by specialist institutes and universities. Many members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association maintain long-standing partnership with such bodies. Innovations are often joint efforts.

Feel-good technical fabrics
Some technical textiles feel like a second skin. A well-known example is activewear from the ‘sport tech’ field. Activewear includes breathable clothing, usually consisting of a three-layer-laminate: an inner lining, a breathable membrane in the center, and an outer fabric. The challenge is to bond the individual layers without losing breathability or softness, while meeting technical requirements such as resistance to a number of wash cycles.

Bonding solutions meeting top quality requirements, as well as ambitious standards for environmental protection and sustainability, were reinvented by the Cavitec brand from the Santex Rimar Group. This company’s hotmelt technology uses one-component polymers applied to textiles in a hot, molten state. Bonding based on hotmelts is both water- and solvent-free. Drying and exhaust air cleaning are not necessary, which is an ecological advantage. Energy consumption is also significantly lower. Cavitec hotmelt technology is also developed for laminated medical protection fabrics which are safe, high-quality and sustainable. These fabrics can be washed, sterilized, and used again.   

A second skin with added value is the result of Jakob Müller Group’s cooperation with an institute for an established outdoor fashion brand. They have devised a heating mat applied as an inner jacket. Outdoor gear with a heated inlay offers the wearer a comfortable feeling even in a cold climate. The heating mat is particularly light, breathable, flexible and adjustable to three temperature levels.

Fabrics with these advantages are now possible thanks to multi direct weaving (MDW) technology from the Jakob Müller Group. A lacquer-insulated heating strand is inserted into the base textile as a ‘meander’ using MDW technology. The technology is offered with both label weaving machines and the latest generation of ribbon weaving machines. The textile pocket calculator is another MDW based future-oriented application developed in cooperation with a textile research institute.

Safety and health
Life-saving reliability is a must for vehicle airbags. They have to fulfil high security aspects, and must remain inflated for several seconds when an accident occurs. Airbags made of flat-woven fabric – cut and seamed – can show weakness at seams during the inflation phase. Latest Jacquard technology by Stäubli enables one-piece-woven (OPW) airbags to be produced, creating shape and structure in a single process. The final product is an airbag consisting of a sealed cushion with woven seams. OPW airbag weaving reduces the number of production steps, and increases the security aspects.
Another big advantage of Stäubli’s new weaving technology is the flexibility in formats required in today’s mid- and upper-range cars, where lateral protection (in the seat or in the roof over the door) has become standard and is designed in line with the car shape. Safe airbags are woven on modern high-speed weaving machines. The warp material, the variety of fabric patterns, and the importance of precisely shaped airbags require the use of a robust and reliable Jacquard machine.

A revolution for orthopaedic patients is a knitting machine from Steiger Participations, which uses compressive yarns developed to meet the needs of the specific health market. This machine model was exclusively designed for production with inlaid elastic yarns and offers optimum performance with guaranteed final product quality.

In the orthopaedic field, many Steiger flat knitting machines have already been operating as automatic, custom-made production systems. For example, the dimensions of an injured limb are taken by the doctor and fed into a web-based application. The doctor selects the compression class in the various sections of the item and a data file created by the software automatically applies a preconfigured program. With no human intervention required, the program is generated and produced on the machine, precisely matching the patient’s dimensions. Each product is different, and generally available within 48 hours.

08.07.2022

Swedish textile machinery in Brazil at Febratex

A delegation from TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, will participate in the forthcoming Febratex textile show which is being held in the German Village Park in Blumenau, in Santa Catarina, Brazil from August 23-26.

As the fourth largest textiles manufacturer in the world, Brazil’s annual revenues from textiles and apparel amount to an annual $48 billion and the industry employs around 1.5 million people directly.

As with the USA and many European countries, product shortages resulting directly from the Covid-19 pandemic, and subsequent supply chain difficulties, have emphasised to Brazil’s industry the attractiveness of more diversified and shorter supply chains which are closer to customers wherever possible. In the past two years, there has been less reliance on imports from Asia to Brazil, and opportunities are arising again for local manufacturing.

Svegea of Sweden has supplied many automatic collarette cutters to Brazilian companies, which are used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements.

A delegation from TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, will participate in the forthcoming Febratex textile show which is being held in the German Village Park in Blumenau, in Santa Catarina, Brazil from August 23-26.

As the fourth largest textiles manufacturer in the world, Brazil’s annual revenues from textiles and apparel amount to an annual $48 billion and the industry employs around 1.5 million people directly.

As with the USA and many European countries, product shortages resulting directly from the Covid-19 pandemic, and subsequent supply chain difficulties, have emphasised to Brazil’s industry the attractiveness of more diversified and shorter supply chains which are closer to customers wherever possible. In the past two years, there has been less reliance on imports from Asia to Brazil, and opportunities are arising again for local manufacturing.

Svegea of Sweden has supplied many automatic collarette cutters to Brazilian companies, which are used by garment manufacturers around the world for the production of tubular apparel components such as cuff and neck tapes and other seam reinforcements.

Svegea supplies many other bespoke machines for applications in the production of both garment components and technical textiles, including rewinding, measuring, inspection and band knife machines.

Eton Systems, the inventor and world’s leading provider of automated production systems for apparel and other textile-based processes, has supplied a large amount of workstations to Brazilian companies over the years, and believes its newly-launched Opta system is good news for this market becoming more efficient and profitable.

Automation is also high on the agenda of ACG Kinna Automatic, which specialises in automation solutions for filled products such as quilts, pillows and mattresses and also has extensive knowledge in areas such as bed linen and textile filters.

Given Brazil’s extensive forestry sector, the country is a key market for Texo AB, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of weaving machines for the production of paper machine clothing (PMC).

All paper manufacturing machines require a regular supply of PMC, which as large continuous engineered fabrics, carry the paper stock through each stage of the paper production process. With technologically sophisticated designs, they employ fibres and other polymeric materials in complex structures and each paper machine has an average of ten separate fabrics installed on it. Although the PMC business represents just a small proportion of the total cost of manufacturing paper, it can have a significant impact on the quality of the paper, the efficiency of a machine and machine production rates.

More information:
TMAS Febratex
Source:

AWOL Media

01.07.2022

Award for best master's thesis of the German Textile Mechanical Engineering 2022 goes to young engineer of ITA Aachen

The 2002 prize of the Walter Reiners Foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association for the best Master's thesis in German textile mechanical engineering was awarded to a young engineer from the ITA Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University. The prize ceremony took place at Techtextil 2022 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Peter D. Dornier, Chairman of the Board of the Walter Reiners Foundation, presented the award at the VDMA Textile Machinery Association’s booth.

Felix Xaver Zerbes, M.Sc., was awarded the "Promotional Prize for the Best Master's Thesis of the German Textile Machinery Industry 2022", endowed with 3,500 EUR, for his master's thesis "Development and Construction of a Separation Unit for Weft Yarns in Air Jet Weaving".

The 2002 prize of the Walter Reiners Foundation of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association for the best Master's thesis in German textile mechanical engineering was awarded to a young engineer from the ITA Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University. The prize ceremony took place at Techtextil 2022 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Peter D. Dornier, Chairman of the Board of the Walter Reiners Foundation, presented the award at the VDMA Textile Machinery Association’s booth.

Felix Xaver Zerbes, M.Sc., was awarded the "Promotional Prize for the Best Master's Thesis of the German Textile Machinery Industry 2022", endowed with 3,500 EUR, for his master's thesis "Development and Construction of a Separation Unit for Weft Yarns in Air Jet Weaving".

The subject of the master's thesis was the development of a mechanism with which faulty sections in the weft yarn can be sorted out before they are woven into the textile. This way, both yarn-related weft defects and material defects can be drastically reduced. The prototype developed by Mr Zerbes shows how this can be done even during the ongoing weaving process without having to stop production. Due to its modular design, the yarn rejection unit can be retrofitted to many different types of air-jet weaving machines, which represents an enormous savings potential not only in Germany but in weaving mills all over the world.

Source:

ITA – Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University

(c) ISKO
10.06.2022

ISKO™ purchased new weaving machines by Itema

With the purchase of the latest technology, iSAVER® by Itema, in weaving machines, ISKO pushes the envelope of technological performance and sustainability, making further progress in product and process efficiency.

This decision is an additional, important asset in ISKO’s journey towards a genuine Responsible Innovation™. It is part of other crucial investments made by the company, aimed at further reducing its environmental impact, among which stand out R-TWO™50+ – a new denim generation made with a minimum of 50% pre- and post-consumer recycled blend – and the Green Machine – a pioneering technology providing a 100% post-consumer recycling solution that fully separates and recycles cotton and polyester blends at scale.

After an intensive process, a selection was made where ISKO focuses on the development of technical solutions that enable greater resource savings and more sustainable production methods, always with the protection of workers at heart.

With the purchase of the latest technology, iSAVER® by Itema, in weaving machines, ISKO pushes the envelope of technological performance and sustainability, making further progress in product and process efficiency.

This decision is an additional, important asset in ISKO’s journey towards a genuine Responsible Innovation™. It is part of other crucial investments made by the company, aimed at further reducing its environmental impact, among which stand out R-TWO™50+ – a new denim generation made with a minimum of 50% pre- and post-consumer recycled blend – and the Green Machine – a pioneering technology providing a 100% post-consumer recycling solution that fully separates and recycles cotton and polyester blends at scale.

After an intensive process, a selection was made where ISKO focuses on the development of technical solutions that enable greater resource savings and more sustainable production methods, always with the protection of workers at heart.

As a result, ISKO’s Headquarters extend the company's long-term relationship with Itema,
strengthening the company’s position as the mill with one of the world’s largest denim capacities. The new rapier machines are enhanced by the iSAVER® technology, a breakthrough mechatronic innovation that eliminates the waste selvedge on the left side of the fabric, allowing for saving in energy and raw materials, cutting in half the cotton waste that typically results from the weft yarn. All types of ISKO’s innovative fabrics, with a multitude of different constructions and fiber mixtures, can now be produced using these advanced weaving technologies, with a special focus given to the R-TWO™ technology in terms of its sustainable credentials.

More information:
Isko Itema weaving machine
Source:

ISKO / Menabò Group srl

16.03.2022

TMAS: TEXO AB sees Demand for Compfelt Weaving Looms

TEXO AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, is currently seeing a surge in demand for its Compfelt weaving looms for press felt base fabrics.

“These are far from standard machines,” explains TEXO President Anders Svensson. “Off-the-shelf industrial weaving machines generally range in their working widths from 1.9 to 3.2 metres, with those purpose-built for technical applications such as geotextiles extending to wider widths of six metres and beyond. Meanwhile, one of the machines we have recently successfully delivered and commissioned has a working width of 23 metres and is not even the widest of the many such machines the company has engineered and delivered worldwide since its formation.”

A second recently-delivered line has a more modest working width – in relative terms – of 13 metres.

TEXO AB, a member of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery association, is currently seeing a surge in demand for its Compfelt weaving looms for press felt base fabrics.

“These are far from standard machines,” explains TEXO President Anders Svensson. “Off-the-shelf industrial weaving machines generally range in their working widths from 1.9 to 3.2 metres, with those purpose-built for technical applications such as geotextiles extending to wider widths of six metres and beyond. Meanwhile, one of the machines we have recently successfully delivered and commissioned has a working width of 23 metres and is not even the widest of the many such machines the company has engineered and delivered worldwide since its formation.”

A second recently-delivered line has a more modest working width – in relative terms – of 13 metres.

Paper machines
The demand for such machines comes from the suppliers of paper machine clothing (PMC) to paper mills, who in turn operate colossal machines for paper manufacturing.
On of the largest paper making machines is currently believed to be located on Hainan Island off the southern coast of China and is 428 metres long – roughly the length of four football pitches. Naturally, such machines require equally large-scale components, which is where TEXO comes in. All paper machines require a regular supply of PMC fabrics which are employed in three separate areas of the paper machine – the forming section, the press section and the drying section.

Press felts
TEXO Compfelt weaving machines are specifically employed for the production of endless (tubular) woven base fabrics for the press section of paper machines, where water is mechanically removed from the newly formed sheet of fibres. In the simplest press, the sheet is carried by the PMC fabric between two rolls, where water is squeezed out by the application of load and pressure. This can also be assisted by the use of vacuum and heat. The PMC fabrics here need to be replaced regularly, with a maximum lifespan of six months.

Press felts have become increasingly sophisticated over the years, consisting of complex woven base structures which are subsequently combined with nonwovens via needlepunching on equally huge machines. The woven base fabrics are primarily made from polyamide for its strength and hygroscopic and elastic properties.

Dobby harness
“A major refinement of the machine has been the ability to equip it with up to 24 dobby harness frames to meet the demand for sophisticated structures from the PMC manufacturers. Although the PMC business represents a small proportion of the total cost of manufacturing paper, it can have a significant impact on the quality of the paper, the efficiency of a machine and machine production rates.”

Another significant development has been that of a self supporting base pre-filled with concrete, which has eliminated the need to dig out foundations in a plant to support the machine.

Retrofits
TEXO’s looms are built to last, but technology moves forward, and the company is also currently active in the retrofitting of existing machines built as far back as the 1970s.

Integration
TEXO has also just integrated its offices and production centre at its base in Älmhult, Sweden, to create a unified 5,000 square metre site.

Source:

TMAS / AWOL Media

(c) Picanol. Connect generation - PicConnect enabled (BlueTouch display).
Connect generation - PicConnect enabled (BlueTouch display)
08.11.2021

Picanol: New Connect generation of airjet and rapier weaving machines

Picanol has introduced its latest generation of airjet and rapier weaving machines, which have been called the “Connect” generation. These new generation weaving machines focus on connectivity and an increased level of data availability. With this new generation, Picanol is launching several new functionalities such as a digitalized Gripper stroke setting, Gripper tape monitoring, Climate control, Shed angle measurement, and fully integrated Power monitoring.

Picanol has introduced its latest generation of airjet and rapier weaving machines, which have been called the “Connect” generation. These new generation weaving machines focus on connectivity and an increased level of data availability. With this new generation, Picanol is launching several new functionalities such as a digitalized Gripper stroke setting, Gripper tape monitoring, Climate control, Shed angle measurement, and fully integrated Power monitoring.

“Following the successful launch of our digital platform PicConnect earlier this month, we have now released a new generation of weaving machines, which are known as the Connect generation. Our Connect generation weaving machines can provide the correct data and are loaded with new and never-before-seen functionalities. This is clear proof that for Picanol “Driven by Data” is not just a slogan but a commitment. Not only have these innovations allowed us to make big improvements when it comes to our four design principles – Smart Performance, Sustainability Inside, Intuitive Control, and, of course, Driven by Data – but when combined with our new digital platform they will allow you to amplify your own intuition.” comments Johan Verstraete, Vice President Weaving Machines.

From now on, the range of Picanol weaving machines will have the “Connect” suffix. For the airjet weaving machines, this means: OmniPlus-i Connect and TerryPlus-i Connect, while for the rapier weaving machines, this means: OptiMax-i Connect and TerryMax-i Connect. These new machines are built around Picanol’s four main design principles:

Smart Performance
On the OptiMax-i Connect, Picanol has introduced a lubrication monitoring sensor in combination with a temperature sensor. The combined data they provide allow the user to make sure the gripper tapes are in optimal condition for maximum performance. As an option, a gripper stroke measurement sensor is also available. This not only dramatically simplifies the setting of the gripper stroke, but also enables the user to realize higher machine speeds when weaving reduced widths – a pure extra output combined with more user-friendliness.

Sustainability Inside
Even though it was 25 years ago that the Sumo Drive concept was launched, it remains the most powerful, versatile and energy friendly machine drive available. And it has been even further optimized. It features an optimized sheet metal package for lower energy consumption, optimized oil cooling circuit for a better performance and a built-in temperature monitoring. Moreover, the Connect machines can be equipped with a Power monitoring module, which allows the user to keep track of the power consumption of each machine over time. Every Connect machine also has a built-in ambient temperature and humidity sensor, which will help to optimize the climate control in the weaving shed at the lowest cost. And as raw material is the biggest cost factor, each machine can also be equipped with raw material use monitoring.

Driven by Data
As the machine has more sensors than ever before, it also generates more data. To enable a fast reaction to all these sensor data, the BlueBox control unit has been further optimized: better heat management guarantees short reaction cycles combined with the long lifetime of components. To have a good view of all of the data generated, a special sensor dashboard screen is available in the BlueTouch display: with a simple touch of the screen, the current and historical power consumption, temperature, humidity, material consumption, and – on the OmniPlus-i Connect – also the air consumption, can be monitored. The BlueTouch display is now also equipped with an Action center, an electronic logbook where all actions such as maintenance interventions can be logged or scheduled beforehand. The machine manual is now available on the BlueTouch display, and with the context-based help function the help pages related to the operation the user wants to perform appear with one touch of his/her fingertip. The built-in web browser even allows the user even to consult, for example, tutorial videos on the web to guide them through a setting procedure.

Intuitive Control
The Connect generation was designed to focus on what really matters: weave the highest possible grade A fabrics at minimal costs. A large set of tools have been installed to facilitate this goal. One of the most remarkable ones is the Harness frame stroke measurement – until recently, it was only available on the revolutionary SmartShed, but it is now also available on the cambox and dobby machines. Combined with the shed visualization and simulation, it offers a quantum leap in terms of optimizing the user’s shed settings without losing any time or taking any risks. The colors of the programmable Smart signal lights with stop timing functionality are now repeated around the push buttons, allowing even better visibility and the prioritization of interventions by the weaver. A full-fledged Access control system not only limits the access to certain pages and settings depending on the user, but also allows a tailored dashboard to be established for each user profile.

Source:

Picanol

Picanol introduces online plattform for weaving (c) Picanol
08.10.2021

Picanol introduces online platform for weaving

With PicConnect, a new fully digital platform, Picanol is offering a wide range of features, from industrial IoT to service-related applications. PicConnect is a web-based application that can be accessed through a web browser on any device and it functions as the gateway to all Picanol’s digital services. The platform is cloud-based and it allows connecting the Picanol weaving machines to the platform in order to leverage its full extent of possibilities.

“PicConnect enables weavers to quickly react to changes in the weaving room, and it will have an immediate impact on the performance of the weaving machines. It will not only change how weavers interact with their machines but also the way they interact with Picanol. For this reason, Picanol can boldly state that PicConnect is bringing weavers into the era of intuitive weaving,” comments Johan Verstraete, Vice President Weaving Machines.

The first four applications that will be launched as part of PicConnect are: production monitoring, energy monitoring, style administration, and PartsLine, which is Picanol’s new online webshop.

With PicConnect, a new fully digital platform, Picanol is offering a wide range of features, from industrial IoT to service-related applications. PicConnect is a web-based application that can be accessed through a web browser on any device and it functions as the gateway to all Picanol’s digital services. The platform is cloud-based and it allows connecting the Picanol weaving machines to the platform in order to leverage its full extent of possibilities.

“PicConnect enables weavers to quickly react to changes in the weaving room, and it will have an immediate impact on the performance of the weaving machines. It will not only change how weavers interact with their machines but also the way they interact with Picanol. For this reason, Picanol can boldly state that PicConnect is bringing weavers into the era of intuitive weaving,” comments Johan Verstraete, Vice President Weaving Machines.

The first four applications that will be launched as part of PicConnect are: production monitoring, energy monitoring, style administration, and PartsLine, which is Picanol’s new online webshop.

Source:

Picanol

Monforts: A complete finishing line upgrade for Wülfing (c) A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG / AWOL Media
A completely new joint control system joins the two machines seamlessly.
06.07.2021

Monforts: A complete finishing line upgrade for Wülfing

Wülfing GmbH is one of the oldest but also one of the most modern home textiles companies in Germany, with its main weaving and finishing operations located in Borken, North Rhine-Westphalia, and a further jacquard weaving mill in Steinfurt, as well as with a making up and packaging plant in the Czech Republic.

At its Borken plant, Wülfing has employed a Monforts sanforizing line since 2009 to guarantee the required dimensional stability and shrink-fastness of its high quality bed linen. With a working width of over three metres, the sanforizing process is a central pillar in the production of typical wide-width cotton fabrics for home textiles.

In 2017, the company was able to acquire a second Monforts sanforizing line from another company which, although built in 2005, had been virtually unused. It was overhauled and installed behind a Monforts equalizing frame of a similar age.

“Unfortunately, the two machines had to be operated separately via individual controls and did not represent an integrated unit,” says Schulte-Mesum. “This resulted in deficits in the desired productivity and in the control technology.”

Wülfing GmbH is one of the oldest but also one of the most modern home textiles companies in Germany, with its main weaving and finishing operations located in Borken, North Rhine-Westphalia, and a further jacquard weaving mill in Steinfurt, as well as with a making up and packaging plant in the Czech Republic.

At its Borken plant, Wülfing has employed a Monforts sanforizing line since 2009 to guarantee the required dimensional stability and shrink-fastness of its high quality bed linen. With a working width of over three metres, the sanforizing process is a central pillar in the production of typical wide-width cotton fabrics for home textiles.

In 2017, the company was able to acquire a second Monforts sanforizing line from another company which, although built in 2005, had been virtually unused. It was overhauled and installed behind a Monforts equalizing frame of a similar age.

“Unfortunately, the two machines had to be operated separately via individual controls and did not represent an integrated unit,” says Schulte-Mesum. “This resulted in deficits in the desired productivity and in the control technology.”

Wülfing consulted with Monforts on a number of upgrade options and opted for a completely new joint control system to merge the two machines, as well as a new connecting inlet, a tensioning and damping field and a steaming unit.

“Monforts provided a fast and precise erection and commissioning of the technology in spite of the difficult pandemic circumstances,” says Schulte-Mesum. “The result has been an increase in production speeds by 20% and enhanced uniformity in fabric width through a much improved guidance system.

“We are also achieving energy savings as a result of the new control and drive technology and operation has been simplified and improved as a result of the unified control. We benefit from simplified access for maintenance work such as the grinding of the rubber blanket, but most of all we have greatly improved our flexibility and now have two almost identical Monforts sanforizing lines.”

Source:

A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG / AWOL Media

Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development ©Stäubli
Multilayer Aramid
17.03.2021

Swiss weaving: Fabrics of the future

  • Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development

Shoes and electronic calculators are probably not the first products people would associate with the textile weaving process. But they certainly signpost the future for woven fabrics, as two examples of the ever-wider possibilities of latest technology in the field. Fashion and function already combine in the increasing popularity of woven fabrics for shoes, and this is a present and future trend. Calculators in fabrics? That’s another story of ingenious development, using so-called ‘meander fields’ on the back and keys printed on the front of the material.

  • Swiss weaving machinery manufacturers are in the forefront of novel application development

Shoes and electronic calculators are probably not the first products people would associate with the textile weaving process. But they certainly signpost the future for woven fabrics, as two examples of the ever-wider possibilities of latest technology in the field. Fashion and function already combine in the increasing popularity of woven fabrics for shoes, and this is a present and future trend. Calculators in fabrics? That’s another story of ingenious development, using so-called ‘meander fields’ on the back and keys printed on the front of the material.

These glimpses of the outlook for modern weavers are among the highlights of developments now being pioneered by Swiss textile machinery companies. All weaving markets require innovation, as well as speed, efficiency, quality and sustainability. Member firms of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association respond to these needs at every point in the process – from tightening the first thread in the warp to winding the last inch for fabric delivery. They also share a common advantage, with a leading position in the traditional weaving industry as well as the expertise to foster new and exciting applications.

Technology and research cooperation
The concept of a ‘textile calculator’ was developed by Jakob Müller Group, in cooperation with the textile research institute Thuringen-Vogtland. Müller’s patented MDW® multi-directional weaving technology is able to create the meander fields which allow calculator functions to be accessed at a touch. A novel and useful facility, which suggests limitless expansion.

Today, the latest woven shoes are appreciated for their precise and comfortable fit. They score through their durability, strength and stability, meeting the requirements of individual athletes across many sports, as well as leisurewear. Stäubli is well known as a leading global specialist in weaving preparation, shedding systems and high-speed textile machinery. Its jacquard machines offer great flexibility across a wide range of formats, weaving all types of technical textiles, lightweight reinforcement fabrics – and shoes.

It’s possible to weave new materials such as ceramics, mix fibers such as aramid, carbon and other, and produce innovative multi-layers with variable thicknesses. Such applications put special demands on weaving machines which are fulfilled by Stäubli high-performance TF weaving systems.

Great weaving results are impossible without perfect warp tension, now available thanks to the world-leading electronic warp feeding systems of Crealet. Some market segments in weaving industry today demand warp let-off systems which meet individual customer requirements. For example, the company has recognized expertise to understand that geotextile products often need special treatment, as provided by its intelligent warp tension control system. Individual and connective solutions are designed to allow external support via remote link. Crealet’s warp let-off systems are widely used in both ribbon and broadloom weaving, for technical textiles applied on single or multiple warp beams and creels.

Functional, sustainable, automated
Trends in the field of woven narrow fabrics are clearly focused on functionality and sustainability. The Jakob Müller Group has already embraced these principles – for example using natural fibers for 100% recyclable labels with a soft-feel selvedge. It also focuses as much as possible on the processing of recycled, synthetic materials. Both PET bottles and polyester waste from production are recycled and processed into elastic and rigid tapes for the apparel industry.

For efficient fabric production environments, it is now recognized that automated quality solutions are essential. Quality standards are increasing everywhere and zero-defect levels are mandatory for sensitive applications such as airbags and protective apparel.

Uster’s latest generation of on-loom monitoring and inspection systems offers real operational improvements for weavers. The fabric quality monitoring prevents waste, while the quality assurance system significantly improves first-quality yield for all applications. Protecting fabric makers from costly claims and damaged reputations, automated fabric inspection also removes the need for slow, costly and unreliable manual inspection, freeing operators to focus on higher-skilled jobs.

Smart and collaborative robotics (cobots) offer many automation possibilities in weaving rooms. Stäubli’s future oriented robotics division is a driver in this segment with first effective installations in warp and creel preparation.

Control and productivity
Willy Grob’s specialized solutions for woven fabric winding focus on reliable control of tension, keeping it constant from the start of the process right through to the full cloth roll. Continuous digital control is especially important for sensitive fabrics, while performance and productivity are also critical advantages. In this regard, the company’s large-scale batching units can provide ten times the winding capacity of a regular winder integrated in the weaving machine.

The customized concept by Grob as well as design and implementation result in great flexibility and functionality of the fabric winding equipment – yet another example of Swiss ingenuity in textile machinery.  
There is even more innovation to come in weaving – and in other segments – from members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association in future! This confident assertion is founded on an impressive statistic: the 4077 years of experience behind the creative power of the association’s member firms. It’s proof positive that their developments grow out of profound knowledge and continuous research.

Photo: TMAS
04.11.2019

Swedish machinery companies see major opportunities at Heimtextil 2020

The decision by Messe Frankfurt, the organiser of the annual Heimtextil exhibition for home textiles, to significantly expand its focus on textile technologies in 2020, has received an extremely enthusiastic response from members of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery manufacturers association.

“Heimtextil is already a huge show, having attracted well over three thousand visitors to Frankfurt in January this year, filling all twelve halls of the Messe Frankfurt fair grounds,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “The expansion of textile technologies at next January’s Heimtextil can only help further boost this international community of manufacturers and suppliers for the home textiles market at all levels, and naturally we want to be a part of it.”

The decision by Messe Frankfurt, the organiser of the annual Heimtextil exhibition for home textiles, to significantly expand its focus on textile technologies in 2020, has received an extremely enthusiastic response from members of TMAS, the Swedish textile machinery manufacturers association.

“Heimtextil is already a huge show, having attracted well over three thousand visitors to Frankfurt in January this year, filling all twelve halls of the Messe Frankfurt fair grounds,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “The expansion of textile technologies at next January’s Heimtextil can only help further boost this international community of manufacturers and suppliers for the home textiles market at all levels, and naturally we want to be a part of it.”

  • ACG Kinna Automatic
    At Heimtextil 2019, TMAS member ACG Kinna Automatic generated a significant buzz with live demonstrations of its new robotic pillow filling system and will provide details of how it has been further developed over 2019, with several commercial systems now in place.
  • Automatex
    Meanwhile, in the first quarter of 2020, Automatex ES, the specialist in automated cutting, sewing and folding equipment, is planning to launch another innovation in advanced manufacturing for the bedding industry.
  • IRO AB
    IRO AB has consistently introduced new milestones in the field of yarn feeding technology for weaving machines and at Heimtextil 2020 will be providing information on new introductions to its product range.
  • Eltex
    Eltex is achieving considerable success with its yarn fault detection and tension monitoring systems across a range of sectors, including the tufting of carpets and the creeling of woven materials, but at Heimtextil 2020 the focus will be on its advanced systems for the sewn products sector, including the UPG-Stitch thread break sensor, which is based on the piezoelectric principle and is suitable for all types of yarns while being insensitive to dust, dirt and humidity variations.
  • Svegea of Sweden
    Svegea of Sweden now has over 60 years of experience in exclusively designing, manufacturing and installing bespoke bias cutting, roll slitting and rewinding and inspection machines.
    The company’s complete Bias System includes a tube sewing unit a bias cutter/winder for opening up previously-formed tube material – spirally on a bias – and strip cutter.
(c) COMSAT
04.07.2019

COMSAT opts for the Eltex EyETM

COMSAT is equipping its latest Tecmat sectional warping machine for weaving preparation with the new Eltex EyETM yarn tension monitoring system.

Unlike yarn tension monitors that are fitted solely on the weft insertion systems of weaving machines, the new Eltex technology is for the warping process prior to weaving – and instead of monitoring only the tension of the six-to-eight yarns fed by the weft insertion system the Eltex EyETM keeps a close eye on literally hundreds.

“Several hundred yarns can be fed from the creels during the warping process compared to only a few weft insertion yarns during weaving,” explains Brian Hicks, managing director of Eltex. “Tension monitoring for multiple ends has been a great challenge to achieve for us, but this new system generated tremendous interest at the recent ITMA 2019 textile machinery show and we already have systems in operation and orders on hand. The EyETM allows mills to greatly reduce problems.”

COMSAT is equipping its latest Tecmat sectional warping machine for weaving preparation with the new Eltex EyETM yarn tension monitoring system.

Unlike yarn tension monitors that are fitted solely on the weft insertion systems of weaving machines, the new Eltex technology is for the warping process prior to weaving – and instead of monitoring only the tension of the six-to-eight yarns fed by the weft insertion system the Eltex EyETM keeps a close eye on literally hundreds.

“Several hundred yarns can be fed from the creels during the warping process compared to only a few weft insertion yarns during weaving,” explains Brian Hicks, managing director of Eltex. “Tension monitoring for multiple ends has been a great challenge to achieve for us, but this new system generated tremendous interest at the recent ITMA 2019 textile machinery show and we already have systems in operation and orders on hand. The EyETM allows mills to greatly reduce problems.”

More information:
COMSAT
Source:

TMAS by AWOL Media

(c) AWOL Media
06.05.2019

The new Vandewiele RCE2+ digital carpet weaving machine at ITMA 2019

A wide range of new technologies will be demonstrated by Vandewiele at the ITMA 2019 textile machinery show in Barcelona from June 20-26, including the latest RCE2+ digital carpet weaving machine.

All Vandewiele technologies are now being equipped for machine-to-machine interaction and learning, as part of the company’s comprehensive TEXconnect programme.

Meeting new industry needs
As a leader in complete carpet manufacturing systems – including BCF extrusion lines, heat setting systems and carpet weaving and tufting machines – Vandewiele has rapidly responded to the evolving needs of the textile industry for smaller and customised production runs, the most challenging of designs, and faster and more sustainable manufacturing.

A wide range of new technologies will be demonstrated by Vandewiele at the ITMA 2019 textile machinery show in Barcelona from June 20-26, including the latest RCE2+ digital carpet weaving machine.

All Vandewiele technologies are now being equipped for machine-to-machine interaction and learning, as part of the company’s comprehensive TEXconnect programme.

Meeting new industry needs
As a leader in complete carpet manufacturing systems – including BCF extrusion lines, heat setting systems and carpet weaving and tufting machines – Vandewiele has rapidly responded to the evolving needs of the textile industry for smaller and customised production runs, the most challenging of designs, and faster and more sustainable manufacturing.

The company’s sensors, software programmes and servers have become increasingly sophisticated as part of the TEXconnect program, and the real-time data from different machines – across connected manufacturing sites and across different countries and even continents – can be collected and shared. Digital models of both machines and production processes can be created and analysed for the optimisation of production settings, to vastly improve scheduling and planning and also make considerable savings in raw materials and energy consumption.

Virtual and remote control now allows for the Big Data analysis that is propelling the industry forward and will pave the way for AI applications. For carpet manufacturers, all of this is leading to the creation of truly Smart Factories.

RCE2 carpet weaving
The new RCE2+ Rug and Carpet Expert weaving machine is a truly digital workhorse, with all yarns continuously controlled and measured and the difficult bobbin changes of the past completely eliminated. This is as a result of Vandewiele’s latest Fast Creel, with the feed and tension of each pile yarn controlled by individual servomotors.

The pile yarns are now fed directly into the machine without having to pass pile-stop motions, to both increase efficiency and eliminate any waste yarns, while achieving previously unreachable industrial speeds.

The filling enters the machine smoothly via the latest IRO X3 winders, heavy duty filling brakes with multi lamellas, an active yarn recuperator and a high speed weft mixer, where again, all tensions are set electronically. Vandewiele’s servo-driven heddle frames (Smart Frames) are meanwhile already well proven in the industry.

TEXconnect further provides readily-available data on all yarn consumption, tension and threading, and then will supply the predictive maintenance that is paving the way to self-learning carpet weaving machines.

All of this would be unnecessary, if it didn’t result in allowing manufacturers to make the highest quality carpets at the most economic prices ever, with savings on the highest-bulk pile yarns from the Vandewiele extrusion lines, reduced waste yarns in the creel and industrial production speeds that have never before been attained.

 

More information:
TEXconnect
Source:

AWOL Media

(c) TMAS
26.04.2019

Innovate or die: TMAS at ITMA 2019

A focus on customer service, aligned with the drive to constantly innovate, has long ensured that the member companies of TMAS – the Swedish texile machinery manufacturers’ association – stay well ahead of the curve.

“All of the Swedish textile machinery companies are doing really well in major markets such as Europe, China, India and the USA,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “They are now gathering forces to prepare for the most important show – ITMA 2019 in Barcelona in June. I expect to see new players and partnerships as we enter the industry 4.0 era for real. We are ready to display an even higher degree of the real time monitoring of processes, automation, flexible customisation, and the incorporation of robots into production lines.  Our customers expect a lot of in terms of knowledge and our ability to customise and offer turnkey solutions.”

A focus on customer service, aligned with the drive to constantly innovate, has long ensured that the member companies of TMAS – the Swedish texile machinery manufacturers’ association – stay well ahead of the curve.

“All of the Swedish textile machinery companies are doing really well in major markets such as Europe, China, India and the USA,” says TMAS Secretary General Therese Premler-Andersson. “They are now gathering forces to prepare for the most important show – ITMA 2019 in Barcelona in June. I expect to see new players and partnerships as we enter the industry 4.0 era for real. We are ready to display an even higher degree of the real time monitoring of processes, automation, flexible customisation, and the incorporation of robots into production lines.  Our customers expect a lot of in terms of knowledge and our ability to customise and offer turnkey solutions.”

The forward-looking attitude of the Swedish companies is perhaps best summed up by Reimar Westerlind, the owner, since 1961, of ACG Gruppen.
At the age of 90, Reimar still travels to his office every day to oversee the operations of the diverse companies operating under the ACG umbrella.
“Everything now is about automation and digitisation,” he says. “We have to be on that track or we will be lost – innovate or die.”

Robotics
One ACG Gruppen company moving rapidly forward with new innovations in this area is ACG Kinna, which at ITMA 2019 will be providing dramatic live demonstrations of its new robotic pillow filling system.
This has the ability to fill and finish some 3,840 pillows per eight-hour shift, which is a considerable improvement on what is currently possible with existing systems, resulting in significant savings in both labour and energy for busy home textile businesses.

At ITMA 2019, Eton will be demonstrating a complete material handling solution with advanced software providing real-time information covering every aspect of the process.
“Our systems are a natural fit with the major Industry 4.0 networked manufacturing plants that are now being constructed worldwide for sectors such as the garment and home textiles manufacturing and automotive industries,” says Eton’s Sales and Commercial Director Roger Ryrlén.

Sensors
Advanced senor developments are playing a large part in moving many areas of the textile industry forward too.
Eltex of Sweden, for example, is achieving considerable success with its yarn fault detection and tension monitoring systems across a range of sectors, including the tufting of carpets, the creeling of woven materials and even the production of woven reinforcements for the composites industry.

At successive ITMA shows, IRO AB has also consistently introduced new milestones in the field of yarn feeding technology for weaving machines, and ITMA 2019 will be no exception.
“Following significant investment in our R&D capabilities, we have been making great progress in further boosting the efficiency and performance of our expanding X3 range,” says IRO AB Managing Director and Chairman of TMAS Mikael Äremann. “I can’t remember a time since the 1980s when we had so many new innovations to unveil at an ITMA, and I’m greatly looking forward to the positive response to them we are anticipating in Barcelona this June.”

Resource savings
ITMA 2019 will meanwhile see the launch of TexCoat G4 – the next generation of Baldwin Technology’s non-contact precision application system for fabric finishing. The TexCoat G4 enables a continuously high-quality and productive textile finishing process with zero chemistry waste and minimised water and energy consumption.
The non-contact spray technology brings a range of advantages including single or double-sided application,  the elimination of Foulard bath contamination, low wet pick-up levels leading to the elimination of drying steps, zero chemistry waste in changeovers of chemistry, colour or fabric, and the possibility of batch reporting, visibility of pad loading, chemical usage etc.

Other TMAS companies exhibiting in Barcelona include Texo AB, whose wide-width weaving looms make the belts for machines on which half of the world’s paper is made, ES-Automatex, which specialises in bespoke automation concepts and Svegea, a company leading the field in a number colarette machines and cutting and slitting equipment.

“At the last ITMA in 2015 in Milan, there was much talk about Industry 4.0 technologies but certainly from the perspective of TMAS, ITMA 2019 will be the place for concrete solutions as to how data and the new tools we have available can be exploited to the full,” says Therese Premler-Andersson. “There is already much more networking between the companies, with software very much the enabler and common interfaces bringing ideas closer together. We are greatly looking forward to further exchanges of ideas when meeting with customers old and new in Barcelona.”

More information:
TMAS ITMA 2019
Source:

Issued on behalf of TMAS by AWOL Media.

16.07.2018

Leading nonwovens & weaving machinery brands sign up for Cinte Techtextil China

Asia’s largest biennial event for the entire technical textiles and nonwovens sector will feature some of the industry’s biggest overseas machinery brands. Held on the earlier date of 4 – 6 September this year, the fair will feature an expected 500-plus total exhibitors from around 20 countries & regions.

As the world’s largest producer of technical textiles and nonwovens, China’s demand for production machinery is insatiable. As such, this September’s Cinte Techtextil China has attracted some of the world’s leading machinery brands, particularly in the nonwovens and sewing machinery sectors, ensuring a wide range of sourcing options for both domestic and international buyers.

Asia’s largest biennial event for the entire technical textiles and nonwovens sector will feature some of the industry’s biggest overseas machinery brands. Held on the earlier date of 4 – 6 September this year, the fair will feature an expected 500-plus total exhibitors from around 20 countries & regions.

As the world’s largest producer of technical textiles and nonwovens, China’s demand for production machinery is insatiable. As such, this September’s Cinte Techtextil China has attracted some of the world’s leading machinery brands, particularly in the nonwovens and sewing machinery sectors, ensuring a wide range of sourcing options for both domestic and international buyers.

Overseas producers respond to strong Chinese demand
As the Chinese domestic and export markets’ demand for quality technical textiles and nonwovens products continues to increase, overseas machinery brands continue to enter the country, using Cinte Techtextil China as their starting-out platform. ANDRITZ Nonwoven is just one of those who see the growing potential. “Chinese nonwovens manufacturers are increasingly requiring higher capacities and top-class quality for their nonwovens products for local and export markets,” Mr Laurent Jallat explained. “China is the biggest market in terms of installed capacity, and shows quite promising potential for the future. In the past years, we’ve seen rapid growth in products such as disposable face masks.” ANDRITZ responds to this demand with their neXline spunlace eXcelle line which features state-of-the-art TT card web forming and JetlaceEssentiel hydro entanglement units for high capacity and speed.

The DiloGroup also report an increase in demand for their products in China. “China is one of our biggest markets,” explains Mr Dominik Foshag. “We have procured huge orders from China, as Chinese customers are considering German technology more frequently nowadays. The visitor quality of Cinte Techtextil has been very good in this past, and we think this year’s fair will be also successful as we know many of our customers are going to visit.”

Oerlikon will introduce its spunbond technology to the Chinese market this year, and is expecting to conclude initial contracts at the fair due to increased demand for overseas products. “The Chinese market for nonwovens products is by far the largest and fastest growing national market. Chinese manufacturers are no longer satisfied with lower product quality, but want to exceed Western quality levels, for example. The products must now meet stricter customer requirements and legal standards, some of which are significantly higher than other international standards,” Ms Lena Kachelmaier said.

Truetzschler Nonwovens has also noticed this trend. Ms Jutta Stehr commented: “In the last two or three years, China became one of the pacemakers in the field of nonwovens used in beauty, skin care and hygiene applications. Asian markets have set new standards concerning quality in nonwovens. For instance, making disposable wipes from cotton fibres is a trend originating in Asia. The luxurious feeling of cotton combined with the requirement for eco-friendly products will further drive demand in China and elsewhere. Accordingly, Truetzschler Nonwovens anticipates more inquiries at Cinte Techtextil for its proven carding and spunlacing solutions for cotton nonwovens.”

Weaving machine supplier Itema has also noticed strong demand in China for products made in Italy. “Generally speaking, and especially for technical fabrics, imported machinery is highly evaluated and appreciated by Chinese customers. In recent years, Itema experienced significant growth in the sale of its Made-in-Italy weaving machines in China, and in other APAC countries. Imported machines are synonymous with quality and reliability, and we believe this positive trend will be constant in the future,” Mr Matteo De Micheli outlined.

Weaving machinery exhibitor highlights

  • ANDRITZ Nonwoven: their specialty is technologies for drylaid, wetlaid, spunbond, spunlace, needlepunch and textile calendering. At Cinte Techtextil, they will highlight their aXcess product portfolio, which has been especially designed for medium-capacity production. ANDRITZ has developed this range to fit the demands of producers with medium-capacity requirements, particularly in emerging markets. It includes lines and individual machines for needlepunch, spunlace, wetlaid and calendering processes.
  • Autefa Solutions: visitors to their booth will experience the company’s expertise as a full line supplier for carded- crosslapped needlepunch lines, aerodynamic web forming technology, spunlace and thermobonding lines. Their nonwovens lines meet customers’ requirements for quality web formation, bonding, active weight regulation and minimal maintenance.
  • DILO Systems: a leader in the field of staple fibre nonwoven production lines, DiloGroup will present their latest developments at the fair, including staple fibre production lines, card feeding and cards and crosslappers & needlelooms.
  • Oerlikon: they will showcase spunbond solution lines for the production of polypropylene geotextiles. According to the company, spunbond geotextile applications are on the rise as the market is increasingly demanding more efficient processes and products, which means the product requirements are often the same or greater, but with a lower raw material input. Spunbonds are progressively replacing classical carded nonwovens due to their technical and commercial benefits.
  • Truetzschler Nonwovens: concentrating on solutions for producing a broad range of hygiene nonwovens including wipes at the fair, they will focus on thermobonding & spunlacing processes and the respective machinery, from fibre preparation down to winding.

Sewing machinery exhibitor highlights

  • Itema: making their debut at Cinte Techtextil, they are a leading supplier of weaving machines for technical fabrics production. According to the company, they are the only weaving machine producer to offer technical textile manufacturers the top three technologies for weft insertion: Rapier, Projectile and Airjet.
  • Picanol: they use their leading position as producers of weaving machines for other textile products to expand into machines for woven technical textiles by investing heavily in state-of-the-art technology, as well through the modular design of their machine platforms which allow them to serve different industry sectors effectively.
  • Lindauer Dornier: featuring in the German Pavilion this edition, they offer a number of weaving machine varieties including rapier, air-jet, open reed weave (ORW) and more. Their rapier weaving machines have set the technological standard in the high quality wool textiles market for decades, and this quality will be on display at their booth with the DORNIER P1 rapier weaving machine.

Domestic brands to watch out for

In addition to these leading overseas brands, a strong line-up of Chinese machinery producers will also feature at the fair, including Changshu Weicheng Non-Woven Equipment and Shijiazhuang Textile Machinery.

 

More information:
Cinte Techtextil China
Source:

Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd

Intertextile Shanghai, Taiwan Pavillion (c) Messe Frankfurt
26.02.2018

Largest range of exhibitors from Asia awaits at Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics

For buyers that prioritise having the widest range of sourcing options in one place, their best bet is March’s Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics. Boasting pavilions from Japan, Korea, Pakistan and Taiwan, individual exhibitors from Hong Kong, India, Indonesia and Vietnam, not to mention 2,800-plus Chinese exhibitors, the fair is the largest gathering of Asian suppliers under one roof for the spring / summer sourcing season. To ensure convenience for buyers, international exhibitors are grouped by country or region, while Chinese exhibitors are located in product halls including fabrics for casualwear, functional wear / sportswear, ladieswear, lingerie & swimwear, shirting and suiting, as well as for accessories and denim.

In total, around 3,300 exhibitors will showcase their apparel fabrics and accessories at the fair, with the SalonEurope zone hosting premium suppliers from Europe – including pavilions and zones from France, Germany, Italy and Turkey – while the International Hall also houses other overseas exhibitors from the likes of Argentina, Australia, Peru the US and elsewhere.

For buyers that prioritise having the widest range of sourcing options in one place, their best bet is March’s Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics. Boasting pavilions from Japan, Korea, Pakistan and Taiwan, individual exhibitors from Hong Kong, India, Indonesia and Vietnam, not to mention 2,800-plus Chinese exhibitors, the fair is the largest gathering of Asian suppliers under one roof for the spring / summer sourcing season. To ensure convenience for buyers, international exhibitors are grouped by country or region, while Chinese exhibitors are located in product halls including fabrics for casualwear, functional wear / sportswear, ladieswear, lingerie & swimwear, shirting and suiting, as well as for accessories and denim.

In total, around 3,300 exhibitors will showcase their apparel fabrics and accessories at the fair, with the SalonEurope zone hosting premium suppliers from Europe – including pavilions and zones from France, Germany, Italy and Turkey – while the International Hall also houses other overseas exhibitors from the likes of Argentina, Australia, Peru the US and elsewhere.

Japan Pavilion keeps ‘Banshu-Ori’ tradition alive
Organised by the Japan Fashion Week Organization (JFW), the Japan Pavilion will house 22 exhibitors and also feature a Japan Trend Corner. After the immense popularity of this pavilion with buyers in previous editions, the organisers are in a good position to comment on the trends in the local market. “The now mature Chinese market tends to seek out very different types of products and purchase in smaller batches, which is a world away from the mass-production focus of the past,” JFW commented.

Included in this edition’s Japan Pavilion are three companies from the Nishiwaki region, which is famous for its ‘Banshu-Ori’, or Banshu weave. Banshu-Ori is a yarn-dyed fabric, woven into various patterns, such as checks and stripes, with yarns that are dyed before being woven by weaving machines. This tradition dates back to 1792, and will be showcased by Bon Co Ltd, Ueyama Orimono Corp and Kuwamura Co Ltd at the fair. Bon will showcase a range of new products using this traditional technique, including organic cotton fabrics, paper yarn fabrics and indigo items. Ueyama Orimono, which boasts Japan’s largest dyeing factory in Nishiwaki, designs its own fabrics in Tokyo, and will present cotton, cotton / linen and medium-thin yarn-dyed fabrics at the fair. Kuwamura will showcase fabrics based on 100% yarn-dyed cotton, as well as cotton and cotton-blend materials.

Taiwan Pavilion the place to find innovation
The Taiwan Pavilion, with over 40 participating companies, is a guaranteed source of innovation at the fair, with a number of exhibitors also offering eco-friendly options. Some of the highlights include:

  • Keen Ching Industrial: they will have a number of their patented KCC-branded zippers at the fair including a durable double-coil zipper, an invisible zipper with a movable retainer box, a track type water-repellent zipper, a curved metal zipper and more.
  • Handseltex Industrial: will showcase a wide range of products including lace, jacquard and mesh, made with the likes of organic cotton and recycled polyester with an eco-friendly production process.
  • Paltex: the company’s ‘From Waste to Yarn’ regeneration system involves turning waste fishing nets and plastic bottles from the ocean into polyester and nylon fabrics, membranes and trimmings.
  • Superwill: their unique gradient fabric combines specialty yarns and a special knitting process, and features a thickness that decreases from top to bottom. This design allows the fabric to be tailored to different garments.
  • Tri Ocean Textile: will feature its own DreamFel® high-performance filament polypropylene yarn which is lightweight, durable and environmentally friendly, and used in sports & outdoor apparel and outdoor furniture.

The Taiwan Pavilion will be full of innovative textile solutions again this edition
The Korea and Pakistan Pavilions round out the Asian offerings. Nearly 60 Korean exhibitors will showcase predominantly manmade, fancy, knitted, acetate woven, tricot, jacquard, faux leather and printed fabrics, as well as lace and embroidery, for ladieswear, while other members will feature fabrics for sportswear and outdoor wear. Those from Pakistan, meanwhile, will feature in the Beyond Denim hall and offer a wide range of denim products.  

In addition to Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics, four other textile fairs also take place at the National Exhibition and Convention Center: Yarn Expo Spring, Intertextile Shanghai Home Textiles – Spring Edition, fashion garment fair CHIC and knitting fair PH Value.

Source:

Messe Frankfurt

RWTH doctoral candidates Marcin Kopaczka (LfB) und Marco Saggiomo (ITA) with the award-winning image processing system RWTH doctoral candidates Marcin Kopaczka (LfB) und Marco Saggiomo (ITA) with the award-winning image processing system (c) ITA
RWTH doctoral candidates Marcin Kopaczka (LfB) und Marco Saggiomo (ITA) with the award-winning image processing system
09.02.2018

Researcher of ITA and LfB win ICPRAM-Best Student Paper Award

Image processing system allows cost savings of more than 2,000 euros per year and weaving machine

MSc Marco Saggiomo from the Institut für Textiltechnik (ITA) and graduate engineer Marcin Kopaczka from the Institute of Imaging & Computer Vision of RWTH Aachen University (LfB) developed an image processing system for weaving machines that provides comprehensive benefits for woven fabric producers. The image processing system enables the weaving machine to detect faulty pickings autonomously. The application of the image processing system leads to cost savings of at least 2,210 euros per year for each weaving machine in comparison to manual faulty picking repairs.

The researchers won the “Best Student Paper Award” within the framework of the 7th International Conference on Pattern Recognition Applications and Methods (ICPRAM) for their joint paper on “Fully Automatic Faulty Weft Thread Detection using a Camera System and Feature-based Pattern Recognition”. The award confirms the success of the co-operation of both institutes, ITA and LfB, which will be continued in future research projects.

Image processing system allows cost savings of more than 2,000 euros per year and weaving machine

MSc Marco Saggiomo from the Institut für Textiltechnik (ITA) and graduate engineer Marcin Kopaczka from the Institute of Imaging & Computer Vision of RWTH Aachen University (LfB) developed an image processing system for weaving machines that provides comprehensive benefits for woven fabric producers. The image processing system enables the weaving machine to detect faulty pickings autonomously. The application of the image processing system leads to cost savings of at least 2,210 euros per year for each weaving machine in comparison to manual faulty picking repairs.

The researchers won the “Best Student Paper Award” within the framework of the 7th International Conference on Pattern Recognition Applications and Methods (ICPRAM) for their joint paper on “Fully Automatic Faulty Weft Thread Detection using a Camera System and Feature-based Pattern Recognition”. The award confirms the success of the co-operation of both institutes, ITA and LfB, which will be continued in future research projects.

The image processing system is part of the doctoral thesis of Marco Saggiomo. Marcin Kopaczka supported ITA with the development of the image processing algorithm.
The joint paper is based on the successfully concluded project WeftAlert within the framework of the German Federation of Industrial Research Associations. Further results of the WeftAlert project include the extension of the state of the art of image-based process optimisation of air-jet weaving, excellent outcomes in image processing as well as the validation of image processing systems in laboratory and industrial environments.

More information:
RWTH Aachen ITA
Source:

ITA

Techtextil PHP Fibers GmbH
Techtextil
08.05.2017

PHP Fibers expands in Germany into Airbag Weaving

 PHP Fibers will open a state of the art airbag fabric weaving and finishing plant in its German production site Obernburg, near Aschaffenburg. The new facility will be embedded into the Nylon high-tenacity spinning plant and is based on technology provided by Toyobo Co., Ltd. Toyobo has airbag fabric weaving operations in Asia and the technology is currently used in the USA at PHP Fibers Inc. with great success.
The German weaving operation will have 47 water jet weaving machines and will use Polyamide 6.6 yarn from its own spinning facility. “This strategic investment will drive PHP Fibers closer to the automotive producers in Germany and Europe,” said Jochen Boos, Managing Director of PHP Fibers. “This investment is a clear commitment on the part of our owners to the site in Germany.”

 PHP Fibers will open a state of the art airbag fabric weaving and finishing plant in its German production site Obernburg, near Aschaffenburg. The new facility will be embedded into the Nylon high-tenacity spinning plant and is based on technology provided by Toyobo Co., Ltd. Toyobo has airbag fabric weaving operations in Asia and the technology is currently used in the USA at PHP Fibers Inc. with great success.
The German weaving operation will have 47 water jet weaving machines and will use Polyamide 6.6 yarn from its own spinning facility. “This strategic investment will drive PHP Fibers closer to the automotive producers in Germany and Europe,” said Jochen Boos, Managing Director of PHP Fibers. “This investment is a clear commitment on the part of our owners to the site in Germany.”


The Business Director Volker Siejak added, “PHP Fibers was the pioneer in the development and production of airbag yarns. With this investment, PHP will be able to complete its portfolio and can offer yarns and fabrics for airbag application which our customers need. By this we will continue to be successful and we can strengthen the position of PHP Fibers as a market leader in the Airbag segment.”

More information:
PHP Fibers Germany airbag
Source:

PHP Fibers GmbH